• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The morning lesson
 "Whom do you love best?"
 The musical mouse
 The injured horse
 The comical kittens
 Sympathy
 Robin's message
 The seagull and the kite
 A happy evening
 Prying Tom
 A clever seal
 Auntie's presents
 A pretty Chinese "feast"
 Nellie's bath
 Heedless Lucy
 In disgrace
 Hilda's hiding-place
 Mr. Briny's pig
 Brave helpers
 Rover, the jumper
 Be pleasant
 Rupert's pet
 Sue and Bob
 Two boys
 A morning walk
 Mother's baby
 Dick's yacht
 Elsie's party
 The holiday at Saltburn
 The young housekeeper
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: Bright rays for cloudy days : pictures and stories for little ones
Title: Bright rays for cloudy days
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080705/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bright rays for cloudy days pictures and stories for little ones
Physical Description: 72 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: J. D, fl. 1893
Arnold, Harry ( Engraver )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Hazell, Watson & Viney ( Printer )
Publisher: S.W. Partridge & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Hazell, Watson and Viney
Publication Date: [1891?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1891   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1891   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Aylesbury
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by J.D.
General Note: Date of publication from publisher's advertisements on endpapers.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Harry Arnold.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080705
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225150
notis - ALG5422
oclc - 189849407

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The morning lesson
        Page 7
    "Whom do you love best?"
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The musical mouse
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The injured horse
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The comical kittens
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Sympathy
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Robin's message
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The seagull and the kite
        Page 20
        Page 21
    A happy evening
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Prying Tom
        Page 24
        Page 25
    A clever seal
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Auntie's presents
        Page 30
        Page 31
    A pretty Chinese "feast"
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Nellie's bath
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Heedless Lucy
        Page 36
        Page 37
    In disgrace
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Hilda's hiding-place
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Mr. Briny's pig
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Brave helpers
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Rover, the jumper
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Be pleasant
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Rupert's pet
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Sue and Bob
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Two boys
        Page 56
        Page 57
    A morning walk
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Mother's baby
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Dick's yacht
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Elsie's party
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The holiday at Saltburn
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The young housekeeper
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Advertising
        Advertising
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text


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LONDOn : 8. W. PARTRIDGE & CO., 9, PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.






























THE MORNING LESSON.


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BRIGHT RAYS


FOR CLOUDY DAYS


'Pkitufeg 5ud tofieO fof the Iittle Orie


J. D.


AUTHOR OF "MERRY TIMES FOR TINY FOLKS "
"SMILES AND DIMPLES," ETC.


LONDON
S. W. PARTRIDGE & CO
9, PATERNOSTER Row












































PRINTED BY

IIAZELL, WATSON, AND VINEY, LD.,
LONDON AND AYLESBURY.





























CONTENTS.



PAGE
THE MORNING LESSON. 7

"WHOM DO YOU LOVE BEST?" 8

THE MUSICAL MOUSE .

THE INJURED HORSE 12

THE COMICAL KITTENS 14

SYMPATHY 16

ROBIN'S MESSAGE 18

THE SEAGULL AND THE KITE 20

A HAPPY EVENING 22

PRYING TOM 24

A CLEVER SEAL 26

AUNTIE'S PRESENTS 30

A PRETTY CHINESE "FEAST 32

NELLIE'S BATH 34

HEEDLESS LUCY 36

IN DISGRACE. 38







PAGE
HILDA'S HIDING-PLACE 40

MR. BRINY'S PIG 42

BRAVE HELPERS 44
ROVER THE JUMPER 48

BE PLEASANT. 50

RUPERT'S PET 52

SUE AND BOB 54

Two BOYS 56

A MORNING WALK 58

MOTHER'S BABY 60

DICK'S YACHT .. 62

ELSIE'S PARTY 66

THE HOLIDAY AT SALTBURN. 68

THE YOUNG HOUSEKEEPER 70






THE MORNING LESSON.
(See Frontispiece.)


can generally manage to amuse herself when
left alone-as she is, very often. It is not
that she is shy or does not care for the company
of little friends. Oh, dear no; for when her
cousin Claude comes to see her, they have merry
times together. But Mary has no dear Mamma to
love her and help her to pass away the hours; and
as Mrs. Stuart, the housekeeper, has her duties to attend
to, she cannot always be with Mary. So, you see, she
is often compelled to find her own amusement.
This morning she has taken her dolls out of their
cradles and arranged them in a row to give them
their morning lesson. The sedate-looking dolly in
the centre is named Belinda; the one on the left,
with the sweet, smiling face, is called Daisy; and the
lady of colour, leaning so comfortably on Belinda,
with eyes shining like live coals, is known as Daph.
Mary gets her picture book, and, after seating herself
on the -floor, commences the lesson. She gives her
scholars words to spell, but they evidently do not
know their lessons, for they do not answer. She
talks to them seriously about it, and threatens that
if they do not know them the next day, they certainly
shall not wear the lovely red cloaks she has been so
busy making them.






"WHOM DO YOU LOVE BEST?"
IOU love me best, don't you, papa? said
wee Ethel. No, it's me you love best! "
Cried Martha. "No, me!" chimed in
Millie; and so the eager voices went on.
One moment, my dear children. I love
you all; but let me tell you a story. There
was a very poor man who had six children. A
lady who rode in her carriage called at his cottage
one day. She said: 'You have six children, and
are very poor. God has blessed me with riches,
but He has given me no children. Let me have
one of your six to love and cherish. I will call for
your answer to-morrow.'
That same evening, when the children were in
bed, the poor father crept to their bedroom to decide
which should leave him. He stood first at the bed-
side of his youngest born. No, he could not part
with her: how he-would miss her loving caresses and
childish prattle! Then he moved to. the next bed,
where timid little Rosie lay calmly sleeping. 'No,
not her,' murmured the father; 'she is too delicate a
flower to transplant.' And so he went on to the end.
They were all too precious to part with. When the
lady called he said, I thank you, but I cannot part
with any of my children; they are all alike dear to me.'
So it is with me, my dear children: I love you
each and all alike."














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"WHOM DO YOU LOVE BEST?"






THE MUSICAL MOUSE.

UR little friend, Winnie Stephens, had taken
her seat in church, and the opening hymn
had commenced, when she heard a rustle
in her pew. She was a little startled, and no
wonder, for there, sitting by her side, and
looking up prettily at her, was a wee brown
mouse. He did not appear at all frightened, but
sat quietly upon the cushion until the hymn was
finished. Then he evidently thought it was time
for him to go, for he crept quickly along the
side of the seat and disappeared behind the cushion.
But when the singing commenced again, up came
mousie, and took his position upon the cushion,
where he stayed until the singing was over, when,
after a shy side-look at Winnie, he made his exit
as before. After service Winnie lifted the cushion,
and found in the corner a small hole, down which,
doubtlessly, Master Mousie's nest was cosily built.
Winnie took care to be in church early the following
Sabbath, so that she might sit in the same pew and await
her little friend. The singing had only just begun, when
Master Mousie made his appearance, afterwards disap-
pearing again, and so this continued for many Sundays.
But Mousie's musical treats were brought to an end.
Certain alterations were made in the church, after
which Winnie saw her little companion no more.











































































WINNIE AND THE MOUSE.
Bright Rays.
B






THE INJURED HORSE.

OME time ago Archie North's father brought
home a mysterious-looking parcel. Naturally
Archie was very curious to know what it
contained. His father told him that he should
know in the morning. Archie went to bed, but
could not help wondering what might be in
the parcel. The next morning, on awakening, there
stood by his bedside a magnificent horse, with arched
neck, flowing mane, and a long tail. Archie was
delighted, and as soon as school was over took his
present out to show his friends.
Alas! one day his horse met with an accident, and
it occurred thus. Archie was in a lane gathering
wild-flowers, and had left his companion by the
roadside. Just at this moment Farmer Giles' hay-
cart passed, and, sad to relate, ran over the poor
horse, breaking off one of his supports. Archie was.
going home tearfully, when he saw the glow from
Mr. Croft's forge, and it struck him that if he took
the injured charger to him, the kind blacksmith
would attend to its wounds. He was not dis-
appointed, for Mr. Croft quickly healed the injured
part. Archie was very grateful, and after thanking
the blacksmith for his kindness, he went on his
way. He has made up his mind to take greater
care in future of his horse.




























Tilii





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I I~f' I I:l~llllL, 111

I I


THE INJURED HORSE.






THE COMICAL


" ME-OW !


Me-ow !


Me-ow!"


O, dear me, what a row!


Have the
silly ?


kittens all


And what's the matter now?


What has Jenny been about ?


She's gone
paw!


She's making


and hurt


her


strange


grimaces-
The like I never saw.
Just look at little Tommy!
You'd think he'd had a fall;
But he is only playing
With Baby's woollen ball.
... And here is


wee


Jemima,
A rose beneath her


paw;


gone


KITTENS.






She'll tear it soon to pieces ,-
With sharp and crooked claw. '' '.- ,
The flower is torn asunder,
And now she thinks it fun $A- -
To break the twig and scatter
The green leaves one by one.
And next she looks about her,
On further mischief bent;
-- She sees her brother Mopsy
,i-.', \ His thirst to quench intent,
,_ She steals up close
behind him,
And strikes him with her might;
Poor Mops looks up from drinking,
It gives him such a fright.
And as for Arabella
And Bob, I think the pair
Seem quite at home B
and happy
Upon the cushion ---
there!







SYMPATHY.

DMUND FOX has an aunt who is a nurse
in a hospital. One hot summer afternoon,
when Edmund had tired of his toys, she
called in and asked if he would like to go
out with her. Edmund was glad to do so.
When they were in the street he wanted to know
where his aunt was taking him, but she asked him
to restrain his curiosity. They were soon passing
down a narrow street, and Auntie stopped and
knocked at a rickety-looking house. The door was
opened, and they were taken up a dark staircase into
a barely furnished room. In the corner of the room
lay a little girl, stretched on two chairs, with her
arm strapped and bandaged. Edmund crept up to
look at her. How thin and white she looked! Tears
filled his eyes.
Auntie explained to him on their way home that
the poor little maid had been run over, and that her
mother was very poor-so poor, indeed, that she had
not enough money to buy food for the invalid.
Edmund was silent for some time. At last he said:
" Auntie, I have half a crown at home which I am
saving up to buy a steam-engine. May I give it
to the poor woman ?' Auntie kissed her little
nephew, and told him he might .do so, and that
God would no doubt bless the gift and the giver.






































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THE POOR INVALID.






ROBIN'S MESSAGE.


T the first peep of the sun which came in the
morning, a little robin flew out of his nest,
Which he had built in the highest branch
of a neighboring oak, smoothed his feathers,
blinked his eyes, and then cleared his throat
by whistling a merry tune. The morning was
very beautiful, the foliage was fresh and green, and
Dame Nature was abroad with a smiling face. Master
Robin felt very happy this morning. I am sure,"
said he, "it is time for my little friend to give me
my breakfast. I will go and wake her."
So down he flew from his high perch on to the
window-sill of a cottage close by, and commenced to
trill his very loudest. Still no one came to greet him
or praise his sweet notes. Presently he ceased his
warbling, and, turning to the window, saw his little
benefactor kneeling by her bedside, offering thanks
to God for preserving her through the night, and
asking for His protection during the day.
When she had risen from her knees she came to
the window to bid Robin good morning, and promised
him his breakfast. as soon as she could prepare it.
And Robin did not fly away, but looked as if he
quite understood all she was telling him, for he put
his little head on one side and chirruped to her
very prettily.






A I '


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11 p


ROBIN'S MESSAGE.






THE SEAGULL AND THE KITE.

HOSE of our little readers who have visited
the seaside have doubtless seen the seagull,
S as it flits along the shore or sits so gaily
riding on the white-crested waves, and have
admired the grace and ease of all its move-
ments.
The poor bird in our picture met his death in a
peculiar manner. Some fishermen, who were sailing
round one of the headlands off the Irish coast, were
surprised to see a seagull coming towards their boat,
travelling on the surface of the water at a great speed.
The wings were outspread, and it had every appear-
ance of being alive. When they came closer, however,
they discovered that the poor gull was quite dead.
But what was making the bird travel so fast? On
examination they found that the body was tightly
bound with cord, being attached to a string, at the
end of which, high in the air, was a kite flying.
It was the flying kite which was the cause of
the seagull's remarkable rate of progress through the
water. But how the unfortunate bird had got into
such a plight could only be guessed. It was thought
that while flying on shore it had entangled itself
in the string of a boy's kite, and flying out to
sea had been drowned in its vain attempts to release
itself.























































































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THE SEAGULL AND THE KITE.


7 -!Z -=a-m


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MA-~






A HAPPY EVENING.

RE they not bright and happy faces which
appear in the picture opposite? What is
the reason of it? Let me tell you. Uncle
John, who is a ventriloquist, is on a visit to
__._ the young folks for a few days, and to-night,
as it is Eric's birthday, he is going to delight
them with an entertainment.
Eric, Bertha, and Hubert have been helping him
to fix his figures, and. when all was ready, they parted
the curtains, and Eric announced that the entertain-
ment was about to begin.
Uncle John stood on the platform, and on either
side of him was a figure, the one on the left being
that of a lady, and the other on the right a gentle-
man. Such funny things they said to each other
that the children were kept laughing the whole of
the time. Next, Uncle John had a conversation with
some one who was supposed to be up the chimney,
and could not get down. Then he threw his voice
upon the roof; the sound appeared to be such a
long way off that the children thought it could not
be Uncle John's voice which; they heard.
When the performance was finished there were
shouts of delight, and Uncle John had to promise
that he would come and amuse them another evening
later on.




































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A HAPPY EVENING.





PRYING TOM.

i HERE'S a very funny
; box,
Without either keys or
locks.
How I wonder what
can be
S Shut up in it. I must
y see.
Sitting down upon the
stool,


At the lid Tom r"'
gave a pull!
If that prying boy
had known,
He'd have left that
box alone:
For the lid flew '..
up, and he
Saw -- Please
turn your eyes
and see.





Oh it was a
dreadful sight,
And it gave him "'
such a fright!
With a shriek, .
and with a
roar,
Down .he tumbled
on the floor,
And began to
scream and
shout,
" Shut him up don't let him out!"
Prying Tom made such a din,
His Mamma
came run-
,--. ,. ) ning in.
.... -- Y o u re
a naughty
-i boy," she
said,
And then sent him off to bed.






A CLEVER SEAL.

A PROMISED visit to the
.- Zoological Gardens is
Generally looked forward to
with. eagerness by most young
'- folks, and the pleasant outing
i s not a complete one if they
return home without, having seen
the seals or sea-lions.
There is now in the Zoo" a sea-lion which
understands wonderfully what is said to it, and does
a number of amusing tricks in obedience to its keeper's
instructions. Amongst others is that of being told
not to catch certain fish which are thrown to it.
The keeper calls the seal out of the water and
commands her to take her usual place, which is
on a chair, with her fins hanging over the back. He
then tells the young folks round that, as they see,
he has six fish in his hand, and that the seal will
catch in its mouth all that are thrown to it, with
the exception of any one they like to mention.
Immediately there are shouts on all sides-" the third,"
the sixth," c the fourth," and so on. Of course
the keeper cannot oblige them all, so he asks some-
,one in the front rank to select a number. Perhaps
the answer will be the fifth and the third. Then
the keeper turns to the seal, which has meantime.










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A CLEVER SEAL.


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been sitting patiently watching the proceedings, with
its fins perched on the chair-back. "Now," says he,
"you may catch all the fish but the fifth and the
third." So he throws them to the seal one at a
time, but does not speak. The first and the second
of the fish the seal catches, and swallows them very
quickly, but the third it allows to drop by its side
into the water, and the same occurs when the fifth
fish is thrown to it. But the sagacious animal has
taken notice where the fish have fallen, and at a
word from its keeper it dives in, causing the water
to be splashed up and wetting all those in front of
the railings. It does not take it long to devour the
remaining fish, and it is soon again on the platform.
The performance, however, is not yet finished, for
the keeper reminds the seal that it has yet to kiss
him before he leaves, which it does, to the great
amusement of all the young people around.


,Bright Rays.






AUNTIE'S PRESENTS.

I WONDER when Auntie will come. Oh,
I wish she might come to-day: I do so
S want to know what it is she has for us.
Perhaps it is a parrot or a cockatoo ?" And
the speaker, a little blue-eyed maiden, looked
up at her brother, with whom she was walking,
and sighed.
These children had just come from the Park,
where they had been feeding the stately swans, and
were now on their way home. On the previous
day a letter had reached their mamma, saying that
the writer, their Aunt Emily, who lives at Enfield,
was hoping to pay them a visit soon; and in this
letter was a mysterious reference to something she
had for her niece and nephew, Willie and Flossie. You
may imagine how the thought of what this present
might be was filling the minds of both children.
On reaching home they were met by their Cousin
Maud, who said to them, Who do you think is
here?" They did not wait to answer, but at once
made a rush to the door. Maud, however, was there
before them, and held on to the handle. Willie and
Flossie pulled at the door with all their might, and,,
getting it open, rushed pell-mell upstairs, and there sat
their aunt. What do you think the presents were?
Why, two little white-haired, pink-eyed guinea-pigs !












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"THEY PULLED WITH ALL THEIR MIGHT"






A PRETTY CHINESE "FEAST."

HE Chinese people keep many festivals or
feasts" during the year, some of which
we should think peculiar. A very pretty
one is that called the Feast of Lanterns."
This feast takes place early in the autumn of
each year. Everybody buys lanterns, either to fix
outside the houses and shops, or to carry about at
the end of long poles. The poorest people save
money for days previously, in order to get lanterns
to hang over the lintels of their cottage doors. At
night, when all these lanterns are lit, the cities look
like fairy-land, and the sight from a neighboring
hill is charming indeed. But the boats and vessels on
the river are even more gay with illumination than the
houses. The occupants of the boats lighF and throw
into the water gilt paper, and as it falls sparkling and
crackling, the effect is very brilliant and picturesque.
Many of the lanterns are wonderful works of art.
Some are in the form of figures of animals, such as
horses, birds, etc., while others are made to represent
buildings, and revolve on wheels, the draught from
the heat of the light causing them to go round.
The two little Chinese children in the picture
have just bought their lanterns, and are admiring the
lantern which Mr. Lung-Chi is trying to sell to the
Chinese gentleman.










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A PRETTY CHINESE "FEAST."


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NELLIE'S BATH.

THE sea does look so
tempting,
S. I'll have a wade about.
I know Ma would be angry;
But Ma won't find it out."

'Twere well if little Nellie
Upon the shore had kept.
^ Alas! With socks and
Si, slippers
Into the waves she stept.

"How nice!" said naughty Nellie;
Oh, isn't this a treat!"
While came the tiny wavelets
Fast rippling round her
feet.

Now, as she went on wading,
The water deeper grew.
She cried out, in her terror,
"Oh dear, what shall I
do ? "






"But what's the use of
crying
When help can not be
found ?
If no one comes to save me---"-
I know I shall be drowned." --

SStill deeper grew the water,
The tide was rolling in.
Down with a flop went Nellie,
Drenched to the very skin.

But, after many a struggle,
She reached the garden gate,
I And when'her mother saw her
In such a draggled state,

She spoke to her in sorrow,
Few were the words she
said;
And, with a dish of gruel,
She packed her off to bed.
R. P. SCOTT.




36
HEEDLESS LUCY.

" I UCY, my dear, I want you to do something
for me."' "Yes, mamma," said a voice
coming from a little girl who was huddled
up in the corner of the room reading. "I am
obliged to go out for a short time, so I want
you to listen for your papa. Tell him, when
he comes in, to go at once to Mrs. Cavendish's house;.
her little girl is not so well again this morning."
"Yes, mamma," answered the voice again, dreamily.
Lucy was very much interested in her book.
Minute after minute went by until an hour or more
had passed, and still Lucy sat reading. Her papa,
who was a busy doctor, had come in and gone out
again, yet Lucy had not heard him, so much was
she interested in the story she was reading. In fact,
she had quite forgotten her charge.
Soon afterwards her mamma came in. My child,"
said she, "why did you not give papa my message?
I am distressed at your disobedience. Had not your
papa met Mrs. Cavendish's messenger, I fear the
result of your carelessness might have been sad indeed
to her little daughter." Oh, mamma, I am so
sorry," Lucy said, with tears in her eyes, "I did
not mean to forget." The mother took the wistful
face between her hands. "I know you do not intend to
be disobedient, my dear, but you must overcome these
heedless moods, or they will bring you sad trouble."







































































































HEEDLESS LUCY.


i, 1l.J






IN DISGRACE.

P HIS picture represents the inside of a school-
house in Normandy. No doubt many of
you know that Normandy is a province of
France, and that the juicy apples of which you
are so fond, known as Normandy pippins, come
from that part of the country.
The lessons are over and most of the scholars have
gone home. Six, however, are remaining behind for a
time with Dame Giraud. These young folks' names
are Francois, Adele, Loisette, Jacques, Jeannette, and
Marie. The first five are standing round their teacher's
desk, while she writes their names in a book, which
she keeps for the purpose of entering any particulars
as to the behaviour of her scholars. Francois has done
well in arithmetic, Adele's needlework shows signs of
great care, Loisette has taken first place for history,
Jeannette's writing was the best in the class, and so on.
But Marie, who is sitting on the stool by the side of
the desk, is in disgrace; she has sorely tried her mistress
by her bad conduct. She has been taken out of her
class and is to stay in school until she promises to
amend. You will see she has kicked off her sabot, or
wooden shoe, and now, instead of learning her lessons
and making up for lost time, she has gone to sleep.
Let us hope that she will promise to behave well in
future, and not vex her teacher by her misconduct.













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MARIE IN DISGRACE.;


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40
HILDA'S HIDING-PLACE.
R. ASHWELL was a miller, and owned a
steam flour-mill. By the side of his mill
his house was built, and for convenience
he had had a passage made which led from the
house into the mill. When his children were
at play they made frequent use of this passage to
the mill, especially when the game was hide-and-seek,
for the large mill was full of dark corners, and capital
hiding-places could be found there.
The children had not long been home from school,
when Hilda proposed that they should play at hide-
and-seek. Charlie was to hide. He .soon found
Arthur and Jessie, but could not discover where Hilda
had hidden. Search was made everywhere, but still
Hilda could not be found. Let us go to the engine-
house," said Charlie. When they had peered through
the gloom, they saw poor frightened Hilda crouching
up in the corner, and the great fly-wheel whizzing
round, threatening every moment to tear her from
her retreat and throw her into the pit below. The
wheel was soon stopped, and Mr. Ashwell lifted Hilda
from her hiding-place, feeling very thankful that she
had come to no harm.
Hilda thinking it a good place to hide had crept in,
but no sooner had she done so than the engine, which
drives the wheel, was started working. The miller has
now forbidden his children to use this place for play.


















































































A DANGEROUS HIDING-PLACE.






MR. BRINY'S PIG.


M R. BRINY'S pig was treated as one of his family.
All were very fond of it. It was given to
Mr. Briny when it was a very little piggy, and he
had fed it each day
until it had grown so
fat that it could hardly
waddle. Then trouble
visited Mr. Briny's
house, and although
they were all so fond

of Piggy, yet he had
to be sold to relieve
their distress. So Mr.
Chip was called in, and
he handed to Mr. Briny
a sum of money equal ,
to Piggy's value. All
the members of the Briny family were in tears at the
parting; even the jackdaw was overcome with grief.
When they had embraced Piggy, and bidden him a
final farewell, a cord was attached to one of his






hind legs, and he was led away by his new master,
who was accompanied by his dog Yap, snapping at
the pig's heels. All went well for a little time, but
when they had got some distance from Mr. Briny's
cottage, Yap thought the pig a lazy animal and ought
to move faster, so he caught a little bit of one of its
legs between his teeth.
The pig gave a loud
squeal, turned round
very quickly, snapped
the cord by -which it
was held, darted be-
Stween Mr. Chip's legs,

upsetting him com-
pletely ; and then
started off running as
quickly as it could
towards its old home,
where it arrived, pant-
ing and breathless. Mr. I_-_a__-
Chip arranged for it to stay there that day, but on
the morrow it was carried away in Mr. Chip's cart, and
great care was taken that he did not get loose again.






BRAVE HELPERS.

SHARLES and Kate Horton
lived with their mother, a
Swidow, in a pretty village called
.-.. Combedale. Their father had
not long been dead. He had
been a porter at Combedale
S- Station for some years. He was
crossing the line one day, when
an accident occurred which deprived him of his life,
making his children fatherless and solely dependent
on their mother. Mrs. Horton had no one to whom
she could apply for help, and was sorely puzzled to
know how to earn bread for herself and children.
But after a little time she obtained some employ-
ment at needlework.
Meantime Charles .was trying to think of some
plan whereby he could help his mother. He had
made application for work that might be done after
school-hours, but had met with nothing but dis-
appointment. Then a brilliant idea flashed into his
brain. Why not gather the wild flowers which grew
in such profusion in the adjacent lanes and woods,
make them up into bunches, and offer them for sale
to the passengers in the trains which stop at Combe-
dale Station? The station-master, he knew, would
help him ,as far as he was able.






























































"IT BROUGHT SMILES TO THEIR FACES."






Charles made no mention of this idea to his mother,
but took Kate into his confidence. The result of
their consultation was that the next day, being
Saturday, they made their way into the woods with
baskets on their arms, and gathered enough flowers
to make many button-holes." On their way home
they felt a little tired from their exertions, so sat
down on a stile by the roadside to rest. They had
not sat long when they saw a sight which brought
smiles to their 'faces. Perched up in a tree just
opposite to them was a young squirrel. The pretty
little fellow was full of antics. He peeped down at
the two on-lookers, then ran up to the top of the
tree with lightning rapidity, turning over and over
many times as he went up. The children were greatly
amused, but as dinner-time was drawing near, and
they had yet to make the flowers up into bunches for
sale in the afternoon, they hurried on, leaving Master
Squirrel to his fun.
The afternoon found them at Combedale Station
with many bright bunches of flowers in their baskets,
and when in the evening they counted their gains,
they exceeded their expectations. When they handed
over the proceeds to their mother and told her how
they had earned it, tears came into her eyes; she
could not speak, but kissed them both affectionately.
She felt thankful that she had two such loving and
thoughtful children left to comfort and help her.


Bright Rays.






ROVER, THE JUMPER.

OVER is a magnificent dog. He has a rough
glossy coat and a bushy tail. He has an
intelligent-looking face, and appears to
understand all the children say to him. They
love him very much, and he, doubtless, returns
their affection, for he is never thoroughly happy
away from them.
Rover is a clever jumper. When he was quite
a puppy Harry taught him to jump over a stick,
which was at first placed only a few inches from the
ground, and then higher and higher until one would
thieik Rover could not possibly jump over it. Harry,
however, has only to hold out his stick and say,
"Now, Rover!" when, with a run and a leap,
Rover is over. And he is evidently as pleased to
jump as the children are to see him, for when he
has gone over the stick he capers about, barking
joyously, asking Harry, as plainly as he can speak,
to hold it out again so that he may repeat the
performance.
Rover is also found very useful by his mistress, or
master, when they are out walking. A bag or parcel
is put into his mouth, and he is told to carry
it home, which he does with great carefulness, and
has never been known to lose anything entrusted
to his care.











































































"NOW, ROVER, OVER "








BE PLEASANT.


DEAR children, love each other!
Pray do not vex or tease
Your sister or your brother,
But try their lives to ease.


For what a wealth of pleasure
Bright smiling faces bring,
And with what sweetest music
The pleasant voices ring!


The skies may look so dreary;
The blustering winds may blow;
But if we all are cheery
What sunshine we bestow.








5 R- T ,


"CHILDREN, LOVE EACH OTHER!"


___ __ __ __ 7






.1~



I,






RUPERT'S PET.

UPERT BUXTON'S school-mate, Horace
Andrews, is the very happy possessor of
Small kinds of pets. He has white mice which
he has taught to climb up a ladder, and a tortoise
which follows him round the garden. He has
also some fine, plump rabbits, which are the
admiration of all his young friends. But Horace is
a very kind lad, and looks well after his pets. He can
be seen, early each morning, attending to the rabbits'
house and putting in their food, consisting of fresh
green cabbage leaves.
One morning, on making his usual visit to his:
rabbits, he was surprised to see the sleeping part of
the hutch occupied by four wee bunnies, all huddled
closely to their mother. .Horace almost danced
for joy. He closed the door quickly, so as not to
disturb the young family. Horace told his friend,
Rupert, the good news. Rupert was very pleased, and
begged Horace to give him one of the little rabbits,
and Horace promised to do so if Rupert would also
promise never to neglect it, and to treat it kindly.
As soon as the bunnies were able to leave their
mother's care, Horace picked out a nice white one for
his friend, and sent it to him in a basket. Rupert
took it at once to show his sisters, who thought it a
very pretty pet.



























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RUPERT'S PET.






SUE AND BOB.

UE and Bob are brother and sister; Bob is
the elder of the two, being about a year
older than Sue. These two are constant
companions. Bob never thinks of taking a walk
without his sister; and as for Sue, she declares
that there is no one who knows the common so.
well as Bob, and that at blackberrying time he can
generally find the choicest of the fruit before any one
else.
Bob is also familiar with the names of many of
the wild-flowers which smell so sweetly, and make the
hedge-rows look so bright. He will climb the steepest
bank to get a flower for his sister to add to her posy.
It is on account of his daring that you see him in
the picture leaning so strangely over the table. Bob
has met with an accident. On one of their walks they
were passing through a lane, and on a high bank wild
roses were hanging in glorious profusion. Sue said
she would like a spray, so her champion, Bob, com-
menced to climb the bank and soon had the coveted
spray in his hand. But, as he was coming down, his
foot slipped and he rolled to the bottom. He was not-
much hurt-his nose receiving most of the damage,
being scratched by a thorn. When they reached
home, Sue bathed Bob's nose for him, and doubtless it
will soon be well again.




























































































































SUE AND BOB.


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Will, I am
afraid, also,


was a cruel
boy, for while
on his way
--- n------ 22
to school he --------
threw stones at a poor
bird. And he loitered
about so long, that when
he reached the school-
house he was too late,
and his teacher was vexed


TWO BOYS.

W ILL GRAY could not
be called a good boy.
When his mother roused
him in the morning he
Answered her rudely, and
----- lay in bed for
some time
S after, with a
scowl on his
face, idling
S his time away.






with him, and when school was over gave him
extra lines to write as a punishment.
Tom Burt was quite a
different boy. He trotted
along merrily to school
with his slate under his
arm, and so careful and in-
dustrious was
he, that all his
lessons were ..
praised by the -
teacher. All "
his sums were
done correctly. His Papa was
at home un-
well, and
-'"""--" : Tom hurried
S,-- away from
school so that
he might be in time to
S- carry him his cup of tea.
\_ Which of these two boys
would you like to copy
S --< --Lazy Will or Industrious
Tom?






A MORNING WALK.


HE village of Woodcroft and the country
round about is covered with a mantle of
snow. The air is fresh and crisp, and not too
cold, so Jessie Hartley, wrapped up warmly as
we see her, enjoys her walk. You will notice
that she carries a basket on her arm which con-
tains some sprigs of bright-berried holly; and she is
now on her way across the heath to visit a place
where she knows she can get a good supply of laurel
leaves. Just as she reaches this place the bells of
the old Woodcroft Church ring out a joyous peal,
for it is New Year's Day. Jessie stops to listen,
the bells seem to speak, and she can almost hear
them give forth their message: Peace, good-will to
men.
But she does not linger long, for she has a mission
to perform. The holly and laurel-leaves which she
has been out to gather this morning are to be used
for a good purpose. Jessie and her sister Sybil
have been asked by their Sunday-school teachers
to make a floral motto with which to decorate the
schoolroom on the occasion of the anniversary meet-
ing, and the holly and laurel-leaves are to be used
for the border of the motto. When it is finished
it will be sure to meet with the admiration of
their school-friends.





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MOTHER'S BABY.

7/ Now take off his stock-
ings,
S \ ',And take off his
shoes;
SHow happy he looks,
-.1 How softly he coos.
Undo all the fastenings,
Pull off the long clothes;
There he is, pink and white,
Like a newly-blown rose.
Jump him into the tub
While the pure water flashes; \ .r* /
How he frolics and laughs, /'
How he tumbles and splashes. /
All dimple and curve,
All motion and beauty; ,
It's a great pity, baby,
That dress is a duty.






Take him out of the water;
He mustn't stay long.
Put on his white gown, ,."'I
And sing him a song; (

Then open his crib, ,, i
His own little nest, i
And give him a kiss, '' ''.
From the one he loves best.

What a pretty white bed!
What a darling within it!
His lashes are drooping,
He's off in a minute.

Be careful, don't wake
him,
I'm going away;
S 'Tis the first time I've
S//taken
SA long breath to-day.
R. P. SCOTT.






DICK'S YACHT.

DICK HARRIS is the son of
a fisherman, who braves
--- the perils of the sea to earn
i, his daily bread. The sea as
it appears in the picture is
smooth and pleasant, but when
it is lashed into fury and the
waves are running high, then
it is that the sea is so dangerous to fishermen and
others who toil upon its surface. But with all its
dangers Dick's father loves the sea, and it has also a
great charm for Dick himself, for he spends most of
his spare time on the shore. It is one of his greatest
pleasures to go out, for two or three days at a time,
with his father in the fishing-boat. And Dick has
learnt to be very helpful to his father on these
journeys.
Dick has many times thought how pretty the yachts
with their white sails look as they go out from the
harbour; and one day it occurred to him that he
might make a small one, just after the patterns he
had seen. He knew it would mean many hours of'
labour, but Dick was a hardy and persevering boy. So
he commenced his work. First he bought the wood,
and cut and chipped at it for several days with great
zeal, until the once rough piece of wood assumed the








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DICK'S YACHT.


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correct form. Then the rudder had to be made, and
the mast fixed on. It had also to be painted. But at
last the boat was finished, and very smart it looked,
with its red pennant fluttering from the top of the
mast. Dick was a long time before he fixed upon it,
name, but some time previous he had seen a yacht races
and the winning vessel, which was indeed a beautiful
yacht, was called the Spinaway, so he decided to call
his by the same name.
The eventful day for launching his craft came at
last, and he had asked his friend Polly Wilson to walk
with him to the seashore, to see how his Spinaway
would behave itself on its first trip. Polly was very
glad to accompany him; and when the Spinaway, after
being launched, went sailing gaily along, she clapped
her hands with glee, and thought Dick a very clever
boy to make such a shapely boat.
When Dick. showed his father his boat, and told
him it was all his own work, he was greatly pleased,
and praised him for the neat way in which he had
finished his little vessel.







Bright Rays. E
Bright Rays. E






ELSIE'S PARTY.

S pHE day fixed for Elsie's party
seemed so long in coming that
-- she began to think there were more
,i- than twenty-four hours to each day,.
i I and that the days had doubled them-
S selves since her Mamma arranged the
date for her party. But it came at
last. Her guests were asked to an early tea, so that
it should not be necessary for them to stay out late.
What appetites they brought! The cake disappeared.
as if by magic.
When the tea was cleared from i
the table, Elsie asked her two little
school-mates, Mab and Tiny, to sing
the duet that their mamma had I
been teaching them. They had
brought their music, so were pleased
to do so. Their voices sounded very
sweet as they sang, but Mab was a
little nervous. Max Sach, the son
of Elsie's music-teacher, then played _
a solo on his violin, which was
greatly applauded-so much so, that _./
he had to repeat it. Tom Wood
next suggested a game at snap-
apple." An apple was tied to a











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string which was suspended from
a bracket; the string was swung
gently to and fro. Each one in
turn tried to bite a piece from
the swinging apple, and if they
missed, it would rebound quickly,
and strike them if they were not
on the alert. When the biter
missed the apple, peals of laughter
greeted him. But meantime, half


of the party had .
gone to the kitchen ;I ;
and were playing ,
"Blind Man's Buff." J "
Will Martin was '. '
"blind man." Sam
Wilson was in such i
a hurry to get out ---- ---
-I_ *l'.l,-i of his way that he fell on
-" his back, and would have been
caught had he not rolled over
S.-and over.
These young folks finished the
: ;'".=-1* ',< ,' ,.
Si'. .. evenings fun with a game at
:, "Oranges and Lemons," in which
''/^ V I~i all joined. Then the party broke
: I' I up, all agreeing that they had
Spent a most enjoyable time.
... I, al" *-'- 5T *l -.'






THE HOLIDAY AT SALTBURN.

t" +iIOOD-BYE, good-bye: take care of pussy!"
The guard of the train blew his whistle,
shut the door with a loud bang, and the
train moved out of the station, and was soon
S racing through the country on its way to
London, bringing our young friends, Walter,
Jennie, and Edgar, back to school and work
again.
The last fortnight had been a very happy one for
them. Their cousins at Saltburn, with whom they
had been staying, had made their holiday most
enjoyable. Each day brought a fresh amusement.
Town-bred Edgar was never tired of watching the
wonderful things in the rock-pools, and when his
cousin Ralph told him that the beautifully-coloured
jelly-looking mass which he saw in the pool was really
alive, he opened his eyes wide with surprise. Oh, it
was a grand change for these little folks! but, like
all holidays, it had come to an end, and they were
now on their way home.
Walter's cousin Eva has given him a little kitten
to remember her by, and Walter will be sure to
care for it for the sake of his kind cousin. The
gentleman sitting opposite appears highly amused
at the efforts of the kitten to get out of the
basket.
















''II






If i
"Il









g ~ ~ 1 i.' // 'r







I If II
-4..


"THEY WERE NOW ON THEIR WAY HOME."






THE YOUNG HOUSEKEEPER.

$RS. THOMPSON had been ailing for some
days, so it was no surprise to Mrs. Hawkins,
her neighbour, when she learned one morn-
ing that the poor woman was too ill to rise
from her bed. As soon as she had attended to
her own household duties, Mrs. Hawkins stepped
in to see how the invalid was, and found her in great
trouble because she knew of no one who could cook
her husband's breakfast and wash and dress little
Freddy. Mrs. Hawkins would have liked to have
undertaken this work herself, but she had her own
family to attend to and could not possibly do it.
The same evening she was telling her husband of
Mrs. Thompson's difficulty, when her daughter Molly
asked eagerly if she might be allowed to help. She
felt sure she could do the work, and she pleaded
so hard that Mrs. Hawkins finally consented to let
her try. So Molly commenced her duties next
morning. She quickly had the fire alight and the
breakfast ready, and her able hands soon made the
room look tidy. Each day she cheerfully went
through her self-imposed tasks until Mrs. Thompson
got well again. Then she complimented Molly for
the clever way in which she had managed the house-
hold duties, and presented her with a nice book in
return for her kindness.














































I~ 'I K









-~~- --~-I
II


j;p





,,,... o ?


















"SHE QUICKLY HAD THE FIRE ALIGHT."






















CHILDREN'S


faces


smiling gay,


Happy all the livelong day;


May "Bright Rays"


them shine-


Love their sweet young


upon

lives
lives


entwine.









S. W. Pari dlge o.'s List of lew lBooiks


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David Livingstone: His Labours and His Legacy. By ARTHi MONTEPIOR, F.G.8., F.R.G.S., Author
of H. M. Stanley, the African EBplorer."
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John Williams, the Martyr Missionary of Polynesia. By Rev. JAMES J. ELLIS.
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Samuel Crowther, the Slave Boy who beoanie Bishop of the Niger. By JESSE PAGE, Author of "Bishop
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