• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 How do you do?
 Sowing and reaping
 A helping hand
 Killing the weeds
 Sunny days
 Rough sport
 Learning to sew
 The selfish dog
 Kind Fanny
 Waiting
 A natural history study
 The greedy bear
 Dancing lessons
 Buttercups and daisies
 Alone
 Only one poor chick
 Kind Mollie
 Unselfishness
 Caught
 Must get the lesson
 Dispute
 The race
 Wait a minute
 A hobby horse
 Crossing the stream
 A street acquaintance
 Learning to cook
 Hungry sparrows
 Good news
 Napoleon
 A mother's love
 Kind Fred
 Learning tricks
 Make a good foundation
 Little by little
 Cruel fun
 The faithful dog
 Happy sisters
 The blind boy
 Chit chat
 In the meadows
 Tell the truth
 A friend in need
 Look before you leap
 The kind lass
 Baby's dreams
 Hard study
 Reflection
 A sad mishap
 Thieving Tom
 Waiting for the ship
 The ducks
 Autumn leaves
 Kind animals
 Going to meet Papa
 Telling Mamma
 Learning to knit
 Seed time
 The happy bird
 The change
 Christmas morn
 Sick dolly
 Camping out
 Cratch-cradle
 Alone and sad
 Be gentle with the erring
 Earning her living
 Fun in a basket
 The birds and the harp
 Mischief in the pantry
 The fighting beasts
 Spilt milk
 Learning to work
 Vain Miss Jane
 Home again
 Dolly's bath
 Mischief in a band box
 The school girl
 Lost in the snow
 No rose without a thorn
 The orphan and his friends
 Hastening to school
 The dead bird
 The Italian child
 Be in time and tune
 The flower girl
 Singing and swinging
 The adopted squirrels
 The trained dog
 Looking for home
 First lessons
 The lesson
 Kind Rover
 In mischief
 Little wide-awake
 The kind maiden
 Playful Puss
 Young chicks
 Catching a hare
 The wounded bird
 Caught in a storm
 Showing off
 Welcome home
 Out in the rain
 The first snow
 Playing on the beach
 Out in the storm
 The market dog
 The donkey ride
 Helping Mamma
 The flattering cats
 Mischievous birds
 Studying together
 The thoughtful dog
 Bashful Bessie
 First steps
 Defeated plans
 Stitch by stitch
 At the watering place
 Bright bubbles
 Selfish ducks
 Out of school
 Danger near
 Result of disobedience
 Try,try again
 Mutual aid
 The bare-footed boy
 Humble help
 Hay making
 Good-by
 Cherry picking
 The selfish cat
 A loving letter
 A stitch in time
 The contented cripple
 Two wrongs don't make one...
 Thankful sparrows
 The mountain deer
 The knowing dog
 A day-time nap
 Christmas decorations
 Pushing away
 Happy birds
 The ostrich
 Climbing high
 Water bearing
 Known by its fruits
 Haying-time sport
 Childhood dreams
 The sluggard
 Feeding the pony
 The boat builder
 Spring time
 Thinking it over
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Young folks' picture gallery
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080708/00001
 Material Information
Title: Young folks' picture gallery
Physical Description: 160 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Locke, John S
Cassell Publishing Co ( Publisher )
Mershon Company Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Cassell Publishing Company.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Mershon Company Press
Publication Date: c1891
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1891   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- New Jersey -- Rahway
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by John S. Locke.
General Note: Publisher's and other's advertisements on endpapers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080708
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224137
notis - ALG4398
oclc - 16858153

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Preface
        Page 5
        Page 6
    How do you do?
        Page 7
    Sowing and reaping
        Page 8
    A helping hand
        Page 9
    Killing the weeds
        Page 10
    Sunny days
        Page 11
    Rough sport
        Page 12
    Learning to sew
        Page 13
    The selfish dog
        Page 14
    Kind Fanny
        Page 15
    Waiting
        Page 16
    A natural history study
        Page 17
    The greedy bear
        Page 18
    Dancing lessons
        Page 19
    Buttercups and daisies
        Page 20
    Alone
        Page 21
    Only one poor chick
        Page 22
    Kind Mollie
        Page 23
    Unselfishness
        Page 24
    Caught
        Page 25
    Must get the lesson
        Page 26
    Dispute
        Page 27
    The race
        Page 28
    Wait a minute
        Page 29
    A hobby horse
        Page 30
    Crossing the stream
        Page 31
    A street acquaintance
        Page 32
    Learning to cook
        Page 33
    Hungry sparrows
        Page 34
    Good news
        Page 35
    Napoleon
        Page 36
    A mother's love
        Page 37
    Kind Fred
        Page 38
    Learning tricks
        Page 39
    Make a good foundation
        Page 40
    Little by little
        Page 41
    Cruel fun
        Page 42
    The faithful dog
        Page 43
    Happy sisters
        Page 44
    The blind boy
        Page 45
    Chit chat
        Page 46
    In the meadows
        Page 47
    Tell the truth
        Page 48
    A friend in need
        Page 49
    Look before you leap
        Page 50
    The kind lass
        Page 51
    Baby's dreams
        Page 52
    Hard study
        Page 53
    Reflection
        Page 54
    A sad mishap
        Page 55
    Thieving Tom
        Page 56
    Waiting for the ship
        Page 57
    The ducks
        Page 58
    Autumn leaves
        Page 59
    Kind animals
        Page 60
    Going to meet Papa
        Page 61
    Telling Mamma
        Page 62
    Learning to knit
        Page 63
    Seed time
        Page 64
    The happy bird
        Page 65
    The change
        Page 66
    Christmas morn
        Page 67
    Sick dolly
        Page 68
    Camping out
        Page 69
    Cratch-cradle
        Page 70
    Alone and sad
        Page 71
    Be gentle with the erring
        Page 72
    Earning her living
        Page 73
    Fun in a basket
        Page 74
    The birds and the harp
        Page 75
    Mischief in the pantry
        Page 76
    The fighting beasts
        Page 77
    Spilt milk
        Page 78
    Learning to work
        Page 79
    Vain Miss Jane
        Page 80
    Home again
        Page 81
    Dolly's bath
        Page 82
    Mischief in a band box
        Page 83
    The school girl
        Page 84
    Lost in the snow
        Page 85
    No rose without a thorn
        Page 86
    The orphan and his friends
        Page 87
    Hastening to school
        Page 88
    The dead bird
        Page 89
    The Italian child
        Page 90
    Be in time and tune
        Page 91
    The flower girl
        Page 92
    Singing and swinging
        Page 93
    The adopted squirrels
        Page 94
    The trained dog
        Page 95
    Looking for home
        Page 96
    First lessons
        Page 97
    The lesson
        Page 98
    Kind Rover
        Page 99
    In mischief
        Page 100
    Little wide-awake
        Page 101
    The kind maiden
        Page 102
    Playful Puss
        Page 103
    Young chicks
        Page 104
    Catching a hare
        Page 105
    The wounded bird
        Page 106
    Caught in a storm
        Page 107
    Showing off
        Page 108
    Welcome home
        Page 109
    Out in the rain
        Page 110
    The first snow
        Page 111
    Playing on the beach
        Page 112
    Out in the storm
        Page 113
    The market dog
        Page 114
    The donkey ride
        Page 115
    Helping Mamma
        Page 116
    The flattering cats
        Page 117
    Mischievous birds
        Page 118
    Studying together
        Page 119
    The thoughtful dog
        Page 120
    Bashful Bessie
        Page 121
    First steps
        Page 122
    Defeated plans
        Page 123
    Stitch by stitch
        Page 124
    At the watering place
        Page 125
    Bright bubbles
        Page 126
    Selfish ducks
        Page 127
    Out of school
        Page 128
    Danger near
        Page 129
    Result of disobedience
        Page 130
    Try,try again
        Page 131
    Mutual aid
        Page 132
    The bare-footed boy
        Page 133
    Humble help
        Page 134
    Hay making
        Page 135
    Good-by
        Page 136
    Cherry picking
        Page 137
    The selfish cat
        Page 138
    A loving letter
        Page 139
    A stitch in time
        Page 140
    The contented cripple
        Page 141
    Two wrongs don't make one right
        Page 142
    Thankful sparrows
        Page 143
    The mountain deer
        Page 144
    The knowing dog
        Page 145
    A day-time nap
        Page 146
    Christmas decorations
        Page 147
    Pushing away
        Page 148
    Happy birds
        Page 149
    The ostrich
        Page 150
    Climbing high
        Page 151
    Water bearing
        Page 152
    Known by its fruits
        Page 153
    Haying-time sport
        Page 154
    Childhood dreams
        Page 155
    The sluggard
        Page 156
    Feeding the pony
        Page 157
    The boat builder
        Page 158
    Spring time
        Page 159
    Thinking it over
        Page 160
    Advertising
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text



















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MAMMA'S PETS.


e.-11VI-





YOUNG



PICTURE


FOLKS'



GALLERY



BY


JOHN S. LOCKE


Though sermons long a truth may hold.
By Proverbs short 'tis better told.


NEW Y


CASSELL


PUBLIC


Io4 & 1o6 FOL














































COPYRIGHT, 1891, BY

CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY.


All rights reserved.


THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS,
RAHWAY, N. J.



















Come, children, if your play is
through,
And you want something else
to do
Your passing moments to beguile,
Just take this 'book and read
awhile;
Turn leaf by leaf, and slowly
view,
For on each page is something
new.
J. S. L.


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HOW DO YOU DO?


HERE, first, a baby, bright and fair,
With eyes of blue and sunny hair,
Comes with his dog to welcome you,
Both seem to say, "How do you do ?."
These are so pretty, you must look
And see what else is in this book.




SOWING AND REAPING.


THE reaper reaps the ripening rye-
That 's grown so very rank and high;-
Last spring he scattered there the grain,-
His labors have not been in vain.
Before you, then, this lesson keep,
What's sown in youth in age you '11 reap.





A HELPING HAND.


To glide upon the glitt'ring ice
Little Miss Susie thinks it nice;
Her brother standing by her side
Is kindly teaching her to slide.-
In places where 'tis hard to stand
We often need a helping hand.
9





KILLING THE WEEDS.


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PoIsoN weeds in the garden grow-
Root them out with spade and hoe-
Wheel them away, lest they should sprout-
And crowd the blooming flowers out.
An evil thought is a dangerous weed-
To crush it out is what we need.





SUNNY DAYS.


'TIs now the sunny morn of May,
Stern winter's storms have passed away.
These children here with flowers seen
Are twining garlands for their queen.
Taking the years as the seasons run
*You '11 always find less clouds than sun.
11





ROUGH SPORT.


THREE constant friends are playing here
And Kitty seems to be in fear;-
She seems to teasing Skip to say,
"You ought not look at me that way."-
When full of frolic children may
Be often too rough in their play.
12





LEARNING TO SEW.


THIS little girl her apron tore
Against the rose bush by the door;
To mend the rent she's trying now
And Ma sits by to show her how.-
To use a needle and to sew
Is something .every girl should know.
13






THE SELFISH DOG.


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Once from his perch an old magpie
Thought down to Tiger's meal he'd fly
And ask a bite from a cold bone;-
The selfish dog would give him none.
He flew away with chatting beak,
"Of selfish folks no favors seek."


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KIND FANNY.




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THIS little lamb with wool like silk
Miss Fanny feeds with warm sweet milk
And makes for him a soft warm bed;-
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She 's very kind-his mother 's dead.
With her he loves to skip and play;-
For all kind deeds we have our pay.






WAITING.







































HER papa was to meet her here.
His train is late, and she 's in fear
He will not come take her home:-
How long the time to wait alone!
Learn this, my child, though 'tis no news,
The patient waiters never lose."
16
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16





A NATURAL HISTORY STUDY.


THESE boys have stopped to take a look
At tadpoles taken from the brook,
And also many little fish
To learn the ways of them they wish:-
From .them instruction they will find,
But they should treat them very kind.
17





THE GREEDY BEAR.


SEE little Lizzie and the bear,
You '11 think they nre a funny pair.
She gave him candy, just to bite,
He quickly swallowed every mite.
This remember everywhere
And don't be greedy as a bear.
18






DANCING LESSONS.


HERE you can see just at one glance
This girl would teach her dog to dance;
But he will never learn at all,
Unless he learns while he is small.
This always is a proper plan,
While you are young learn all you can.





BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES.


HERE little girls play 'mid the flowers,
And while away the sunny hours.
With butter-cups and daisies bright
They dress themselves;-a lovely sight.-
Oh, may these children ever find
Their pathway bright with love's sunshine.
20





ALONE.


HERE is a girl who 's all alone,
Kind loving playmates has she none;
So by herself she has to play
And find amusement every day.
One better be alone than be
Found mixing with bad company.
21





ONLY ONE POOR CHICK.


FRoM all the eggs beneath the hen
They expected chickens eight or ten.
Yet, they have only one poor chick
Which needs their care because 'tis sick.
A lesson to this is attached:
"Don't count your chickens till they're hatched."





KIND MOLLIE.


THIS is Miss Mollie with her pets,
The care of which she ne'er forgets.
Old and young her attentions share,
And they enjoy her friendly care:
Kindness of heart in little things
Repays, in gratitude it brings.





UNSELFISHNESS.


To gather berries rich and bright
Gives these two children much delight.
The eldest miss stands picking there,
But little sister gets a share.-
To live unselfish be your plan,
And share with others when you can.
24





CAUGHT.


You can see here they've broke the rule.
No one should whisper in the school;-
The teacher caught them at the trick,-
See him approaching with his stick.-
There is no doubt these lads will say,
"Transgressors have the hardest way."
25





MUST GET THE LESSON.


"I CANNOT go with you to play,
A lesson I must learn to-day."
So said this steady, sober lad
Whose goodness makes his parents glad.
A lesson here for one and all:
No wisdom comes from playing ball.





DISPUTE.


HERE is trouble as you can see.
This dog and cat cannot agree.
They each would like to have that chair;-
They are a very selfish pair.
And where'er selfishness is found
There always quarrels will abound.
27





THE RACE.


HASTEN, hasten and don't be late,
You better run at swiftest gait.
Let others never wait for you,
Be on hand in whatever you do.
Always keep your promised time
And never, never be behind.





WAIT A MINUTE.


" Now you must -wait till this is done,
Then I will feed you, every one;
And it must cool before one sips:-
Once by hot food you burned your lips.
To burn again you've no desire ?
For those once burned will fear the fire."
29





A HOBBY HORSE.


THIS boy rides an oaken limb,
It is a hobby horse for him;
The summer winds the branches toss,
'Tis as real to him as a live horse,
He, like others, when older grown,
Some other hobby horse will own.
30





CROSSING THE STREAM.


THE berries grow beyond the brook;
For them these children wish to look,
And as no bridge has there been made
Through the waters they must wade:-
Of future troubles do not dream,
And never cross till you reach a stream.
31






A STREET ACQUAINTANCE.


THESE children have an old tame bear:-
He has just broken from his lair;
He seems quite kind and walks quite straight
And yet he is a dangerous mate.
Companions choose with special care;
Of street acquaintances beware.
32






LEARNING TO COOK.


THIS little girl upon the floor
Is watching by the oven door.
She's reading in a new cook-book
Because she wants to learn to cook.
It is a fact, that all girls should
Know how to nicely cook their food.
33





HUNGRY SPARROWS.


THE snow has covered all the seeds,
There's nothing for the sparrows' needs:-
Each hungry birdie daily comes
And Ethel feeds them with the crumbs.-
For her kind deed they '11 gladly pay
With a sweet song some bright spring day.






GOOD NEWS.


A LETTER from a distant friend;-
How glad to read from end to end.
There's nothing more the heart to cheer
Than from our absent ones to hear.
As water in a sultry day
So is good news from far away.
35





NAPOLEON.

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HERE is the great Napoleon:-
Mighty armies led he on;
And yet he died in lone exile
On St. Helena's dreary isle.
A lesson here for one and all,
There 's none so great but they may fall.
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A MOTHER'S LOVE.


THms little lad with aching head
Is lying ill upon his bed;
His mother bathes his aching brow
As only mother's care-knows how:-
It is a fact above all others
No love on earth is like a mother's.
37





KIND FRED.


IN the forest over the way
Other children have gone to play,
Were it not that Fred is kind
Little Miss May must stay behind:-
'Tis always right for boy or man
To help another when he can.





LEARNING TRICKS.


HERE is a picture of Miss May;
She's teaching youthful Spitz to play;
While he is young 'tis just the time
To fix these antics in his mind.
This proverb in your mem'ry fix,
"A dog that's old won't learn new tricks."
39





MAKE A GOOD FOUNDATION.
































TRNG to build a tower tall,
See how likely it is to fall.
Carefully place each domino
Or down your tott'ring tower '11 go.
Learn to lay the foundation sure,
Then your structure will endure.
Then your structure will endure.





LITTLE BY LITTLE.


DROPS of water and grains of sand
Make the ocean and make the land,
And moments spent in work or play
Make up the hours of the day;
Thus months and years go quickly by;
Improve them, children, as they fly.





CRUEL FUN:


- -i-,


THE children here are having fun
In ways that never should be done.
To this mouse within the trap
His capture is a sad mishap.
No doubt he says at their device,-
"What's fun for boys is pain for mice.





THE FAITHFUL DOG.


THIS shepherd dog guards well the sheep
And watches by them while they sleep;-
He follows them by night and day
And keeps the hungry wolves away-
He guards his trust early and late.
His faithfulness let's imitate.





HAPPY SISTERS.


Two happy sisters here we see,
In all their sports they well agree;
They pluck bright flowers, leaves and grass
And chase the butterflies that pass:-
If children all would thus agree,
Like these, they would most happy be.





THE BLIND BOY.


THIS little boy is wholly blind;
About, his way he could not find,
'Cept for his dog-which leads his way
And begs for money when they play.
If little dogs kind deeds can do
,Much greater ones should come from you.






CHIT CHAT.


Two little girls sat down to chat;
They talked of this and then of that;-
Of other playmates no one heard
Them speak a single harmful word.
This lesson learn: Sisters and brothers,
You never should speak ill of others.
46






IN THE MEADOWS.


IN the meadows picking daisies
Through the forests' shady mazes
Full of sport and full of play
These children wear their hours away.-
Don't think, children, life 's all fun,
There 's always hard work to be done.






TELL THE TRUTH.


"TELL me, my boy, tell me true,
Who broke the window, was it you 2"
"Yes, Grandma, it went all to smash
When my ball bounced againstt the sash."
That's right, my boy; this motto try:
Like Washington ne'er tell a lie."
48





A FRIEND IN NEED.




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THE tide is coming fast this way,
The ocean's power naught can stay;
'Twill deeply roll across the place
And of their structures leave no trace;
'Tis well to have a friend near by
To warn of danger when 'tis nigh,.
49





LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP.


A DOG as cross as dogs can be
Once frightened Kitty up a tree;
The children coaxed her to come down;-
She feared to jump upon the ground.-
This cautious Kitty's motto keep
And always "look before you leap."





THE KIND LASS.


THROUGEH the meadows, through the grass
Roams this radiant, rosy lass;-
To sick and poor she sends bright flowers
To cheer them in their lonely hours.
There is one thing we all should try:-
To do as we would be done by.





BABY'S DREAMS.


BABY boy in sister's lap,
Just waking from a noon-day nap;
From his sweet smiles, it often seems,
He talks with angels in his dreams.
From baby life this lesson comes:-
The greatest men once sucked their thumbs.




- -""~BiR,"" P~9alii~


HARD STUDY.


Miss Effie waiting to begin
To play upon her violin;-
If she with skill would learn to play,
Hard must she study every day.
Though dry and hard are knowledge's roots
SFragrant and sweet will be its fruits.-
.1 68s





REFLECTION.


THIS aged man thinks of the past,
Of days and hours flown so fast,
It seems but a short time since he
Play'd like the children that we see.
Remember, then, this worthy rhyme,
We can not stop the wheels of time.





A SAD MISHAP.


WISHING to take her doll to ride
Kate to a cart her Kitty tied.
To do such work did Kitty spurn
And so upset the whole concern.
Kate cried and said, at this sad loss,
"Don't get your cart before the horse.'
55





THIEVING TOM.


SAID thieving Tom, "I've often guessed
There's young birds up there in that nest;
I can take one, there is no doubt "-
In went his paw-it don't come out.-
Here by this picture we are taught,
Dishonest folks are often caught.
56





WAITING FOR THE SHIP.


" WHEN things I ask for I am told,
"' Wait till the ship comes in with gold.'
And so I've waited day by day;
Why don't that vessel come this way ?"
The sailor said, and gently laughed:
"Many are waiting for that eraft."
57


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THE DUCKS.


S__. -_-- .- _.- ___,-



THESE ducks, they paddle in the drain
And in the mud and dirt and rain;
Their habits are not very clean,
Yet in bright plumage they are seen.-
This fact will prove these common words:
"Fine feathers often make fine birds."
58





AUTUMN LEAVES.


'TIs autumn, and the leaves are red
Upon the maples, over head;-
Frost-flowers bright and golden-rod
Along the wayside hedges nod.-
Remember this, dear girl and boy,
Each season brings some special joy.
59





KIND ANIMALS.


JOKER, the horse, is glad to find
Jumbo, the cat, so very kind;
Around his nose will Jumbo purr
And stroke it with his silky fur.-
It is a pleasant sight, to see
How well these animals agree.






GOING TO MEET PAPA.


PAPA is coming home to tea,
He will be glad his girl to see;
So trot along, dear little miss,
And great him with a loving kiss.
One thing on earth is free from guile:-
It is the kiss of a sweet child.






TELLING MAMMA.


SHE 's whispering to her mamma,
Telling of presents for papa
Which she has safely put away
For him upon his next birthday.
To trust your mother it is well,
And to her all your secrets tell.
62






LEARNING TO KNIT.


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GRANDMA is teaching Kate to knit,
To shape a sock and make it fit,
To round the heel and point the toe,
Something that every girl should know.
All girls should learn to knit their socks,
Also to mend and make their frocks.
63






SEED TIME.


THE farmer at his spring-time toil:-
He's ploughing up the stubborn soil,
He smooths the land and scatters seed
To yield a crop for time of need.-
These truthful. words before you keep,-
"What'er you sow that you will reap."





THE HAPPY BIRD.


THOUGH it is cold and trees are bare,
This joyous bird is singing there;
On the chill air his music rings
And this is the sweet song he sings-
4"Let your heart be both light and gay
And December is as bright as May."







THE CHANGE.


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THOUGH pigs are sometimes white as snow,
They into filthy brutes may grow.
And lovely children sometimes be-
Come stained with deep depravity.
If you would never see this done
Be careful evil thoughts to shun.
66





CHRISTMAS MORN.


'TIs Christmas morn;-while she has slept
Down chimney Santa Claus has crept,
And filled her little sock with toys:-
He's always good to girls and boys
Who're kind and gentle in their play
And always mind what parents say.






SICK DOLLY.


WHEN dolly went out in the cold
She "got a tooth-ache," we've been told.
So from her play Miss Annie stops
To give her doll some "tooth-ache drops":-
This motto we should always heed,
Only the sick a doctor need."
68





CAMPING OUT.


THESE boys here are camping out;
'Tis plain to see what they're about;
They've built a fire and all agree
To have a rabbit fricassee.
In camp or household, this is true,
Too many cooks will spoil a stew.
69





CRATCH-CRADLE.


IT sometimes seems a silly thing
To play cratch-cradle with a string,
Yet children better play at this
Than with noisy sport to do amiss.-
With something good your mind employ
If you a life-time would enjoy.
70





ALONE AND SAD.


THIS poor old man's alone and sad,
Once a good, happy home he had;-
He's lost his fortune, children, wife,
Here's none to cheer his lonely life.
Have pity for this poor old man
And cheer the sad whene'er you can.





BE GENTLE WITH THE ERRING.


"ANOTHER step I will not go,"
Says this old donkey here, and so
No shout of boy or bark of dog
Can coax or drive him o'er the log.-
Be gentle, boy-act kind your part,
Kindness will melt the hardest heart.
72





EARNING HER LIVING.


PAPA and mamma both are dead;-
Many the pleasures once she had;
But ever since they both have died
Thus for herself she can provide,
Because she's learned to knit and sew,
Something important for girls to know.
73





FUN IN A BASKET.


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WHAT funny things some children do!-
Here in the basket see these two.
They're playing sailing in a boat;
Over the waves they think the float.-
Children will always find some way
For joyous sport whene'er they play.
74





THE BIRDS AND THE HARE.


"How very happy birds must be,
Flitting about from tree to tree!"
"How very nice to be a hare,
Nibbling the clover everywhere!"
If we but knew another's cares,
Our lot we'd not exchange for theirs.
15





MISCHIEF IN THE PANTRY.


THE family all went away
And left the cats at home to stay.-
The closet door they did not close,
Hence all this mischief here arose.
When people leave things without care,
They may expect some trouble there.





THE FIGHTING BEASTS.


HERE is a bear and buffalo,
And this picture's made to show
How savage beasts on plain and hill
Each other fight and often kill.-
For human beings 'tis not right
To ever quarrel or to fight.





SPILT MILK.


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As accident has happened here.
The cause of it does not appear:-
Though not to blame, this little one
Seems very sorry it's been done.-
To mend the fault she better try,
"O'er milk that's spilt don't ever cry."





LEARNING TO WORK.


LEARNING to smooth the garments white,
To fold them nice and place them right
And fix them all for future wear
Is what Miss Kate is doing there.-
How household duties should be done
Ought to be learned by every one.







VAIN MISS JANE.
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Miss Jane is viewing her new hat,
We wonder what she thinks of that
New pink bow and light blue feather,
Do those shades blend well together?
And do you think this little queen
Can see herself as she is seen?
80


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HOME AGAIN.


THIS dog was carried far away,
But there, they could not make him stay;
He grew homesick and broke his chain;
How glad he is he's home again!
When from our friends away we roam
There's always joy in coming home.





DOLLY'S BATH.


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MIss Mary standing at the tub
Giving dolly a thorough scrub.
Trying to make her nice and sweet
Before she dresses for the street.
If health and happiness you'd glean
Remember always to keep clean.
82





MISCHIEF IN A BAND BOX.


A PROUD lady left her bonnet
Where the kittens pounced upon it;
They sniffed the feathers, tore the rose,
Broke the straw and crushed the bows.
Then from this tale let one and all
Remember "pride may have a fall."






THE SCHOOL GIRL.


WITH books and slate and bright bouquet
This girl to school is on her way.
The bouquet's for her teacher kind,
Who aids her to improve her mind.
This is most commonly the rule
The child that's good will like the school.
84





LOST IN THE SNOW.


LoST :-this poor dog amid the snow
Is lost; he knows not where to go,-
To save his master who 's fallen nigh
He '11 bring help by his pleading cry.
This wise good dog we may admire,
And to his faithfulness aspire.





NO ROSE WITHOUT A THORN.


MIss Nellie placing to her nose
A fresh and fragrant blushing rose.
It is a fact we often find
Those who love flowers are refined.-
Of this we would this maiden warn:
"There is no rose without a thorn."
86





THE ORPHAN AND HIS FRIENDS.


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A LITTLE crippled orphan boy
Once met kind friends-it was great joy
After all the pain he had endured
To have his lameness fully cured:-
He grew to be a learned man.-
Let's help the poor whene'er we can.
87






HASTENING TO SCHOOL.


THROUGH pathways green and very cool
Miss Daisy trips along to school;
She is in haste, for she would hate
To stop and play and be marked "late."
All children should learn well this rule
And never be late at their school.
88





THE DEAD BIRD.


THEY all felt sad when birdie died.-
Miss Lucy turned away and cried,
And little Fred he wondered why
So sweet a little bird should die.
Alas! dear child, he does not know
Death comes to all things here below.





THE ITALIAN CHILD.


IN Italy far, far away
Where breezes soft through vineyards play,
'Neath sunny skies and moonbeams mild
Was born this little wand'ring child.
Now she's compelled through streets to roam,
Yet sings of Home, Sweet Home, Sweet Home.
90





BE IN TIME AND TUNE.


" ONE-two-three-four, One-two-three-four,"-
Counting the music o'er and o'er;
She must study many a day
If e'er. she would correctly play.-
Here is the moral of this rhyme,
Working or playing be in time.





THE FLOWER GIRL.


"COME buy my little roses red
Sown and bloomed in sorrow's bed.-
Come listen to an orphan's cry!
My roses red, who '11 buy, who '11 buy.
If you would do a worthy deed
Then help poor orphans in their need.





SINGING AND SWINGING.


BACKWARDS and forwards, high and low,
Where neathh the branches breezes blow,
Here ev'ry day this sweet maid swings
And this the song she often sings:
"Be good and kind at work or play
And you '11 be happy every day."





THE ADOPTED SQUIRRELS.


WHEN these two squirrels were quite small
Their home was in an oak tree tall;-
Their loving mother died up there
And Pussy took them in her care.
They play with her and with her kit;
Her care for them they don't forget.





THE TRAINED DOG.



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" Bow-wow! bow-wow! "-" what now-what now "
This is the dog that's learned just how
To speak, when he's in want of food,
So loud he's always understood.-
To jump and speak, he learned it all
When he was very, very small.
95





LOOKING FOR HOME.
ll-sM 7 PI" 3SISrillMIi M BA l?


So far from home this maiden strayed,
She lost her way and was afraid;-
She's climbing up a maple tree,
Hoping her distant home to see.
When'er you do not know the way
You better ask than go astray.
96




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