The Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program (CRSP)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080683/00002
 Material Information
Title: The Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program (CRSP) an international community of persons, institutions, agencies and governments committed to collectively strengthening both health and nutrition in developing countries by improving the availability and utilization of beans and cowpeas
Physical Description: 1 folded sheet (9 p.) : ill. ; 46 x 30 cm. folded to 23 x 10 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bean/Cowpea Collaborative Research Support Program
Publisher: Bean/Cowpea CRSP, Michigan State University,
Bean/Cowpea CRSP, Michigan State University
Place of Publication: East Lansing, Mich
Publication Date: 1988?
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Beans -- Research -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Cowpea -- Research -- Developing countries   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Bean/Cowpea CRSP.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 173257068
Classification: lcc - SB327 .B425 1988
System ID: UF00080683:00002

Full Text






THE BEAN/COWPEA

COLLABORATIVE

RESEARCH SUPPORT

PROGRAM

(CRSP)


An international community of persons, institutions,
agencies and governments committed to collectively
strengthening health and nutrition in developing coun-
tries by improving the availability and utilization of
beans and cowpeas.


Bean/Cowpea CRSP
200 Center for International Programs
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan 48824
U.S.A.
Telephone: (517) 355-4693
Telex: 810-251-0737
MSU INT PRO ELSG







THE BEAN/COWPEA CRSP
Michigan State University

The Bean/Cowpea CRSP is a coordinated effort
addressing hunger and malnutrition in Africa and Latin
America through research on the production and utili-
zation of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and cowpeas
(Vigna unguiculata).
Beans and cowpeas are dietary staples in the countries
associated with this CRSP. Among the poor, these
legumes provide the major source of high quality,
affordable protein, as well as an important source of B
vitamins. Beans and cowpeas generally are grown as
food for household consumption, rather than as export
crops. They are typically grown on subsistence farms
and, in some countries, are grown solely by women on
whose shoulders fall the major responsibility for pro-
viding the food for family consumption.
Based on a global plan developed in concert with
Host Country colleagues, the CRSP is made up of a
series of discrete but integrated international research
projects involving teams of scientists collaborating in a
study of designated facets of the overall plan. Eighteen
research projects, each led by a principal investigator
from one of the 9 lead US research institutions, were
selected from over 80 proposals initially received.
These vigorous international research partnerships
directly involve research institutions in 13 Host Coun-
tries, 2 International Centers and 14 US agricultural
research institutions, which include the 9 having lead
roles in the CRSP.
To attack the complex factors underlying the limited
availability of beans and cowpeas, the CRSP has
directed its resources to:
* Supporting close collaboration between Host
Country and US colleagues within the individual pro-
jects throughout the entire process.
* Including in each project training components at
the graduate level for Host Country nationals.
* Monitoring project impacts on women and their
families, emphasizing each project's contributions to
women's roles in the fight against hunger and malnutri-
tion.
* Emphasizing multidisciplinary research, especially
integrating with the production components such non-
production components as the health, nutritional and
socio-economic aspects of the farming systems.
* Requiring the expenditure of a minimum of one-
half of each project's allocated funds in or directly on
behalf of the project's Host Country.


* Emphasizing maximum use of research sites in
traditional settings, including field trials on small farms.
* Identifying mechanisms for the subsequent distri-
bution of research findings in ways which will benefit
families in all bean/cowpea consuming countries.
This CRSP will make important contributions to the
resolution of difficult and persistent problems
associated with bean and cowpea production and
utilization. Additionally, there will emerge from this
CRSP a heterogeneous cadre of professional research
colleagues who are comfortable and confident with one
another and can address long-term troublesome con-
straints to adequate food and nutrition in poverty
regions of the world.


BEAN/COWPEA CONSTRAINTS


The Bean/Cowpea CRSP is based on a comprehen-
sive global plan which includes agronomic, socio-
economic and farming systems components in problem
identification and project implementation. The research
projects, which emphasize problems of subsistence
farmers in their traditional settings, focus on the follow-
ing constraints:
* crop performance limitations due to pests/diseases
* crop performance limitations due to the physical
environment
* inherent plant response limitations
* farming practices limitations
* storage problems
* economics of production and consumption
* nutrition/food preparation/health factors
* socio-cultural factors
* limitations of education, training and research capa-
bility

Each project research team concentrates on a par-
ticular area or areas of research drawn from the global
plan. A research team includes a principal investigator
from one of the 9 lead US institutions who is linked with
a collaborating principal investigator from a Host
Country institution. Frequently, additional US and
Host Country institutions and their designated re-
searchers are also involved.
Basic attention to farm family goals and farm family
structures, as well as the rural culture of subsistence


farmers, is crucial to the ultimate usefulness and accept-
ance of the research findings of these projects. The con-
straints, therefore, are addressed with a serious concern
for appropriateness and relevance and with a sensitivity
to the implications of applying the findings among
women, who have an important role as producers, pro-
cessors and consumers of beans and cowpeas.

THE BEAN/COWPEA CRSP
ORGANIZATION


The Bean/Cowpea CRSP operates on resources from
the United States Agency for International Develop-
ment (USAID) and the participating research institu-
tions. It is guided by the Board of International Food
and Agricultural Development (BIFAD). Four admini-
strative components are involved:

The Management Entity - Michigan State University
(MSU) was designated the management entity upon the
recommendation of the 9 lead institutions participating
in the program. MSU has created a CRSP Management
Office consisting of a director, deputy director, women-
in-development specialist and administrative officer,
plus office support staff.

The Board of Directors - Elected by and from the in-
stitutional representatives, who are designated by their
respective institutions' presidents, the Board of Direc-
tors serves as the policy-making component of the
CRSP. The five person Board is typically made up of
administrators of international programs who hold their
positions, on the Board for two-year terms. The Board
has provided for a sixth, non-US member.

The Technical Committee - Elected by the Board of
Directors, the Technical Committee consists of five
members from US institutions engaged in CRSP projects
plus two international members, one from an interna-
tional research center and one from a Host Country col-
laborating institution. Members are appointed for two-
year terms. They advise the CRSP in areas of research
technology, project management and technical review.

The External Review Panel - With recommendations
from the CRSP, persons with international research and
program management expertise are appointed by
AID/BIFAD to review and evaluate CRSP management
and research progress.






BEAN/COWPEA CRSP RESEARCH PROJECTS

HOST COUNTRY
Research Institution Lead US Institution
Collaborating Institution(s)

BOTSWANA
Ministry of Agriculture Colorado State University
'Development of Integrated Cowpea Production Systems in
Semi-Arid Botswana"


BRAZIL
Empressa Brasileira de
Pesquisa Agropecuria
(EMBRAPA)


University of Wisconsin


"Identification of Superior Bean-rhizobia Combinations and
Utilization in Cropping Systems Suitable for Small Farms in
Brazil."
BRAZIL
EMBRAPA University of Wisconsin
Improved Techniques for Development of Multiple Disease
Resistance in Phaseolus vulgaris L."
BRAZIL
EMBRAPA Boyce Thompson Institute
"Insect Pathogens in Cowpea Pest Management Systems for
Developing Nations."
CAMEROON
L'Institut de Recherche University of Georgia
Agronomique Boyce Thompson Institute
au Cameroun
"Pest Management Strategies for Optimizing Cowpea Yields in
Cameroon.".
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Secretaria de Estado de University of Nebraska
Agriculture
"Biology, Epidemiology, Genetics & Breeding for Resistance to
Bacterial & Rust Pathogens of Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L)."
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Secretaria de Estado de University of Puerto Rico
Agriculture Mayaguez Institute of
Tropical Agriculture (MITA)
"Improvement of Bean Production in the Dominican Republic."


ECUADOR
Institute Nacional de
Investigaciones Agropecurias


Cornell University


GUATEMALA
Institute de Ciencia y Cornell University
Technologia Agricolas
"Agronomic, Sociological and Genetic Aspects of Bean Yield
and Adaptation."
HONDURAS
Escuela Agricola Panamericana University of
Puerto Rico
"Increase and Stabilization of Honduran Bean Production
through disease resistance."


INCAP
Institute of Nutrition Washington State University
of Central America Colorado State University
and Panama Kansas State University
Michigan State University
University of Puerto Rico
USDA
"Improved Biological Utilization and Availability of Dry Beans."

KENYA
University of Nairobi, University of
Kabete California-Davis
University of California-Riverside
"Improvement of Drought and Heat Tolerance of Disease
Resistant Beans in Semi-arid Regions of Kenya."

MALAWI
Bunda College of Michigan State University
Agriculture Virginia State University
"An Analysis of Genetic, Agro-Ecologic and Socio-Cultural
Factors Which Account for Persistent Patterns of Bean Land-
Race Diversity in Malawi."

MEXICO
Institute Nacional De Michigan State University
Investigaciones Agricolas
(INIA)
"'Improving Resistance to Environmental Stress in Beans through
Genetic Selection for Carbohydrate Partition and Efficiency of
Biological Nitrogen Fixation."

NIGERIA
Ibadan University Michigan State University
University of Jos
"'Medical Problems Associated with Feeding Cowpeas to
Children. "

NIGERIA
University of Nigeria, University of Georgia
Nsukka
"Appropriate Technology for Cowpea Preservation and Pro-
cessing and a Stuidy of its Socioeconomic Impact on Rural
Populations in Nigeria.'

SENEGAL
Institute Senegalais University of
de Recherches Agricoles California-Riverside
University of Arizona
University of California-Davis
"A Program to Develop Improved Cowpea Cultivars for Pro-
duction and Utilization in Semi-arid Zones."

TANZANIA
University of Washington State University
Dar es Salaam, Morogoro University of Illinois
"Breeding Beans for Disease and Insect Resistance and Deter-
mination of Economic Impact on Subsistence Farm Families."






THE BEAN/COWPEA
COLLABORATIVE RESEP F C, H
SUPPORT PROGRAM


MANAGEMENT ENTITY
Michigan State University


SAID PROGRAM C.- , ER
Dr. B. L. Pollack
Bureau of Science and Technology

MANAGE' iNT ( > . -


Director
Deputy Director
Women in Development
Specialist
Administrative Officer
Executive Secretary
Secretary/Receptionist


Dr. P. W. Barnes-McConnell
Dr. Ardeshir Ghaderi
Ms. Anne Ferguson

Mr. John Niles
Ms. Sue Bengry
Ms. Irma Gutierrez


BEAN/COWPEA CRSP
BOARD OF DIRE( r
(1983-84)

Dr. Landis L. Boyd, Chairperson
Director, Agricultural Research Center
Washington State University, Pullman


Dr. Charles Laughlin,
Secretary
Associate Director of
the Agricultural
Experiment Stations
Resident Director of
Georgia Station
University of Georgia

Dr. Roger Uhlinger, Head
Department of Horticulture
University of Nebraska
Lincoln


Ing. Miguel Gonzalez-Roman
Associate Dean
Sub-Director of
Experiment Station
College of Agricultural
Sciences
University of Puerto Rico


Dr. Dale Harpstead
Chair, Department of
Crop and Soil Sciences
Michigan State University






BEAN/COWPEA CRSP
TECHNICAL COMMITTEE
(1983-84)

Dr. Matt Silbernagel, Chairperson
USDA/SEA/AR
Irrigated Agricultural Research and Extension Center
Washington State University, Prosser


Ms. Kay McWatters,
Secretary
Department of Food Science
University of Georgia

Dr. Ricardo Bressani, Chief
Division of Agriculture and
Food Science
INCAP, Guatemala

Dr. A. E. Hall
Department of Botany and
Plant Science
University of California,
Riverside


Dr. George Hosfield
Department of Crop and
Soil Sciences
Michigan State University

Dr. Donald Roberts
Insect Pathology
Resource Center
Boyce Thompson Institute

Dr. Shiv R. Singh
Assistant Director and
Group Leader
Grain Legume Improvements
Program
IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria


BEAN/COWPEA CRSP
EXTERNAL REVIEW PANEL


Dr. Clarence C. Gray, III, Chairperson
Professor, International Extension
and International Studies
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University


Dr. Melvin Blase
Agricultural Economics
Department
University of Missouri

Dr. Hugh Bunting
Agricultural Development
Overseas
University of Reading,
England

Dr. Luis H. Camacho
INTSOY Plant Breeder
CIAT, Cali, Colombia

Date publication last prepared: 2/84


Dr. Peter E. Hildebrand
Food and Resource
Economics Department
University of Florida

Dr. Antonio M. Pinchinat
Tropical Agricultural
Research and
Development Specialist
IICA, Lima, Peru

Dr. Charlotte E. Roderuck
Director, World Food
Institute
Iowa State University




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