• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Full of fun
 A funny bunny
 Bear and forbear
 So like his pa
 The shepherd's dog
 Mrs. Speckle's dilemma
 Dr. Stork's bill
 The bogie owl
 Tommy Purr's hamper
 Those young monkeys
 The boat race
 See-saw
 Who robbed Cock Robin
 Serve him quite right
 Neighbours
 Kitchen manners
 Ups and downs
 Robin and Richard and Jenny...
 A sad story
 Mrs. Hen and Madam Duck
 Injured innocence
 Young shavers
 Too many cooks spoil the broth
 The afternoon call
 Grandpa and grandma
 Puffin' and blowin'
 Back Cover














Group Title: Full of fun : humourous rhymes & pictures
Title: Full of fun
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080709/00001
 Material Information
Title: Full of fun humourous rhymes & pictures
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Mack, Robert Ellice
Nister, Ernest ( Publisher, Printer )
Thompson, G. H ( Illustrator )
Foster, William, 1853-1924 ( Illustrator )
Hanslip, Alice ( Illustrator )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Ernest Nister New York :
E.P. Dutton & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1891?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Picture books   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's poetry
Children's stories
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Germany -- Bavaria -- Nuremberg
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by Robert Ellice Mack ; illustrated by G.H. Thompson, W. Foster & Alice Hanslip.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080709
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002230087
notis - ALH0430
oclc - 189641291

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Full of fun
        Page 3
    A funny bunny
        Page 4
    Bear and forbear
        Page 4
    So like his pa
        Page 5
    The shepherd's dog
        Page 6
    Mrs. Speckle's dilemma
        Page 7
    Dr. Stork's bill
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The bogie owl
        Page 10
    Tommy Purr's hamper
        Page 11
    Those young monkeys
        Page 12
    The boat race
        Page 12
    See-saw
        Page 13
    Who robbed Cock Robin
        Page 14
    Serve him quite right
        Page 14
    Neighbours
        Page 15
    Kitchen manners
        Page 16
    Ups and downs
        Page 17
    Robin and Richard and Jenny Wren
        Page 18
    A sad story
        Page 19
    Mrs. Hen and Madam Duck
        Page 19
    Injured innocence
        Page 20
    Young shavers
        Page 20
    Too many cooks spoil the broth
        Page 21
    The afternoon call
        Page 22
    Grandpa and grandma
        Page 23
    Puffin' and blowin'
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text














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FULL OF FU,\

HERE was great excitement in Pussytown. An entertainment was
advertised to take place that evening, and everyone was buying tickets.
r" We have such nice places! cried Miss Clawissa.
"Not better than ours, I assure you, my dear," answered Mrs.
Tabbitose. But now tell me, do you mean to go in your bonnet ?"
"Oh, no!" Miss Clawissa replied; "no-just my fur cloak."
So in the evening the room was thronged. Professor Purr, with his
young gentlemen, were there, and the Misses Lipmilk, with their young
ladies, and all the fur and fashion of the place. Then the showman began.
"Ladies and gentlemen," he said, "this entertainment has received
the highest patronage, His Gracious Majesty King Wiskeros, and His
Royal Highness the Prince of Paws, having expressed great satisfaction
with it. The first scene, I am sure, will not fail to interest you."
Here he ceased speaking, and in a minute three mice were seen
rapidly running across the light cast on the transparency.
Miow! How beautiful! how life-like! Miow! miow! sounded from
various parts of the room, and some of the audience sprang to their feet.
"Keep your seats!" shouted the showman, ',ile I explain. These
historic characters- Three blind mice! cried a voice from the back.
"No, no, these are not those mice," said the man. Observe, they
are not blind, and that their tails are not curtailed. The first is the n--."'
that released the lion-you all know that story; the second is the mouse
that ran up the clock to see if it was time for dinner; the third- "
But here one of Professor Purr's young gentlemen could restrain himself
no more. He made a wild bolt forward, and was only prevented rushing
headlong at the picture by being caught by the tail and hauled back to
his place; and the general excitement became so great, that the showman
hurriedly removed that picture, and went on to the next, which was less
disturbing to the nerves of his audience.

















FUNCNYT BU\C.

II, isn't it pretty-
.l' oh, isn't it nice?
Do you mind asking him
what is the price?
He's painted the grass
such a beautiful green;
TI,v l~ tlh bluest that ever was seen:

And right in -the centre he's painted a pond,
A nice flock of geese just a little beyond.
He's painted us in it-how nice we appear !
The prettiest part of the picture, my oat





For multiplying we don't care,
Addition only makes us sad,
While Long Division drives us mad;
Substraction sends us both to sleep, I.
And at the Rule of Three," we weep.

















FUNCNYT BU\C.

II, isn't it pretty-
.l' oh, isn't it nice?
Do you mind asking him
what is the price?
He's painted the grass
such a beautiful green;
TI,v l~ tlh bluest that ever was seen:

And right in -the centre he's painted a pond,
A nice flock of geese just a little beyond.
He's painted us in it-how nice we appear !
The prettiest part of the picture, my oat





For multiplying we don't care,
Addition only makes us sad,
While Long Division drives us mad;
Substraction sends us both to sleep, I.
And at the Rule of Three," we weep.










SO LIKI( HIS '4P.

N OW, isn't he a little dear?
The finest chick I've seen this year;
As like his pa as he can be,
A perfect little prodigy.

He's got his father's eyes and beak,
And though his voice is rather weak,
The difference you'd hardly know
When, like his pa, he tries to crow.

Oh, yes, my dear, that's brave of you!
Now try a Cock-a-doodle-doo."
Take care, my darling, don't forget
You're not as big as father yet.


- 'AI-j-A41


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TH8 SHEPHERD'S DOj.

S AM a shepherd's dog, and keep
Strict watch upon a flock, of sheep.
To go to sleep would be a crime,
With more than one eye at a time.

This sort of life is slow, I find,
No chance to cultivate the mind.
On souls like mine it sometimes jars
To hear no other words than ha-a-as.

Well, never mind, it is my lot,
It is the only work I've got;
And I'm content through life to jog,
A true and honest shepherd's dog.


' -, '








PI1S.S ST6CkLE'S JDIL&ME KMI.

MRS. SPECKLE, the hen, was sad. Ten out of her eleven eggs
1 were hatched, but the eleventh, the largest, and glossiest of the
lot still remained in the nest, and although Mrs. Speckle had sat
Son it two days longer than on the others, no chicken had appeared.
Perhaps," said Mrs. Waddle, the duck, it has been boiled.
Nothing hardens an egg's heart so much as hot water. If they once find
their way into the saucepan, try how you will, you can never get them to
take an interest in anything after. I'd give it up if I were you."
Ah, well, perhaps it would be best to give up trying to hatch it
now," sighed Mrs. Speckle. The other chickens are getting quite
neglected. I shall have to borrow Mr. Cock's comb to straighten out
their feathers. And I thought this egg would turn out such a fine child.
Ah, me, I'm afraid it's no use."
Never say die!" said Mrs. Crawleyweb, the spider, who rented the
top corner of the hen-house. "Try, try, try again, is my motto. Some
hundreds of years ago an ancestor of mine said the same to King Robert
Bruce of Scotland," and then the spider told Mrs. Speckle all about it, and
how King Robert took the spider's advice, and tried again, and succeeded.
Very well," said Mrs. Speckle, I will try." And she did, and kept
on trying, but the egg still remained unhatched, and the chickens grew more
neglected and untidy every day.

Dear me," said the Farmer's wife, .
"here's poor Speckle been trying to /
hatch the china nest-egg; how stupid
of me to leave it in the nest with the _
others!"

"Bother! said Mrs. Speckle, "I've wasted all my time for nothing."
Never say die," chimed in Mrs. Crawleyweb. Try, try, try again
is my motto. Some hundreds of years ago an ancestor of mine- "
"Bother your ancestor," cried Mrs. Speckle. It's all very well
trying, but even King Robert Bruce couldn't hatch a china nest-egg."













T VWO Kits at school were kept in late,
So drew a figure on a slate;
And somehow, what they drew, resembled
The master, at whose voice they trembled.

It's like him," said one Kitten small;
His cap and gown and cane and all."
Then Dr. Scratch, the man who taught 'em,
Came slyly up behind and caught 'em.

What happened next ? Ah! can you guess?
Those Kittens never would confess!
But as they crept home sore and aching,
They vowed to leave off portrait-making.



tDR. STORIJ(S 9ILL.

H, Dr. Stork, though I've been ill,
I can't afford to pay your bill;
I haven't got a single penny,
The guinea-pig won't lend me any;
Besides, dear me, I think you're wrong
To make your bill so very long.
But still, I'll tell you what to -do, A .
Please call again, kind sir. Adieu! '......


























CaUGHT JN T& HAfCT.


Clqc~Bb











THS BOgIS OWL.

T HE moon is up, the stars are out,
And shining overhead.
It's time that every little Owl
Was tucked up warm in bed.
The Bogie Owl comes out at night,
When supper-time is near;
I think I hear his Bogie voice,
'So..sun, my babies dear.

13ut hush, hush, hush!
I hear the Bogie Owl;
He'll catch you if you sit up late,
For he's a hungry fowl.
So hush, hush, hush!
He's out upon the prowl,
Run off to bed, my dearies all,
Here comes the Bogie Owl!

For little Owls who won't be good
His Bogie cane he brings;
So don't be naughty, lest you hear
Him flap his Bogie wings!
He'll take you to his Bogie nest,
Up in the Bogie tree,
And turn you all to Bogie Owls;
And that would dreadful be!
Clifton Binglham.















'TOVLAMT PUIRjS HaMVPeSg.

T the school to-day there was quite a stir,
A hamper had come for young Tommy Purr.
There were nuts and apples all rosy red,
Oranges nearly as big as my head;
With almonds and raisins, and sugar and spice,
A pie that was filled with the tenderest mice.
And cakes all covered with candied peels,
And a mouse to play with that ran on wheels;
From far and near the -Kittens did scamper,
And shouted hurrah for Tommy Purr's hamper.


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THOSS YOU\(CG

.~.MIo3\C(I(8YS.

HESE two monkeys
T have played a trick
On the one inside the hamper;
But you'd better turn over
th:, page quick,
Or out after you he'll scamper.





TIHS OAT Rd'CE8.

S HOUT Hurrah! 'tis boat-race day,
All the frogs are blithe and gay;
Now the first great race begins,
All the fishes clap their fins;
Wild excitement on each face,
As the boats increase their pace.
"Yellow won! "
"Oh, no, 'twas Red!" '
No, indeed! 'twas Blue that le. '"

A race can't well be .
won by three.
Ah, well! 'tis all
the same to me.

A3 "-










THOSS YOU\(CG

.~.MIo3\C(I(8YS.

HESE two monkeys
T have played a trick
On the one inside the hamper;
But you'd better turn over
th:, page quick,
Or out after you he'll scamper.





TIHS OAT Rd'CE8.

S HOUT Hurrah! 'tis boat-race day,
All the frogs are blithe and gay;
Now the first great race begins,
All the fishes clap their fins;
Wild excitement on each face,
As the boats increase their pace.
"Yellow won! "
"Oh, no, 'twas Red!" '
No, indeed! 'twas Blue that le. '"

A race can't well be .
won by three.
Ah, well! 'tis all
the same to me.

A3 "-












S68-SeV.

U P and down in play we go,
Sometimes high, and sometimes low;
On the plank we slip and sprawl-
Hold on tight, or else you'll fall.

Life is like the game we play,
Ups and downs from day to day.
This advice I give to all,
Hold on tight, or else you'll fall.






qq*4., -


WHO R~OB8'D
W11*0 w "93B8
CoCk- ROSIC.<


I, said the Owl,
I was that naughty fowl;
And the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and a-sobbing,
SWhen they learnt that the Owl
.-. Had been a-robbing!




SSRVS IIIf QUITS R -gHIT.

ATERRIBLE story I'm now going to tell,
Of what to Cock Robin one dark night befell.
He hadn't so very long been in his bed,
From under the blankets his wife popped her head,
And said, in a voice that with terror was gurgling,
" Cock Robin, I think there are burglars a burgling."
Then Robin he jumped out of bed with a dash,
And saw Barney Owl running off with the cash*
He ran to the window,
dressed in bedroom attire,
And shouted for P'lice,"
while his wife shouted Fire."






qq*4., -


WHO R~OB8'D
W11*0 w "93B8
CoCk- ROSIC.<


I, said the Owl,
I was that naughty fowl;
And the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and a-sobbing,
SWhen they learnt that the Owl
.-. Had been a-robbing!




SSRVS IIIf QUITS R -gHIT.

ATERRIBLE story I'm now going to tell,
Of what to Cock Robin one dark night befell.
He hadn't so very long been in his bed,
From under the blankets his wife popped her head,
And said, in a voice that with terror was gurgling,
" Cock Robin, I think there are burglars a burgling."
Then Robin he jumped out of bed with a dash,
And saw Barney Owl running off with the cash*
He ran to the window,
dressed in bedroom attire,
And shouted for P'lice,"
while his wife shouted Fire."


























S8eigHOvURS.

_ IRE the potatoes good, my neighbour?
Digging, I fear, is very hard labour.
When you've finished, and had some tea,
Come in and smoke a pipe with me!


But Constable Bull-dog
was passing that way,
Who collared the thief,
much to Barney's dismay;
Said Bull-dog, The man who
takes what isn't his'n,
Shall, when he is caught,
just be taken to prison."
And Robin, who'd had
such a terrible fright,
Turned round to his wife
and exclaimed,
Serve him right.'


I 11 11 11 w -
W, ---'qWIWW









KITCH8I ( _Mq/aZ JSS. S.

s 0 you consider it good manners?" said the Fire to the Saucepan,
to come and sit down on me, without taking your lid off, or
saying, By your leave,' or 'Excuse me,' or 'Pardon this intrusion.'"
Pooh, my fiery friend!" said the Saucepan, I'm here on
business, and good manners have nothing to do with it."
"Your character is black, Sir," replied the Fire; "you're not fit to
mix in good society."
"Who blackened me?" retorted the Saucepan. "Why. you, through
your bad habit of smoking, to be sure."
"Sir," answered the Fire, "although I don't like you, I have, until
now, always been polite enough to give you a warm reception. I appeal
to my friends, the Fender and Fire-irons,- whose manners are as polished
as emery powder can make them, to say if you ought not to take your
lid off before sitting down."
Certainly he ought," shouted the Poker, who was always ready to stir up
the Fire's hot temper. Certainly he ought," echoed the Tongs and Shovel.
"Take off your lid, Sir," said the Fire. J -
"Shant," answered the Saucepan. -
"Then, I'll make you, Sir," said the Fire,
and his flames beat the Saucepan's sides, / .
thumping harder and harder, till out of
sheer agitation he lifted his lid, boiling
over with rage. 4
Oh, what a commotion! how the Fire did sneeze and sputter as the
water fell on his glowing face. How rusty-red, with shame, the Fender
and Fire-irons turned, as the steam and drops of water reached them,
and they saw the mischief that they had helped to bring about.
"Ah!" said tle Fire, as he sank down in a faint, "I feel quite
put out."
"This comes of having a hot temper," said the Bellows, as he blew
in his face to bring him back to life again, "but it's no use telling you
to keep cool, that's what I think," And I think so too.









U'PS dI7\n(D 'DOWn3 S.

" TOW we go up, and now we go down,
S This is the way to London Town!"
Oh, Toby and Tittums, let me say,
You'll never get so far to-day!
'Tis lucky for you (don't think me rude)
The horse you ride is a steed of wood;
For Toby .fat, and a sweet pussy-cat,
\Vould be lost in London, I'm sure of that!
Clifton Bingham.




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R.OBIJ^Y eA^T> RCHVJ tRi

y A& J5S Qr WR6& \.

OBIN and Richard loved sweet Jenny Wren,
They sat on a rail as the clock struck ten;
They hummed and they ha'ed as the moon rose high,
But Robin was awkward, and Richard was shy.

Said Robin to Richard, It seems to me
Three people are very bad company!"
Said Richard to Robin, Precisely so;
There will just be two if you will go."

Said Robin to Richard, I mean to stay!"
Said Richard to Robin, Then fire away!"
But while they quarrelled exactly like men,
Off and away flew Jenny Wren.









&Y SfD STORTY-.

CART-HORSE once got out of bed,
And turned to his Mother, and coolly said,
"Mother, why ain't I a thoroughbred?"

His Mother almost began to faint,
She leaned on the stable, and scratched the paint,
And sighed, "My darling, we don't say ain't!

"You were born a cart-horse; and so," said she,
With your own position contented be,
And then you will be a happy gee-geel"


'UgS. H85V &L5VD 94af acfU< DUCK.

TOW d'you do, Mrs. Hen? "
s said polite Madam Duck,
If for corn you are looking,
I wish you luck!"
Thank you much, Madame Duck;
if you're seeking the pool,
I trust that your bath
will be pleasant and cool.








vv^.


'~71~"F~'?n-~gA-nlaPsarpsaneaaparPn~~a









&Y SfD STORTY-.

CART-HORSE once got out of bed,
And turned to his Mother, and coolly said,
"Mother, why ain't I a thoroughbred?"

His Mother almost began to faint,
She leaned on the stable, and scratched the paint,
And sighed, "My darling, we don't say ain't!

"You were born a cart-horse; and so," said she,
With your own position contented be,
And then you will be a happy gee-geel"


'UgS. H85V &L5VD 94af acfU< DUCK.

TOW d'you do, Mrs. Hen? "
s said polite Madam Duck,
If for corn you are looking,
I wish you luck!"
Thank you much, Madame Duck;
if you're seeking the pool,
I trust that your bath
will be pleasant and cool.








vv^.


'~71~"F~'?n-~gA-nlaPsarpsaneaaparPn~~a









L15\cfUkT.


rous'ACg SHafV8Sf S.
N OW all young shavers, look at this;
Such fun you surely cannot miss.
I think these pigs were meant for you,
For they are both young shavers, too!


I\'A. CoCsE CC.


L T ~ERE am I, an honest Fox,
Caught, and locked up in the stocks,
'Cause I found a goose one day
Who I thought had lost his way;
SSo I took him home, you see,
Just that he might dine with me.
Now I'm caught, and lock'd up here,
And his children come and jeer-
Say I ate their poor old dad,
Call me everything that's bad.
What they say I will not mind;
This has come through being kind.
Wait awhile, until I'm free,
Then just let them jeer at me.
Though their pa was old and tough,
They look young and fat enough.


5 .
4 -81 ~.- <









L15\cfUkT.


rous'ACg SHafV8Sf S.
N OW all young shavers, look at this;
Such fun you surely cannot miss.
I think these pigs were meant for you,
For they are both young shavers, too!


I\'A. CoCsE CC.


L T ~ERE am I, an honest Fox,
Caught, and locked up in the stocks,
'Cause I found a goose one day
Who I thought had lost his way;
SSo I took him home, you see,
Just that he might dine with me.
Now I'm caught, and lock'd up here,
And his children come and jeer-
Say I ate their poor old dad,
Call me everything that's bad.
What they say I will not mind;
This has come through being kind.
Wait awhile, until I'm free,
Then just let them jeer at me.
Though their pa was old and tough,
They look young and fat enough.


5 .
4 -81 ~.- <










TOO 9V1 CrT ooFVs SPOIL THS BROTH.

_LL upon the smooth waters,
A Dame Duck's pretty daughters
Swam splishety splashety here, as you see,
Quite happy together,
In the sweet Summer weather,
Till little Miss Flossygold chanced on a bee.

Such a big, buzzy fellow,
Brown, velvet, and yellow!
And every one tried to persuade him to stay.
They pushed and they hustled,
They scrambled and bustled,
Till, somehow or other, the bee got away!

\\\ \. \








,. .. :












THE aF'rTEq OO-{ C&JLL.

_7 HIS is quite a little treat,
(Have I made your tea too sweet?)
I've not seen you for so long.
(Do you like it very strong?)

Tell me all the news you've got.
(I'm afraid your tea's too hot.)
You're not looking well, I fear.
(Pour it in the saucer, dear.")

I will call when I am able;
(There's the cream-jug on the table.)
No, I really can't say when.
(Let me fill your cup again.")


ir- & I.Jud-
TML
40FIr-











GR&T-XDP&Y eAnCD GR&Y-kD-MW&
" H, don't I look funny in father's hat?
Q I am sure I feel like a grown-up cat;
And you look charming in mother's bonnet,
But mind her dress, and don't tread upon it.
How do you do, Sir? We could not pass by,
And not call to see you, my wife and I."
Oh, dear! oh, dear! Mr. Mousey replies,
"I scarcely know how to believe my eyes.
But look at them, Ma! who would ever suppose
It's Kitty and Tommy dressed up in our clothes?"


-',











PUFFI5\C; fVCID BLOWIY '.


RA VE Captain Puffin
Looks very bluff in,
And rather gruff in,
His seafaring clothes;
He's a good sailor,
Never grows paler,
On steamboat or whaler,
As everyone knows.

Blowing and puffing,
Tacking and luffing,
Bold Captain Puffin,
On deck still is he;
Sou'-wester capped in,
Sea-jacket wrapt in,
He's the best Captain
That e'er went to sea.


Waves the deck sweeping,
He's never sleeping,
Wide open keeping
His rough-weather-eye;
Skies dark and grim, O,
Never daunt him, O,
If he can't swim, O,
To shore he can fly I




... I- : : ,-, --, -, -V S --?,;; ;*]7


Ca'P'3j\ TUFF.LJ.












SWITTER-TY-TWEET," said. the House-sparrow as he hopped
on to the bedroom window-sill and looked in through the open
window. Hulloa -who are you?"
"Who am I ?" answered the bright coloured little fellow
who lay in a beautiful nest of black velvet and lace on the
dressing-table. Why, I'm the bird in Mother's best bonnet."
S "Any crumbs about here?" asked the Sparrow, as he
hopped in.
"I don't care for :crumbs," answered the bird in Mother's
best bonnet. I'm' perfectly stuffed with cotton-wool and don't
want any."
"Conie and have a game round the chimney-pots," said the Sparrow.
What! Don't you hear the bells ringing? It's Sunday, and I've to go
to church twice to-day. Besides, chimney-pots are low," said the. bird in
Mother's best bonnet.
"Low!" exclaimed the Sparrow, in surprise,-"What do you mean by
that, why, they're the highest point of the house, but somebody's coming,
good-bye," and away he flew out on to the spout.
"He must be mad," he exclaimed, when later on he saw the bird in
Mother's best bonnet going to church. Fancy him saying chimney-pots
are low, and stuffing himself-with cotton-wool. I'm glad I'm not a bird
Sin Mother's bonnet."



p LLOSE up the book, for all the tales are done,
C We hope that you have'found it "Full of Fun,"
And still it may some weary hours beguile,
It does its duty if it makes you smile, ,
We've tried to please; when next year comes, why, then,. '
All being well, we hope to try again. / .


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