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 Recommendations of the Commissioner-General...
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Title: Annual report of the Commissioner-General of Immigration to the Secretary of the Treasury for the fiscal year ended ..
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080539/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual report of the Commissioner-General of Immigration to the Secretary of the Treasury for the fiscal year ended ..
Physical Description: 10 v. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: United States -- Bureau of Immigration
Publisher: U.S.G.P.O.,
U.S.G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Washington D.C
Publication Date: 1901-1902
Copyright Date: 1895
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Naturalization -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Emigration and immigration -- Periodicals -- United States   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1894/1895-1904/1905
Numbering Peculiarities: Report year ends June 30.
General Note: At head of title, 1895-1898: Immigration Service.
General Note: Title varies slightly.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080539
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEQ6809
oclc - 09663755
alephbibnum - 000944992
lccn - sn 85018270
 Related Items
Preceded by: Annual report of the Superintendent of Immigration to the Secretary of the Treasury for the fiscal year ended ...
Succeeded by: Annual report of the Chief of the Division of Naturalization to the Commissioner-General of Immigration
Succeeded by: Annual report of the Commissioner-General of Immigration to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor for the fiscal year ended

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
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    Recommendations of the Commissioner-General of Immigration to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor
        Page 117
        Page 118
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    Back Cover
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Full Text




















I iJ 1


A-


UNITED STATES IMMIGRATION STATION, ELLIS ISLAND, NEW YORK HARBOR.







ANNUAL REPORT




OF THE





COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION




FOR THE


FISCAL YEAR ENDED JTUNE 30,1903.














WASHINGTON:
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.
1903.












05.\
















TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
Document No. 2330.
Commissioner- General of Immigration.















ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE

COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


TREASURY DEPARTMENT,
BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION,
Washington, D. C., June 30, 1903.
SIR: Although by the terms of an act to establish the Department of
Commerce and Labor, approved February 14, 1903, the Immigration
Service was transferred to said Department, such transfer did not take
effect until the beginning of the fiscal year 1904, and I accordingly
present for your consideration the following report of the operations
of the Bureau for the year ending June 30, 1903.
For reasons that will appear in the appropriate place in this report,
there have been incorporated into it the reports to the Bureau of cer-
tain officers having charge of the administration of the immigration
laws at ports whose needs or operations call for special mention; but
it is not intended thereby to give the impression that the officers at
other ports or places have been any less efficient, or that the duties
performed by them, or the accessories required by them in such per-
formance, are any less indispensable to the success of this branch of
the Executive Department. As will be shown hereinafter, there is no
part or detail of the immigration service which can with impunity be
neglected. Its power to accomplish the purpose for which it was
organized may, perhaps, best be measured by the work accomplished
at its weakest point.
The usual tabulated statements are given below, with appropriate
headings indicating the nature of the information shown by the tables,
respectively, over which they are placed. In some instances, for the
purpose of making it possible to institute a comparison with the figures
for the corresponding periods of other years, the latter are given in
parallel columns.
TABLE I.-REPORT OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY PORTS, DUR-
ING THE FISCAL YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1902 AND 1903.

1902. 1903.
Ports.
Males. Females. Total. Males. Females. Total.
New York, N.Y.......................... 355,414 137,848 493,262 451,404 180,481 631,885
Boston, Mass ............................ 24,295 15,170 39,465 39,598 23, 240 62,838
Philadelphia, Pa......................... 11,360 5,815 17,175 19,676 8 084 27,760
Baltimore, Md ......................... 32,193 7,486 39, 679 44, 328 11 474 55,802
San Francisco, Cal ....................... 4,389 882 5,271 6,097 1,159 7,256
San Juan, P.R ........................... 568 224 792 1,481 639 2,120
Key West, Fla ......................... 2,938 1,131 4,069 3,112 1,442 4,554
New Orleans, La......................... 3,158 1,253 4,411 3,755 1, 338 5,093
Galveston,Tex.... ........................ 610 481 1,091 1,268 862 2,130

638035









4 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


TABLE I.-REPIORT OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, ETc.-Cont'd.


Port Townsend, Wash ...................
Portland, Me............................
Honolulu, H.I ...........................
Portland, Oreg .......................
New Bedford, Mass ......................
Providence,R.I ........................
Miami and Tampa, Fl ------.............
Newport News, Va.....................
New London, Conn......................
Bangor,Me ..........................
Gloucester, Mass.........................
Shieldsboro, Miss ......................
Fernandina, Fla.........................
Wilmington, Del........................
Jacksonville, Fla ........................
Beaufort, S.C ...........................

Total, United States................

Through Canada via:
Quebec, Point Levis, St. John, and
Halifax.......... ............
Vancouver and Victoria............

Total, Canada....................
Grand total........................


1902.

Males. Females.

2,145 86
1,001 633
6,139 3,731
76 2
266 60
38 19
69 13
5 2
30 14







444,694 174,850


19,010 7,399
2,665 125
21,675 7,524

466,369 182,374


Total. Males.

2,231 2,587
1,634 38
9,870 10,835
78 378
326 2,133
57 193
82 121
7 8
44 ..........
.......... 1
.......... 1
.......... 4
.......... 7
.......... 1
.......... 10
.......... 1

619, ,M4 587,037


26,409 23,346
2,790 2,763

29,199 26,109

648,743 613,146


1903.

Females. Total.

210 2,797
31 69
3,715 14, 550
35 413
1,206 3,339
78 271
87 208
1 9

.......... 1
2 3
.......... 4
.......... 7
.......... 1
5 15
.......... 1

234,089 821,126


9,597 32,943
214 2,977

9,811 35,920

243,900 857,046


From the foregoing table it appears that the total steerage immigra-
tion for the year was composed of 857,046 souls, an excess over that of
last year of 208,303, or 32 per cent. Of these there arrived at-

United States continental ports...----......---------................---.. 804,456
United States insular ports:
Hawaiian.......-............---. ..--.... ....----........... 14,550
Porto Rican....---..--.......------............................ 2,120
16,670
Canadian ports -........ ............ ....-.......-..-.......... ......... 35,920

Total----....................------ .- --... ..... .............. . ---857,046

The above noted increase was made up of additional arrivals at con-
tinental ports of this country of 195,574, at insular ports of 6,008, and
at ports of Canada of 6,721. Apart from the general increase of immi-
gration the most noticeable feature of the above table is the increase
at New Bedford, Mass., from 326 to 3,339, and the decrease at Port-
land, Me., from 1,634 to 69.

TABLE II.-COMPARATIVE STATEMENT SHOWING THE NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED
IN THE UNITED STATES, BY COUNTRIES, DURING THE FISCAL YEARS ENDED JUNE 30,
1902 AND 1903, RESPECTIVELY, SHOWING INCREASE AND DECREASE FOR EACH
COUNTRY.


Country.


Austria-Hungary .... ...................................
Belgium ....... .............. .................
Denmark -.............-. ................. .......:
France, including Corsica....................................
German Empire ............................................
Greece............................... .................
Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia.........................
Netherlands ...............................................
Norway ......................................................
Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore Islands ..........
Roumania ..................................................
Russian Empire and Finland.................................
Servia, Bulgaria, and Montenegro...........................
Spain, including Canary and Balearic Islands ..............
Sweden.....................................................


Decrease.


1902.


171,989
2,577
5,660
3,117
28,304
8,104
178,375
2,284
17,484
5,307
7,196
107, 347
851
975
30,894


1903.


206,011
3,450
7,158
5,578
40,086
14,090
230, 622
3,998
24,461
9, 317
9,310
136,093
1,761
2,080
46,028


Increase.


34,022
873
1,498
2,461
11,782
5,986
52,247
1,714
6,977
4,010
2,114
28,746
910
1,105
15,134







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 5

TABLE II.-COMPARATIVE STATEMENT SHOWING THE NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED
IN THE UNITED STATES, ETc.-Continued.

Country. 1902. 1903. Increase Decrease.

Switzerland .................................................. 2,344 3,98 1,639 ..........
Turkey in Europe ............................................ 187 1,529 1,342 .........
England ........................................-............ 13,575 26,219 12,644 ......
Ireland------------------------29, 138 35, 310 "6,1]72 .
Ireland ....................................................... 29,138 35,310 6,172 ..........
Scotland...................................................... --------------------------------------------2,560 6,143 3,583 ..........
W ales......................................................... 763 1,275 512 .....
Europe, not specified ......................................... 37 5 .......... 32
Total Europe........................... ............ 619,068 814,507 195,439 ..........
China......................................................... 1,649 2,209 560 ....
Japan......................................................... 14,270 19,968 5,698 ..
India......................................................... 93 94 1 .
Turkey in Asia................................................ 6,223 7,118 895 ....
Other Asia.................................................... 36 577 541 ...-----
Total Asia................................----...... 22,271 29, 966 7,695 .........
Africa......................................................... 37 176 139 .
Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand....------- ....--..... 384 1,150 766 ..--
Philippine Islands............- ...........-.................. 126 132 6 ......
Pacific islands, not specified.................................. 56 67 11 .
British North America........................................ 636 1,058 422 ..
British Honduras.................. ....................... 51 81 30 ......
Other Central America ....................................... 254 597 343 .. ..
Mexico........................................................ 709 528 .......... 181
South America................................................ 337 589 252 ..........
West Indies....................................... ....... 4,711 8,170 3,459 ..........
All other countries............................................ 103 25 .......... 78
Total.............. ................................... 648,748 857,046 208,303 ...
Other alien passengers..................................... 82,055 64,269 .......... 17,786
Total alien passengers.................................. 730,798 921,315 190,517 ..........

This table shows increase in immigration from all foreign sources,
suggesting as the chief cause of the influx of aliens into the United
States during the year the inducements offered to settlers here rather
than any specially localized causes of discontent in their own countries.
Of the total steerage immigration, there came from Europe 814,507,
from Asia 29,966, and from all other sources 12,573. If to these fig-
ures are added those representing the total arrivals of alien cabin
passengers (64,269), the result will show that, irrespective of those
coming from Canada and Mexico, either as residents or citizens of
those countries, of whom no record is kept, the total immigration of
aliens to the United States during the year aggregated 921,315, or
105,043 more than the greatest number heretofore reported for any
one year.
The following statement, made from the data in Table II, is inter-
esting as showing the countries, in groups, from which the steerage
immigrants came during the year under consideration and the next
preceding year:

Countries of northern and western Europe. 1902. 1903. Increase.

German Empire......................................................... 28,304 40, 086 11,782
Switzerland ...............................................---....... 2,344 3,983 1,639
France ................................................................. 3,117 5,578 2,461
Belgium ............................................................... 2,577 3,450 873
Netherlands............................................................. 2,284 3,998 1,714
Denmark............................................................... 5,660 7158 1,498
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.......................... 46,036 68,947 22,911
Norway.................................................................. 17,484 24,461 6,977
Sweden...................................... .................... 30,894 46,028 15,134
Total................................. ........................ 138,700 203,689 64,989

Ratio of increase, 47 per cent.







6 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


Countries of eastern and southern Europe. 1902. 1903. Increase.

Austria-Hungary....................................................... 171,989 206,011 34,022
Italy ................... ........................:................ ::178,375 230,622 52,247
Greece .................................................................. 8,104 14,090 5,986
Roumania............................................................... 7,196 9,310 2,114
Russian Empire and Finland........................................... 107,347 136,093 28,746
Spain-................................... ............................. 975 2,080 1,105
Portugal................................................................. 5,307 9,317 4,010
Servia, Bulgaria, and Montenegro .................................. 851 1,761 910
Turkey .................................................................. 187 1,529 1,342
Total .............................................................. 480,331 610,813 130,482

Ratio of increase, 27 per cent.

While some encouragement may be gained from consideration of the
foregoing tabulated statements showing that the ratio of increase in
immigration from northern Europe was greatly in excess of that of
the increase from southern Europe, yet the fact remains that the great
bulk of aliens added to our population during the year just passed
came from Austria-Hungary, Italy, and Russia, those three countries
alone sending 572,726 of the total number of steerage aliens-more
than two-thirds.













ii


THE CHAMBERLAIN, FOR USE OF BOARDING OFFICERS. ELLIS ISLAND STATION.







TABLE III.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AND DEBARRED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA, FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.


Race or people.








African (black) .....
Armenian...........
Bohemian and Mo-
ravian ............
Bulgarian, Servian,
Montenegrin ......
Chinese .............
Croatian and Slove-
nian ...............
Cuban...............
Dalmatian, Bosnian,
Herzegovinian ....
Dutch and Flemish..
East Indian .........
English ............
Filipino ............
Finnish .............
French.............
German .............
Greek ...............
Hebrew .............
Irish.................
Italian (north)......
Italian (south) ......
Japanese ............
Korean..............
Lithuanian..........
Magyar..............
Mexican ............
Pacific Islanders....
Polish ...............
Portuguese ..........


i
c5



1,549 625
1,424 335

5,820 3,771

6,315 164
2,152 40

29,222 3,685
1,945 999

1,544 192
4,312 2,184
70 13
17,229 11,222
125 8
12,755 6,109
4,450 2,716
44,663 27,119
13,885 491
43,985 32,218
16,112 19,254
30,477 6,952
158,939 37,178
15,990 4,051
496 68
10,721 3,711
20,440 6,684
324 162
46 6
58,992 23,351
4,999 3,434


2,174 242 1,811
1,759 150 1,557

9,591 1,856 7,224

6,479 74 6,165
2,192 32 2,055

32,907 1,111 30,457
2,944 610 1,987

1,736 33 1,625
6,496 1,602 4,404
83 5 75
28,451 4,270 20,649
133 16 115
18,864 1,807 16,540
7,166 938 5,554
71,782 13,377 53,992
14,376 1,185 12,951
76,203 19,044 53,074
35,366 1,843 32,037
37,429 3,404 32,606
196,117 21,619 164,661
20,041 515 19,344
564 43 520
14,432 1,137 13,078
27,124 2,141 23,721
486 67 384
52 3 46
82,343 7,761 72, 629
8,433 2,072 5, 665


I I


Arrived.

Illiteracy, Immigrants
14 years bringing--
and ver. bringing











121 23 604 275 1,834
52 2 442 217 1,079

511 4 119 1,306 5,000

240 1 2,859 283 5,586
105...... 280 1511,614

1,339 75 11,104 2,554 27,318
347 10 87 596 2,139

78 1 405 280 1;024
490 8 326 1,617 2,134
3...... 18 34 7
3,532 60 340 13,856 5,871
2 1 24 41 42
517 191 187 2,515 13,551
674 10 238 3,141 1,720
4,413 138 2,438 16,331 30,861
240 5 3,653 1,814 10,860
4,085 161 14,980 4,648 29,029
S1 1,173 6204 23,21
1,419 39 4,283 10,526 19,020
9,837 71 84,512 11,208135,195
182..... 5,274 18,748 1,048
1 ...... 199 521 48
217 712 5,487 653 9,972
1,262 55 2,564 1,505 20,962
35...... 58 230 80
3....... 3 17 28
1, 953 1, 12 22,634 3,305 60, 558
696 12 4,645 695 5,625


2

a.


a


3a U









$23, 749 783
30,7791 74

217,439 279

71,749 82
58,322 2,122

407,117 1,869
98,268 1,900

26,056 112
197,543 573
3,130 15
1,405,365 8,065
7,643 21
332,742 1,356
355,623 1,329
2,480,634 5,590
269,912 451
738,866 1,269
796,082 7,233
859,624 4,452
2,159,017 12,619
1,026,108 1,365
22,172 13
180,515 331
841,401 1,688
21,000 177
2,837 7
785,541 2,743
113,072 877


o 0 p a0 0
o a o o a


.... ...... 39 7 1 ....
.... ...... 831 26...... ....

.... ..... 27 3...... ....

.... ...... 50 5...... ....


.... ...... ...................
.... ...... 5 ...... ...... ....

.... ...... ..... ...... ....

.... ...... ...... ... ...... ....
1 18 4 ..........

.... ...... ...... .... ...... ....
.... .....'. 22 79 ..........
.... ...... 4 1 ...... ....
1 349 131...... ....
.......... 474 29...... ....
1 1 706 252..........
5 75 14 1 ....
.... ...... 160 9 3 ....
8 2,164 147 46....
.... ...... 109 538...... I
.......... 15 15...
.......... 34 69 ...... ....
.......... 170 16 ...... ....
.......... 4 ...... ... ....
.... ..... 1 .
.... 1 269 201 ...... ....
.... ...... 90 3 ... ....


.........





1....






. 2 ....










TABLE III.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AND DEBARRED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA, ETc.-Continued.


Race or people.


Roumanian .........
Russian .............
Ruthenian (Russ-
niak).
Scandinavian .......
Scotch...............
Slovak ..............
Spanish.............
Spanish-American ..
Syrian...............
Turkish ...........
Welsh...............
West Indian.........
All other peoples....

Total ..........


I




268 4,740
7111 3,608
2.148 9,843

28,075 79,347
2,224 6,219
10,033 34,427
559 3,297
287 978
1,802 5,551
25 449
442 1,278
554 1,497
30 89

243,900857,046


------~i


Arrived.


78 4,408
407 3,069
467 9,084

8,396 67,518
960 4,600
3,300 30,042
282 2,722
150 735
952 4,379
8 434
253 895
202 1,175
19 66

102,431714,053
102, 4311714, 053


Arrived


Illiteracy
14 years
and over.



c 0






4 997
15 1,009
39 4,595

152 264
10 52
102 6,632
7 266
...... 208
3 2,468
...... 134
5 34
2 67
...... 51

3,341185,667


128,266 511,30216,117,513 76,702 1 23


----~----;-------;----


Immigrants '
bringing- 2



'0







114 4,182 $49,267 111
437 2,277 90,429 12c
254 8,247 92,462 79c

14,641 47,586 1,630,859 8,81,
2,940 1413 273,129 1, 36
1,84926903 413,237 4,88(
1,529 1,372 165,414 1, 49
716 182 122,893 3711
1,025 2,531 156,792 45(
109 246 13,986 8~
547 286 64,180 294
805 515 60,074 52'
29 36 2,485 3(


Debarred.











79 9 .....






65 24 ......
16 ...... ... ..
151 42 ...... .
27 1 ...... ..
8 1......



195 56
S 4 ...... ..
27 1 .........
1...... .


195



4 ...... ...... .
50 17 ..
45 4.


5,812 1 -


!


-1' ......I


8 9
5 2
3 2

11 28
2 3
43 15
19.



17 2


1,086 547


1, 13






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 9

An inspection of Table III will show that of the total of 857,046
steerage aliens 613,146 were males and 243,900 were females, of whom
102,431 were less than 14 years of age, 714,053 ranged from 14 to 45,
and 40,562 were 45 years old and over. There were of these 3,341
who could read but not write and 185,667 who could neither read nor
write, leaving a balance able both to read and write of 668,038. It
also appears that 76,702 of these steerage aliens had been in the United
States before; that 128,266 of them brought each $30 in money or
more; that 511,302 had each less than $30, and that the total amount
of money shown by them to the officers was $16,117,513.
As showing the comparative thrift of the races, attention is directed
to the fact that the 71,782 Germans brought $2,480,634, while the
196,117 South Italians had but $2,159,017; that the 28,451 English
brought $1,405,365, while about the same number of Magyars, 27,124,
showed only $341,401, and the 32,907 Croatians and Slovenians but
$407,117.
Exclusive of those denied admission at the land boundaries of the
United States there were rejected altogether 8,769, the causes of which
are shown, with the corresponding figures for last year, in the subjoined
statement:

Rejected aliens. 1902. 1903.

Idiots ................................ ................................................. 7 1
Insane persons.............. ........................................................ 27 23
Paupers..........................................................- ..................... 3,944 5,812
Diseased persons...........-........................................................... 709 1,773
Convicts ...................................................................... ........ 9 51
Polygam ists.............................. .......................................... .... 0 1
Women for immoral purposes............ .........-------- .... ....................----------- ... 3 13
Assisted aliens--......------------ .............-................ ................... 0 9
Contract laborers .............. ...................................................... 275 1,086
Total .................................................. .............. 4,974 8,769

The most noteworthy features in this statement are those in relation
to the rejections of alien contract laborers and persons suffering with
dangerous contagious diseases. With respect to the former, it may
fairly be assumed that the extra vigilance of the officers charged with
the enforcement of the law has resulted in the detection and exclusion
of the large number given, 1,086, which is in excess of the number
excluded during any previous fiscal year since the establishment of the
Bureau.
As regards the rejection of diseased aliens, I must reiterate the state-
ment made in the last annual report that it exhibits upon the part of
some of the transportation lines such a wanton disregard of the laws
of the country as fully vindicates the wisdom of Congress in author-
izing, by the act approved March 3, 1903, the imposition of a penalty
for bringing diseased aliens to this country in those cases in which
the existence of the disease was perceptible at the time of foreign
embarkation.
Doubtless there are cases in which the transportation lines should
not be punished, cases in which the disease may not be observable even
after careful inspection by a competent physician. It is needless to
say that in such instances, the power to penalize being in a measure
discretionary, no fine should be exacted. It is equally beyond question
that in other instances the fine should be imposed, for there is no






10 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

feature of the system of legislation devised to protect the people of
this country from the dangers of an indiscriminate and unrestricted
influx of aliens so important, from a physical point of view, as that
intended to prevent the introduction of disease. If some of the dis-
eases are obscure, that fact simply emphasizes the need of greater pre-
caution. The transportation lines, in those instances in which a doubt
exists as to the nature or fact of disease, has within its own power
complete protection from the risk of incurring the penalty by resort-
ing to a refusal to take aliens who are, or may be, afflicted therewith
on board their vessels. On the other hand, if a diseased alien is once
allowed to embark, neither the healthy aliens on the same vessel nor
the people of this country can escape the evil consequences. These
views apply, of course, merely to communicable diseases, on account
of bringing which alone the fine alluded to may be imposed; but for
reasons to be stated hereafter it is, in my judgment, time to exclude
all physically defective and diseased aliens, including those who have
reached an age when they can not reasonably be expected to support
themselves much longer, if at all.
The following statement shows the annual rejections and the causes
therefore since the establishment of the Bureau:

REPORT OF IMMIGRANTS REFUSED ADMISSION AT SEAPORTS, SHOWING ALSO THOSE
RETURNED IN ONE YEAR AFTER LANDING, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE ALIEN
CONTRACT LABOR LAWS AND THE LAWS REGULATING IMMIGRATION, DURING THE
TWELVE YEARS, 1892 TO 1903, INCLUSIVE.

Debarred.
A g Re-
SA1897... ., 1 2 0,863 turned
Year1899 ... grants. 1 19 2,599 348 8 82 ...... 741 3,798 263
o 0 of oy e
no a P U H after
a a 3 land-
.~o 9'. a ing.
o 00 o ce go o


1892 ........ .. 479,663 4 17 1,002 80 26 .... 23 80 932 2,164 637
1893............... 439,780 3 8 431 81 12 ................ 518 1,053 577
1894 .............. 285,631 4 5 802 15 8 ....-...... 2 553 1,389 417
1895........ ....... 258,3 6 ...... 1,714 ........ 4 .... 1 .. .... 694 2,419 114
1896 ............... 343,267 1 10 2,010 2 ....................... 776 2,799 238
1897.................. 280,82 1 6 1,277 1 1 1.... 3 1,0 28 1,617 264
1898............... 522, 299 12 2,261 258 12 1 79 1 ...... 417 3,030 199
1899 ............... 311,715 1 19 2,599 348 8 .... 82 ...... 741 3,798 268
1900 .............. 448,572 1 32 2,974 393 4 .... 2 7 833 4,246 356
1901 .............. 487,918 6 16 2,798 809 7 .... 50 3 827 3,516 363
1902...............648,748 7 27 ,944 709 9 .......... 3 275 4,974 465
1903 ............... 857,046 1 23 ,812 1,773 51 1 9 13 1,086 8,769 547
Total........ 5,120,952 36 175 27,624 3,969 132 1 249 108 7,480 39,774 4,502


Table III also shows that there were returned to their own countries
within one year after landing, from subsequently arising inability to
maintain themselves, 547, as compared with 465 for the next preceding
year; and that 6,394 were cared for in hospital, 4,217 having been so
provided for during the year 1902.
This same table also supplies the information for the following state-
ment, which shows the principal races which contributed to the sum
total of alien steerage immigrants:
Italian (north and south)............................................... 233,546
Polish-...- ......- ...........-...-...-....... .........-........... ..... 82,343
Scandinavian ...............-..........- ............................... 79,347






BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION.
CHART N 1. FR SARSENT. Commissioner-Senera


PERCENTAGE,._,
DEBARRED

















PERCENTAGE.,
RETURNED-,


PROPORTION OF ARRIVALS AT SEAPORTS DEBARRED FROM LANDING, ~o
PROPORTION OF LANDED AFTERWARD RETURNED.
1892 1893 1 184 1 1895 1896 1 97 1898 199 1900 1901 1902 903
37 24-1 49 Z729 76 9 1


















T6-o -,'h% i lib% Z% Tho% -4-% A%% lo% - 'ZA A80%
1892 1893 [894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 03


-, PERCENTAGE
DEBARRED

















,_ _,F E F "- rI; r T. G E


TABLE SHOWING NUMBER DEBARRED AND CAUSES THEREFORE, NUMBER RETURNED AFTER LANDING, AND NUMBER OF ARRIVALS.
(UPON WHICH THE ABOVE DIAGRAM IS BASED.)


1892 1893 1894 1895 11
IDIOTS 4 3 4 6
INSANE 17 8 5
PAUPERS 1002 431 802 1714 2
!iH DISEASED 80 81 is


2974


1903
I IDIOTS
23 INSANE
5812 PAUPERS
1773 DISEASED 9J


0 CONVICTS 26 12 B 4 I 2 8 4 7 9 51 CONVICTS
S ASSISTED 23 I 3 79 82 2 50 9 ASSISTED
w PROSTITUTES 80 2 7 3 3 13 PROSTITUTES
SONTRACT LABORERS 932 518 553 694 776 328 417 741 833 327 275 1086 CONTRACTLABORERS
TOTALDEBARRED 2164 1053 1389 2419 2799 1617 3030 3798 4246 3516 4974 8769 TOTAL DEBARRED

RETURNED 637 577 417 177 238 263 199 263 356 363 465 547 RETURNED

ARRIVALS 579663 439730 285631 258536 343267.230832 229299 311715 448572 487918 648743 857046 ARRIVALS

sHOWLn MuY.IB03 JULIUS BI EN & CO. LITH N.Y.


2599








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 11


Hebrew ....................----------.....-... .------... -.. ---------- 76, 203
German ..--------.........- ..... ..----------..--...-------------- ..--- 71, 782
Irish ..........-...-......--...---- ...--...-....-...---. ...--- ....---- 35,366
Slovak..--.......-..-....... ..-..... .......------ ...--------..........-- 34,427
Croatian and Slovenian.-...........---- ------------ -------........--. 32, 907
English..--.........---...-----...---------.........-------........-------------. 28,451
Magyar...--..........-..--- ......----.... ...-----------------------... 27, 124
All others ......................................-----------------------------------...155,550

Total.-...--.....----- -....--.......--- ..-- .....--- .....------- .. 857,046

TABLE III A.-REPORT OF IMMIGRANTS REFUSED ADMISSION, FROM FOREIGN CONTIG-
Uous TERRITORY, TO THE UNITED STATES, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF THE ALIEN
CONTRACT LABOR LAWS AND THE LAWS REGULATING IMMIGRATION, FOR THE YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.

Debarred.


Ports.


Eastport, Me..................
St. Stephens, New Brunswick ..
Vanceboro, Me ................
Megantic, Quebec..............
North Stratford, N. H...........
Newport, Vt ...................
Montreal, Quebec...............
Cornwall, Ontario ..............
Ogdensburg, N. Y..............
Niagara Falls, N. Y............
Black Rock, Ontario............
Windsor, Ontario..............
Port Huron, Mich ..............
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich..........
Winnipeg, Manitoba............
Emerson, Manitoba...........
Gretna, Manitoba.............
Pembina, N. Dak..............
Estevan, Northwest Territory...
Huntingdon, British Columbia..
Other Canadian border ports ...
Total Canadian border ...

Laredo, Tex ..................
Brownsville, Tex ..............
Eagle Pass, Tex.................
El Paso, Tex..................
Nogales, Ariz ...................
Del Rio, Tex..................
Piedras Negras, Mexico ........
Naco, Ariz ....................

Total Mexical border .....

Total border rejections....


Idiots.


Insane
per-
sons.


1 1
........ ........
........ ........
........ ........


I ...... i

2 ........





........ .. ...
6




.. . .. . .


4





4

8


Paupers,
or likely
to be-
come
public
charges.

79
1
214
34
58
67
441
4
19
78
58
34
10
125
113

36
16
9
176


Loath-
some or
danger-
ous con-
tagious
diseases.

1
.......
1I


Womer
forim-
moral
pur-
poses.


3
2


380 ......

71 ........
37 2
15 ........
23 3
577 2
177 ........
19 .....
2 ........
17 ........
6 ........
113 2


171 1,575 1,439 14

........ 111 19 ........
........ 3 ........ ........
4 370 54 15
1 4,409 2 3
........ 2 .......... ........
........ 25 2 ........
.38 .................
6 .......... 7

5 4,964 77 25

22 6,539 1,516 39


Con-
tract
labor-
ers.


12

39
33
19
34
3
3
16
27
72
22
58
45

9
6
33

431
57
174
61
7
2
4

305

736


With-
out
certifi-
cates.


52
35
223

8
66
22
34
28
9
2


56
197
18
73
41
198

1,062










1,062


Total
de-
barred.



149
36
479
34
100
154
877
41
51
175
124
127
59
768
336
56
220
65
106
62
523

4,542
187
3
621
4,476
9
29
38
17

5,380

9,922


It should be explained, however, that these rejected aliens were not
of the arrivals reported in Table I, given in this report, but were a
portion of the unnumbered aliens crossing into the United States from
foreign contiguous territory.
From Tables IV and V, subjoined, information may be obtained,
respectively, of the comparative arrivals, by sex and for each month
of the fiscal year, during 1902 and 1903 and of the countries whence
the steerage aliens came, as well as the races to which they belong.








12 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


TABLE IV.-REPORT OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES, BY MONTHS,
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING JUNE 30, 1902 AND 1903.


Month.


July.............. ...................
August.................................
September ..........................--
October................................
November ............................
December ...............................
January................................
February ............................
March ....... ........................
April-.................................
May....... .........................
June ..................................

Total..............................


Males.

22,060
20,392
26,350
24,657
28,247
25,721
17,135
28,898
64,850
75,070
80,131
52,858

466,369


1902.

Females.

12,959
12,011
16,671
17,147
15,053
11,827
6,094
7,865
12,638
20,537
26,870
22,702

182,374


Total.

35, 019
32,403
43,021
41,804
43,300.
37,548
23,229
36,763
77,488
95,607
107,001
75,560

648,743


1903.

Males. Females. Total.

33,254 17,528 60,782
28,770 16,779 45,549
34,826 23,402 58, 228
40,519 23,095 63,614
36,654 18,523 55,177
34,336 15,955 50,291
23,543 8,308 31,851
37 620 9,647 47,267
75,457 16,209 91,666
100,265 26,021 126,286
99,840 37,674 137,514
68,062 30,759 98,821

613,146 243,900 857,046












4 At



UUlf
II N

I-.


ALIENS LANDING FROM BARGES AT ELLIS ISLAND STATION.







TABLE V.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, SHOWING THE
COUNTRIES WHENCE THEY CAME AND THE RACES OR PEOPLES TO WHICH THEY BELONG.


Countries.






Austria-Hungary ....
Belgium .............
Denmark ............
France, including
Corsica............
German Empire .....
Greece .............
Italy, including
Sicily and Sardinia.
Netherlands.........
Norway..............
Portugal, including
Cape Verde and
Azore islands.......
Roumania ...........
Russian Empire and
Finland............
Servia, Bulgaria, and
Montenegro........
Spain, including Ca-
nary and Balearic
islands............
Sweden..............
Switzerland..........
Turkey in Europe....
United Kingdom.....
Not specified.........

Total Europe...


C3
5a "

.g -0


0 00
H CH


I,.




a
0~
U


..... - .. .... - .............. 2,452 ..... 1....... ........ 949
2 9,577 4,227 ....... ..892 ....... 1,723 2 ........ ........ 3

1: .... .. ....... ........... .. ...... ... .... ........ ... ......... .. 5,488
....... .... 10 ....... ... ........ ........... 12 ..... 10 ....... ........ 47
--- -- --- -- --- -- --- -- --- -. ... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. 1 ............ .. .


3.... 4 ........
. ........... ....... .... ... ....... 3,975 ...... .......
....... ....... ............... ..... ... ...... -------- -------


....--- ...... ........ 1,705 .......


:::::::. :::::"

:...............


...............

6...........




6.111111
6 .......


9 .....
25,652 1
4 .......


0




23, 597
41
3

41
34,213


....... i
14,082
14,082


9 14
........ 9 14 ........
........ ....... 2 ........


18,776 ...... 10, 485

........ 15


75


1
5
2,930
1
29


18,759
7


.0
's
1-


2
.03
0
0
C)


.0

0


....... 2,146 24


11 ....... 35
477 ....... 1
1 ........ 6

2 ........ 34,571
20...
1....


........ 210 ...;.... 5 j. 8,562 J...1.


14


260

S1


195,993


47,689 ..................


8

1


161
420


6
1
572

14


938 99 9,587 6,475 ....... 32,906 7 1,726 6,449 .....25,693 1 18,851 6,967 71,587 14,363 76,126 35,309 37,352 196,025


China .......... ........... ..... ......... 2,191............. 11 ......... ...... ..... ..
Japan..................... ...... ......... ............. ....... ..... ....
India...... ......... ...... ....... ............. ...... ............... ....... 83


6 ........ ........ 1
16..................
7 ...... ... .......


3 ................ ...........
11 ............... 2 .. .......
1 ........ 1 ........ ........ : : ......


2
5
1


934 ....... ....... ....... ....... ........ ....... ....... ....... .....
. .... . ..... ....... 3 ....... ........ ....... .......I....... .....










TABLE V.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA, ETC.-Continued.


Countries.


Turkey in Asia.......
OtherAsia............

Total Asia......

Africa...............
Australia, Tasmania,
and New Zealand..
Philippine Islans. -..
Pacific Islands, not
specified .........
British North Americs
British Honduras ....
OtherCentralAmerica
Mexico...............
South America.......
West Indies ..........
All other countries...

Grand total ....


1,660


8 .la-
a 0




a '-
a SC0
H gH


....... 1,660 ............. 2,191


0
01


a
^."
a
0


lg 4
0 >

a




Sa a


44

893

8
900
16
89
12
2
762
3


4
.5
a
.?


1 ....... ....... ...... ....::.......:: .....

1 .............. 2 83 29 ................


............... 1 4 ........ 6

1 13 8 32 1 10
130 ........ ....... ......... ................


96.. ...... .... .............. .............
......: ...... ...1... 2..... J..... ..... ..:.......


I: _____ i,.......i ___ I___ .____ ___I.____ 1 ___ ___ I____ 1 ___ I ____I ____:


....... 1
20 2

23 5
2,894 2
-...-. .......


4 a
e .
m.


4
~0


....... ... 8 50 ....... .......

1 15 8 51 3 ........


2
3
2
46
2
19
70


32 4


12
1

2
5
1


1
3


1
1


0
a


.i-


1,759 9,591 6,479 2,192 32,907 2,944 1, 736 6,496 83 28,451 133 18,864 7,166 71,782 14,376 76,203 35,366 37,429
1,75 9,51 6479 ,19232,07 2944 73


a






2C








27 M
9 0







56 0


196,117 r
.... f
.. ..

.. -.
27 0


2
3

2
25
41


i


I


.............. 4
. . 12






TABLE V.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA, ETc.-Continued.


Countries.


Austria-Hungary .............
Belgium .....................
Denmark ....................
France, including Corsica....
German Empire..............
Greece ........................
Italy, including Sicily and
Sardinia ...... ........
Netherlands ................
Norway......................
Portugal, including Cape
Verde and Azore islands....
Roumania .................
Russian Empire and inland.
Servia, Bulgaria, and Mon-
tenegro ...................
Spain, including Canary and
Balearic islands.............
Sweden......................
Switzerland.................
Turkey in Europe.............
United Kingdom..............
Not specified.................

Total Europe............

China........................
Japan........................
India.........................
Turkey in Asia................
Other Asia....................

Total Asia..............


..... .......









2

..... 14,432


37,499 ......14,178


.. . ..... .. .44 6 0..
.. ... .... ... ... ... .... ...... .... ....... 2 ......
-... -. .8,5 381 ...... ...... ...... ....... ......
..... ....... 514 5 ...... ....... .....
....... ..... ...... 39,548 ...... 1 3,565 24 1,571 ......


....... ..... ......

......... ....

......27,124 ..... ......1
27,124 ... 1


.......... ""

3 1

....... ... 19



. 8.... 1
S. .....

3-

....... 1,974
1-
16

....... ......

34,427 2,027


8 ......


1-


...... I ......
- I


---. ...... .


65 403 11,274 89


...... 1 ....... .... .... .. .... ......... ....... ..... 1 3 ....... 2 ...... .................. 2,209
19,935 ...2... 19,968
... 1.. 1" .... -----------------94
19,935 ..... .... ................ ........ .............. ... .. ...... ... 1
....... 1 .... ... .... ... ...... ...... ....... ...... ....... ..... ..... 1 ...... ...... ...... ...... 94,6
....... ..... ...... ..... ..... ...... ....... ...... ...... ..... ...... ....... ...... ....... ...... ..... 5, 366 33 ...... ...... ...... 7,118
.. 562 ...... ........ .. ......... .. .. ..... ...... ...... .. .... ....... ...... ....... ............ ...... ...... ...... ...... 15 577

19,935 664 ....... .... ........ ... ............. ...... 2 ...... 1 ....... 2 ...... 5,367 3 ...... ...... 15 29,966


4


o



206, 011
3,450
7,158
5, 578
40,086
14,090

230,622
3,998
24,461 )

9,317 I
9,310
136,093

1,761

2,080 t
46,028
3,983
1,529
68,947
5

814,507


H

C










TABLE V.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA, ETC.-Continued.


Countries.


Africa........................
Australia, Tasmania, and New
Zealand....................
Philippine Islands..........
Pacific Islands, not specified..
British North America........
British Honduras.............
Other Central America .......
Mexico.......................
South America................
West Indies...................
All other countries............

Randd total ...........


t1-- -1-


20,041 564


14,432


............ I
1a












....... 468 ......
2 ......

27,124 486 52
1* 5

27,124 4868 52


....... 3 ...... ...... ......


I
s a




49 i....... 1
49 ....... 1
3 ....... ......
3-
12 ...... 7
"""6 .......45
......I....... 20
...... ....... 112
4 .......1,088
.......... ------ ---


I I:-1---1--1 1-1--I. ______I ___________________ _____


82,343 58,433 4,740


3,608 9,843 79,347 6,219 34,427 3,297 978 5,551 449 1,278 1,497 89


176

1,150
132
67
1,058
81
597
528
589
8,170
25


357,046


N
N

0
N
H














0
N

0
0





0
z


N






N
I-1

N
H
0









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 17


In Table VI is given a statement of the total arrival of aliens, both
steerage and cabin, at seaports of the United States and Canada, show-
ing the countries from which they came and their sex. As will be
observed, the old form of report is still adhered to, by which some
sort of distinction is made between cabin and steerage passengers, the
latter being classified as "immigrants" and the former as "other alien
passengers." As was stated in my last annual report, the distinction
is not one of any particular value under any circumstances, particularly
as the recent act regulating immigration applies in terms to all
"aliens" regardless of the actual or professed intent of such persons
with respect to the duration of their stay or the object of their com-
ing. The total reported immigration of aliens to this country, there-
fore, is, as shown in the last column of the next table, 921,315 for the
year 1903.

TABLE VI.-REPORT or ALIENS ARRIVED AT THE PORTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND
CANADA DURING THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.


Sex of immigrants. Totalim-
Countries.
Males. Females. migrants.

Austria-Hungary................................... 147,984 58,027 206,011
Belgium.......................................... 2,308 1,142 3,450
Denmark........................................... 4,554 2,604 7,158
France, including Corsica.......................... 3,513 2,065 5,578
German Empire.................................... 24,861 15,225 40,086
Greece....................................... ... 13,634 456 14,090
Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia................ 186, 966 43,656 230, 622
Netherlands........................................ 2,499 1,499 3,998
Norway ...... .................................. 16,249 8,212 24,461
Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore islands. 5,829 3,488 9,317
Roumannia............................ 5,313 3,997 9,310
Russian Empire and Finland ...................... 92,935 43,158 136,093
Servia,Bulgaria,andMontenegro.......... ........ 1,699 62 1,761
Spain, including Canary and Balearic islands...... 1,733 347 2,080
Sweden... ................................... 29,808 16,220 46, 028
Switzerland ....................................... 2,796 1,187 3,983
Turkey in Europe .................................. 1,453 76 1,529
United Kingdom:
England...................................... 15,593 10,626 26,219
Ireland....................................... 15,966 19,344 35,310
Scotland ....................................... 3,953 2,190 6,143
Wales .......................................... 835 440 1,275
Europe not specified ............................... 3 2 5
Total Europe................................. 580,484 231,023 814,507
China ............................................. 2,167 42 2,209
Japan ............................................ 5,909 4,059 19,968
India .. ...................................... 79 15 94
Turkey in Asia ................................... 5,114 2,004 7,118
Other Asia.......................................... 507 70 577
Total Asia.................................... 23,776 6,190 29,966
Africa ............................................. 121 55 176
Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand ............ 796 354 1,150
Philippine Islands ................................ 123 9 132
Pacific islands not specified ........................ 58 9 67
British North America.... ....................... 728 330 1,058
British Honduras................................... 54 27 81
Other Central America ............................ 423 174 597
Mexico................................... 416 112 528
South America..................................... 405 184 589
WestIndies ........................................ 5,743 2,427 8,170
All other countries ................................. 19 6 25
Grand total.................................. 613,146 243,900 857,046


Other Grand
alien pas- total
sengers.


3,282
603
654
4,243
10,936
281
4,930
715
646
154
201
2,237
33
1,139
1,306
1,039
108
16,433
3,165
3,174
241

55, 470
108
195
95
387
2
787
197
405
4
9
2,370
98
397
476
618
3,436
2
64,269


209,293
4,053
7,812
9,821
51,022
14,321
235,552
4,713
25,107
9,471
9,511
138,330
1,794
3,219
47,334
5,022
1,637
42,652
38,475
9,317
1,516
5
869, 977
2,317
20,163
189
7,505
579
30,753
373
1,555
136
76
3, 428
179
994
1,004
1,207
11,606
27
921, 315


Tables VII, VIII, and IX follow, showing under appropriate head-
ings the races, occupations, and destinations in the United States of
the steerage aliens.

5567-03- 2










TABLE VII.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, SHOWING
THEIR DESTINATIONS BY RACES OR PEOPLES.


Race or people. 5




African (black) ................ 2........
Armenian........................ .... .... ....
Bohemian and Moravian............. ........
Bulgarian, Servian, and Monte-
negrin........................ 11 17 68
Chinese .....................................
Croatian and Slovenian.......... 5 6 52
Cuban............................ 2.......
Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Herze-
govinian ......................... 3 26
Dutch and Flemish................... 2 1
East Indian ...................... .... .... ....
English........................... 41 6 29
Filipino ................................ ..
Finnish ........................ 8 14 4
French......................... 69 7 2
German ........................ 29 4 15
Greek .......................... 57 .... 3
Hebrew ......................... 20.... 1
Irish........................ 10 .... 5
Italian (north).................. 74.... 78
Italian (south).................. 88.... 2
Japanese .......................... 6 2
Korean ............. ............ .......
Lithuanian... ................. .... ..
Magyar....................... 10.... 5
Mexican ......................... ... ....
Pacific Islander ............ .... ........
Polish ................................
Portuguese .................... ...........
Roumanian ...............................
Russian ....................................
Ruthenian (Russniak)........... 1........
Scandinavian (Norwegians,
Danes, and Swedes)............ 74 12 18
Scotclh........................... 51 6 5
Slovak.........................22... 2
Spanish ....................... 8 2....


2 2 .... ......
15......

538 24 78 364
...... ...... 2 ......


25
110......
104 4 33 1H
1,172 89 131 28
152 1 81 25
1,020 35 68 6
1,492 51 79 16
1,242 62 44 70C
6,301 407 124 294
6 ..... 5 1

932 84.... ......
983 4 1......
.... . .... 1 8

4,170 450 9 1
114 ....... ......
60 2 2 ......
117 9 7......
213 12 2......

1,666 28 30 37
128 5 5 5
873 10 4 2
8'...... 8 724
724


S *s ~
.c c
e '0
'0 0


P 0





504 29 2
58s 69 185

56 197 69
567 3 4
4~ 6 ,~ 0 n'


7
i 5146


.... 7 1



20

10 1,589
I 24
7 165
142
110 117
64 92


6 9
9 16

14 29


2 6
6 1

8 3,627
6 54
7 21
.... I......


...... .....84 I

1..... 32
1..... 14
106 6 31
53 1......

43 ...... 2
20 1 15

262 293 222
21 142 1
177 11 35
181 41 948
87 6 87;

84 333 192
27 43 39
4,815 248 373

..... 92 118
2 8 5

1 112 85
2 ...... ......
1 ...... 2
8 16 4
...... 2 3

119 276 13(
19 76 16
6 48 16i
60 9 i


5
292

1 5,362

3,264
S419
S1,033
S2,538
4,130
7,350
2,233
13,731
20

S1,591
6 148
3
1
3 6,444
S5,691
3 26
6 265
7 220

6,599
7 995
5i 232
5, 50


15 15
1,268 151

892 169
1 ......
4,538 3,137
57 39
2,114 1,487
150 20
367 552
209 115
1,209 437
1,562 391
2....

132 5
313 101

3,199 500

4 12
56 17
36 21

3,22813,656
86 58
311 242
7 1





Spanish-American ............. 1 1.... .... 212 1 ...... ...... 7 ...... ... 13 .... 2 3 .... ... ...... 7 181 ...... 6 7 ..........
Syrian...................---........ 16.... 1.... 57 18 171...... 7 8 1...... 10 126 135 3 2 25 6 138 82 21 781 13 38
Turkish .......................... .... .... .... .... 4 ...... 3 ...... 1 1 .... ...... .... 8 ...... .... ...... 4 .... 6 ...... 2 176 .........
W elsh ............................ 8 .... .... .... 29 27 6 ...... .... ...... 2 3 4 43 7 .... 21 16 7 ...... 5 17 48 271 13
W est Indian...................... 3 .. 8 .... 35 ...... ...... 3 417 .... 4 .... ...... 5.... ...... ...... 1 14 1...... 59 ......
All other peoples................. .... .... .... .... 2 ...... ...----... ...... .... ...... .... 16 .... 7 ...... .... ...... ...... .... ...... ...... 3 3 ...... ...

Grand total................. 613 86 343 26422, 74 4,778 21,813 1,176 701 5,105 33114,581 538 63,378 4,342 271 7,056 2,087 384 6,334 1, 997 4,758 65,757 20, 92022, 835



0





M









cr-


i-3

a

ri











TABLE VII.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED AT THE PORTS OF UNITED STATES AND CANADA FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, ETc.-Cont'd.


Race or people.





African (black).............
Armenian ..................
Bohemian and Moravian...
Bulgarian, Servian, and
Montenegrin .............
Chinese.....................
Croatian and Slovenian....
Cuban .....................
Dalmatian, Bosnian, and
Herzegovinian ..........
Dutch and Flemish ........
EastIndian................
English....................
Filipino ...............
Finnish..................
French...................
German ...................
Greek.......................
Hebrew.....................
Irish............... .......
Italian (north).............
Italian (south) .............
Japanese ...................
Korean....................
Lithuanian.............
Magyar..................
Mexican....................
Pacific Islander............
Polish ...................
Portuguese.................
Roumanian ................
Russian ...................
Ruthenian (Russniak) ...
Scandinavian(Norwegians,
Danes, and Swedes)......
Scotch.... ...........
Slovak... ..................
Spanish ...... ..........


38 ..... 5 ... 21
185 13 385... .....

186 41 1 8 10
3 ..... ..... ... .....
1,058 229 8 24 1
5 ..... ............

2 30 8 4....
78 21 32 1 1

58 103 4 167
1..... 4 ... .....
26 181 15 4 119
59 20 9 18 14
1,7041 12 1,622 7 58
67 3 12... 284
667 10 96 4 54
257 160 64 13 268
513 130 28337 37
809 29 461 25 122
6: 15 ..... ........

5 ..... 13... 113
107 7 19 1 7



... 1 ..... 8 1
87 17 ..... ... .....
17 1 18 1
44 1 31 ... 22

249 6831,490 30 209
32 67 109 32
215 25 2...
22 5..... 85 1


C,
SIa --a





12... 165 14




243 24 2,34...
8,... 454 2

93 6 730 ...
604 5 954 1
1... 54 ...
1,099 14 6,669 11
... .. 2 ..
142 4 2,824...
214 2 2,444 1
3,985 24 15,491 4
167... 4,182 8
2,004... 50,945 34
1,8491 13,071 12
1,158 79 9,452
9,970 9' 91,774 2
1... 180 ...
1 ... ....... ...
744 2 ,418 4
3,661 7 5,291...
2 ... 148 ...

6,412 ... 16,018 ...
4 ... 475...
20 ... 242 ...
121 ... 717 ...
874... 1,854...

1,477 12 12,711 6
317 ... 1,462 10
2,842 9 3,341 9
8 4 1,034...


10 ...


14...
176


1...:


0








S1,183 62


0
o C5



a -



22 ...

59...
. 4
65144


38...
93'...


3,035 938 24
34 202 2S
8 3,516...
..... 4 ...


.... ......
Sg





1 4
54 259

73 23

615 494
.... 1

110 2
235

74 179

.... 536
20 35
213 3,270
18 177
42 411
15 68
224 279
,096 702
2

101 1i70
443 100


449 1,552

16 ......
20 33
71 18

19 5,450
25 59
380 450
2 ......


... 2,174
1,759
8 9,591

15 6,479
... 2,192
56 32,907
... 2,944

1,736
72 6,496
83
54 28,451
133
122 18,864
25 7,166
43 71,782
4 14,376
.. 76,203
22 35,366
119 37,429
37196,117
10 20,041
564
... 14,432
5 27,124
... 486
52
6 82,343
... 8,433
.. 4,740
3 3,608
1 9,843

148 79,347
28 6,219
16 34,427
5 3,297


791,16C
1.. ...

129 14E
28 14E1
2 7i
32
... 81E
49 196
102 3, 51


63
..... .....

..... 60



..... 656
11, 029
..... 3
8 13
..... 41

65 528
1 209
13
866 1


9 69 20
... .... 1.
1 188...
... 2 1
91,153 30
... ..... 31
11 20 60
3 68 5
1 62 93
11 27 87
1.........
... ..... ... .

1 9...
... ..... ... .
... .... ... .
1 17 271
2...

..."5 9


51,992 5
6 11 2
.. 19 4


63 212
5
12 389
4 53
81 789
12 15
85 66
25 87
77 238
67 180
11,820
9
27 19
94 9


40 62
1

5 02
8 .....

382,452
18 77
92 26:
4 2






Spanish-Am erican ......... ... 1 2 ................... 1 371........ 3... ..... 24 114 1 ... ..... 3 1 ..... ..... ... 13 3 ...... ... 978
Syrian...................... 18 85 21 12... 6 106 5 1,84815 4 21221 3 835 120 78 10 16 5 77 1 47 23 6 76 25 1 5,551
Turkish .................... ... 3 ..... ..... ... 5 6... 138 ........ 7.. 1 56 5 12 1..... ... 6 ... 2 ... ..... ... .... ... 2 449
Welsh ...................... ... 14 7 111 6 32... 250.. 5 127... 12 426... 7... 1 8 4 5 213 16 10 12 31,278
West Indian................ ... ...... ......... ... .. 31... 604... ...... 1... ..... 63 235 6 1 ..... 1.... ..... 2 ..... .... ..... .. 1,497
All other peoples........1.. ....................... 8... 19................. 13 2 12........ .......... ....... 3 ........... ... 89
Grand total........... 193 7,132 2,009 4,0915901,861 38,533218 254,665113 7,012 37,184415 1,996177,1692,1359,467 733,939 4982,4382,132 1,6118906,967 5,17014,546 805o857,046



0


0



M


I-




0


I-1
0

z
a
















a










TABLE VIII.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, SHOWING THEIR OCCUPATIONS BY to
RACES OR PEOPLES. to


Race or people.




African (black)............................. 2
Armenian................................... 9
Bohemian and Moravian .............. 3 3
Bulgarian, Servian, and Montenegrin.. ...... ......
Chinese ..........................................
Croatian and Slovenian................ 6 3
Cuban ................................. 7 6
Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Herzegovin-
ian ........... ................... 5 ......
Dutch and Flemish.................... 2 9
East Indian............................ 28 1
English ................................ 188 139
Filipino................................ ...... ......
Finnish .................................... 6
French................................. 21 67
German.............................. 63 56
Greek................................. 6 7
Hebrew.............................. 16 27
Irish ................................. 7 45
Italian (north)........................ 13 18
Italian (south)........................ 4 42
Japanese............................. 30 29
Korean ................................... 4
Lithuanian ............................... 1
M agyar ................................ 2 7
Mexican ........................... 1 ......
Pacific Islander ..............................
Polish................................. 1 3
Portuguese ................................ 4
Roumanian .............................. ......
Russian .............................. 23 10
Ruthenian (Russniak)................. ...... 1
Scandinavian (Norwegians, Danes, and
Swedes) ......................... 10 50
Scotch ................................ 9 12
Slovak .................................... 2
Spanish.............................. 14 32


...... 58 6

44 601 62
...... 1 1
2 13 ......
5 117 3
10 430 10
6 4
4 81 2
7 80 7
7 47 4
3 23 5
16 18 4


1 4
3 5

2 91....
...... ....... . "
5 1
2 20 1


9 392 9
5 208 1 1

4 10 10i


I I I


1 ...... 5
2 11
2 2 2
i. ...... ....i
1 ...... 1
1 4 1
27 ...... 6

1 ...... ......
4 12 8
1 1 2
84 71 140
...... ...... 1
1 4 3
17 24 78
50 67 127
5 1 5
9 31 147
12 2 76
17 81 18
24 65 51
24 14 37


1 11 8
3 1

1 2
1 ...... 2

1 1 21
...... 1 1 1

6 16 50
10 8 18

11I 11i 7


1 15 4 3 4 ...... 3 30 22 ..
4 37 27 31 29 12 97 19 1 1



25 88 15 21 1 ...... 2 8 125- ....

S....2 1 1 8 1 ..... 1
164 37 27 31 29 ...... 12 97 19 1 1

209 1,594 98 30 154 20 118 473 967 16 144
36 38 .......-- 1.... ... ..... 1 .... ..i...... 1-------


3 34 14 2 35 ...... 1 115 56 3
47 389 52 19 53 7 38 69 136 10 26
156 ,075 924 277 791 26 761 1,807 1,019 36 214

7 44 131 31 78 1 36 189 227 2 14
74 499 937 266 695 14 743 2,600 1,060 23 19
37 280 74 7 113 4 49 245 729 ...... 60
16 253' 182 57 236 15 51 396 175 5 62
42 532 605 2,088 913 4 265 2,583 292 7 262
100 274 32 60 26 ...... .......2 1 256 1 17
16 121 69 6 62 1 81 126 68 3 61










2 8 ....... ....... ....... ............. ....... .. .......
2 6 7 ...... 17 2 65 3 1 2
S 87 45 28 262 83 363 53 1 15
1 17 2 1 3 761 1,807 1,19 .6

7 44 124 11 395 5 132 6189 227 2 14
37. 2 19 9 ...... 1 56 8 ...... ......
3 11 6 ....... 23 1 75 30 21 1 ..
3 66 16 3 31 ...... 5 67 6 1 17
...... 6 ....... ....... 18 ...... 3 25 4 ...... .......
70 629 258 36 759 26 143 2,093 784 14 123
20 295 53 3 80 27 148 142 5 36
2 16 26 4 165 1 42 238 17 1 14
19 119 21 1 38 ...... 82
3 11 6 223 1 7 30 2 1...... 29





19 119 21 5 4 i......l 1 29 389 1......1 2







Spanish-American ..................... 4 7 1 10 19 3 18 3 6 23 94 1 ....... 2 1 ..... 4 37 ..... 2
Syrian ....................... ... ... 16 2 2..... ...... ........ 1 14 8 13 5 20 61 ...... 10 12 61 1 4
Turkish .................................... ..... .................................. 2 ...... 2 10 6 3 ...... 2 9 8 ...... 2
W elsh ....................................... 14 ...... 17 ...... 2 1 ...... 1 2 37 3 ....... 8 ... 5 14 26 ...... 3
West Indian ........................... 3 6 1 6 5 1 8 2 15 13 60 3 6 12...... 1 47 122 ...... ....
All other peoples ...................... ...... 1 ..... 1 ......- ...... 1 ........ 1 ....... 4 ....... ....... ......... 5 ...... .......

Grand total ...................... 466 639 129 2,286 174 711 34 439 85 959 6,999 3,885 3,069 5,345 365 2,810 13,250 6,978 141 1,182







0




Cr


M






EC
1 -<









TABLE VIII.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, ETC.-Continued.


Race or people. .





African (black) ............................ 1 .....
Armenian .......................... 1 12 3
Bohemian and Moravian ........... 139 4 238
Bulgarian, Servian, and Montene-
grin .............................. 1 ...... 6
Chinese ................ ..... ....... ..
Croatian and Slovenian ............ 7 ...... 39
Cuban .............................. 1 ...... .......
Dalmatian, Bosnian, and Herzego-
vinian .............................-...... 1
Dutch and Flemish................. 2 2 6
East Indian......................... .. .. ....
English............................. 223 34 8
Filipino................................
Finnish ............................. 8 3
French.............................. 17 8 9
German............................. 294 63 940
Greek-..............- ............... 4 7 4
Hebrew.....................-....... 22 193 691
Irish ................................ 59 3 2
Italian (north) ..................... 19 9 13
Italian (south) ..................... 233 8 9
Japanese................................... .......
Korean ............................
Lithuanian ......................... 28 ..... 15
Magyar ............................. 46 3 185
Mexican....................... .......... .........
Pacific Islander............................
Polish............................... 34 4 255
Portuguese ................................. 1 1
Roumanian......................... 1...... 11
Russian............................. 3 3 8
Ruthenian (Russniak) ............. 4 ...... 7
Scandinavian (Norwegians, Danes,
and Swedes)...................... 150 19 15
Scotch .............................. 107 10 ....
Slovak .............................. 27 6 76
Spanish............................. 2 2 .......


-= g
B


264 6
..... 24
8 203

31 6

586 127
2 2

257 6
70 32
3 .......
593 243
1 .......
209 19
93 40
270 684
343 129
13 153
106 104
259 1,251
1,790 2,975
147 2

5 7
6 85
101 1
43 .......
13 142
104 11
2 6
38 12
2 6

3,403 438
88 210
18 63
105 23


--


...... ...... 3 2 46 1 5
2 2. 3 1 ...... 223

..... ...... ...... ...... 19
...... ...... 7 6 28 ...... 59
...... ...... 9 ...... 1 ...... 129
..... ... ... 19 ---- 223
"".. 2 41.... 9.i 4 ...... 19


9 1 1
.... ...... 1 ...... 5,
4 4 9 2 5 ...... 33

38 85 i6 101 21 289 17 84

...... 1 2 1 32 1 32
6 2 12 3 198 ...... 33
7 12 79 133 365 4 661
1 .. ...- 4 2 6 1 186
5 39 154 206 3,315 ......1,614
17 20 21 19 525 9 58
38 4 13 5 222 ..... 326
15 1 62 28 2,398 I 3 4,636


2 1 18 1 33

... .. .... 10 ...... ...... 5
..... 2 9 16 41 1230

...... ...... ...... ...... 5 .......
...;.. 1 8 41 119 .."-. 371i
..... 1 ...... 2 40 ...... 10
...... ...... 1 4 7 ...... 17
...... 2 1 2 10 ...... 38
...... ...... 1 ...... 4 ...... 28

6 12 74 61 563 28 431
50 24 14 5 61 25 13
...... 1 3 13 19 ...... 213
...... ...... 6 2 8 ...... 15


6 58 7
19 227 13

3 i0 2
....... -7.1 ......
24 65 8 18
....... ......


4 38 2

61 129 17

9 70 i 13
12 51 6
121 786 107
3 88 19
21 9,233 i 497
43 74 .....
436 206 ; 11
542 3,258 37
5 | 90 ......

12 190 19
..... 2. ......

13 481 31
6 ....... 1
....... 24 1
....... 127 2
127 3 2

1 26 3

192 397 47

4 11 2






SpanishAmerican .......................... -.......... 1 66 1 1 2 7 1 ............ 6 1 ....2- 2 1
Syrian ........................... .. ... 4 41 3 4 ........ 4 12- 19 6
Turkish ............................. ............. ............. 2 3 ..... ...... ..4 1 ....... ....... 1 ...... ....... 9 ... 4 .....
Welsh............................... 15 ............. 4 18 12 6 2 224 6 5 1 2 12.... 3 3 4 1
West Indian................. .... ... 4 1 4 39 14 5 .... 1 4 ...... 6 8 ...... 78 1 24 2 24 ......
All other peoples .................. ........ .............. 16 4 ....... ....... ...... ...... 1 .......................... .... .. ...
Grandtotal................ 1,448 485 2,549 1,395 9,148 7,085 1,956 839 8,059 2,826 192 220 61 605 8,513 91 9,770 1,730 15,992 925














os













P-3
o









TABLE VIII.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, ETC.-Continued.








African (black) ............ ....... 1 ...... ....... ...... 172 599 ...... ...... 4 422 ..... 319 4 293 13 1,055 505 2,174
Armenian ................. 4 7 5 50 ...... 11 564 2 ...... 12 349 ...... 243 59 90 26 781 377 1,759

Montenegrin.............. ................... 3 7 177............ 25 487...... 5,517 21 49 3 6,102 196 6, 479
S............. ...... ...... ....... ...... 1 ...... ...... ...... 1,22 1 11 2,065 77 2192

CroatianandSlovenian. .... 9 ...... 2 ....... 5 17 1,680 ...... .... 277 3,937 3 22,912 35 1,6 22 83 28,869 2,323 32,907
Cuba...... 19 ................... 786 1,039 ...... 14 6 ...... 48 250 52 6 377 1,440 2,944
Dalmatian, Bosnian, and


Herzegovinian. ........... ......................... 2 321 ...... 221 ...... 642 8 37 1 918 490 1,736
... Z E2 ... .. 42Z









DutchandFlemish.. 5 99 1 54 7 43 1,006 1 10 85 942 2 1,324 147 403 70 2,984 2,385 6,496
EastIndian ( ...................... .... .... ... .....2 1.. ..... 4 293 1 26 26 20 83 0
rEnglish... ..........9.... 5 1 3 10 121 ,4 2 1259 37 376 40 2,612 993 2,02 1,92 8,717 9,851 28,451
FBlipino ................. . ..... .. ..... ...... 32 ...... .. .... 2.... 2 2 70 1 75 19 5133
Bulgarian, Servian, and





Finnish egin................. 4 ...... 3 6 ........ 28 780 1 7 ...... ...... 10,022 16 455 96 14,109 3,941 1,864
French .............................. 8 43 142 5 12 12,75 172 775 281 20 323 2, 06 2,096 7,166
C an..............................19........... ........ ......7. 1. .1 14 8 48 256 52 6 377 1,440 2,1944





German i.....a............... 241 46 65 49 141 695 14,459 10 13 1,691 4,489 45 13,470 1,739 8,500 846 30,803 25,445 1,782
Greek ..a F................... 11 50 2 17 ...... 17 1,662 1 222 3,680 20 6,048 345 189 72 10,583 2, 087 14,376
Hebrew ....................... 727 346 333 287 31 1 280 27,071 6 1 46 334 .20 6,664 2,363 7,039 1,008 17,481 31,152 76,203
Irish.......................... 1 4 3 309 6 194 ,273 1 8 469 1,244 26 9,850 223 15,214 476 27,526 4,287 35,3664
Italian (north).............. 15 ...... 15 226 3 131 6,766 7 1 200 6,462 12 15, 622 422 1,956 166 24,848 5,562 37,429
Italian (south) .............. 77 15 43 348 16 241 24,895 9 2 678 32,391 17 85,682 872 6,606 1,045 127,302 43,388 196,117
Japanese.................... .... 9 2 ...... 99 922 4 3 5,010 5,816 51 12 5 533 13,563 5,282 20,0416
Germn..................... 241 46 65 469 141 695 5 10 1 1,691 4,489 45 13,470 1,769 8,506 846 30,0 5, 71,782




Korean....................... ..... ...... .... ...... 20 26 ...... 54 369 ...... 3 74 1 ....... 434 96 5643
Hebrew ......................727 346 287 31 1,280 27,071 6 1 46 634 20 6,664 2,363 7,09 1,008 17,481 76,203 i-



Lithuanian.................. 5 1 2 4 1 90 ...... 1 ......6 40 220 ...... 9,333 4 1,790 20 11,407 2,429 14,432
Ialian (south)...............9 9 2 678 5 17 85,682 72 6,606 1,45,1

Magyar...................... 78 4 3 6 43 41 2,062 ............ 269 3,807 2 18,162 75 2,666 55 20,036 4,939 27,124
Mexican .................... ............. ............. ...... 5 132 ............ 6 3 ...... 10 48 39 21 127 210 486
Pacific Islander ........................................... ....... 43 ...... ...... ..... ...................... 1 2.... .. 3 6 52
Polish ....................... 63 14 5 69 50 126 3 715 1 1 293 2,069 3 48,834 89 11,245 111 62,646 15,932 82,343
Portuguese.................. ................... 2 ...... 9 299 ............ 76 598 ...... 2,793 23 1,825 143 5,458 2,669 8,433
Roumanian ............... .. 6 ...... 3 4 4 12 194 ............ 22 331 ...... 3,878 16 49 5 4,301 234 4,740
Russian ..................... 10 7 1 2 ...... 50 498 ...... 1 89 59 ...... 1,951 58 170 23 2,351 693 3,608
Ruthenian (Russniak) ...... 1 1 ...... 2 3 8 165 ............ 11 593 ...... 6,758 1 1,404 1 8,768 904 9,843 0
Scandinavian (Norwegians,
Danes, and Swedes) ....... 87 27 62 2 27 577 12,221 24 2 2,199 2,558 10 28,512 232 17,496 699 51,732 14,765 79,347
Scotch....................... 4 ...... 2 174 3 110 2,214 13 8 93 139 3 581 119 623 307 1,886 1,824 6,219
Slovak....................... 19 1 ...... 6 21 30 1,389 ............ 168 3,193 ...... 18,200 13 4,404 35 26,013 .7,009 34,427
Spanish............................. 17 2 1 2 277 954 2 ...... 52 197 1 713 474 98 55 1,592 632 3,297






Spanish-American.............. .. .... 1 ..... 8 154 2 2 35 9...... 9 201 74 42 374 356 978
yrian .... ......... 12 1 2 113 ...... 15 841 3 ...... 67 964 956 349 495 20 2,854 1,813 5,551
Turkish.................. .... 1 ...... 1 1 2 69 ...... 1 7 119 ... 151 32 2 5 317 61 449
Welsh........................ 19 .... 1 3 ...... 11 411 4 1 16 40 2 97 10 90 33 293 537 1,278
West Indian .................. 126............. 2 5 539 ............ 26 18 2 144 123 129 30 472 426 1,497
All other peoples ........... .............. ............. 3 32 ...... ...... 6 ...... ...........4 5 4 19 34 89
Grandtotal........... 1,465 833 623 3,823 412 6,097 124,683 248 124 13,363 77,518 290 320,642 12,379 92,686 8,413 525,663 199,701 857,046








0


a















0
a
Y1










TABLE IX.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, SHOWING THEIR DESTINATIONS AND
OCCUPATIONS.


Destination.


Alabama.....................
Alaska.......................
Arizona......................
Arkansas ....................
California.................
Colorado..................
Connecticut ...............
Delaware.....................
District of Columbia..........
Florida ......................
Georgia......................
Hawaii ........................
Idaho.........................
Illinois........................
Indiana......................
Indian Territory.............
Iowa........................
Kansas........................
Kentucky.....................
Louisiana....................
Maine........................
Maryland ........-...........
Massachusetts ...............
Michigan ....................
Minnesota ...................
Mississippi...................
Missouri .....................
Montana .....................
Nebraska .....................
Nevada ......................
New Hampshire .............
New Jersey ..................
New Mexico .................
New York....................
North Carolina ...............
North Dakota................
Ohio ..........................
Oklahoma ...................
Oregon........ ...........


0 0



2 ...... 8
1 ...... 5
1 ...... 4
...... ...... 1
47 23 153
15
1 ...... 15
5 4 37
...... ...... 3
1 1 5
115
11 ...... 7
4 ...........
11 1 6

49 1 123
23 ...... 5
...... ...... 1
5 ...... 3
2 ...... 2
18 ...... 2
8 ...... 26
1 ...... 1
4 1 26
34 1 65
5 1 34
15 ...... 31

7 1. 195
I ...... 5

1 ...... 1

54 3 91
2 ...... ........
216 78 1,150

2 ...... 2

3 ...... ........
3 ...... 6


0





17
6
5
1
550
25
79
5
28
88
5
69
1
340
33
1
24
11
24
124
5
60
307
67
78
1
64
9
18
3
5
232
3
3,591
1
7
133
3
21


I



2

1
1
108
11
44
3
6
23


261i
13
1
31
5
3
5
4
45
186
47
60

45
2
14
2
6
146
1
2,167

12
90

5


1

41'
9
74
1
6
29





4
102
3



29
13

27
4
29
241
17
13

26"

5"


134

1,837
4
69

" "4"


4
1
3
1
110
22
123
5
2
4
2
11
5
469
32
1
63
12
1
13
4
33
350
97
120

46
11
35
1
13
252
1
1,961
1
38
235
1
13


9

1 2
........ 1

50 299
5 45
36 209
2 16
1 9
6 27
2 4
1 29
1 8
290 1,065
12 49
...... 2
25 159
3 23
4 5
7 33
4 19
39 87
111 760
46 233
37 412
1
40 170
6 21
14 73
........ 10
2 30
137 660
1 2
1,359 5,722
1
7 90
120 563
3 4
1 27


0)
-




10


2
883
24
70
4
12
325
14
27
4
454
14

56
10
7
52
8
47
372
71
123
3
69
20
19
3
12
181

3, 408
3
17
123
3
27


...... ........

...... ........
2 90
1 6
...... 22


...... 2

1 ........
3
2


7 96
9

1 9
2
2
...... 2

...... 12
1

12 69
2 47
6 13
...... 1
1 39
8
9


10 33
81 442

...... 5
4 26

...... '3






Pennsylvania................. 3
Porto Rico .................... 22
Rhode Island .....................
South Carolina............... ....
South Dakota ................. ......
Tennessee .................... ......
Texas......................... ......
Utah..............................
Vermont..................... ......
Virginia ............................
Washington .................. 7
West Virginia......................
Wisconsin.................. ......
Wyoming..........................

Total.................... 466


262
15
12
3
7

4
4
2
7
13
6
32
3


18 23
14 1
1 4
...... 1



1 4
1 ......
3 2
... 1 ....
...... ......


525
139
44
4
16
3
38
12
12
16
77
7
57
5


384
13
30

6
2
12
6
4
5
17
4
56
3


255
4
45

1
2
6
1
2
24
6
14


912
16
49

26
2
17
30
7
7
32
23
124
4


312
1
12
2
8
1
15
7
1
5
11
2
57
3


1,632
34
95
2
41
5
68
30
20
9
115
49
264
7


403
264
38
1
13
6
48
34
6
12
121
8
88
5


639 129 2,286 174 711 343 1 439 853 959 6,999 3,885 3,069 5,345 365 2,810 13,250 6,978


3 113
...... ......
1 6

1 2
...... 2


7 1 1
-......

...... 2~
7 21

141 1,128 8





o
Cz










'-


I


I










TABLE IX.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, ETc.-Continued.


Destination.


Alabama...............
Alaska..................
Arizona................
Arkansas ...............
California..............
Colorado.............
Connecticut ...........
Delaware ...............
District of Columbia....
Florida ..............
Georgia ................
Hawaii .................
Idaho..................
Illinois..................
Indiana.................
Indian Territory........
Iowa....................
Kansas................
Kentucky...............
Louisiana.............
Maine... ...........
Maryland ...............
Massachusetts ..........
Michigan ..............
Minnesota ..............
Miscissippi.............
Missouri ...............
Montana................
Nebraska ...............
Nevada .................
New Hampshire ........
New Jersey ............
New Mexico..........
New York..............
North Carolina..........
North Dakota...........
Ohio ......... .....
Oklahoma ..............
Oregon..................


0


oI

1 1
........ .....


10 8
5 ......
36 6
1 ......

17 1
........ 1..

........ 1.
S
90 21

5 2

78 ......



....... 1.. .
1
1 1



1 ......
1.
9 3
90 21
25 .
25 ......
13 3

22 3




3 ......
7 1


71 25

473 346"


109 9

........ I......


.a








2



48
2
2






9
4



51
64
32
22


1
24


109

992
13
5
213
1
312
3


2

58
3
20
4
2
3

1
1
98
3

98
1

5
7
3
140
45
34

9
4
5

6
67

544

5
40
1
2


54
3
4

1,216
42
100
2
3
228
14
219
3
337
4


4
2
128
10
44
642
115
109
5
38
8
11

1
262

4,211
2
21
68
2
64


12

4

165
55
225
9
4
8
3
3
445
25
1
45
10
7
9
11
35
437
107
99
4
79
45
21
3
24
309
1
2,842
i ".....
16
276
1
11


0a







1



29 17
4 2
35 25
3 2
2 ......
12 1
2 ......

11 ......

7 9
1 ......
1.
13 14



8 10
145 40
21 16
29 20
..............
18 11
2 3
11 6
1 1
2 ......

3 ......

........ ......


3 3
3 1


0



75
6
57
21
301
296
74
3
1

2
1
18
668
123
17
72
133
5
6
8
42
133
485
115
1
75
74
12
6
6
79
23
1,188
1
12
352
2
12


1
..




18
1
2
58
5
37
2
2
9
1
1
4
201
23

29"
6

8
5
18
179
35
82
1
39
8
6


96

1,515

16
68

5


2 ......
aa










107 2
OU -







15 ......
166 ......
9 ......


1
6 ......
1 ......
6 ......
1 ......

318 1
15 1


7 ...--.
2 ......
6 ...--.
11 ......

590 8
48 ......


40 ......
14 ......
12 ......
11
2 ......
11 ......
303 5

5,424 63
1 ......
18
18 ......
116 ......
8


3

1
3
108
22
263
13
15
12
4
3
543
36

49
10
3
70
17
57
765
122
113
4
87
14
15
2
39
556

4,619"
....... ii
44
312
4
13


0
0




1

27
2
31
1
3
2

1
54
5
1
49
1


42
13
155
21
49

12
1
8
1
14
56
790


38
1
1


o o
0 0



6 --
........ 1. .

3 -
175 13
16 ..
219 21 ci
13 2 I
12 1
17 ..
6 .
11 ..
2 ....
784 57
24 2
3 ......
32 4
13 .. ..
9 1
16 1
14 2
194 5 O
1,024 41
93 8
131 12

119 5
11 ......
28 3
1 ......
17 ......
516 34

9,978 572
1.
15 2
320 22

12.






Pennsylvania........... 357 21 508 151 570 1,320 220
Porto Rico.............. 2 1 .. 1 15 9 23
Rhode Island........... 24 6 9 31 104 58 35
South Carolina.......... ........ ...... .......... 3 1
South Dakota........... 1 ...... 5 3 21 12 3
Tennessee.............. ........ ..... 1 1 ..
Texas ................... 10 ...... 21 9 15 26 10
Utah.................... 3 3 1 13 18 16 13
Vermont.............. .. 1 1 2 2 ........ 53 ........
Virginia ................ 3 ...... ........ 10 7 4
Washington ............ 3 1 13 11 232 41 15
West Virginia...... ........ 1 2 2 12 84 5
Wisconsin .............. 32 1 69 35 113 101 27
Wyoming............................................ 2 4 ........

Total ............. 1,448 485 2,549 1,395 9,148 7,085 1,956


2,901 253
1 2
39 17
2 ........
35 12
1 ..
33 2
135 5
6 .. ....
18 2
105 10
127 4
115 54
56 1


54 73
8 1
2
2 ......



2 3
2 2
2 2
1 1
6 2

6 17


839 8,059 2,826 192 220 631 605


767 6 1,451 1 204
22 ...... 11 .......
92 ...... 105 5
1 ...... ..... ............
21...... 14 8
5 ...... 2 2
13 ...... 21 2
68 ...... 10 .......
9 ...... 12 127
6 1 9 1
15; i 28 12
4 ...... 36 14
48 1 129 11
4 ...... 1 ........


8,513 91 9,770 1,730


1,808 1 91
8
107 1

9
6 ......
26 2 H
5 ...... .
5.
11 1 W
59 3 '
16 1
95 17
2 ......

15,992 925







H

r(


II


I I I I I I I~


I


I~


I











TABLE IX.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903, ETc.-Continued.


.Destination.


Alabama....................
Alaska ......................
Arizona .....................
Arkansas....................
California ................
Colorado ..................
Connecticut.... ........
Delaware...............
District of Columbia..........
Florida......................
Georgia......................
Hawaii....................
Idaho .......................
Illinois .... ............
Indiana ..................
Indian Territory..............
Iowa.......................
Kansas ....................
Kentucky .................
Louisiana ...................
Maine.....................
Maryland....................
Massachusetts................
Michigan..................
Minnesota....................
Mississippi .................
Missouri.....................
Montana..................
Nebraska.....................
Nevada......................
New Hampshire.............
New Jersey.................
New Mexico.................
New York....................
North Carolina..............
North Dakota ...............
Ohio.........................
Oklahoma..................


18
4
19


1


82
8


81
3
1
16
1
5
41
14



3


59

897

3
50
1


2 1|










5 15

1i28" ......

...... 1
18 ,45






1 2
3 211
72 30
4 61
3 7
128







.1 2..... 1
2 1
...... .....
1 2
3 213

10..... 18

504 378

3 13
.. 1


26
'&









9
1




127
3





10
2
14
3
2

28
11
1,176
23
14

4
6

67

1
1,024
2
6
42
1


z;

4

3"
250
12
45
3
9
1,215
2
32
6
349
33
24
10
8
8
18
108
532
82
90

86
5
15
3
21
161

1,771
1
22
176


'd







193
10
87
44
3,707
624
2,132
106
107
2,076
66
370
77
7,547
491
30
798
275
72
420
236
947
8,538
1,915
1,889
24
1,226
268
367
38
284
4,928
31
57,491
16
377
3,665
34


a s


81 o o s


............ 3 51 ......
...... ...... 2 2 4
...... ...... 8 33 1
.... . . 7 15 ...
18 13 1,036 2,828 34
............ 110 714 5
2 .... 66 1,981 2
.... ...... 5 11 ......
1...... 5 33...
3 2 2i 120 8
...... ...... ........ 37 ......
5 3 3,964 5,316 .....
......... 36 58 ......
9 1 663 5,752 15
............ 42 341 2
...... ...... 35 ......
............ 274 667 1
............ 89 158 1
............ 1 36 1
2 1 38 2,538.....
1 ...... 25 99 2
2 ...... 15 230 ......
22 2 643 4,782 18
1 ...... 361 1,336 3
2 ...... 772 1,055 1
... .... 2 20 ...
...... 1 79 692 1
............ 111 189 2
...... ...... 214 320 3
... . ... 7 142 ......
...... ...... 17 94 1
4 ...... 71 3,790 9
.. ....... 26
157 97 660 17,150 120
.... ...... ........ 21 ......
1 ...... 650..... .....60 381
2 ...... 328 1 3,608 5
............ 37 24 ......


1




147
34
131
60
5,549
1,637
9,021
620
157
189
88
508
174
27,110
1,900
100
2,057
471
61
685
644
1,382
22,126
9,403
9,999
56
2,687
631
947
295
730
14,832
64
76,003
19
1,649
18,192
41


r


I .

al sa 0 ss
0 0





14 24 2 241 162 613
3 6 2 53 17 86
5 16 ....... 194 57 343
10 15 ...... 107 112 264
1,220 1,631 785 13,114 5,375 22,746
24 96 15 2,901 1,228 4,778
68 3,013 110 14,263 5,339 21,813
1 83 3 823 242 1,176
21 107 19 343 223 701
233 219 13 808 2,133 5,105
22 19 3 169 91 331
266 9 63 10,134 4,008 14,581
5 49 7 329 131 538
459 7,472 392 41,873 13,618 63,378
24 301 24 2,634 1,184 4,342
2 11 ....... 153 87 271
28 1,019 49 4,095 2,139 7,056
15 154 4 892 909 2,087
13 40 1 153 135 384
275 102 92 3,733 2,057 6,334
14 315 72 1,172 584 1,997
92 382 50 2,153 1,598 4,758
918 11, 292 1,293 41,096 15,816 65,757
75 1,956 75 13,210 5,728 20,920
69 3,450 100 15,448 5,420 22,835
3 12 2 95 73 193
102 568 59 4,189 1,653 7,132
11 263 6 1,213 519 2,009
15 503 19 2,021 1,685 4,091
2 36 ....... 482 67 590
6 358 45 1,251 321 1,861
316 5,477 194 24,693 8,680 38,533
6 7 ....... 103 78 218
6,116 33,802 3,433 137,538 56,045 254,665
2 3 1 46 50 113
9 788 24 3,502 3,126 7,012
175 2,487 199 24,996 8,390 37,184
2 12 1 117 261 415







Oregon ....................... 1 1 .... 2 ... I 5 226 ......
Pennsylvania ................ 174 51 55 372 51 633 16, 344 7
PortoRico... ................ 6 9 1 2 1 23 492 .
Rhode Island................. 3 2 ...... 289 3 62 1,269 1
SSouth Carolina.......................... ...... 2 ..... ........ 14 ......
OC SouthDakota ................. 1 ...... 3 4 2 12 273
CT Tennessee .................... ........ 1 ..... 2 ...... 4 52 ......
' Texas ....................... 1 1 10 6 10 405 2
Utah ...................... 1 ...... 1 32 ...... 59 503 1
Vermont .............-...-........ ...... 1 1...... 21 288 1
SVirginia...................... ....... ............ 1 1 10 131 ......
SWashington .................. 1 5 5 ...... 46 953 2
West Virginia ................ 3 ...... ...... 2 ...... 15 432 1
Wisconsin .............. ....... 18 6 15 12 92 1,698 1
W yom ing .................... .............. ...... 1 ...... 1 94 ...

Total ................... 1,465 833 623 3,823 412 6,097 24,683 248


134
1,350
81
58

201
6
156
78
22
9
501
36
348
16


163 6
18,359 17
37 1
757 1
3 ......
328 1
52 .
116 1
94 .....
113 ......
86 ......
499 21
1,022 ......
1,044 1
60 2


124 13,3631 77,5181 290


622 91
92,758 675
141 411
3,055 61
15 2
1,185 15
211 19
541 58
391 14
698 7
255 19
2,065 280
2,832 4
5,175 75
299 7

320,642 12,379


171
11,325
108
1,289
3
514
18
138
203
121
38
674
140
1,472
75

92,686


27 1,214
515 125,008
28 807
228 5,450
3 26
35 2,279
5 311
6 1,018
83 864
13 975
9 416
212 4,255
12 4,047
76 8,192
4 464

8,413 525,663


535 1,996
35,292 177,169
697 2,135
2,704 9,467
29 73
1,371 3,939
132 498
977 2,438
753 2,132 )
336 1,611
327 890
1,682 6,967
684 5,170
4,599 14,546
242 805 Q

199,701 857,046






o
ts


a




r
a




H








34 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


Table X gives the arrivals in the United States from the foreign
countries whence they respectively came, of all aliens during each year
since 1857 arranged in the form of reports of alien passengers issued
prior to the organization of the Bureau.

TABLE X.-NUMBER AND NATIONALITIES OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED
STATES FROM 1857 TO 1903, INCLUSIVE.


Countries. 1857.

Austria-Hungary.............. ......
Belgium.................... 1,011
Denmark.................... 762
France........................ 4,441
German Empire............... 86,407
Italy........................... 1,046
Netherlands................... 986
Norway ....................... 1
Portugal...................... 116
Russian Empire and Finland.. 74
Spain.......................... 637
Sweden........................ 881
Switzerland .................. 1,713
United Kingdom:
England................. 27,060
Ireland................... 59,370
Scotland................... 3,833
Wales...................... 601
Europe not specified .......... 20,191
Total Europe............ 209,130

China ........................ 4,524
Other Asia...................... 4
Total Asia............... 4,528

Africa ........................ 26
British North America ......... 6, 068
Central America .............. 277
Mexico........................ 401
South America ............... 85
WestIndies.................... 808
All other countries............ 9,223


1858. 1859. 1860. 1861.


160
490
2,747
69,586
1,414
1,201
..........
203
108
922
2,645
1,671
21,013
41,500
3,202
492
16,823


137
470
2,772
46,635
1,051
168
.........
85
314
1,454
1,850
866

15,188
34,410
1,981
320
11,884


30
527
3,080
43,946
920
342

88
156
974
629
676

12,838
40,547
1,995
547
12,633


13
100
154
3,389
52,116
954
369
92
129
804
287
1,243
13,207
43,351
1,244
554
13,771


1862. 1863.

78 93
124 136
1,565 1,473
2,898 2,314
23,811 29,741
621 514
339 349
.......... 20
22 104
134 135
381 836
1,021 1,179
587 696

7,659 13,615
16,800 36,545
730 954
366 632
7,055 33,432


164,177 i 119,585 119,928 131,777 64,191 122,268

7,183 3,215 6,117 6,094 4,174 5,280
5 1 8 14 7 9

7,188 3,216 6,125 6,108 4,181 5,289
8 20 119 48 8 12
5,360 4,544 4,412 3,221 2,538 3,388
11 5 7 9 31 8
S342 301 243 207 197 101
130 116 204 148 90 139
922 718 1,158 853 543 575
13,804 1,066 947 506 404 1,145


Grand total.............. 230,546 191,942 129,571 133,143 142,877 72,183


Countries.

Austria-Hungary..............
Belgium......................
Denmark......................
France .......................
German Empire...............
Italy..........................
Netherlands....................
Norway .......................
Portugal .....................
Russian Empire and Finland
Spain........................
Sweden......................
Switzerland ..................
United Kingdom;
England.................
Ireland....................
Scotland...................
Wales ....................
Europe not specified ..........
Total Europe............

China.... ...................
Other Asia.................

Total Asia..............
Africa .......................
British North America ........
CentralAmerica ..............
Mexico.......................
South America..............
West Indies .................
All other countries............


1864. 1865. 1866. 1867.


136
411
738
2,128
41,155
694
520
265
48
385
681
1,192
1,022
29,349
69,161
3,136
856
29,222

181,099
5,240
2
5,242


518 87
282 1,515
772 1,092
2,949 5,724
58,153 120,218
594 1,318
572 1,613
84 9,220
383 249
217 999
902 613
2,500 2,840
1,738 3,751
25,964
51,018 133,061
3,195
332
19,599 13

169,772 282,313

3,702 1,872
11 25

3,713 1,897


392
1,173
2,031
5,886
124,076
1,585
2,598
2,510
320
618
862
5,919
4,656


126,289

15

278,930

3,519
60
3,579


1868.

553
97
1,596
5,119
122,677
1,549
718
4,296
294
376
876
11,253
3,405


115,392

9

268,210
6,707
63

6,770


1869.

1,499
1,922
3,649
3,879
131,042
1,489
1,134
16,068
87
527
1,123
24,224
3,650

S35,673
40,786
7,751
660
40,380

315,543
12,874
68

12,942


132,925


1870.

4,425
1,002
4,083
4,007
118,225
2,893
1,066
13,216
255
1,130
663
13,443
3,075
60,957
56,996
12,521
1,011
29,216

328,184

15,740
85

15,825


25 46 32 26 21 72 31
3,642 3,763 87,419 18,128 5,373 21,117 40,411
1 1 6 5 2 3 33
78 139 244 237 292 320 463
142 128 225 266 197 90 69
494 743 988 891 839 2,237 1,679
391 2,034 9,453 1,042 485 444 508


Grand total.............. 191,114 180,839 332,577 303,104 282,189 352,768









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 35


TABLE X.-NUMBER AND NATIONALITIES OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED
STATES FROM 1857 TO 1903, INCLUSIVE-Continued.


Countries.


Austria-Hungary..............
Belgium.....................
Denmark.....................
France .......................
German Empire...............
Italy ..........................
Netherlands -.........--..........
Norway.......................
Portugal......................
Russian Empire and Finland..
Spain.........................
Sweden.......................
Switzerland ...................
United Kingdom:
England...................
Ireland...................
Scotland................
Wales.--.....................
Europe not specified ..........


1871.


4,887
774
2,015
3,137
82,554
2,816
993
9,418
290
1,208
558
10,699
2, 269

56, 530
57, 139
11,984
899
16,078


Total Europe............ 264,548

China ........................ 7,135
Other Asia..................... 102

Total Asia-.............. 7,237

Africa ........................ 23
British North America........ 47,082
Central America .............. 4
Mexico........................ -402
South America.........---....... 96
West Indies.................... 1,251
All other countries............ 707

Grand total.............. 321,350


Countries.


1878.


Austria-Hungary ............ 5,150
Belgium..---...-----.........-- 354
Denmark...................... 2,105
France ....................... 4,159
German Empire .............. 29,313
Italy........................... 4,344
Netherlands............. .... 608
Norway ...................... 4,759
Portugal..........--.. -----... 660
Russian Empire and Fmnlanl.. 3,595
Spain .........--------.. ...... 457
Sweden ...........-. ..... .... 5,390
Switzerland ................... 1,808
United Kingdom:
England..--- ... 18,405
Ireland .................... 15,932
Scotland................... 3,502
Wales ................... 243
Europe not specilied.......... 48

Total Europe............ 100,832

China ....................... 8,992
Other Asia--------------22
Other Asia .................... 22

Total Asia............... 9,014

Africa ................ ....... 12
British North America ........ 25, 568
Central America .............. 50
Mexico........................ 465
South America ..........-..... 88
WestIndies.................... 1,019
All other countries............ 1,421

Grand total ............ 138,469


1872.


4,410
738
3,690
9,317
141,109
4,190
1,909
11,421
416
2,665
595
',, l


69,764
68,732
13,916
1,211
65


1873. 1874.


7,112 8,850
1,176 817
4,931 3,082
14,798 9,643
119,671 87,291
8,757 7,667
3,811 2,444
16,247 10,384
24 60
41,972 5,868
541 485
14,303 5,712
3,107 3,093

71,801 50,905
77,344 53,707
13,841 10,429
840 665
104 130


351,265 396,380 261,232

7,788 20,291 13,776
37 39 61

7,825 20,330 13,837

38 22 14
40,176 37,871 32,960
8 38 20
569 606 386
101 163 144
1,351 1,657 1,829
3,473 2,736 2,917

404,806 459,803 313,339


1879. 1880.


5,963 17,267
512 1,232
3,474 6,576
4,655 4,313
34,602 84,638
5,791 12.354
753 3,340
7,345 19,895
392 260
4,942 7,191
457 389
11,001 39,186
3,161 6,156

24,183 59,454
20,013 71,603
5,225 12,640
543 1,173
58 80

133,070 347,747

9,604 5,802
56 37

9,660 5,839

I17 21
31,268 99,706
9 44
556 492
69 88
1,123 1,351
2,054 1,969

177,826 457,257


1881.


27,935
1,766
9,117
5,227
210,485
15,401
8,597
22,705
171
10,655
484
49,760
11,293

65,177
72,342
15.168
1,027
131

527,441

11,890
92

11,982

25
125,391
29
325
110
1,680
2,448

669,431


1875.


7,658
615
2,656
8,321
47,769
3,631
1,237
6,093
763
8,981
601
5,573
1,814

40,130
37,957
7,310
449
77

181,635

16,437
57

16, 494

35
24,051
15
610
132
1,832
2,694

227,498


1876.


6, 276
515
1,547
8,002
31,937
3,017
855
5,173
471
5,700
518
5,603
1,549

24,373
19,575
4,582
324
86

120,103

22,781
153

22,934

41
22,471
15
631
156
1,413
2,222

169,986


1882. 1883. 1884.


29,150 27,625 36,571
1,431 1,450 1,576
11,618 10,319 9,202
6,003 4,821 3,608
250,630 194,786 179,676
32,160 31,792 16,510
9,517 5,249 4,198
29,101 23,398 16,974
42 176 701
21,590 11,920 17,226
378 262 299
64,607 38,277 26,552
10,844 12,751 9,386

82,394 63,140 55,918
76,432 81,486 63,344
18,937 11,859 9,060
1,656 1,597 901
274 246 504

646,764 521,154 452,206

39,579 8,031 279
50 82 231

39,629 8,113 510

32 56 13
98,295 70,241 60,584
20 9 23
366 469 430
91 77 65
1,291 903 2,208
2,504 2,300 2,553

788,992 603,322 518,592


1877.


5,396
488
1,695
5,856
29,298
3,195
591
4,588
1,291
7,132
665
4,991
1,686

19,161
14,569
4,135
281
74

105,092

10,594
39

10,633

16
22,116
7
445
87
1,390
2,071

141,857








36 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


TABLE X.-NUMBER AND NATIONALITIES OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED
STATES FROM 1857 TO 1903, INCLUSIVE-Continued.


Countries. 1885. 1886. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891. 1892.


Austria-Hungary ........... 27,309 28,680 40,265 45,814 34,174 56,199 71,042 76,937
Belgium .................... 1,653 1,300 2,553 3,212 2,562 2,671 3,037 4,026
Denmark ................... 6,100 6,225 8,524 8,962 8,699 9,366 10,659 10,125
France, including Corsica .. 3,495 3,318 5,034 6,454 5,918 6,585 6,770 4,678
German Empire ............ 124,443 84,403 106,865 109,717 99,538 92,427 113,554 119,168
Gibraltar............................. 8 12 18 13 9 13 .....
Greece ...................... 172 104 313 782 158 524 1,105 660
Italy, including Sicily and
Sardinia .................. 13,642 21,315 47,622 51,558 25,307 52,003 76,055 61, 631
Malta ...................... 4 7 1 3 ......... 1 6 .....
Netherlands ................ 2,689 2,314 4,506 5,845 6,460 4,326 5,206 6,141
Norway..................... 12,356 12,759 16,269 18,264 13,390 11,370 12,568 14,325
Poland....................... 3,085 3,939 6,128 5,826 4,922 11,073 27,497 40,536
Portugal, including Cape
Verde and Azores islands. 2,024 1,194 1,360 1,625 2,024 2,600- 2,999 3,400
Roumania .................. 803 494 2,045 1,186 893 517 957 .......
Russian Empire and Finland 17,158 17,800 30,766 33,487 33, 916 35,598 47, 426 81,511
Spain ...................... 350 344 436 526 526 813 905 4,078
Sweden .................... 22, 248 27,751 42,836 54,698 35,415 29,632 36,880 41,845
Switzerland................. 5,895 4,805 5,214 7,737 7,070 6,993 6,811 6,886
Turkey in Europe .......... 138 1 176 206 207 252 206 265 1,331
United Kingdom:
England................ 47,332 49,767 72,855 82,574 68,503 57,020 53,600 34,309
Ireland ................. 51,795 49,619 68,370 73,513 65,557 53,024 55,706 51,383
Scotland................ 9,226 12,126 18,699 24,457 18,296 12,041 12,557 7,177
Wales................... 1,127 1,027 1,820 1,654 1,181 650 424 729
Europe,not specified........ 39 54 130 12 16 32 43 .........

Total Europe ......... 353,083 329,529 482,829 538,131 434,790 445,680 546,085 570,876
China....................... 22 40 10 26 118 1,716 2,836 (a)
Other Asia .................. 176 277 605 817 1,607 2,732 4,842 (a)

Total Asia ............ 198 317 615 843 1,725 4,448 7,678 (a)

Africa............ ... 112 122 40 65 187 112 103 (a)
Australasia, Tasmania, New
Zealand, and Pacific is-
lands, not specified ....... 679 1,136 1,282 2, 387 2,196 1,167 1,301 (a)
British North America .....i 38,291 ............... .........................
Central America............ 24 32 23 67 88 147 285 (n)
M exico .....................I 323 .. .... ..... ..... .... .
South America.............. 44 246 366 40 27 438 664 (a)
WestIndies ............. 2,477 2,731 4,876 4,880 4,923 3,070 3,906 (a)
All other countries ......... 115 87 78 76 91 240 297 8,787

Total immigrants..... 395,346 334,203 490,109 46,889 444,427 4,302 560,319 579,663


Countries. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898.


Austria-Hungary ........................ 57,420 38,638 33,401 65,103 33,031 39,797
Belgium ................................. 3,324 1,709 1,058 1,261 760 695
Denmark ............................... 7,720 5,003 3,910 3,167 2,085 1,946
France, including Corsica ............... 3,621 3,080 2,628 2,463 2,107 1,990
German Empire............... ......... 78, 756 53,989 32,173 31, 85 22,533 17,111
Greece................................... 1,072 1,356 597 2,175 571 2,339
Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia..... 72,115 42,977 35,427 68,060 59,431 58,613
Netherlands -. ..--.... .................. 6,199 1,820 1,388 1,583 890 767
Norway ................................ 15,515 9,111 7,580 8,855 5,842 4,938
Poland ................................. 16,371 1,941 791 691 4,165 4,726
Portugal, including Cape Verde and
Azore islands .......................... 4,631 2,196 1,452 2,766 1,874 1,717
Roumania ....................................... 729 523 785 791 900
Russian Empire and Finland............ 42,310 39,278 35,907 51,445 25,816 29,828
Spain .................................... 206 925 501 351 448 577
Sweden ................................. 35,710 18,286 15,361 21,177 13,162 12,398
Switzerland.............................. 4,744 2,905 2,239 2,304 1,566 1,246
Turkey in Europe....................... 625 298 245 169 152 176
United Kingdom:
England ............................. 27,931 17,747 23, 443 19, 492 9,974 9,877
Ireland .............................. 43,578 30,231 46,304 40,262 28,421 26,128
Scotland............................ 6,215 3,772 3,788 3,483 1,883 1,797
Wales ............................... 1,013 1,001 1,602 1,581 870 1,219
Europe not specified............................... 60 24 9 25 1

TotalEurope...................... .29,139 277,052 250,342 329,067 216,397 217,786

aIncluded in all other countries.
v, included in all other countries.








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 37


TABLE X.-NUMBER AND NATIONALITIES OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED
STATES FROM 1857 TO 1903, INCLUSIVE-Continued.


Countries. 1893. 1894. 1895. 1896. 1897. 1898.


China.................................... 472 1,170 539 1,441 3,363 2,071
China----- ---- 1,170 539 1,441 3,363 2,071

Japan- ................................. 1,380 1,931 1,150 1,110 1,526 2,230
Other Asia ............................... 510 1,589 2,806 4,213 4,773 4,336

Total Asia.......................... 2,392 4,690 4,495 6,764 9, 662 8,637

Africa.................................. (a) 24 36 21 37 48
Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, and
Pacific Islands, not specified ........... () 244 141 112 199 201
British North America ................... ......... 194 239 273 290 350
Central America ........................ (,,) 32 21 17 6 7
Mexico..................... ... .............. --- 109 116 150 91 107
South America........................ (a) 39 36 35 19 39
West Indies...... ................... 2,593 3,177 3,096 6,828 4,101 2,124
All other countries................ 5,606 70 14 ...........

Total immigrants................. 439,730 285,631 258,536 343,267 230,832 229,299


Countries.


Austria-Hngary ...................................
Belgium ...................................... ...
Denm ark.........................................
France, including Corsica.........................
German Empire .................................
Greece.........................................
Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia................
Netherlands......................................
Norway ............................................
Poland ...........................................
Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore islands.
Roumania.........................................
Russian Empire and Finland .....................
Servia, Bulgaria, and Montenegro .................
Spain...............................................
Sweden...........................................
Switzerland .......................................
Turkey in Europe.................................
United Kingdom:
England......................................
Ireland ........... ............. ...............
Scotland.......................................
W ales....... ............................... ...
Europe, not specified.............................

Total Europe ................................

China ........................................
Japan .............................................
Other Asia ........................................

Total Asia ..................................

A frica .................................. ...........
Australia, Tasmania, New Zealand, and Pacific
islands, not specified............................
British North America .............................
Central America .................................
Mexico ................................... ....
South Am erica ...................................
W est Indies .......................................
All other countries.................................

Total immigrants ..........................


1899.


62,491
1,101
2,690
1,694
17,476
2,333
77,419
1,029
6,705
(b)
2,054
1,606
60,982
52
385
12,797
1,326
80

10,402
31,673
1,724
1,324
6

297,349

1,660
2,844
4,468

8,972

51

1,322

159
161
89
2,585
1,027

311,715


1900.


114,847
1,196
2,926
1,739
18,507
3,771
100,135
1,735
9,575
(b)
4,231
6, 459
90,787
108
355
18,650
1,152
285

9,951
35,730
1,792
764
2

424,700

1,247
12,635
4,061
17,346

30
........ ..
396

12
237
124
4, 656
441

448,572


1901. 1902. 1903.


113,390 171,989 206,011
1,579 2,577 3,450
3,655 5,660 7,158
3,150 3,117 5,578
21,651 28,304 40,086
5,910 8,104 14,090
135,996 178,375 230,622
2,349 2,281 3,998
12,248 17,484 24,461
(b) (b) (b)
4,165 5,307 9,317
7,155 7,196 9,310
85,257 107,347 136,093
657 851 1,761
592 975 2,080
23,331 30,894 46,028
2,201 2,344 3,983
387 187 1,529

12,214 13,575 26,219
30,561 29,138 35,310
2,070 2,560 6,143
701 763 1,275
1I 37 5

469,237 619,068 814,507

2,459 1,619 2,209
5,269 14,270 19,968
5,865 6,352 7,789

13,593 22,271 29,966

173 37 176
498 566 1,349
540 636 1,058

150 305 678
347 709 528
203 337 589
3,176 4,711 8,170
1 103 25

487,918 648,743 857,046


a Included in all other countries.
SBeginning with 1899, Polish immigrants have been included in the countries to which they
belong.








38 REPORT OF OOMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


In Table XI is given the figures for the calendar year ending Decem-
ber 31, 1902, to assist those who keep records of alien immigration for
such period.

TABLE XI.-ARRIVALS OF IMMIGRANTS BY NATIONALITIES, IN THE UNITED STATES DUR-
ING THE CALENDAR YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1902.


Countries.


Austria-Hungary .......................
Belgium.................................
Denmark................................
France, including Corpica...............
German Empire........................
Greece ..............................
Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia ....
Netherlands .............................
Norway ................................
Portugal, including Cape Verde and
Azore islands.........................
Roumania..............................
Russian Empire and Finland'...........
Servia, Bulgaria, and Montenegro.......
Spain, including Canary and Balearic
islands ................................
Sweden .............................
Switzerland ...........................
Turkey in Europe......................
United Kingdom:
England..............................
Ireland............ ....
Scotland ...
Wales cotland............. .............
Wales ................ ..............


Immi-
grants.

185,659
2,822
6,318
3,391
32,736
11,490
201,269
2,484
20,152

7,575
8,853
123,882
899

1,281
39,020
2,623
541

16,147
31,406
2,863
922


Countries.


Europe, not specified ..................
Total Europe.....................
China ...............- ---------........
Japan...............................
India ..................................
Turkey in Asia........................
Other Asia ............................
Total Asia .......................
Africa..................................
Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand
Philippine Islands .....................
Pacific islands, not specified..........
British North America.................
British Honduras.....................
Other Central America ...............
M exico ..............................
South America........................
West Indies ............................
All other countries .................
Grand total....................


Table XII gives the immigration of aliens for each year beginning
with 1820 up to and including that for the fiscal year 1903; and the
two succeeding tables repeat the figures presented in Table VI, but
arranged with reference to the calendar year.

TABLE XII.-NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES EACH YEAR
FROM 1820 TO 1903, BOTH INCLUSIVE.


Period.


Year ending September 30-
1820 .................................
1821.................................
1822 .......................... ......
1823. ..............................
1824..................................
1825 ..............................
1826 .............................. ..
1827.................................
1828..................................
1829........... ......... ...........
1830............... ..............
1831 .............................. ..
October 1, 1831, to December 31, 1832 ...
Year ending December 31-
1833..................................
1834..................................
1835..................................
1836 .................................
1837 .................................
1838.................................-
1839.................................
1840..................................
1841.................................
1842..................................
January 1 to September 30,1843..........
Year ending September 30-
1844..................................
1845..................................
1846..................................
1847.................................


Immi-
grants
arrived.


8,385
9,127
6,911
6,854
7,912
10,199
10,837
18,875
27,382
22,520
23,322
22,633
60,482

58,640
65,365
45,374
76,242
79,340
38,914
68,069
84,066
80,289
104,565
52,496

78,615
114,371
154,416t
234,968


Immi-
Period. grants
arrived.

Year ending September 30-Cont'd.
1848 ................................ 226,527
1849................................ 297,024
1850 ................................ 310,004
October 1 to December 31, 1850 ........ 59,976
Year ending December 31-
1851 ................................ 379,466
1852................................ 371,603
1853 ................................ 368,645
1854 ................................ 427,833
1855 ................................ 200,877
1856................................ 195,857
January 1 to June 30, 1857.............. 112,123
Year ending June 30-
1858 ................................ 191,942
1859................................ 129,571
1860................................ 133,143
1861................................ 142,877
1862 ................................ 72,183
1863 ................................ 132,925
1864 ................................ 191,114
1865 ................................ 180,339
1866 ................................ 332,577
1867 .................. ............. 303,104
1868................................ 282,189
1869 ................................ 352,768
1870 ................................ 387,203
1871 ................................ 321,350
1872 ................................ 404,806
1873 ................................ 459,803
1874 ................................ 313,339


Immi-
grants.

35
702,368
1,996
19,298
71
7,363
39
28,767
42
585
112
87
771
29
361
403
394
5,267
103
739,289









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 39


TABLE XII.-NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES EACH YEAR
FROn 1820 TO 1903, BOTH INCLUSIVE-Continued.


Period.


Year ending June 30-
1875................................
1876.................................
1877.................... ............
1878...............................
1879 ....... ... .....................
1880................ ....... ........
1881............ ................
1882.............................
1883 ................... ............
1884 ................................
1885.............. ..................
1886..............................
1887.......... ..................
1888................................
1889....... . ....................


Immi-
grants
arrived.


227,498
169,986
141,857
138,469
177,826
457,257
669,431
788,992
603,322
518,592
395,346
331,203
490,109
546,889
444,427


Period.


Year ending June 30-Continued.
1890 ................................
1891............... ..............
1892 ....... ..... ................
1893 ................................
1894 ..............................
1895...............................
1896 ...............................
1897 ..............................
1898 .......................... .....
1899 ...............................
1900 ...............................
1901 ................... .........
1902..............................
1903 ................................


TABLE XIII.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES DURING) THE Six
MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1902.


Countries.


Austria-Hungary ......................... .
Belgium...... ................................
Denmark......................
France, including Corsica.........................
German Empire...................................
Greece................... ........ .... .........
Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia................
Netherlands ... .............. ...........
Norway............... .........................
Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore islands.
Roumania.......................................
Russian Empire and Finland ......................
Servia, Bulgaria, and Montenegro..................
Spain, including Canary and Balearic islands....
Sw eden.............................................
Switzerland...................................
Turkey in Europe ...............................
United Kingdom:
England.............. .....................
Ireland........................................
Scotland........................................
Wales .......... ...............................

Total Europe.................................

China ............................................
Japan ..........................................
India ................ ... ........................
Turkey in Asia............. ..................
Other Asia ............... .....................


Sexofim:

Males.

48,171
828
1,449
1,250
10,059
4, 664
55,619
535
4,564
2,270
3,144
35,083
398
583
11,023
852
414

5,693
5,451
922
374

193,346

1,211
7,312
17
3,516
12


Total Asia................................... 12,068

Africa ............................................. 29
Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand ............ 270
Philippine Islands................................... 79
Pacific islands not specified ........................ 45
British North America ............................. 343
British Honduras.................................. 10
Other Central America........................... 150
M exico............................................ 123
South America ..................................... 128
West Indies......................................... 1,754
All other countries ........................ ....... 14

Grand total.................................. 208,359


migrants.

Females.

25,104
496
1,136
711
6,381
198
22,226
326
3,462
1,633
2,437
22,106
34
162
8,855
432
34

4,325
8,847
618
222

109,745

26
2,729
4
1,462
7


Total
immi-
grants.


73,275
1,324
2,585
1,961
16,440
4,862
77,845
861
8,026
3,903
5,581
57,189
432
745
19,878
1,284
448

10,018
14,298
1,540
596

303,091

1,237
10,041
21
4,978
19


4,228 16,296


Other
alien pas-
sengers.

2,560
491
551
3,093
9,474
116
2,735
617
474
129
151
1,388
22
820
898
914
77

12,542
2,820
2,575
176

42,623

92
140
90
290


612


9 38 167
104 374 226
6 85 2
6 51 7
172 515 1,553
10 20 6
67 217 315
51 174 319
49 177 428
831 2,585 3,034
4 18 .........

115,282 323,641 49,292


Immi-
grants
arrived.


455,302
560,319
579,663
439,730
285,631
258,536
343,267
230,832
229,299
311,715
448,572
487,918
648,743
857,046


Grand
total.


75,835
1,815
3,136
5,054
25,914
4,978
80,580
1,478
8,500
4,032
5,732
58,577
454
1,565
20,776
2,198
525

22,560
17,118
4,115
772

345,714

1,329
10,181
111
5,268
19

16,908

205
600
87
58
2,068
26
532
493
605
5,619
18

372,933









40 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


TABLE XIV.-REPORT OF ALIENS ARRIVED IN THE UNITED STATES DURING TIE SIX
MONTHS ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.


Sex of immigrants.
Countries. les.
Males. Females.


Austria-Hungary... ......................
Belgium ............................................
Denmark....... ........... ..............
France, including Corsica....... ..........
German Empire....... ....................
Greece...... .... .........................
Italy, including Sicily and Sardinia ............
Netherlands ... ......................
Norway ...............................
Portugal, including Cape Verde and Azore islands .
Roum ania..........................................
Russian Empire and Finland.....................
Servia, Bulgaria, and Montenegro .................
Spain, including Canary and Balearic islands .....
Sweden................................ ...........
Switzerland ........--........-.......-........--.....
Turkey in Europe......................... .....
United Kingdom:
England............ ............ .........
Ireland... ...........................
Scotland ....................................
Wales .......................................
Europe not specified ............................
Total Europe................................
China ..............................................
Japan .............................................
India ..............................................
Turkey in Asi.....................................
Other Asia....... ............................
Total Asia.................................

Africa .............................................
Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand............
Philippine Islands...............................
Pacific islands not specified ........................
British North America ......... ................
British Honduras.......... ....................
Other Central America..........................
Mexico......................................
South America ....................... ....
W est Indies ......................................
All other countries............................


99,813
1,480
3,105
2,263
14,802
8,970
131,347
1,964
11,685
3, 559
2,169
57,852
1,301
1,150
18,785
1,944
1,039
9,900
10,515
3,031
461
3
387,138
956
8,597
62
1,598
495

11,708
92
526
44
13
385
44
273
293
277
3,989
5


32,923
646
1,468
1,354
8,844
258
21,430
1,173
4,750
1,855
1,560
21,052
28
185
7,365
755
42

6,301
10,497
1,572
218
2
124,278
16
1,330
11
542
63

1,962
46
250
3
3
158
17
107
61
135
1,596
2


Grand total.................................. 404,787 128,618


Total
immi-
grants.

132,736
2,1261
4,573
3,617
23, 646
9,228
152,777
3,137
16,435
5,411
3,729
78,901
1,329
1,335
26,150
2,699
1,081.

16,201
21,012
4,603
679
5


511,416
972
9,927
73
2,140
558

13, 670
138
776
47
16
543
61
380
354
412
5,585
7


Other Grand
alien pas- total.
singers.

722 133,458
112 2,238
103 4,676
1,150 4,767
1,462 25,108
115 9,343
2,195 154,972
98 3,235
172 16,607
25 5,439
50 3,779
849 79,753
11 1,340
319 1,654
408 26,558
125 2,824
31 1,112
3,891 20,092
345 21,357
599 5,202
65 744
.......... 5


12,847
16
55
5
97
2
175

30
179
2
2
817
92
82
157
190
402
2


533,405 14,977


524,263
988
9,982
78
2,237
560

13,845
168
955
49
18
1,360
153
462
511
602
5,987
9
548,382


ALIEN CONTRACT LABOR.


Although the number of aliens rejected during the year as coming
to the United States under contract or agreement to perform labor
here was 1,086-which was larger than the denials on the same account
in any other year-yet the Bureau inclines to the belief that many more
would have been excluded had the provisions of the new act of March 3,
1903, been in force from the beginning of the fiscal year.
The construction placed upon the original act of February 26, 1885,
and the amendatory act of February 23, 1887, by the courts, although
made upon a consideration of the penal provisions thereof, naturally
affected the views and the actions of administrative officers in deciding
upon the admissibility of aliens. This construction, based upon a
review of the circumstances attendant upon the passage of the said
legislation and the expressed views of some of the legislators as to the
object intended to be accomplished thereby, was, substantially, that
Congress purposed merely to exclude the introduction, under contract,
in large numbers of the lower grades of unskilled manual laborers.






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 41

Notwithstanding that Congress has twice since before the passage
of the act of March 3, 1903, had occasion to express itself upon the
subject and has named the classes to be admitted although they came
under a prior contract, the construction referred to had apparently
secured such a foothold, both in the popular and the official under-
standing, that in every case nearly there was a reference to it and an
expression of individual opinion that Congress "did not intend to
exclude" such cases, "as is shown by the legislation on this subject."
Fortunately the general immigration act of the last Congress, in
which is embodied the law in relation to the importation of contract
labor, has finally set the subject at rest by amplifying the language so
as to extend it to both "skilled" and unskilled" labor, and by includ-
ing with those coming under "contract or agreement" such as come
under "offers, solicitations, or promises."
The new law has not yet, however, been in operation long enough
to materially affect the number of exclusions on this account or to
test, through the courts, the practical value of its penal provisions
against the employers in this country of such labor.
An interesting case that has arisen since the passage of the new act
is that of Loterios Lontos, a Greek, who was sent to this country by a
firm which desired to establish an agency here for the sale of currants.
This man was engaged to work in the dual capacity of an expert grader
and an accountant, and upon his failure to show that similar labor
could not be secured in the United States was excluded. By recourse
to writ of habeas corpus his case was brought before Judge Lacombe,
of the United States circuit court for southern circuit of New York, to
secure a review of the action of the Executive Department of the Gov-
ernment, or, in other words, a judicial construction of the new act as
to its provisions for the exclusion of aliens. This attempt was, of
course, a failure, as the courts have uniformly held since the passage
of the act of August 18, 1894, that they had no power to review the
action in this respect of the appropriate officers.
From this decision an appeal is pending in the United States Supreme
Court, as to the result of which there seems no ground for apprehen-
sion by the Government in view of the settled opinion of the courts
upon the issue raised. This case is related at some length merely to
show that Congress has given not only plenary authority to exclude
such aliens to the Executive Branch of the Government, but has used
sufficiently broad and comprehensive terms to enable officers charged
with the administration of this legislation to protect every species of
American labor, other than the expressly excepted classes, from unfair
competition in the open markets of the world with alien labor. If the
defensive efficiency of this barrier is weakened or destroyed, such result
can only ensue, therefore, from the action of the officers upon whom
rests the enforcement of the law, unless Congress itself should here-
after modify or repeal that law.
One of the immediately practical results of the passage of the act of
March 3, 1903, was to repeal from that date the special appropriation
for the enforcement of the alien contract labor law. Thereafter all
expenses incurred in the administration of that feature, as of all other
features of the new act, were payable from the head tax, or immi-
grant fund," provided for in section 1 thereof.
As will be seen by reference to the financial statement appearing
farther on in this report, there was expended in the enforcement of






42 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

the alien contract labor law during the fiscal year up to March 3, 1903,
the sum of $106,718.89, leaving an unexpended balance of the annual
appropriation of $150,000 amounting to $43,281.11.

DISEASED IMMIGRANTS.

The statement following will show that the increase in the number
of immigrants afflicted with dangerous contagious diseases has been
in much greater ratio than the total increase of immigration, notwith-
standing the effort to prevent such persons from access to this country.
The recent act imposing a penalty on vessels for bringing such persons
to the United States has been in operation too short a time to produce
any noticeable results. Perhaps, moreover, in considering the large
number of such cases, it is not unreasonable to assume that the increase
is to some extent apparent rather than actual, for doubtless the vigi-
lance of the examining medical officers at our ports has grown in
proportion to the energy with which the Bureau has sought to detect
and exclude all aliens so diseased as to endanger the health of the
people of this country. The increase may be due also to the efficiency
that has been displayed by the immigration officers guarding our
northern boundary and the resultant lessening of the inducements to
diseased aliens to abandon our seaports and seek an easier entrance by
land. Upon this point special attention is directed to the report of
the United States commissioner of immigration at Montreal, Canada,
which appears later in this report.

Race. 1902. 1903. Race. 1902. 1903.

Japanese ......................... 29 538 Croatians and Slovenians........ 21 41
Hebrews ........................ 107 252 Russians ......................... 10 30
Poles................. ......... 140 201 Greeks........................... 12 29
Italians (south) ................. 74 147 Armenians....................... 6 26
Germans ... .................... 67 131 Irish ............................ 7 14
Finns........................... 28 79 All others........................ 77 118
Lithuanians...................... 31 69
Syrians........................ 76 56 Total..................... 709 1,773
Slovaks........................ 24 42

A casual glance at the foregoing statement is sufficient to show that
the diseases which endanger the health of the American people through
alien immigration are distinctively oriental in origin, and that the
transportation lines bringing aliens from eastern Europe and from
Asia are the ones to be most carefully scanned. Attention is particu-
larly directed to the number of diseased Japanese, 538 out of a total
immigration of 20,041, and to the consequent necessity of a more
rigorous examination by medical officers at the Pacific ports, through
which principally aliens of this race seek admission to the United
States.
With the assistance of the new legislation referred to, and with the
advantage of the enforcement of similar laws for the exclusion of
diseased aliens by the Dominion of. Canada, the Bureau is sanguine that
at the expiration of another year it will be able to report a much
diminished arrival of such aliens at our ports. It can not leave this
subject without expressing its conviction of the importance of making
an examination on behalf of this Government at foreign ports of
embarkation. Such an examination, made by competent medical






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 43

officials, it may be assumed will be much more effective than that
instituted by the transportation companies, whose employees, even if
competent, are biased by the very natural interest of the companies to
book as many passengers as possible.
Another advantage of making such a physical inspection at ports of
foreign embarkation is that the denial of a diseased alien at any such
port will not involve the separation of members of a family with the
distressing incidents of such separation. It must not be overlooked
that many poor families have sold out their possessions in their own
country and have invested practically all they have in the purchase of
transportation. To suggest to such after their arrival in this country
that they are at liberty to return with those members who can not, on
account of being afflicted with disease, be admitted under the law, and
thus avoid the distress of parting, is the refinement of cruelty. Their
money has been spent in the cost of preparation for the journey and
of transportation. Should they be able to pay the return fare they
would be landed in their own countries penniless, burdened with the
care of invalids, whose necessary expenses they would be unable to
defray.
In my judgment, therefore, it is alike demanded by the requirements
of an effective administration of the law excluding diseased aliens and
by the principles of enlightened humanity that skilled physicians,
representing this Government, should be detailed for service, as above
indicated, to the principal foreign ports of embarkation. I can think
of no feature of administrative reform, in this respect, which is of
greater importance.

IMMIGRATION THROUGH CANADA.

The following statement, covering the past seven fiscal years, will
serve to show the steady increase in alien immigration to the United
States through the ports of Canada:
July 1, 1896, to June 30,1897...-......................................... 10,646
July 1,1897, to June 30,1898 .................. -----......---------........ 10,737
July 1, 1898, to June 30,1899 .........-.....---- --..... ----... .......... 13, 853
July 1, 1899, to June 30,1900..-.....--.-- ..--.--.--- ...............-..... 23,200
July 1, 1900, to June 30, 1901-----------------.----..-----..... -.--.... 25, 220
July 1, 1901, to June 30,1902 .................................. ..... ... 29,199
July 1, 1902, to June 30,1903-----...... ----------------------------...- 35, 920
The foregoing figures, it should be remembered, refer to those only
who are manifested on the lists furnished by transportation lines
whose North American terminals are at Canadian seaports as destined
to the United States. They do not include those aliens who subsequent
to landing in the Dominion enter this country as residents of Canada.
The number of such is doubtless considerable, but the Bureau has no
data at its command to enable it to make even an approximately
accurate computation thereof. The inspection of those referred to in
the foregoing statement is made at the Canadian port of arrival in
the same manner that aliens arriving at seaports of this country are
examined.
As the operations of administrative officers in respect to those who
seek admission after temporary residence in the Dominion the sub-
joined report of the United States commissioner of immigration at
Montreal gives information that can not fail to impress one with the







44 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

magnitude and importance of the duties discharged under his super-
vision, as well as with the efficiency with which those duties are
pel formed.
233 ST. ANTOINE STREET,
Montreal, Canada, June 30, 1903.
SIR: I have the honor to report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1903, concerning
immigration from Europe to the United States through Canada.
Pursuant to the requirements of section 10 of Department Circular 97, dated Novem-
ber 1, 1901, monthly reports have been made to the Bureau on the prescribed forms;
you are therefore already fully advised as to the numbers of aliens examined, admitted,
or rejected, as the case may be. This report is intended to amplify the information
furnished per regular forms.
One year ago I had occasion to report that an "act of Parliament" had been passed
at Ottawa, to wit, "bill 112, passed by House of Commons May, 1902," designed to
prevent "the landing at Canadian ports of any immigrant or other passenger who is
suffering from a loathsome dangerous infectious disease or malady, whether such
immigrant intends to settle in Canada or only intends to pass through Canada to settle in
some other country."
Although this act was passed in May, 1902, it was not made effective till September
8 of the same year. This delay was due to the absence from Ottawa of certain gov-
ernment officials whose approval was essential to its promulgation.
During the interim from the passage to the promulgation of this "act a large num-
ber of aliens destined to the United States, and a greater number destined to Canada,
were permitted to land despite the fact that the "act" in question, if enforceable,
would have precluded the possibility of their landing.
Indeed, it was not until said "act" was made enforceable and enforced that a sin-
gle legal deportation could have been effected from Canada, so that its promulgation
may be cited as the one paramount important feature of the year.
The Bureau having been amply apprised of the fact that the above-mentioned
Canadian legislation is due solely to revelations made by United States immigrant
inspectors on the Canadian frontier, it will not be necessary to dwell further on that
point than to emphasize the fact that this very important matter furnishes both the
Canadian and United States Governments genuine cause for gratification, inasmuch
as both are now capable of dealing satisfactorily with a very grave question.
I felt constrained to remark in the annual report for 1902 that we must wait for
developments in order to be able to ascertain whether the Canadian exclusion act
would afford the satisfaction anticipated, and experience has demonstrated that it
was quite a proper observation to make, because it has frequently occurred that a
disagreement of diIgnoses has been determined on the Canadian medical examiner's
certificate, which has led to certain aliens being allowed to land instead of being
deported, as would have been the case had the United States medical examiner's
certificate been accepted as final.
However, it is a source of pleasure to me to be able to report that while such cases
were painfully numerous during the early period of the enforcement of the Canadian
exclusion act, there has been a tendency to uniformity of diagnoses, and not only
that, but also an appreciable improvement in the conditions existing between the
officers of the immigration services, Canadian and United States, respectively.
The superintendent of immigration of the Dominion of Canada, Mr. W. D. Scott,
has evinced a desire to give a broad interpretation of the act alluded to. In this
connection it may not be out of place to quote verbatim a few sentences from a com-
munication he addressed to this Office on May 28, 1903:
OTTAWA, May 28, 1903.
* But it is very clear to me that if these people are of the class who are
likely to be refused by your commissioners * they must be of the class that
would be refused by the Canadian medical officers at Atlantic seaports.
It is quite true, however, that our examination, so far as money standard is con-
cerned, is not particularly strict, but aside from that, on all other points I do not
know that there is very much difference between the general reasons for deporta-
tion taken into consideration by the Canadian and United States officials. * *
Allow me to assure you again, that this department will do everything to cooperate
in preventing an undesirable class of people from the Continent to land in this
country.
These sentiments are so plainly indicative of a realization on the part of the Cana-
dian officials of the necessity for enlightened action, that comment on them on my
part is unnecessary.























Ia


U. S. IMMIGRATION STATION, MONTREAL, CANADA.







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 45

Even a tentative cooperation is a vast improvement on the methods prevalent prior
to September, 1901 (all of which was reported June 30, 1902), and a continuance of
it may be safely relied on to correct still further a condition which had become well-
nigh intolerable.
During the ten months which were covered by my report of June 30, 1902, the
gateways to the United States via the Canadian frontier, east of Sault Ste. Marie,
became thoroughly well known to many interested persons, and it became evident
to us that the properly protected gateways were being avoided by certain classes of
immigrants, and it was incumbent on us to ascertain what outlet was being sought
in lieu of the well-guarded routes.
This investigation revealed a state of things requiring prompt and vigorous action
on the part of the Bureau. It devolved upon me to advise the Bureau that what-
ever leak there was was beyond the western extremity of the jurisdiction of the
Montreal office, and to recommend that steps be taken to "check the current which
was all too plainly being diverted to frontier points west of Sault. Ste. Marie."
The Bureau on October 4, 1902, took action in the premises, as per following letter:
WASHINGTON, October 4, 1902.
ROBERT WATCHORN,
Special Immigrant Inspector in Charge, Montreal, Canada.
SIR: Your jurisdiction as special immigrant inspector in charge is hereby extended
so as to cover authority over matters pertaining to the inspection of immigrants on
the Canadian border from Eastport, Me., to the Pacific coast.

Respectfully, F. P. SARGENT,
Commissioner- General.
Approved: H. A. TAYLOR,
Assistant Secretary.

Pursuant to these instructions, I detailed a corps of well-trained inspectors and
interpreters to duty at Winnipeg, Manitoba, and at the same time, through the
influence of the Bureau, obtained the acquiescence of the parties of the second part
(to wit, certain Canadian transportation companies) to Department circular 97,
dated November 1, 1901, to the establishment of a board of special inquiry at
Winnipeg.
The Bureau will have some approximate idea of the importance of this change
when viewing it in the light of the following figures:
Since the date of the opening of the Winnipeg office (February 14, 1903), no less
than 2,157 immigrants have been examined by the board of special inquiry, and cer-
tificates of admission have been issued to 1,633, while the surprising number of 524 a
have been rejected for the following causes:
Trachoma ....................................-----------------..................-------....... 171
Minors dependent on above........------- ...................-------...---.. 128
Likely to become public charge .........................------------------------------ 171
Contract laborers ....------------..------------------------------------ 51
Measles................................---...---.....---------------------.....------.......---- 3

Total--..........-...-- .. ....----------------------- --------..---. 524
The total amount of head tax collected on account of these immigrants is $3,729,
not a dollar of which would have been collected had this important change not been
made; nor would a single person in the list of objectionables have been denied admis-
sion to the United States, but would have-crossed the frontier without let or hindrance,
as thousands of their equally objectionable kind had been doing for an indefinite
period of time.
The work of the board of special inquiry at Winnipeg had scarcely commenced
when we discovered that the objectionable aliens whose access to the United States
the Montreal office was established to prevent were going still farther westward, and
rejections are now not at all uncommon as far west as the borders of Montana, Idaho,
and Washington.
The Bureau saw fit, on March 26, 1903, to promote the Montreal office from a spe-
cial inspectorship to a commissionership and to extend its jurisdiction to the Atlantic

a Including Pembina and Portal.







46 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

ports, Halifax, Nova Scotia; St. John, New Brunswick, and Quebec, Quebec, as per
the following letter:
WASHINGTON, March 26, 1903.
ROBERT WATCHORN,
Immigrant Inspector in Charge, Montreal, Canada.
SIR: I inclose herewith your appointment as commissioner of immigration for
Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, and St. John. * *
You will proceed to assume charge of all immigration matters in Canada, as con-
templated by this appointment.
Respectfully, F. H. LARNED,
Acting Commissioner-General.

This change added materially to the efficiency of this Office in view of the fact that
it served as a notice to all concerned that the Bureau was earnestly supporting its
force in Canada.
The change also improved conditions at the above-named ports, as it enabled the
officer in charge, Assistant Commissioner John Thomas, to cooperate with the border
force to greater advantage, and thus conserve to a far greater extent the excellent
results attained under his efficient administration.
It has been absolutely necessary for me to apply to the Bureau quite frequently for
additional medical examiners, inspectors, interpreters, and clerks, since the close of
the last fiscal year, and to the prompt and satisfactory manner in which the Bureau
has responded to those applications is due the remarkable showing made during the
present fiscal year.
On June 30, 1902, the total force numbered 66; now it numbers 116. On careful
perusal, the records of admissions and rejections will be found to correspond to the
force employed to deal with the situation, and the maintenance of the present grade
of efficient officers along the entire frontier will enable the Bureau to deal as satis-
factorily with the matter as it deals with it at United States ocean ports of entry.
During the twelve months ended to-day many persons have applied for admission
to the United States via Canada whose personal appearance and general conditions
should have precluded the possibility of their having been allowed to embark on any
vessel designed to carry passengers under conditions of health and comfort.
It is only necessary to relate that in some instances the filthy conditions have been
so abominable as to render it impossible for our medical examiners to give them the
attention required by our laws and regulations. The Bureau, like myself, will have
to leave it to conjecture how fellow-passengers huddled together in the close quarters
of an "Atlantic liner" have endured the contaminating presence of such persons.
Admission to the United States has been invariably denied to such applicants and
in some instances it has been deemed unwise to return them to Canada, and deporta-
tion to Europe has been effected.
I shall not attempt to draw a picture of the situation as it now appears, for the
accompanying figures are so fraught with food for reflection that embellishment
would be superfluous. However, it may be well to emphasize a few of the more
important features represented by these figures.
We have always contended that large numbers of aliens destined to the United
States were designedly manifested to Canada, and while there has been some effort
made by the steamship lines to correct this evil by refusing passage to the more
obviously diseased (some 150 such refusals have been reported by all the "lines"),
it is to be regretted that the improvement has not been on broader lines. I have
used the words "obviously diseased" advisedly, because the decrease is most notice-
able in that class of diseased persons whose ailments can not be hidden.
For instance, during the ten months ended June 30, 1902, so many as 96 cases of
favus were rejected at the'Montreal office alone. It was at that time that the agita-
tion on this question in Canada was kept up with considerable vigor, in view of
which the weeding-out process was undertaken at ports of embarkation.
Favus, as you know, shockingly disfigures its victims, eating out the hair, produc-
ing disgusting scalp sores until cured, which is often deferred until the head is totally
denuded of hair.
An examination at ports of embarkation almost invariably leads to a detection of
this disease, and they who are afflicted with it are most likely to be "set aside."
That such has been the case there is little room for doubt, as you will observe, against
96 cases of favus for ten months last year only 44 such cases are reported for the
Montreal local office for the entire year, and only 7 of these have been reported since
January 1, 1903, a date coincident with the commencement of actual enforcement
of the Canadian act aforementioned.







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 47

Another dangerous and dreaded disease, which is more difficult of detection, has
not been marked by any such decrease; in fact, the very opposite result is shown.
Even at the Montreal office, where the classes of immigrants applying for certificates
of admission to the United States show such marked improvement over last year,
there has been an increase in the number of trachoma cases.
Increases in trachomatous applicants elsewhere than at the Montreal office may
be safely ascribed to the extended field of our operations and the increased force of
inspectors assigned to duty at border stations. Practically no rejections were reported
west of Port Huron last year, whereas the present year's work furnishes a greater
number of border rejections west of Port Huron than east of it.
The accompanying tabulated figures will suffice to inform you as to the classes
rejected, showing the nationalities furnishing the greatest number of objectionables
and the steamship lines carrying them.
Taken as a whole, without special explanatory references, the figures might easily
be misunderstood, hence the necessity for calling attention to certain features con-
nected with these tables.
The figures given are for the whole year, but the latter half of the year is quite
different from the former half. The former half may be said to have been quite nor-
mal, while the latter half represents a totally unprecedented condition in Canadian
immigration.
The Provincial and Dominion governments have been exerting themselves most
actively to induce immigration of the "fitter kind," and so well have they succeeded
that all shipping facilities have been utilized to their utmost capacity to accommo-
date agricultural settlers, principally for the Northwest, to the almost total exclusion
of passengers from the continent of Europe.
The annual arrivals at Canadian ports since 1892 are as follows:
Ocean ports only:
1892.----------.-------------...........----............-........ .. 27,898
1893...-------...-.. -----. -........--....- .........-- ....... ....... 29,632
1894 .------..... ............................................. ...... 20,829
1895.---------.................................................... 18,790
1896 ....- -........................... ....................... 16,835
Total immigration:
1897-----.....-..........------ ----..-.-----.--------....... ....... 21,914
1898.......-----.........---------- ...---..---...-----...... --........ 31,900
1899.... -- ----........ ----... ---------------.------........ -.. 44,543
1900 (first six months).........-- ....-...-....... ............... .... 23, 895
1900-1901---.....----.............................--------------------------....---.....---.... 49,149
1901-2..-..--- ...--------------------------------.........--....... 67,379
1902-3 (estimated) --........-------.....------------....-----.......... 114,000
These figures are furnished by the Dominion superintendent of immigration, and
leave no room for doubt as to the trend of immigration to Canada, and it is only
proper to state that the large numbers having arrived since January 1, 1903, have
been for the most part of an exceptionally fine class.
A preponderance of agriculturists has characterized every shipload for the time
above specified, and they have gone to the Northwestern Provinces in search of homes
on the rich and inviting prairies of that vast country.
It is natural to suppose that a certain percentage of them will find themselves
unsuited to the new conditions, and such of them as do so will probably seek admis-
sion to the United States, or return to their native homes. Arrangements have been
fully made to gather actual statistics concerning such of them as may subsequently
enter the United States, and these figures will be furnished you monthly, as per
official requirements.
Not only has the class of immigrants going to the Canadian Northwest, during the
past three or four months, been of a highly desirable sort, but the whole immigration
to Canada, for Eastern Provinces and for the United States, has shown some improve-
ment during this time. The two nationalities which gave us the greatest concern
last year have shown very perceptible decreases, i. e., Hebrews and Syrians.
The former were unquestionably sent to the United States from Europe via Canada
to avoid the effects of examination at United States ports, but on learning that the
Bureau had taken definite and permanent steps to counteract the deflection from
United States ports to Canadian ports the practice was gradually discontinued, and
now the border boards of special inquiry have comparatively few cases of the Hebrew
race to examine.
A precisely similar condition prevails as to the Syrians, though in the latter case
the change has been brought about by the vigorous policy of prosecution which has







48 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION'.

been waged against professional Syrian smugglers of aliens into the United States
via the Canadian frontier.
The smugglers' business has been made so difficult, dangerous, and expensive that
most of them have ceased to advertise in Europe, and in consequence the arrivals of
Syrians and Armenians have appreciably decreased; but it is said that they will try
to continue their business on the Mexican border.
The most notable increase has been among the Scandinavians, and as this class
generally seeks employment in agricultural pursuits and avoids the congested areas
of population, it is a happy feature of the work of the year to be able to report so
desirable a change.
We anticipate still further improvement, from the fact that the principal steamship
company-that is, the company carrying the greatest number of undesirable immi-
grants to Canada-has been purchased by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company,
and as the latter company has shown by its policy that it regards its covenant with
the United States (Department circular 97) as an active working instrument, to be
observed in letter and spirit, it is presumed that this spirit will be extended to the
operation of its newly acquired property, the immigrant-carrying vessels of the
Elder, Dempster Steamship Company.
There has not yet been sufficient time in which to note the actual effect of this
change, but so far indications quite warrant the foregoing observation.
Adequate detention quarters have not hitherto been provided at any of the Cana-
dian ports, and much difficulty has resulted from this lack. No fewer than 150
rejected aliens, at Halifax, Nova Scotia; St. John, New Brunswick, and Quebec,
Quebec, have failed of deportation solely on this account, but arrangements are now
perfected for the making of necessary provisions of this character, and further trouble
in this connection is not expected.
It ought to be stated that the 150 escapes alluded to were not allowed to enter the
United States, and that almost the entire number escaped prior to the promulgation
of the Canadian act of Parliament which legalized deportations.
In the annual report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1902, it was recommended
that none but strong, vigorous, young, and hardy men be assigned to this jurisdic-
tion, and it is with peculiar pleasure that I report that that recommendation has
been literally accepted and acted upon. It would be a very difficult matter to find
in any given line of work a more capable, efficient, devoted class of officers than the
men who have made it possible for such a gratifying report as this to be written.
Covering a direct line of more than 4,000 miles of frontier, including three ocean
ports, and inspecting more than 100 trains daily and a large number of ferries, sound
steamers," and the growing fleets that ply the Great Lakes, these inspectors, in all
kinds of inclement weather, and frequently under most trying circumstances, have
boarded every train, met every ferry and every steamer, whether by river, lake, or
sound, and have prevented the amazing total of 5,158 diseased and otherwise objec-
sionable aliens from entering the United States, and have done all this without
delaying either train or boat for a moment, and, what is still more remarkable, with-
out causing a single complaint on the part of the traveling public.
This manifests a commendable devotion to duty, which the Bureau will, no doubt,
fully appreciate when considering the year's work thus completed, from the view
point of the difficulties incident to its accomplishment.
The officers are now fully uniformed, as per Department regulation, and the trav-
eling public no longer responds reluctantly to the inspectors' interrogatories; on the
contrary, the average traveler is always ready to impart the information required by
law, and many have shown a willingness to aid the inspectors in detecting the cun-
ning devices of those who live by evading the law.
To what extent we have been able to cope with attempts at smuggling inadmissible
aliens into the United States the Bureau's attention is invited to an analysis of the fol-
lowing table of facts and figures on this point:

Name. ate of By whomar- Where. Cause. Outcome of case.
arrest, rested.

1902.
Antoun Boohan- May 24 InspectorGrant. Island Pond, Vt. Smuggling Han- Pleaded guilty
na, Brahim naand RosaOz- Oct. 8, 1902.
Shasha. maha and Tan- Fined $75 each.
nous Baraket
into United
States.
Sarkis Asadoor- June13 Inspector St. Alban, Vt... Smuggling 6 Ar- Pleaded guilty
ian. Forbes. menians into Feb. 25, 1903.
United States. Fined $75.









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 49


Name.



NicholasMalleto





W. H. Genser ....

Frank Geni......


Jos. Black .......


Jos. Abodeely...


G. Aziz ..........


A. J. Astafan.....


Caspar Hovin-
sian.


Salvatore Boda-
sera.


Meisce Ganow-
sky.





Louis Glagow-
sky.


Gustav Sund-
strom.


Date of
arrest.

1902.
June 18





June 26

July 29


Aug. 12


Aug. 18


Aug. 27


Sept. 8


Sept. 12



Sept. 19



Oct. 14






Nov. 18


Toufick Konry .. Nov. 26


Solomon Osme- Dec. 1
ansky.
Alfred Budd ..... Dec. 3

Ripley & Me- Oct. 9
Crimmon.

Sleem Mansour.. Dec. 14


By whom ar-
rested.


Inspectors a t
Windsor, On-
tario.



Inspector Two-
hey.

Inspector
George Bart-
lett.

Inspector Mc-
Dermott.

Inspector Cam-
eron Miller.

Inspector
O'Brien.

InspectorEstell.


Inspectors
Forbes and
Twohey.

Inspector Fran-
cis.


Inspector Two-
hey.





Inspector Lehr-
haupt.


Inspector Zur-
brick.


Inspectors Two-
hey and
Forbes.

Inspector Estell

Inspector Parker

Inspector Petit.


Inspector Mc-
Dermott.


Where.



Detroit, Mich...





St. Albans, Vt...

Alburg, Vt..-...


Newport, Vt ....


Detroit, Mich...


Niagara Falls,
N. Y.

Watertown, N.
Y.

St. Albans, Vt...



Niagara Falls,
N.Y.


St. Albans, Vt...






Detroit, Mich...



Sault Ste. Marie,
Mich.


St. Albans, Vt...


Ogdensburg,
N.Y.

Machias, Me ....

Port Huron,
Mich.

Newport, Vt....


Thos. Nehas..... Dec. 18 Inspect o r Niagara Falls,
I O'Brien. N. Y.


Harry Coloviras. Dec. 28


5567-03-


Inspector
cis.


-4


Fran- I.....do


Cause.



Smuggling broth-
er, Francisco,
into United
States, and ille-
gal use of natu-
ralization pa-
pcrs.
Smuggling 7 Rus-
sian Jews into
United States.
Smuggling Ital-
ian, Pietro Fer-
racio, into Unit-
ed States.
Smuggling Rus-
sian, Moses Leff,
into United
States.
Smuggling Syri-
angirl,Alexan-
driaJoseph,into
United States.
Smuggling Syri-
an, Michael
Nesser, into
United States.
Smuggling Syri-
an girl, Zahara
Tomma, into
United States.
Smuggling Bul-
garian, Baydus-
ser Hovinsian,
into United
States.
SmugglingAlbert
Bodasera and
Guiseppe Coro-
na into United
States.
Smuggling sister,
Melka Kurtzer,
into United
States and hav-
ing certificate
unlawfully al-
tered in his
possession.
Smuggling Wolf
Chanales and
Samuel Holts-
man into
United States.
Smuggling Otto
Linguist into
United States.

Smuggling Tou-
fick El Batel
into United
States.
SmugglingAaron
Tertakove into
United States.
Smuggling 5 Rus-
sian Jews into
United States.
Bringing women
into United
States for im-
moral purposes.
Smuggling Syrian
woman, Hawa
Domit Zadin,
into United
States.
Smuggling Elias
Eceec into
United States.
Smuggling Peter
Vlasopulas into
United States.


Outcome of case.



Pleaded guilty
July 3, 1902.
Fined $800.



Pleaded guilty
May 26, 1903.
Fined $75.
Pleaded guilty
Sept. 13, 1902.
Fined $75.

Pleaded guilty
Oct. 8, 1902.
Fined $75 or one
month in prison.
Pleaded guilty
Mar. 3, 1903.
Fined $250.

Pleaded guilty
Nov. 11, 1902.
Fined $50.

Pleaded guilty
Oct.9,1902. Sen-
tenced to 60 days
in prison.
Pleaded guilty
Feb. 25, 1903.
Fined $75.

Pleaded guilty
Oct. 16, 1902.
Fined $50.


Pleaded guilty
Feb. 25, 1903.
Fined $50.




Pleaded guilty
Nov. 21, 1902,
and sentenced
to 6 months im-
prisonment.
Smuggler bound
over to appear
before grand
jury in July,
1903.
Pleaded guilty
May 26, 1903.
Fined $75.

Fined $600, or sen-
tenced to 1 year
in prison.
Fined $50 and
costs; total, $250.

Both sentenced to
1 year in prison.

Pleaded guilty
Jan. 10, 1908.
Fined $75.

Pleaded guilty
Jan. 14, 1903.
Fined $40.
Pleaded guilty
Jan. 7, 1903.
Fined $50.








50 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


Name. Date of
arrest.

1903.
Saverio Scida.... Feb. 7

Amelio Anibaldi Mar. 23


Ole Isaacson ..... Apr. 11



Alphonse Brunni Apr. 28

Assaf George .... May14


By whom ar-
rested.


Inspectors Bur-
dette and
Buchanan.
InspectorsFran-
cis and Perry.


Where.


Black Rock, N.Y

Niagara Falls,
N. Y.


Inspector Crane Neche, N. Dak ..


Inspector Zur-
brick.
Inspectors a t
Windsor, On-
tario.


SaultSte. Marie,
Mich.
Detroit, Mich...


LewisFeighner.. May 17 Inspector Dud- Neche, N. Dak..
dleston.


Wm. Karrys ..... June 1

Henry Schiller .. June 9


Inspector Fran-
cis.
Inspector Abel .


Niagara Falls,
N.Y.
Portal, N. Dak..


Joseph School ... June 19 Inspector Bu- Black Rock,
chanan. N. Y.


Frank Lloyd .... June23 InspectorParker Calais,Me ......


Cause.


Smuggling Vin-
cenzoBuonointo
United States.
Smugglingbrother,
Sabitini An i-
baldi, into
United States.
Smugglingbrother,
Nils Isaacson,
into United
States.
Smuggling John
Brunni into
United States.
Impersonating an-
other in obtain-
ing naturaliza-
tion papers and
unlawful use of
same.
SmugglingSchul-
dardt, Wagner,
and Wilhelm
families into
United States.
Smuggling 3
Greeks into
United States.
Smuggling alien,
Margaret Borth,
into United
States.

Smuggling Saba-
tino Cicci and
Antonio Natale
Di Egidio into
United States.
Bringing 2 aliens
into United
States in viola-
tion of alien
contract-labor
law.


Outcome of case.


Pleaded guilty
Mar. 17, 1903.
Fined $50.
Pleaded guilty
May 14, 1903.
Fined $50.
United States dis-
trict attorney re-
fused to prose-
cute, June 12,
1903.
Case still pending.

Pleaded guilty
June 25, 1903.
Sentenced to 2
years in house of
correction, De-
troit.
Grand jury in-
dicted June 12,
1903,and twenty-
four hours later
rescinded its ac-
tion.
Case still pending.

United States dis-
trict attorney
refuses to prose-
cute, June 14,
1903.
Case still pending.



Do.


This showing is a very remarkable one, especially so when viewed in the light of
the wide area covered by the prosecutions. Grand juries all along the line, in all
the States represented in the accompanying table, have viewed the situation with
becoming apprehension, and by their verdicts have given us substantial aid in our
endeavors to make effective the mandates of Congress.
United States attorneys have also given us very able support by appropriately pre-
senting all the facts we have furnished them to the grand juries and the courts.
There are exceptions to every rule, however, and I regret to have to announce one
in this respect.
On May 14, 1903, one Lewis Feighner deliberately took 20 aliens over the border
of North Dakota in wagons. Of these, 19 were afflicted with trachoma, and all of
them had been lawfully excluded from the United States. Feighner set the law at
defiance and furnished wagon transportation when the railroad companies refused
to carry them.
The whole party was taken into custody at Grand Forks, N. Dak., and returned
to Winnipeg by officers of the Bureau, and Feighner placed under arrest. The grand
jury indicted him (Feighner) on June 12 and the following day rescinded its action,
and he is at present free and unpunished.
On the same date a United States attorney refused to prosecute an offender of this
class for reasons not yet disclosed.
This offender presented himself at our Winnipeg office and demanded to know
why his brother could not go to the United States, and he was told that it was
because he was contagiously diseased.
SHe took said alien into the United States with him, in utter defiance of the officers
of the law. The alien was arrested on Treasury Department warrant and in due
time was deported to Europe, and the offender was arrested also and held under bail







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 51

for action of the grand jury, but when the grand jury met the United States attorney
refused to prosecute.
It is difficult to understand why a sworn officer of the law could refuse to prosecute
so serious a violation of the law.
In striking contrast with this case is that of an alien who, after being duly inspected
at Quebec, forged an additional name to his certificate, by virtue of which he attempted
to take a diseased alien with him into the United States, over the Vermont border.
The violation was discovered and both were prevented from entering, the diseased
alien being deported, and the offender has suffered imprisonment in default of bail
(five months) and paid a fine of $50.
Attempts to defeat the law have been made by providing aliens with naturalization
papers, but on investigation we discovered sufficient evidence to warrant us in calling
the matter to the attention of the Department of Justice, and on June 25, 1903, we
succeeded in convicting the principal figure in the scheme, and he is now undergoing
a two years' term of imprisonment in the Detroit house of correction.
The public press somewhat severely criticized us during the month of September,
1902, owing to a young Syrian girl having committed suicide while being deported
to Europe.
The press did not, however, publish the fact that the same girl had been twice
deported to Europe from New York, and that when taken into custody at Detroit
she was being smuggled into the United States by a lawless element who not only
ignore our laws but who derisively defy the officers of the law.
At the time the unfortunate girl took her own life she was made aware for the first
time that the man she had expected to marry had married another girl some few weeks
previously, and this was probably the real cause of her rash act. At any rate she
was treated with every humane consideration by us, and so far as that is concerned,
she had no more cause to complain than any one of the thousands who were similarly
deported, none of whom made any complaint of our treatment of them.
Concerning those who smuggled her into the United States, we caused their arrest,
and the Federal grand jury on learning all the facts, indicted the principal, who
was subsequently convicted and fined $250, which is an appropriate answer to the
sensational stories circulated by a misinformed or a malicious class.
The immigrant inspectors on the frontier are fully conscious of the fact that the
average immigrant who is detained for cause is far more a fit object for pity than
one deserving censure, and while called upon to perform the unpleasant duty of
denying them the coveted admission to the United States, that duty is invariably
performed with a maximum of humane consideration.
It is due the two principal railroads, who are signatories to the agreement under
which we are operating, to state that their interpretation of the agreement, clause by
clause and line by line, has been in exact accord with the views held by the Bureau.
Free and full access to all their trains has been accorded your inspectors, free trans-
portation being furnished them that the inspections may be completed before the
trains reach the border.
They have removed from their trains at the border all objectionable aliens, and
have detained them at their own expense until the Government's disposition of them
has been made.
Their instructions to all ticket agents and train hands have been in keeping with
our requests, and one result of these instructions has been the refusal to sell tickets
to more than 7,000 aliens until they first produce evidence to prove their admissi-
bility to the United States, and in every case they have directed said aliens to the
nearest United States immigration office.
So far as these railway lines are concerned, up to this time there is nothing left to
be desired as to the observation of the terms of the agreement into which they have
entered with the United States Government in regard to immigration.
A reference to the number of exclusions on account of violation of the alien
contract labor laws will be of undoubted interest.
Employers have unquestionably made use of Canada as a source through which to
draw employees in many branches of industry. The testimony of the rejected aliens
under this head leaves no room for doubt on this point, and while we have been
unable to deport any of them direct to Europe from a Canadian port, admission to
the United States has been denied them, and they have been compelled to remain
in Canada.
Some of them have subsequently tried to effect surreptitious entry to the United
States, but owing to the system of inspection in vogue all along the line they have
failed, and for their temerity have been deported to Europe via New York, and the
pursuance of this policy has had a very salutary effect on others, who are quite as
anxious to evade the law, but who are of a less defiant demeanor.







52 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

During the periods of great industrial strife, to wit, the anthracite coal strike and
the cotton workers, lockout at Lowell, Mass., it required constant and unflagging
attention to duty on the part of the entire force to prevent violations of the alien con-
tract labor laws, and the Bureau will doubtless agree with me that the absence of
serious complaint on the part of the United States workmen involved amply attests
that the law was remarkably well enforced under the circumstances.
It is the common opinion of all the inspectors at important border gateways that
the majority of aliens seeking admission to the United States in violation of the alien
contract labor law are thoroughly advised before leaving Europe that the Canadian
frontier affords the easiest access to the United States; indeed, their testimony com-
pels this conclusion.
Special cases might be mentioned in wearying detail, but I purpose mentioning
one case only, and will ask you to accept it as a criterion and to judge whether it
justifies the conclusion aforementioned.
On June 6, 1903, 54 aliens applied for admission to the United States at Winnipeg,
Manitoba, their destination being Caro, Mich.
The testimony of this party conclusively proved that they were engaged in Europe,
that all their expenses were paid by their prospective employers, and that they were
advised to reach their destination via Winnipeg, Manitoba. This route involved a
journey of 2,000 miles farther than was necessary and a corresponding unnecessary
expense.
There can be but one reason for this, and that is that the Canadian frontier as far
west as Sault Ste. Marie was known to be well guarded, while the frontier west of that
point was supposed to be wide open," and it goes without saying that for the same
reason the United States ocean ports of entry were also avoided.
In conclusion, I present parallel columns which may serve to indicate clearly the
improvement made during the present fiscal year.
Special stress must be laid on the recommendation that none but young, active,
strong, and robust men should be assigned to duty on the frontier, and they should
be selected with a view to putting none but men of good judgment in these places of
unusual importance and responsibility.
A maintenance of the present system of border inspection must inevitably reflect
the wisdom thereof in the returns of the almshouses, hospitals, asylums, and other
places of refuge which aliens have previously been wont to seek, for of the 5,158
denied admission at border stations it is not improbable that a very large number of
them would already be a charge on the taxpayers of whatever community in which
they might have settled had they been admitted, and the 1,439 suffering from dan-
gerous, loathsome, contagious diseases would certainly have been a hidden menace
to public health, and an element of deterioration to the general hygienic standard
of the States in which they would have settled.
Everyone of the diseased aliens reported herein was examined under most careful
circumstances by a corps of medical examiners of high repute for proficiency, whose
official certificates in writing are on file here in each and every case, a fact which
will when duly considered serve to demonstrate what a very serious omission it
was to eavee the frontier subject to the methods in vogue until recently in matters
of immigration.
This report will undoubtedly show that immigration from foreign contiguous ter-
ritory is susceptible of adequate control, and the Government can select its future
citizens with as much care through this channel as through its ocean ports of arrival
and successfully exclude all who would tend to pollute rather than to promote the
general body politic.
Respectfully, ROBERT WATCHORN, Commissioner.
Hon. F. P. SARGENT,
Commissioner-General of Immigration, Washingoton, D. C.








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 53


Examined and refused admission.

1902 (10 months).

CAUSE.


No certificates.............................. 235
Contract laborers........................... 419
Paupers, or persons likely to become public
charges......................... ........ 812
Insane...................................... 10
Idiots ...................................... 8
Dangerous contagious diseases ............. 496
Immoral purposes ......................... :3
Arrested and deported to Europe after hav-
ing effected unlawful entrance to the
United States-via Canada, 11; via New
York,55................................... 66
Assisted immigrants........................ 15
Examined and rejected westof Port Huron,
Mich., for all causes...................... 140
Number of smugglers arrested and con-
victed ............................---.....---- ..
In prison pending trial............ 2
On bail pending trial............... 3
Failed of conviction................ 0
-- 5
Total rejections for all causes .............. 2,028
Refused passage at European ports for
Canada .................................. 0
Deported to Europe from Canadian ports
by United States immigration authorities. 101
Deported to Europe by Canadian immigra-
tion authorities........................... 0

Grand total of rejections and deporta-
tions................................ 2,129


1903.

CAUSE.


No certificates.............................. 1,062
Contract laborers........................... 431
Paupers, or persons likely to become public
charges................................... 1,575
Insane...................................... 17
Idiots ............. ........ ................. 4
Dangerous contagious diseases ............ 1,439
Immoral purposes.......................... 14
Arrested and deported to Europe after hav-
ing effected unlawful entrance to the
United States-via Canada, 19; via New
York, 16 ................................. 185
Assisted immigrants....................... 0
Examined and rejected west of Port Huron,
Mich., for all causes...................... 1,247
Number of smugglers arrested and con-
victed .................................... 25
In prison pending trial............. 1
On bail pending trial............... 3
Failed of conviction................ 3
7
Total border rejections for all causes....... 4,542
Refused passage at European ports for
Canada................................... 150
Deported to Europe from Canadian ports
by United States immigration authorities. 336
Deported to Europe by Canadian immigra-
tion authorities........................... 130

Grand total of rejections and deporta-
tions................................ 5,158


Beaver Line:
Examined ................... ..............
Admitted ................... ...............
Deported to Europe...... .................
Deported to Europe from border.................
Allan Line:
Examined .....................................
Admitted ....................................
Deported to Europe......... ................
Deported to Europe from border.................
Hamburg-American Line:
Examined ........ ......................
Admitted ........ ... ........... ....
Deported to Europe...........................
Deported to Europe from border................
Dominion Line:
Examined ..................................
Adm itted .............. ........................
Deported to Europe..............................
Miscellaneous:
Examined .................................. ..
Adm itted .......................................
Deported to Europe from border..............


I

Halifax,
Nova
Scotia.


89
89


3,399
3,368
31
. .....


Ports of entry.

St. John,,
New
Brunswick.


6,230 9,573
6,136 9,443
94 130
....... ............


90
S8
2
. . ... .


1,775 8
1,746 8
29 ............

170 ............
170 ............
.. . ... ............


Quebec,
Quebec.


Total at
Canadian
ocean
ports.



15,892
15, 668
224
83

8,444
8, 362
82
22

1,788
1,759
29
59

790
789
1

28
28
4


4,955
4, 901(
49


5
5


620
619
1

5
5
. . ......









54 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


REJECTIONS AT VARIOUS PORTS.

VANCEBORO, ME.


Causes.


Austrian....................
Bohemian................
Canadian.................
English...... ..........
Finnish .............- .....
French..... ...........
German ..................
Greek ...................
Hungarian ..............
Irish........ .... .........
Italian......................
Newfoundlander..........
Polish ......................
Russian.....................
Russian Hebrew...........
Scandinavian ...........
Scotch.....................
Syrian......................
Turkish ........... .......
West Indian................

Total .................
Persons dependent on those
rejected above............

Grand total.........






Austrian.................
Austrian-German...........
Canadian...................
English...................
Finnish ..................
Galician..................
German .................
Greek .....................
Hungarian ...............
Austro-Hungarian..........
Icelander..................
Irish........................
Italian.....................
Polish ...................
Roumanian ................
Roumanian Hebrew........
Russian ...................
Russian-German ..........
Russian Hebrew............
Scandinavian ..............
Scotch.....................
Syrian.....................

Total................
Persons dependent on those
rejected above...........

Grand total...........






African (black) ............
Armenian................
Belgian...................
Canadian .................
Croatian...................
English...................
French................
German ...................
Hebrew ..................
Irish......................
Italian ...................


Con-
tract
labor.







3















39










6
32
1
2


Insan- No ccr- Prosti- Public F Tracho-
ity. tificatc. tutes. charge. Favus. ma.


1
16

19
2
12
5
51
11
6
11
3
11
10
12
5
9

223


160


5
1


2


........ .......





3
........ 15
7

........ 217


1- ...2


-- [ -----I--1


All
other
dis-
eases.


Total.



46
2
199
17
1
8
20
2
13
5
65
6
6
12
4
14
25
19
5
10

479

14


WINNIPEG, MANITOBA.


........ ........ ........ ........
........ ........ ..... .. ........
-------- ---- I... ........ ........
........ ....... I ........ ........
........ ........ ........ ........
........ ........ ........ ........
.. . . ...... ........ ........
........ ........ ........ .......
2... ... I.... ........ ........
.. 2. ........ ........ ........
........ ........ ........ ........
.. ........ . . . .
2 ........ ........ ........


......_ I~t 19:i:..


...... ........ ........ ........ .. ......
.1


8
3

6

2

1
21
23
1
12
2


13 ........


S...... .......
1 .

1
1.
3. ..


2


1
........ 2. .
........ 1
........ 1

........ 1


1


........ ....... .........
........ ---1 ....


45 ........ 113 ........ 175 2 336


........ ........ ........ 460
1


WINDSOR, ONTARIO.


2
13

19
7


1
28


1
1
1


........ ........ 1 ........ ........ ........
........ ........ 1 ................ ........
........ ........ 10 ........ .... .... 1

........ ........ 1 ......." -----
........ ........ 3 ............. ......
........ ........ 1 ................ ........
........ ........ 2 ................ ----
.. ........ 3 ...................
........ ........ 4 1 2 1


1


















1


..
. .
. .








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 55


REJECTIONS AT VARIOUS PORTS-Continued.

WINDSOR, ONTARIO-Continued.

Causes.

All
Con- Insan- No cer- Prosti- PublicFavus. Tracho- other Total.
tract ity. tificate. tutes charge, ma. dis-
labor. eases.
cases.

Polish ........................... .... .. 2 ... ...... 1 ........ 3
Russian .......................... .... ..... 1 2 ........ 4
Russian Hebrew. ......... .... ... ...... .. ..
Russian Hebrew............. ........ ..................... 1........ ........ ........ 1
Scndinavian ................ ........ ................ ................. ........ 1
Scotch...................... ........ ........ ............... 1........ .. ............
Syrian...................... ............... ....... ....... 3 ........ 6 ........ 9

Total ................. 72 4 2 ........ 34 2 11 2 127
Persons dependent on those
rejected above................ ....... .... ....................... ........

Grand total ...1....... ........ ....... .. .... .. .. .... ..... ........ 132


SAULT STE. MARIE, ONTARIO.


Austrian................ 5 ........ ........ ........
Austrian Croatian......... ....... .................
Austrian Pole ............. ................. .....
Belgian.......................... ......................
Canadian................... 19 1 ..............
English...................... 3 1..............
Finnish ............... .... ..... 3 ................
French ...... i
French ..... .......................... ................ .
German Hebrew............................ ....... .
Greek ......................... ......................
Italian ..................... 31 ........ .......
Persian ........................................ ........
Russian Hebrew.......................................
Scandinavian ................... 1........ 2
Scotch..............................................
Syrian..................... ............... .......

Total .............. 58 6 ........ 2
Persons dependent on those
rejected above......................................

Grand total ....................... .....


3
4
1

2
1
37



58


18
1


15


....... i
15



.......5


13 ..
224 --------.
24 ........
5 ........


152 2
1 .
1 .
12 ........
325 1
1 ....
2 .. ....
25 1

2 ..

567 4

........ ........


768

19


MONTREAL, CANADA.


Armenian .................. 1 ........
Austrian ................... ................
Bulgarian ......... ........ .. ... ....
Canadian............. 9 ........
English..................... 1 ........
Finnish................... 1.......
Flemish .............. ..........
French ..................... -
German .................... 1 ....
Greek .................... 1 ........
Hebrew ................. ..........

Irish. ................. .. .........
Italian..................... 15 ........
Persian .....................................
Polish ....................... ...... .......
P olish --.. .--- -- ----. . --- -------- ..-- .-..
Prussian.............................
Roumanian ................ 1 ........
Russian .................... 2 ........
Scandinavian .............. ........ ........
Servian.................... ..............
Syrian.....................................
Turkish ....................................

Total................. 34 ........
Personsdependent on those
rejected above............ ............

Grand total........... ........ ........


........ ........
........ ........
........ ........
........ ... ..
........ ........
........ ........

1... ........

........ ------..


........ ........
21 .. .

........ ........
........ ........
........ .... ..





I--- I--- --------
........ ........
........ ........
........ ........

22 --------


8
24
1
3
1
3
1

5
25
7


193
3

5
26
63

1
69
1

441


1
10







1

9



1
20


2


44


12
10



3



30
5
4
.....70

2
1

8
42
2

133
5

328


1
3










2



1



1


s


- ..... .l.. ... ......... 918









t6 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


REJECTIONS AT VARIOUS PonTs-Continued.

NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y.


Con-
tract
labor.


Arabian ................... ........
Armenian ...................
Austrian................... ......
Bulgarian ........... ... ........
Canadian................... 5
English...... .............. 1
Finnish .................... 4
French..........................
German ............................
Greek ...................... 3
Hungarian .........................
Irish........................ ........
Italian .....................---------- 2
Polish ........ ....... ........
Roumanian .......................
Russian .................... ........
Scotch...................... 1
Syrian..................... ........


Total ................
Persons dependent on those
rejected above .........

Grand total...........






Armenian .................
Austrian ...................
Austrian German ..........
Belgian..................
Canadian...................
English.....................
Greek ...................
Italian ....................
Scandinavian ............
Syrian.....................

Total ...............
Canadians bringing women
for prostitution...........

Grand total.....


16


Cause .


All
Insan- No cer- Prosti- Public Tracho- other Total.
ity. tifcate tutes. charge. avus. ma. dis-
eases.


........
........
........
........
........
........
........
........
........
........
........
1
........
........
........
........
........
........

1


1



2

5


1



9
........


1

6
1

1
1
1
2
2
7
4
39
1
3
8


1



3

3.. .


........ 78 5


1
4
1


1


4
5

38


6


5 1

65 1


______ ______ I- -------I--I -I- -


PORT HURON, MICH.


2



16
1
2


1


........
........
........
1
........
..
........
........
........
........


1
2

5




2


1
1

1


2
7
1
8

21


........
........
........
........
3

........
........
........
........


1






1 i


BLACK ROCK, ONTARIO.


Armenian ................. ........ ........ ........ ........ -.. ..... ...... 5 ........ 5
Austrian.................... ........ ............. ..--- ....... 3 ........ 3 ........ 6
Austrian German .......... .....-.. ........-....... .- ....... 21 ........ ........ ........ 21
Canadian................... 2 ........ ........ 2 10 ........ 1 ........ 15
English..................... ........ ........ ........ ........ ........... ........ 1
Finnish .................... .... ... ....... .. ..... ........ 1 ........ 3 ........ 4
Germ an .......- ................------ ........ ........ ........ 2 ........ ................ 2
Italian ..................... 25 ........ ........ ........ 15 2 15 1 58
Roumanian ................ ........ ........ ........ ........ 2 ........ .............. .. 2
R ussian .................... ......... .... ... ... .... ........ 1 ........ 3 ........ 4
Syrian .............................. ........ ................ 2 ........ 4 ........ 6

Total ................. 27 ................ 2 58 2 34 1 124


1









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 57


MEDICAL INSPECTION OF ALIEN IMMIGRANTS AT THE PORTS OF QUEBEC, PROVINCE OF
QUEBEC, AND ST. JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA, WITH THE ULTIMATE DISPOSI-
TION OF EACH CASE, DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.


Disease.


Accompanying ..................
Ad noids ......................
Amputation, arm................
Anm mia.........................
Appendicitis............... ....
Astigmatism, marked ...........
Blinda...........................
Blindness, partial a.............
Bronchitis:
Acute......................
Chronic....-..............
Broncho-pneumonia ...........
Cataract, double.............
Cellulitis ....................
Cleft palate................
Conjunctivitis:
Follicular .. .........
Granular ....................
Purulent...............
Corneal opacity, complete, one
eye ........................
Deaf and dumb................
Deafness, marked'............
Debility ....................
Emphysema ....... ........
Equino-valgus................
Erysipelas, facial ................
Favus..........................
Fever........................
Frostbite ....................
Heart disease:
Functional ..............
Valvular .................
Hemiplegia...................
Partial..................
Hermaphroditism, pseudo ......
Hernia, inguinal:
Double ..................
Left .......................
Right......................
Hip-joint disease ................
Hydrocele, of the cord ..........
Hydrocephalus...................
Infancy.........................
Keratitisb ......................
Kneejoint:
Ankylosis of ................
Congenital deformity of.....
Resection of................
Luxation, chronic:
Of ankle..................
Of hip .................
Of knee..... ..........
Mastoiditis ...................
Marasmus ...................
Measles......................
Meningocele.................
Mental aberration...............
Observation....................
Rachitis........................
Rheumatism, chronic...........
Paralysis:
Right arm c..................
Motor, partial .............
Spastic ............. ....
Parotitis.......................
Parturition, results of ...........
Peritonitis:
Tubercular .................
Puerperal ................
Pneumonia, lobar.............
aOne certificate sent to Mont
0 1 was a second-cabin passed


CQO









1 .
------------



...... ......



...... ......




. ....... i




.. .. .. ..:: : :


1 ........ 1.. .....
1 .. ...... .................... ..

1 .............. ...... ......
1 ... .... .. ............ .....
1 ..... . ... ........ ............ ......


.... 2 2 2...... ...... .... ................
...... 1 1 1 ...... ...... ...... ... ..... .......

. 1 1 ...... .... ..... .... ........
1 1 2 1 ...... ...... ...... ..... ........
...... 1 1 1 ....... ....... .............
1 1 1 ..
1 1 ....... ......... ... .. ........ 1 ..
..... 1 1 ...... 1 ......... ......... ...

...... 1 1 ..... ............ .... ...... 1 .....
.-..... i 1 ......-..... .... ... .....
..... ...... .... .. .. .... .. ... ....
2 2 I......1..
real. Ultimate action not known, b Released, not improved.
iger,


8


...... ...... .....


. . .








58 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENE1fAL OF IMMIGRATION.


MEDICAL INSPECTION OF ALIEN IMMIGRANTS AT THE PORTS OF QUEBEC, PROVINCE OF
QUEBEC, AND ST. JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA, ETC.-Continued.


Disease.


Poor physique .................
Pregnancya....................
Psoriasis........................
Pterygium ....................
Puerperal septicEemia...........
Scoliosis...................
Senility and debility b ...........
Septicemia.....................
Spine, Potts disease of...........
Sprain of ankle.................
Suppuratinr glands, neck.......
Syphilis ...... ..............
Tachycardia ....... ...........
Talipes varus.......-............
Tenia sycosis...................
Trachomaa......... .........
Tubercle:
Of knee joint...............
Of lung.....................
Varicocele, marked .............
Varicose veins...............
Weak mind.......................

Total.....................


12 2......
1.
.... ......
S ...... ......
...... 1 ...




4 -29 42--
1............ .....
2 .........
1 ..... ......
1




145 122 78.....
...... ...... 1I


4 29 42

1 ...... ......


... .. ...... ......


145 122 78


...... 1 7
1 ...... 2
1 7
12

...... ...... ......i
...... ...... .... .




...... ...... .... i.




13 5 166
...... ...... 1
...... ....... 2
...... ...... 2
1
...... ...... 2

151 7 223


-


a certificate sent to Montreal. Ultimate result not known.
b 2 certificates sent to Montreal. Ultimate action not known.

W. C. BILLINGS,
Assistant Surgeon, P. H. and M. H. S.

SUPPLEMENTAL REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTION OF ALIEN IMMIGRANTS AT QUEBEC,
PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, CANADA, DURING THE FISCAL YEAR 1903.
[Contains a list of the diseases and the number of each of which a record consisting of the name, age,
nativity, date of arrival, name of vessel, and disease is on file, butwhich were not considered of suf-
ficient severity to necessitate a medical certificate and a reference to the board of special inquiry.]


Disease.


Adherent iris...........................
Amputation:
Of left thumb......................
Of right thumb.....................
Blepharitis marginalis .................
Blind:
Left eye ............. ...............
Right eye.......... ................
Blindness, partial....................
Burns, old..............................
Carbuncle...............................
Caries, old, of jaw....................
Cataract, one eye.....................
Cellulitis ............................
Chlorosis.............................
Conjunctivitis, follicular...............
Corneal opacity ........................
Cured favus.........................
Deafness, moderate ..................
Debility ................................
Deflection of nasal septum.............
Destruction of nasal cartilage ...........
Dislocation crystalline lens.............
Eczema................................
Entropion..............................
Ferunculosis .........................
Fracture, old...........................
Goitre .................................
Heart disease...........................


Number
of cases
recorded.

1

2
2
10

27
53
1
1


10
3
2
28
41
45
2
1
1
1
3
7
2
1
1
1
1


Disease.


Hernia, incomplete ...................
Jaundice, acute catarrhal..............
Keratitis...........................
Loose cartilage in knee joint..........
Lymphadinitis.......................
Marasmus ......... ...............
Nystagmus.........................
Ozoena............................
Physical examination ..............
Pregnancy ..........................
Psoriasis ............................
Pterygium.........................
Rheumatism, chronic................
Spur on nasal septum................
Sty.....................................
Subluxation, hip joint .................
Torticollis ............................
Tumor, benign........................
Ulcer:
Cornea.............................
Soft palate.......................
Varicocele............................
Wound:
Incised ................. ........
Lacerated.........................
Septic.............................

Total...........................


W. C. BILLINGS,
Assistant Surgeon, P. H. and M. H. S.


Number
of cases
recorded.


1
2
5

6
1
2

1
1
1

356


.. ......
oa













.. 6.. ...


..




...... ......





6 33







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 59

SUPPLEMENTARY REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTION OF ALIEN IMMIGRANTS AT
MONTREAL, CANADA, FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.
[Contains a list of the diseases and conditions which were not considered of sufficient severity to
report to the board of special inquiry.]

Number DiaNumber
Disease. of cases. Disease. of cases.

Adentis: Eczema (vesicular) .................... 1
Cervical............................ 2 Epididymitis .......................... 1
Inguinal ............................ 1 Ears, ulcerated, result of frostbite..... 1
Aphonia............................... 1 Femur (old fracture) .................. 2
Atrophy, right arm ..................... 1 Goitre................................ 1
Biepharitis marginalis .................. 4 Iritis................................... 4
Blind in one eye ........................ 28 Inflamed connective tissue of foot..... 1
Bronchitis..................... ........ 3 Lipoma ............................... 3
Conjunctivitis: Pterygium............................ 16
Catarrhal...... .................... 66 Laryngitis ............................ 1
Chronic ............................. 4 Preg cy .................. 7
Follicular .......................... 16 Psoriasis .............................. 1
Cleft palate ............. .............. 1 Seborrh ea............................. 2
Corneal ulcers....... .................... 7 Sebaceous cyst......................... 2
Contusion of hands ...................... 1 Talipes equinus....... ................. 2
Cataract............... ................ 6 Tremor, hereditary................... 1
Dislocation of lens ..................... 2
Eczema of scalp pustularr) .............. 9 Total............................. 198

JAMES BARCLAY, M. D.,
Medical Examiner, U. S. Inspection Service.

As specially indicative of the value of the system of inspection con-
ducted through the agency of the Montreal office, attention is directed
to the number of rejections on account of communicable diseases,
1,439, as compared with the grand total of rejections on the same
account at all the seaports of the United States, 1,773.

DISTRIBUTION AND NATURALIZATION.

It is impossible for any but the most reckless or foolishly optimistic
to consider the figures presented in this report without realizing their
serious bearing upon our well-being. It is not alone that virtually
1,000,000 aliens have been added to our population within the brief
space of one year, although that fact is one of large dimensions. The
constituent elements of this great army of invasion are to be consid-
ered, their individual character and capacity for useful work, their
respect for law and order, their ability to stand the strain-morally,
physically, mentally-of the life of their new surroundings; in other
words, the power to assimilate with the people of this country and
thus become a source of strength for the support of American insti-
tutions and civilization instead of a danger in periods of strain and
trial. To doubt that they possess such ability is to discredit unvary-
ing human experience. Human beings vary not so much because of
any inherent difference of nature as because of difference in the mold-
ing influences of which at every stage of development they are the
product. All instruction of mind and training of body constitute a
practical recognition of this fact. The problem presented, therefore,
to enlightened intelligence for solution is how may the possibility-
nay, probability-of danger from an enormous and miscellaneous influx
of aliens be converted, by a wise prevision and provision, into a power
for stability and security? If such a solution can be obtained, it seems
the part of foolhardiness to make no effort to that end, to trust fatu-
ously to the circumstance that though numerically immigration was
years ago nearly as large in proportion to our population as it now is






60 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

no very serious ill resulted from'the failure to take any especial care
in reference to it other than an inspection at the time of arrival.
In my judgment the smallest part of the duty to be discharged in
successfully handling alien immigrants with a view to the protection
of the people and institutions of this country is that part now provided
for by law. Its importance, though undeniable, is relatively of sec-
ondary moment. It can not, for example, compare in practical value
with,'nor can it take the place of, measures to insure the distribution
of the many thousands who come in ignorance of the industrial needs
and opportunities of this country, and, by a more potent law than that
of supply and demand, which speaks to them here in an unknown
tongue, colonizes alien communities in our great cities. Such colonies
are a menace to the physical, social, moral, and political security of
the country. They are hotbeds for the propagation and growth
of those false ideas of political and personal freedom whose germs
have been vitalized by ages of oppression under unequal and partial
laws, which find their first concrete expression in resistance to consti-
tuted authority, even occasionally in the assassination of the lawful
agents of that authority. They are the breeding grounds also of
moral depravity; the centers of propagation of physical disease.
Above all, they are the congested places in the industrial body which
check the free circulation of labor to those parts where it is most
needed and where it can be most benefited. Do away with them and
the greatest peril of immigration will be removed.
Removed from the sweat shops and' slums of the great cities and
given the opportunity to acquire a home, every alien, however radical
his theories of government and individual right may have been, will
become a conservative-a supporter in theory and practice of those
institutions under whose benign protection he has acquired and can
Defend his household goods. Suitable legislation is therefore strongly
urged to establish agencies by means of which, either with or without
Sthe cooperation of the States, aliens shall be made acquainted with the
Resources of the country at large, the industrial needs of the various
sections, in both skilled and unskilled labor, the cost of living, the
wages paid, the price and capabilities of the lands, the character of
the climates, the duration of the seasons-in short, all of that informa-
tion furnished by some of the great railway lines through whose
efforts the territory tributary thereto has been transformed from a
wilderness within a few years to the abiding place of a happy and
prosperous population.
Another means of obviating danger from our growing immigration
is the enactment of legislation to prevent the degrading of the elect-
orate through the unlawful naturalization of aliens. Undoubtedly
such naturalization is now often granted upon very insufficient evi-
dence of the statutory period of residence, a looseness in the practice
of the courts which is fostered by the heat and zeal of partisanship in
political contests. It rests with Congress to prevent such abuses and
the consequent distrust in the popular mind of the purity of elections
by establishing additional requirements to be complied with by aliens
seeking the privilege of citizenship.
Within the past year the Bureau has established at the various ports
of entry a card index system, by reference to which the date of the
arrival and personal identity can be readily verified. To require every
alien applicant for naturalization to produce a certified copy of such























































ALIENS ENTERING ELLIS ISLAND STATION.






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 61

record, attested by the signature and seal of the custodian thereof,
would substitute for the oral testimony of professional witnesses writ-
ten evidence of an entirely reliable character.
NEW LEGISLATION.

In addition to the new legislation recommended under the next pre-
ceding title, I have to suggest that Congress be urged to strike out
from section 1 of the act approved March 3, 1903, the words which
exempt transportation companies from the payment of the head tax
for aliens brought by them, respectively, who profess to be merely
transits to foreign territory. It is believed that that provision was
retained in the act through a clerical error, and its elimination is
recommended because of the embarrassments, both to the transporta-
tion lines and to the Bureau, in its enforcement. The amount saved
to the passenger carriers is too trivial to justify the labor and delay
involved in ascertaining who are actually transits, and under the law
not properly subject to the head tax, and who are merely professing
to be such.
The new law referred to above has not been in operation long enough
to enable the Bureau to point out specific defects, other than that one
just cited; but it was so carefully drawn and so aptly embodies the
results of the Bureau's experience in the ten years of the latter's exist-
ence, that the best results are anticipated.
Irrespective of the effect in diminishing the number of alien arrivals,
now approximating 1,000,000 annually, I am impressed with the
importance of still further measures to improve the quality of those
admitted. Such measures would be merely additional steps in the
same direction already taken in dealing with the question of immigra-
tion to this country. They would involve no new departure from a
policy which has been pursued for years, and which therefore may now
be assumed to be a fixed principle of the United States in dealing with
this subject. From this point of view it seems not unjust to require
of aliens seeking admission to this country at least so much mental
training as is evidenced by the ability to read and write. This require-
ment, whatever arguments or illustrations may be used to establish
the contrary position, will furnish alien residents of a character less
likely to become burdens on public or private charity. Otherwise it
must follow that rudimentary education is a handicap in the struggle
for existence, a proposition that few would attempt to maintain. It
would also, in a measure, relieve the American people of the burden
now sustained by them of educating in the free schools the ignorant
of other countries.
There should also be some requirement as to the moral character of
such persons. The present law excludes convicts. This only partially
accomplishes the purpose of establishing a moral standard for admis-
sion to this country. Without attempting in the restricted limits of
this report to indicate the method of devising such legislation, it is
sufficient to point to the criminal record in this country of many aliens
as a justification for this recommendation. Before the close of the
next fiscal year the Bureau will be in possession of interesting and
suggestive data in relation to this subject.
For the purpose of distributing arriving aliens in accordance with
the plan already outlined, it is recommended that suitable legislation






62 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

be enacted for the establishment, in connection with the various immi-
gration stations, more particularly the Ellis Island station, of com-
modious quarters, properly officered, where information may be given
to the new arrivals. In such quarters should be displayed maps of
the different States, with descriptive matter as to the resources and
products of each State, the prices of land, the routes of travel thereto
and cost of transportation, the opportunities for employment in the
various skilled and unskilled occupations, the rates of wages paid,
the cost of living, and all other information that would enlighten such
persons as to the inducements to settlement therein offered respec-
tively by the various sections of the United States. I believe that
such a plan is entirely practicable and that its adoption offers at once
the easiest and most efficient solution of the serious problems pre-
sented by the enormous additions of alien population to our great
cities and the resultant evils both to the people of this country and to
the immigrants.
For the purpose of forming an approximately accurate estimate of
the actual annual increase of the population of the United States by
the immigration of aliens, it is recommended that measures be taken to
obtain information of the number of aliens departing annually. These
figures will be valuable to students of the subject as presenting both
sides of the case, and will correct the extravagant estimates that may
be made from reports of arrivals only as to the actual size of our alien
population.
IMMIGRATION STATIONS.

During the year I have made repeated visits to the various immi-
grant stations with a view to ascertaining, from personal observation,
the needs at each station for an efficient administration of the law and
a humane provision for the comfort of aliens detained there, pending
a decision as to their admissibility. The personnel of the service I have
found generally to be satisfactory, the officers in some instances being
men of high character and intelligence, fully qualified both by expe-
rience and natural endowments for the discharge of their respective
duties. It would be an act of injustice to omit appreciative reference
to the industry, patience, and fidelity of the officers who have been
assigned to service under me, as well as to their loyalty to the service
and their prompt and cheerful obedience. With such agents to aid in
administering the law I am sanguine of achieving the best practical
results.
As regards the difficulties to be surmounted, it was found that the
inspection along the land boundaries is far more of a problem than at
the seaports, As was recited in the last report, and as is confirmed
by the report of the commissioner of immigration at Montreal, the
Bureau has succeeded, by virtue of an agreement with the transporta-
tion lines of that country, in establishing a highly satisfactory inspec-
tion along the northern boundary from Canada. Aliens of the inadmis-
sible classes now find it quite as difficult to gain access to this country
through Canada, which was formerly an open door to them, as at a
seaport of the United States. As one of the results it may be reason-
ably anticipated that the next means to be resorted to by such aliens
will be the Mexican boundary-a point of weakness in our defense
from undesirable immigration that has already been discovered and
utilized by the most resourceful of alien peoples-the Chinese. To






REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 63

strengthen this line will be one of the immediate necessities, involving
the assignment of active, young, and intelligent officers, under a capa-
ble and experienced general control, to guard the long stretch from
the Pacific coast to the Gulf of Mexico.
At the port of Honolulu, where the accommodations for the deten-
tion of aliens pending inspection were wholly inadequate, suitably
located ground has been selected and plans obtained for the erection
of a commodious building with hospital quarters, officers' rooms, board
room, etc. During the ensuing year it is believed that this building
will be completed and paid for with the special appropriation therefore,
and that it will thereafter be possible to enforce the laws as satisfac-
torily and care for the detained aliens as humanely there as at any
continental seaport of this country.
At San Francisco there is no immigrant building. Chinese aliens
have been temporarily landed from vessels, by permission, and placed
in detention quarters furnished by the transportation lines. These
quarters were so disgraceful-cramped in dimensions, lacking in every
facility for cleanliness and decency-that it was necessary to insist
upon an immediate remodeling thereof. As a temporary expedient,
the result of my protest to the steamship lines has been the reconstruc-
tion of a better, cleanlier, and more commodious building, but it does
not obviate the pressing demand for a structure to accommodate all
alien arrivals. This is the principal port of arrival for Japanese and
Chinese aliens, and provision of the nature indicated should be made
at the earliest practicable moment.
It is therefore recommended urgently that the sum of $200,000 be
appropriated for the erection of an immigrant station at said port, and
that to prevent the difficulties which arise from attempts to communi-
cate with the detained aliens the said building be located on land belong-
ing to the Government in the harbor. This isolation from the mainland
is deemed of special importance in view of the fact, appearing else-
where in this report, that the communicable diseases, which it is one
of the express purposes of the law to exclude, are peculiarly prevalent
among aliens from oriental countries.
The recently established examination of Chinese aliens by physicians
has shown the importance, from a sanitary point of view, of taking
every possible precaution to prevent the introduction of disease through
this class of immigration.
Pending provision for a suitable public building at Boston to be used
as an immigrant station, the Bureau, and the transportation lines hav-
ing terminals at said port, have effected improvements in the landing
facilities there by which more commodious and wholesome quarters
are provided for aliens pending examination, and separate apartments
are supplied for the use of the boards of special inquiry and the inspec-
tion officers. This arrangement, however, is merely temporary and
provisional, each transportation company having supplied individually
such accommodation upon their respective properties, thus occasioning
much delay in administering the laws by the necessity for continual
shifting of officers from one point to another.
All of the reasons urged in the last annual report for appropriation
to construct an immigrant station have acquired additional force dur-
ing the past year of heavy immigration. Not alone humanitarian
considerations, but the requirements of an efficient administration,
involving the least amount of expense and movement from one place







64 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

to another of the immigration officers, compatible with proper discharge
of their duties, dictate the necessity as well as the wisdom of providing
for the erection and maintenance there of a suitable building.
As will be shown by reference to Table I, irrespective of the influx
of residents of Canada, the immigration at the port of Boston, which
for the year 1902 was 39,465, this year reached a total of 62,838.
During the year it was found necessary to attach to the jurisdiction of
the commissioner of immigration of Boston the port of New Bedford,
Mass. This action was taken in consequence of cumulative evidence
that the laws were being evaded at the last-mentioned port, and that
to check the boldness of smugglers it would be necessary to increase
the official force there, and place the control of it and of the port under
an intelligent and experienced officer. The Bureau feels confident that
the result of this change will justify its anticipations.
In this connection a report is given of the handling of 418 aliens who
were stranded by the wreck of the Portuguese vessel Vera Cruz VII,
at Ocracoke Inlet, North Carolina. The detail was assigned to Inspector
Bertram N. Stump, of Baltimore, who, under exceptional difficulties,
made, at Newbern, N. C., the inspection required by law, subsequently
delivering the aliens at their destination (New Bedford, Mass.) to Com-
missioner Billings.
PORT OF NEW BEDFORD, MASS., May 20, 1903.
SIR: In the matter of the stranded passengers and crew of the barkentine Vera
Cruz VII, which sailed from Brava, Cape de Verde Islands, April 1, 1903, stranded
at Ocracoke, North Carolina, May 8, landed at Newbern, N. C., May 12, 1903, I have
the honor to reply as follows:
Upon arrival at Newbern, N. C., on the evening of May 13, at 6 p. m., I took
charge of the passengers and crew, in all, 418 souls. Asst. Surg. M. W. Glover, who
had been detailed for this service, will make his report through me, which, when it
arrives, I request to be made part of this record.
At the surgeon's request I at once authorized the leasing of a vacant house as a
temporary hospital, and Acting Assistant Surgeon Primrose, stationed at Newbern,
N. C., was authorized to purchase cots, blankets, and a supply of necessary medi-
cines. Ten of the sick were transferred from the old shed in which they were all
quartered by 10 p. m. of that date.
On May 14 registration of the passengers and crew was begun, and they were tick-
eted for the purpose of identification, so that later they could be classified into groups
and fully manifested. This work continued daily from 8 a. m. until 6 p. m. to the
afternoon of Saturday, the 16th instant, when the registration was completed.
Many cases of dysentery occurred during the time, and the sick were admitted and
discharged from the temporary hospital as Surgeon Glover directed.
The temporary shed being overcrowded and not large enough to keep the sexes
separate, it was necessary, for sanitary reasons, to move the women and children to
the upper floors of the temporary hospital, which were unoccupied. This was also
done at the surgeon's request.
On Sunday, the 17th instant, strong shipping tags were purchased and all the pas-
sengers and crew were tagged to assist the officials at this port upon arrival.
I attach herewith copies of letters to the collector of customs and Acting Assistant
Surgeon Primrose at Newbern, N. C., marked Exhibits A, B, and C, respectively,
which show that there were 29 members of the crew and 389 alien passengers, of
which 225 were manifested and 164 were unmanifested, making in all 418 persons
landed at Newbern, N. C., who were turned over to me by the collector of customs
and the captain of the revenue cutter Boutwell. This does not include the master of
the barkentine (Julio M. Fernandez), who escaped at Ocracoke Inlet.
Statements which I consider authentic incline me to believe that the first and sec-
ond pilots were also left on board, and two alien passengers must have also escaped
at Ocracoke Inlet; in all, five persons have landed in the United States without
medical or other examination, as provided by law.
At 6 p. m. Sunday, the 17th instant, all arrangements having been concluded for
transportation to New Bedford, Mass., by immigrant train, the superintendent of
the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad (the initial road) agreed to bring us all
through at the special rate of not exceeding $12.30 per capital. The same rate applies







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. (35

for the return of the four men employed as special guards on this trip. The train
consisted of eight coaches and one baggage car, made up at Newbern, N. C., and
supplied with such provisions as the captain of the revenue cutter had left over, he
having had charge of the commissary arrangements up to that time. It consisted of
about 75 loaves of bread and sufficient canned meats to give them all breakfast the
next morning at 9 a. m. en route.
At noon, May 18, having been delayed by a wreck on the Richmond, Fredericks-
burg and Potomac Railroad, near Richmond, Va., I issued all we had left, consisting
of crackers. Upon arrival at Washington the food provided by the Department was
placed in the baggage car, and they were given a good dinner. At Baltimore, Md.,
I took on board 3 cans of milk and 2 cans of coffee and 175 loaves of bread, as the
order from the Department countermanding the same had not been received, and it
was needed. I countermanded the order on Jersey City for the amount taken on at
Baltimore. The Portuguese were fed that night about 11 p. m., at Jersey City.
Breakfast was given them at 7 a. m. between New London, Conn., and Providence,
R. I., and consisted of the supplies secured at Jersey City.
The cost of provisions ordered by me for feeding these people will not, I think,
exceed 10 cents per capital per meal.
The train reached New Bedford at 12.10 p. m., May 19, and Commissioner Billings,
with his staff, took charge.
The records of the board of inquiry, copies of which are attached hereto, marked
Exhibits D, E, and F, held at Newbern, N. C., show as follows:
Total number arriving at Newbern .............-.......--.......--.... .... 418
Number admitted at Newbern....-------....----...----................---------------...... 11
Number in hospital at Newbern..................-.................- .... 3
-14

Turned over to Commissioner Billings, at New Bedford, Mass ........... 404
Cases excluded trachomaa) ...........-- ..........--------.......--------- 6
Cases deferred ......-- ....-----..... .......-------------- ..----------- 398
-404
The four men comprising the special guard have been relieved from duty to-day
and started on their return to Newbern, N. C.
All ship's papers which belong to the immigration authorities, taken from the
barkentine, together with copies of the record of the board of special inquiry held
at Newbern, N. C., were turned over to Commissioner Billings, of Boston, with the
recommendation that they be kept on file at this port by Inspector Wright.
Respectfully submitted.
BERTRAM N. STUMP, Inspector.
The CoMMISSIONErI-(ENERAL OF IMMIGRATION,
IVashington, D. C.

Below is given in full a report of the commissioner of immigration
at New York of the operations of his station for the past year.
Another year of experience has confirmed me in the opinion expressed
in the last annual report as to the Ellis Island structure. It is impos-
sible to employ terms that are too extravagant in reporting upon this
costly and handsome building. It is badly designed for the use for
which it was intended and it was constructed, unfortunately, in a man-
ner to give ground for the popular impression that the erection of
Government buildings is distinguished by the use of poor material and
inferior workmanship. The cost of repairs has been heavy, but no
amount of repairing, unless the building is remodeled, will ever render it
suitable for an immigrant station. To cite but one of its many defects,
every alien, be it man or woman, encumbered with heavy and unwieldy
baggage and often surrounded with clinging children, has first to mount
stairways and tHen to descend, in undergoing the process of inspection,
entailing upon such persons unnecessary distress at a time when few
of them are in a condition to undergo fatigue. The board rooms are
insufficient, and, as has already been reported, the hospital accommo-
dations are inadequate.
5567-03-5






66 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

It is therefore recommended that a sufficient appropriation be made
to remodel the interior of the building and enlarge it, so as properly
to accommodate the thousands who are dependent for reasonable com-
fort upon its accommodations.
During the year ejectment proceedings were instituted in the State
of New Jersey to divest the Government of its title to Ellis Island.
These proceedings were subsequently discontinued in New Jersey and
instituted in the courts of New York. Under the advice of the law
officers of the Government no steps were taken to carry out the pur-
poses of the special appropriations for the enlargement of the area of
the island or the construction of additional hospital quarters. Although
the delay is seriously detrimental to the interests of good administra-
tion at the New York station, it seems prudent to make no expendi-
tures as long as the title is questioned in the courts. It is therefore
recommended that both appropriations be continued, so as to become
available as soon as the proceedings referred to have been judicially
determined.
The grounds around the building have during the year been beauti-
fied by the removal of the builders' debris, the location of walks, and
the planting of shrubs and flowers, thus making, so far as outward
appearances go, a great improvement in the station.
OFFICE OF COMMISSIONER OF IMMIGRATION,
New York, N. Y., August 4, 1903.
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following as the annual report concerning the
Ellis Island immigrant station for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1903.
SOME CHARACTERISTICS OF ELLIS ISLAND WORK.
During the preceding twelve months there arrived at this port of New York 689,356
aliens, and of these 631,885 were brought to Ellis Island for inspection. For detailed
information concerning the nationalities and other characteristics of these aliens ref-
erence is made to the statistical tables appended to the report of the Commissioner-
General. On April 9 there arrived at New York about 12,600 immigrants, of which
number I declined.to receive over 6,800, because of the obvious impossibility of
inspecting a greater number in one day. The proper application of the complicated
immigration laws to thousands of aliens involves an enormous amount of work, both
mental and physical, on the part of the Ellis Island force. This office has transacted
business on every Sunday of the year excepting Easter Sunday, and with substan-
tially the same officials who were on duty during the week. It knows no regular
hours, the inspection work frequently continuing without relief from 9.15 a. m. till
after 7 p. m., and sometimes until much later, notwithstanding the fact that no aliens
are now received for inspection later than 4 p. m. on any day.
It is true that there are times when the primary or line inspectors are excused as
early as 1 p. m., but these do not altogether make up for the trying conditions and
irregular hours above referred to, while the boards of special inquiry sit regularly
from 9.15 a. m. till 4.40 p. m., and often until 5.30 p. m. The work of'the inspectors
on the line is both mental and clerical, chiefly the former. That of the boards of
special inquiry is almost entirely mental, and presents peculiar difficulties. Through
trying processes the inspectors and boards are compelled to elicit from thousands of
aliens of various nationalities the facts upon which it can be determined whether or
not these aliens may enter the United States, that is to say, whether they are pau-
pers, persons likely to become public charges, contract laborers, or anarchists. It is
believed that there is no other public office in which such a large number of subor-
dinate officials are called upon to do incessant mental work and exercise discretion-
ary powers of such volume and importance.
DISCIPLINE AND EFFICIENCY OF THE FORCE.
The discipline and efficiency of the force have undergone much improvement
during the past twelve months. A number of unfaithful officials, some holding
important positions, have been dismissed through charges filed pursuant to civil-
service rules. Such charges cover various misdeeds both against the Government











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i; "-


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TYPES OF ALIENS AWAITING ADMISSION AT ELLIS ISLAND STATION.


F":4
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a~7:







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 67

and the immigrants, and constitute an excellent statement of many of the kinds
of wrongdoing which used to flourish at Ellis Island. With the example of unfaith-
ful officials in important positions, it is small wonder that many holding subordinate
places fell into line, if only for the sake of not incurring the ill will of their superiors.
Nor is it surprising that persons pretending to be missionaries should have come to
the island and cooperated with such officials, to the detriment of all concerned,
including the genuine missionaries, some of whom do excellent work among the
immigrants. I believe that the force as a whole will now compare favorably with
that of any other public office, while many of its members are men of great intelli-
gence, untiring energy, and scrupulous honesty.
Every effort is being made to raise the standard of work and to rid the office of
inferior men. On October 21, 1902, there was posted the following notice in relation
to Department circular No. 105, of August 12, 1902, defining the reasons for which
officials may be removed:
" To all officials and employees:
"The careful study of the above circular is commended to anyone who may be
laboring under the false impression that a civil-service appointment carries with it
protection from removal, even though the appointee thereafter become inefficient.
It should be clearly understood that the Government is no more under obligations to
retain such a person in its service than would be a private corporation or individual.
The civil-service laws afford no immunity whatever from the consequences of any
substantial neglect of duty. Any other rule would work gross injustice to others who
may be candidates for civil-service appointments. The proper conduct of this office
in particular requires the presence of officials who are honest, intelligent, alert, and
ready at all times to perform whatever official work may be assigned to them, and
only such officials will be allowed to remain at Ellis Island.
"WM. WILLIAMS, Commissioner."
It is not for one moment contended that all evil practices have ceased to exist at
Ellis Island, or that occasional impositions and petty acts of injustice may not occur.
Having in view the vastness of the work, the ignorance of the people with whom we
deal, the large number of employees, and the temptations to which they are sub-
jected, it is inconceivable that the millennium can-ever exist here, but it is quite pos-
sible, through incessant vigilance and the punishment of all wrongful or careless acts,
to keep evil practices well within bounds, and bring about proper treatment of
immigrants while in charge of the Government. With this in view the following
notice has been posted, and it is not the fault of the commissioner if violations'of
its terms are not brought to his attention:
"Immigrants must be treated with kindness and consideration. Any Govern-
ment official violating the terms of this notice will be recommended for dismissal
from the service. Any other person so doing will be forthwith required to leave
Ellis Island. It is earnestly requested that any violation hereof, or any instance of
any kind of improper treatment of immigrants at Ellis Island or before they leave
the Barge Office, be promptly brought to the attention of the commissioner."
As a matter of fact but few complaints have been made during the past twelve,
months, and each of them has been investigated and in all important cases a decision,
rendered in writing.
EXECUTION OF THE LAWS.
Unceasing effort is made to execute the existing laws with the utmost rigidity,
although the utter inadequacy of such laws makes it difficult for some people to
realize that this is done. During the last fiscal year 6,839 aliens were excluded from
admission and deported to Europe at the expense of the steamship companies bring-
ing them here. The largest percentage of deportations occurred during December,
1902, and was about 3 per cent of the arrivals during that month. It resulted
in many protests to the President, members of Congress, and the immigration
authorities, most of them based on ignorance of the facts or indifference to a correct
execution of United States statutes. The deportations during May and June, 1903,
were about 1 per cent of the arrivals. The fall in the percentage is not to be taken
as showing any less strictness in the inspection, on the contrary such inspection is,
if anything, stricter. By last December this office was in a position to execute the
laws with greater rigidity than formerly, and I believe that the severe lesson of that
month has been taken to heart, and that far fewer of the ineligible classes are brought
here now than formerly.
The last Congress wisely passed a law permitting the summary imposition of a fine
of $100 in each instance where an alien with a loathsome or dangerous contagious
disease is brought to the United States, provided such disease could have been detected







68 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

in Europe by a competent medical examination. This law gave the American people
a new and valuable weapon with which to protect their interests, and I have used it
freely. The first $100 fine was imposed in April, 1903. In June alone this office
imposed upon those steamship companies which persisted in bringing here diseased
aliens fines aggregating over $7,500. I doubt whether any foreign steamship agent
now has any misgivings as to the intention of the Government to keep out diseased
aliens by every means at its command. Already very clear signs exist that the law
wid hereafter be obeyed, and the former alleged inability on the part of some for-
eign surgeons to discover caces of favus and trachoma prior to embarkation is very
rapidly disappearing. The bringing of diseased aliens, with or without a law to the
contrary, is a reckless thing, if only on account of the ready disseminating of disease
among the healthy immigrants.

THE MEDICAL DIVISION.
Much of the important work at Ellis Island is done by the United States marine-
hospital surgeons, with Dr. George W. Stoner in charge. They inspect such aliens
as are allowed to pass the quarantine authorities. The most troublesome diseases
with which they have to deal are favus (scalp disease) and trachoma (eye disease),
both of them prevalent in the countries of eastern and southern Europe, and due to
low vitality and filthy surroundings. Until very recently these surgeons were com-
pelled to perform their inspection during a period which was so brief as to be mani-
festly inadequate. Recently, however, by a new contrivance, such period has been
doubled, to the great satisfaction of these conscientious and painstaking surgeons,
whose work, in view of the character and condition of many of their patients, is of a
trying character. The Ellis Island hospital facilities are utterly inadequate. Con-
gress appropriated $100,000 for the extension of the present hospital, but subsequent
experience shows that this amount should be doubled, and I so recommend. Many
diseased immigrants must now be sent to the Long Island College Hospital, where
they are beyond the immediate supervision of the Government. Frequent escapes
occur, and these will cease only when such immigrants can be treated at Ellis Island.
Congress also appropriated $150,000 for the construction of a new island, on which
is to be built a hospital for such contagious diseases as measles and scarlet fever.
The next Congress should appropriate $150,000 for the construction of such hospital.
SOME CHANGES.
Mention has already been made of the additional facilities granted for medical
inspection. These should be still further increased and the medical force doubled, so
as to reduce to a minimum the possibility of insane aliens, or aliens with any kind of
a contagious disease, entering this country.
Two changes in the manner of performing the cabin inspection have wrought
great improvement: (1) Each second-cabin alien must now receive a card showing
on which manifest list his name appears. Large signs are placed in the four corners
of the second cabin. The passengers proceed to group themselves according to these
signs, and it then becomes possible for the boarding inspectors, by appropriate sub-
division of the manifest sheets, to inspect aliens with reference thereto. Formerly
this was done by checking off the names on the printed passenger list, a proceeding
which was in every way unsatisfactory. (2) Through the wise action of the Bureau
in providing the Ellis Island station with a fine tugboat, the immigration inspectors
are now able to board incoming steamers whenever they please, and need not wait
until the custom-house officials, whose work is of a different nature, are ready to
board. As a matter of fact, the cabin inspection on all large steamers now begins at
quarantine, and it is possible to devote thereto one-half more time than formerly.
Of course, cabin passengers do not require the same careful inspection as the steerage,
but it is nevertheless very important that they be inspected, because a well-to-do but
diseased or otherwise ineligible alien will naturally come in the cabin, evading oft-
times the vigilance of the Government authorities and steamship companies, and
experience shows that unknown persons in Europe are constantly advising and even
supplying funds to ineligible.aliens in order that they may travel in the second cabin,
and thus perhaps avoid the necessity of coming to Ellis Island. The tugboat Cham-
berlain, used for boarding incoming steamers, is chartered. I recommend very
strongly that Congress be requested to appropriate $55,000 for the construction or
purchase of such a tugboat.
A full and special record is now kept of all those applying for relief and deporta-
tion as paupers, or sent here for such purposes, subsequent to the landing. Since
July 1, 1902, about 1,100 aliens belonging to these classes have applied for relief (as
against 2,500 so applying during the preceding fiscal year), and of these it was possi-







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 69

ble to deport about one-fourth. Since the new law has lengthened the period
throughout which the executive branch of the Government retains control over
aliens from one year to two, and in some instances three years, it is probable that
this part of the immigration work will increase in importance. With the setting in
of "hard times" it is certain to become very great. It is hoped that a study of the
history of these charity cases will result in assisting the immigration officials mate-
rially in determining from actual experience who is and who is not likely to become
a public charge.
Following are some further changes which have occurred: A card index is now
kept in which the names of all aliens arriving at New York are arranged alphabet-
ically according to their several nationalities. This requires the constant work of at
least seven clerks. The work of the special inquiry boards is tabulated every month
and shows the numbers held and deported by each board, together with the reasons
and much other interesting information. Most of the blanks formerly used have
been discarded and superseded by new ones of a more concise nature and better cal-
culated to secure the desired information, and many useless blanks and records have
been discontinued. Discharged seamen must now be brought to Ellis Island for
inspection under the immigration laws, and this regulation does away with, or at
least minimizes, a kind of violation of law which was of frequent occurrence.
BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS.

The main buildings at Ellis Island are quite inadequate for the rigid application of
the laws, for such application necessarily means, in view of the present quality of
immigration, the detention of large numbers. The station is in much better condi-
tion than it was last year, because there has been erected a barracks for the accom-
modation at night of 700 additional aliens, so that sleeping quarters for 1,800 people
now exist. This barracks serves a further useful and'humanitarian purpose in that it
is on a level with the ground floor and relieves hundreds of aliens of the necessity of
carrying their baggage up and down long flights of stairs morning and evening. There
should be sleeping quarters for 3,000 people. Increased detention facilities have been
further provided by almost doubling the capacity of the room in which those are
placed who are held for special inquiry. Even these increased quarters are inade-
quate for their purpose, assuming always that all are to be held for special inquiry
who are not clearly and beyond a doubt entitled to land. There is very urgent need
for additional accommodations, as follows:
(1) For those proceeding west by the railroads: The ticket room is much too
small and the waiting rooms are so inadequate that a sidewalk is now frequently
used as a temporary waiting place. (2) For those who are excluded and ordered
deported: These represent the worst elements that come here. There is no possible
means of increasing the size of the rooms in which they are now necessarily placed, and
the conditions of these rooms, which are often overcrowded, are very bad. (3) For
the work of the boards of special inquiry: There are only three board rooms, and
yet much of the time four boards are in session: The only witness room is about 15
by 20 feet, and yet on busy days hundreds of witnesses come to Ellis Island for the
purpose of giving testimony. (4) For the medical inspection: The doctors hold all
doubtful cases for special investigation away from the lines, and they are compelled
to do this work in quarters which are shockingly inadequate and never will be ade-
quate until the building is properly extended, as hereinafter suggested. (5) For
additional executive and clerical offices: There are now at this station, busily
employed all the time, a great number of stenographers and a large corps of other
clerks. The clerks' rooms are quite inadequate for their purposes. Furthermore,
some of the important records must soon be placed in the cellar for safe-keeping
unless additional room on the main floor is provided.
To remedy the foregoing conditions I recommend that the two wings of the main
building be extended to the north about 70 feet, and that the intervening space be
extended about 30 feet, all in accordance with the plans heretofore prepared by
the Supervising Architect. The cost of such extensions would be about $370,000.
Great efforts have been made during the last fiscal year to give the grounds sur-
rounding the building an attractive appearance. There now exist 4 extensive lawns
in places which were formerly.in a disorderly condition, and these lawns are sur-
rounded by nearly 1,500 feet o, privet hedges. Flowers have been introduced at
appropriate points. At a cost of nearly $10,000 the whole interior of the building
has been painted and otherwise put in proper order. This plant is an expensive one
and it can not properly be maintained except by the annual expenditure of liberal
amounts, supplemented by constant care.
The last Congress made liberal appropriations for Ellis Island, including $150,000
for a new island (the location of which is now staked out), $100,000 for the extension







70 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

of the present hospital (the plans for which are now being prepared), and $110,000
for a new ferryboat. The contract for the construction of the latter has been
awarded to the Harlan & Hollingsworth Company, pursuant to its bid of $91,715,
which did not include certain electrical and other equipment, estimated to cost about
$6,000 additional. Further considerable sums must be expended shortly, as indicated
in the foregoing report. The immigration service is self-supporting. Further
amounts can readily be obtained by increasing the head tax on aliens, which now
stands at the very low sum of $2.
IMMIGRATION IN GENERAL.

In what follows I am merely repeating what I have said before in other words.
But there are many trite things which bear repetition, and the facts concerning the
continued coming here of large numbers of aliens, many of them of an inferior type
even in their own homes, is one of these things.
(1) The great bulk of the present immigration proceeds from Italy, Austria, and
Russia, and, furthermore, from some of the most undesirable sources of population
of those countries. No one would object to the better classes of Italians, Austrians,
and Russians coming here in large numbers; but the point is that such better element
does not come, and, furthermore, that immigration from such countries as Germany
and the British Isles has fallen to a very low figure.
(2) The great bulk of the present immigration settles in four of the Eastern States,
and most of it in the large cities of those States. Notwithstanding the well-known
demand for agricultural labor in the Western States, thousands of foreigners keep
pouring into our cities, declining to go where they might be wanted because they
are neither physically nor mentally fitted to go to these undeveloped parts of our
country and do as did the early settlers from northern Europe.
In view of these two propositions, it is as irrevelant as it is misleading to assert
that because immigration in the past has been a source of greatness to the country
and because the great building and other industrial operations now going on in the
United States require labor, therefore immigration should not be further restricted.
Past immigration was good because most of it was of the right kind and went to the
right place. Capital can not, and it would not if it could, employ much of the alien
material that annually passes through Ellis Island, and thereafter chooses to settle
in the crowded tenement districts of New York. Let it be again plainly stated that
these remarks are not directed against all immigration; that the great debt which
this country owes to immigration in the past is cheerfully acknowledged; and that
the strong, intelligent emigrant, of which class many are still coming here, is as
welcome to-day as ever he was.
A strict execution of our present laws makes it possible to keep out what may be
termed the worst element of Europe (paupers, diseased persons, and those likely to
become public charges), and to this extent these laws are most valuable. Without a
proper execution of the same it is safe to say that thousands of additional aliens would
have come here last year. But these laws do not reach a large body of immigrants
who, while not of this class, are yet generally undesirable, because unintelligent, of low
vitality, of poor physique, able to perform only the cheapest kind of manual labor,
desirous of locating almost exclusively in the cities, by their competition tending to
reduce the standard of living of the American wageworker, and unfitted mentally
or morally for good citizenship. It would be quite impossible to accurately state
what proportion of last year's immigration should be classed as "undesirable." I
believe that at least 200,000 (and probably more) aliens came here who, although
they may be able to earn a living, yet are not wanted, will be of no benefit to the
country, and will, on the contrary, be a detriment, because their presence will tend
to lower our standards; and if these 200,000 persons could have been induced to
stay at home, nobody, not even those clamoring for more labor, would have missed
them. Their coming has been of benefit chiefly, if not only, to the transportation
companies which brought them here.
Relying on the views generally expressed by the intelligent press throughout the
country; on those expressed by nine out of ten citizens, whether native or foreign
born, with whom one discusses the subject; on letters received from charitable and
reformatory institutions in some of the Eastern States, and upon official observation
at Ellis Island, I state without hesitation that the vast majority of American citizens
wish to see steps taken to prevent these undesirable elements from landing on our
shores. Attempts to take such steps will be opposed by powerful and selfish interests,
and they will insist, among other things, on the value of immigration in the past to
the United States and the enormous demand for labor, neither of them relevant as
applicable to the particular question whether the undesirable immigrants shall be
prevented from coming here.








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 71

Throughout the discussion of this question, which is becoming of greater impor-
tance to the United States every day, it is necessary to bear in mind that Europe,
like every other part of the world, has millions of undesirable people whom she
would be glad to part with, and that strong agencies are constantly at work to send
some of them here. To determine how to separate the desirable elements from the
undesirable elements will tax the best skill of our lawmakers, but they will surely
find a way to do this as soon as the American people have let it be known that it
must be done.
Aliens have no inherent right whatever to come here, and we may and should
take means, however radical or drastic, to keep out all below a certain physical and
economic standard of fitness and all whose presence will tend to lower our standards of
living and civilization. The only apparent alterantive is to allow transportation com-
panies, largely foreign (whether by their own agents or by men to whom a commission
is paid for each immigrant secured is not important), to cause eastern and southern
Europe to be scoured for aliens, not whose presence here will benefit the United
States, not who belong to a stock which will add to the elements on which the
country in the past has grown great, not who will bring a certain amount of wealth
to their new homes, but who merely happen to have enough money to pur-
chase tickets from Europe to some place in the United States and can bring them-
selves within the easy requirements of existing statutes. A too rapid filling up of
any country with foreign elements is sure to be at the expense of national character
when such elements belong to the poorest classes in their own respective homes.
Respectfully,
WM. WILLIAMS,
Commissioner.
The COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION,
Washington, D. C.




UNITED STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE, MEDICAL DIVISION,
New York, N. Y., August 14, 1903.
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a tabulated report of transactions of
the medical division of the immigration service at this port for the fiscal year ended
June 30, 1903, covering detailed report of hospital transactions, nationality of patients
treated, race of immigrants treated, race of immigrants deported on medical certifi-
cates, work of medical examiners, clerical work, balance sheet, disposition of cases
certified to, medical and surgical report of diseases and injuries treated by immigra-
tion service (medical division), including immigrants in Long Island College Hospi-
tal and hospitals of the city health department.
Six hundred and five thousand three hundred and forty-one steerage passengers
and 84,047 cabin passengers were inspected upon arrival.
Five thousand live hundred and sixty-four aliens, including 205 applying for relief
after landing, were admitted to hospital.
Number of aliens treated in immigrant hospital, Ellis Island --....--....---- 3,427
Long Island College (contract) Hospital..---...----.............----------------. 1,035
City health department (contract) hospitals-----......... ...----- ----------- 1,148
The above figures show a marked increase in the number of patients admitted to
hospital this year as compared with the year preceding, which may be explained by
the increased number of arrivals during the year and the large number placed in
hospital for the purpose of satisfactorily concluding the examination and to deter-
mine diagnosis, in accordance with the instructions for the medical examination of
aliens issued by the Surgeon-General, Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service,
and approved by the Secretary of the Treasury.
There is also a considerable increase in the number of cases of disease certified as
dangerous, contagious, or loathsome, corresponding as nearly as may be with the
general increase in immigration.
In order to meet the additional requirements of the Service by reason of the
increased number of arrivals, and the care exercised at this station to prevent the
admission of undesirable immigrants, the medical as well as the clerical force of this
office has recently been increased, and facilities have been provided by the commis-
sioner for a double line of inspection, thus placing at the disposal of each medical
officer more time for the examination of immigrants passing the preliminary line
inspection as well as of those turned aside for special examination.








72 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

The contract with the Long Island College Hospital was continued during the
year, and on certain days it was necessary to send nearly as many aliens to that hos-
pital as were admitted to the immigrant hospital on Ellis Island.
The appropriation by recent act of Congress for extension and additions to the
present hospital on Ellis Island is probably not sufficient to provide the additional
accommodations needed, but if the extension is made in accordance with a sketch
plan recently submitted the necessity for the use of a contract hospital will be reduced
to a minimum, and the sketch plan referred to will admit of further extensions and
still be in keeping with the general plan.
The act of Congress referred to also provides for the construction of a new island
near Ellis Island, the intention being, I am informed, to erect thereon suitable hos-
pital buildings for the care of immigrants suffering from the acute contagious diseases.
But until such hospital shall have been provided it will be necessary to continue the
contract with the city health department.
In submitting this report I take pleasure in commending the efficiency of the
official staff of this office, and in acknowledging the many courtesies received from
the commissioner and other officers of the Immigration Service at this station.
Respectfully submitted.
GEO. W. STONER,
Surgeon, Public IIealth and Marine-Hospital Service,
In Charge of Medical Division.
The COMMISSIONER OF IMMIGRATION,
Port of New York.




SUMMARY OF HOSPITAL TRANSACTIONS, FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.

Number of patients in hospital at beginning of year........---..-- .......... 164
Patients admitted to hospital during year.....--.....--.......--..---- ... -5,564
Total treated (men, 2,873; women, 1,289; male children, 852; female chil-
dren, 714) ----..............---.....---- ...--- ..-- ...-.....--- ... ---- 5,728
Births (male, 4; female, 10) ..............------ ....-.....--- ....---- ..--- 14
Deaths (men, 40; women, 7; male children, 52; female children, 36)....... 135
Pay patients treated during the year..............------- ....--------....- 5,516
Free patients treated during the year ..--..-...--.--- ................---.. 212
Days treatment for pay patients ......--.............----......----..-----------63, 202
Days treatment for free patients..........------.......---------------......... 2, 349
Total days treatment for hospital cases .----------------------------. 65, 551
Average daily attendance in hospital ...........---- ----.- --..-------..... 179
Patients in hospital at the end of the year........-........................ 436

DETAILED REPORT OF IloSPITAL TRANSACTIONS.

Re-
main- Admit-
ing Admit- Re- Days
ted Total Recov- Im Notim- Died main- treat
Hospitals. from during treated. ered. proved proved. ing. ment.
vioup year.
year.

Immigrant hospital ........ 102 3,427 3,529 2,007 450 797 37 232 36,425
Healthdepartment......... 46 1,102 1,148 1,026 ........ ........ 65 57 13,538
Immigrant wards of the
Long Island College Hos-
pital...................... 16 1,035 1,051 566 56 249 33 147 15,588










REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 73


RACE AND SEX OF IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL DURING FISCAL YEA
ING JUNE 30, 1903.


Race.


Armenian .......................................
Bohem ian ........... ..............................
Bulgarian .............. ............ ..........
Croatian ............................................
Cuban ......... ..............................
Dalm atian................. ........................
Dutch ......................................
East Indian.......................................
English.. ....... .......... ......................
Finnish........ .........................
French .......... ..................... .... ...... ...
German ............................................
G reek.................... .. .....................
Hebrew ..........................................
Irish......................... ......................
Italian, south.............. ...................
Italian, north..... ...........................
Lithuanian......... ...........................
Magyar................. ......................
Montenegrian...................................
Polish .............................................
Portuguese .........................................
Roumanian .......................................
Russian...........................................
Ruthenian ......................................
Scandanavian ......... .....................
Scotch........ ...... ............. .... ..........
Servian........ ................................
Slovak.............................................
Spanish................. ...........................
Syrian .................................. .. ..
Turkish ............. ..........................
W elsh ..............................................
West Indian.....................................
All other races ....................................

Total .................. ............


Men. Women.


46 6
14 8
2 ..........
69 11

5 2
13 5


2,818


......... .
9
32
9
186
3
192
29
249
30
68
36

186
14


11
44
4
3
60
2
43


3
1

1,248


Children.

Male. Female.

3 1
7 4
.. ..........

8 3




16 16
1 4
123 110
9 1
149 108
4 12
179 185
11 8
21 21
26 19

99 75
12 6


8 6
32 34
2 ..........
5
44 38
1 1
23 13

3 2

1 ..........

813 6 85


RACE OF IMMIIGRANTS DEPORTED ON MEDICAL CERTIFICATES.


,Race.


Armenian .........................................
American, South.............................
Bohem ian ..........................................
Bulgarian .........................................
Croatian ......................................
Cuban .............................................
Dalmatian..................... .............
Dutch ........................................
English .............................................
Finnish.................. ..... ... ........ .......
French ...................................... ....
German ..........................................
G reek .................... .......... ...............
H ebrew .............................................
Irish ...............................................
Italian, north .....................................
Italian, south.... .................................
Lithuanian.....................................
M agyar.......... ..................................
Moravian ......................................
Persian .................. ....... ...................
Polish ....................................... -
Portuguese ........................................
Roumanian .......................................
Russian..........................................
Ruthenian .........................................
Scandinavian ......................................
Scotch.............................................
Servian.... .. .....................................
Slovak .............................................
Spanish..........................................
Syrian ......................... ..... ........ .....
Turkish ...................... ....................
West Indian......................................
N otspecified........................................


Total ......................................... 1, 110 171


R END-




Total.


56
33
2
95
14
9
28
2
47
94
36
610
113
768
75
1,456
115
244
166
2
768
45
4
26
59
176
11
19
261
15
183
1
9
11
11

5,564


Men.


Women.


Children.

Male. I Female.


1










1
6


..........


..........

..........
..........
..........
..........
..........

..........


3


13 2

13 2

28 1
1 ..........


7 2
14 3
9 ....... ...
79 19
31 .........
188 37
11 5
6 1
293 30
34 18
29 3
2.
2 ..........
1 .........
207 25
4 ..........
2 ..........
9 ..........
15 1
16 4
1 1
6 ..........
48 1
2






5 ...... ...
35 1
3 ..........
4 1


.......... I ..........
2 1..- 1. ..1


Total.


15
1
6
1
29
1
2
3
9
17
9
104
32
234
16
7
325
54
32
2
1
232
5
2
9
17
20
3
6
49
5
61
3
5
1


..........
1
..........
I..........
1
..........
1
..........
..........
......... W

..........
..........


..........
..........

..........
..........
..........
..........
........i..
..........
..........


11 1,318









74 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


NATIONALITY AND SEX OF IMMIGRANTS ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL DURING FISCAL YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.


Country.


Austria-Hungary ..................................
Belgium............ ............... ..........
Denmark.........................................
France .......................................
Germ any..........................................
Greece.......... ....... .......................
Italy.................... ..........................
Netherlands.....................................
Norway .........................................
Portugal.........................................
Roumania.......................................
Russia .................... ........ ......
Servia and Bulgaria............................
Spain ................. ........................
Sweden........... .............................
Switzerland ......................................
United Kingdom ............. .................
Turkey in Asia...................................
West Indies ................ ..............
Other Asia.......................................
South America ..................................
Central America ..................................
All other countries.................................

Total.......................................


Men. Women.


586 263
9 5
8 15
14 7
103 99
100 3
904 278
6 5
19 5
12 14
60 38
709 387
2 1
9 2
39 24
6 4
65 44
152 50
8 2
11 ..........
1-

4 2

2,818 1,248


Children.

Male. Female.


------- ..........
11 4

813 685


Total.


1,178
20
45
26
342
113
1,565
16
39
44
124
1,497
4
13
92
12
146
243
10
12
1
1
21

5,564


RACE OF IMMIGRANTS DEPORTED WITHIN ONE YEAR AFTER LANDING.


Race


Croatian.... ..... .. ......... ... ....... .......................
East Indian................ .... .... ...... .......... ...............
English..............................................................
Finnish...... ....... ...............................................
French ......... .. ..........................................
Germ an .................. ........... .................................
G reek....................................................................
H ebrew ..... ................. .. .. ..... ... ....... ..................
Irish .... ....... ... ....................................... .. .......
Italian, north .........................................................
Italian, south ..................................-..- .....................
Lithuanian...........................................................
Magyar ......................... .................................
Polish ............. ................................ ... ..................
Russian...................... .................... ........................
Scandinavian ........................................................
Scotch ............... ... ............................................
Slovak.......................................... ........................
Welsh.-.-.-. .--------------------------------------------------
W e st ..Indi.. ...... ..... ...............................................
West Indian ............................................................


Total ......... ........... ...............


1
1

1
1
12
1
16
3

42
1
5
9
1
4
1
3
1
1


........ 105


WORK OF TIE MEDICAL EXAMINERS.

Steerage passengers inspected upon arrival......-.......-.........-...-.. 605, 341
Cabin passengers inspected upon arrival................-------.......--------.... 84, 047
Sent to hospital upon arrival (cabin and steerage) .. ..--......-----.----. 5, 359
Certified on account of loathsome or dangerous contagious diseases or other
physical causes-----...--.--.....---.---....---.--.......---------...... 4,008
Recorded (minor defects)---...--........-- ---..------- ......-------. .... 15,434
Cabin passengers certified ---...................................--....... 113
Cabin passengers sent to Ellis Island for further examination -..-----..-.. 113
Cabin passengers recorded (minor defects).....---...-.............-- .... 633
Immigrants applying for relief after landing-............................. 345


Women.


..........


. ........ .

7

7


3
2






27


Total.


1


132








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 75

Of these there were:
Relieved in hospital and discharged upon recovery ...-....-- .....-....... 133
Relieved in hospital and certified for deportation........................ 72
Certified for deportation, but not placed in hospital....-----------.......---.. -----85
Examined and found to be no medical cases...---.........----------------------- 55

CLERICAL WORK.

Permits and admission record cards sent to hospitals and filed in office, upon
admission of patients ..................-............................ 11,128
Notices to steamship companies upon admission of patients ..----..........--------. 6, 564
Reports to registry division upon discharge of patients........-- ........-.. 5,292
Certificates rendered in cases of immigrants-
Upon arrival. ........-..-.......----............................... 4,121
After landing .....................-.............................- 157
Records made of minor defects of arriving immigrants ................... 16, 067
Receipts given patients for money and valuables held for safekeeping....... 2, 009
Daily reports of hospital transactions rendered to the Commissioner of Immi-
gration and chiefs of divisions ...............-.................-..-...- 1,460
Weekly reports of immigrants detained in hospitals ...................... 52
Reports of diseases and injuries occurring among immigrants during the voy-
age received and filed --..--.........-- ..............................----------..-------------1,095
Vouchers (amounting to $125,875.57) received, examined, and forwarded for
payment..........---- ....-- .....------.....--......---...----..-----. 459
Checks received and forwarded ..-......-....--......---......-----..-... 378
Letters and telegrams and notices received...----------------... ..-------. 565
Letters and telegrams sent -..-.....-.................................. 575

Total...................-.................................- 48,922

BALANCE SHEET.


To health department of the city of
New York for care and maintenance
of contagious cases.................. $27,076.00
To Long Island College Hospital, for
care and maintenance of nonconta-
gious cases ......---..... ............ 19,259.60
To burials (contagious, $1,098; noncon-
tagious, $1,060) ...................... 2,158.00
To transportation of contagious cases. 3,345.00
To transportation of noncontagious
cases ................. .............. 4,836.00
To car fare, ferriage, etc .............. 47.17
To salary of pharmacist, messenger,
and attendants, United States Immi-
gration Service...................... 10,016.15
To bills for subsistence, supplies, etc.,
immigrant hospital .................. 11,672.06
To miscellaneous supplies, including
furniture, bedding, hospital clothing,
medical supplies, surgical instru-
ments, appliances, etc ............. 4,579.02
To meals furnished officers, clerks, and
attendants, United States Marine
Hospital Service (medical division). 865.85
To salary of officers, clerk, and attend-
ants. United States Marine Hospital
Service ............................ 24,605.75
To commutation for quarters of offi-
cers, United States Marine Hospital
Service............................. 2,412.13
To balance .......................... 15,002.84
12, 875.57


By bills rendered steamship com-
panies.............................. $83,079.40
Paid from immigrant fund, care and
maintenance of sick immigrants,
contagious and noncontagious...... 148.60
Transportation of sick immigrants,
contagious and noncontagious-..... 27.50
Burials ................................ 94.00
Furniture, miscellaneoussupplies, etc.,
for immigrant hospital............. 4,579.02
Salaries .............................. 10,016.15
Extra meals, commutation for quar-
ters, etc............................ 865.85
Car fare, ferriage, etc ................. 47.17
Paid by United States Marine Hospital
Service, salaries................... 24,605.75
Commutation for quarters ........... 2,412.13












125,875.57









76 REPORT OF COMMISSION ER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


DISPOSITION OF CASES CERTIFIED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903,
INCLUDING CASES PENDING FROM PREVIOUS FISCAL YEAR.


On Certi- De- Land- Re-
Disease or condition. hand fe- Total, poed. Ld in


Trachoma........................................... 37 840 877 748 91 38
Tubercle of lung ...... .............................. 9 9 6 3 ........
Insanity -................................. ... ....... 22 22 21 1 ........
Idiocy ...................................................... 5 5 2 3 ..
Epilepsy .............................................. 3 3 2 1 ........
Syphilis... .................................... 1 4 5 5 .............
Favus................................................ 4 43 47 35 11 1
Mental deficiency.................................... ........ 24 24 9 15 ........
Hydrocephalus .............................................. 1 1 ........
Cretinism ........................... ......... ......... .. 1 1 ........ 1 .. ....
Chorea............................................. ........ 2 2 1 1 ........
Morphine habit............................................. 1 1 ........ 1........
Mulish .............................................. .......... 1 1 ...
Poor physique ............................................. 109 109 36 69 4
Valvular disease of heart ........................... ........ 60 60 33 27 ........
Irregular action of heart.................................... 3 3 2 1 ........
Hypertrophy of heart.............. ............. ........ 1 1........ .......
Senility andlipoma ......................... ............. ....... 1 ..
Debility....................................... 23 23 7 13 3
Senile debility...................................... 4 758 762 23 723 16
Bronchitis,chronic ................................. ........ 2 2 ........ 2 ........
Anmm ia .............. ...... .... ... ................... 1 1 ........ 1 ........
Pleurisy...................................... ........... 1 1 ............
Partial paralysis ...................................................
Paralysis............................. ........ . 1 1 ................
Paralysis of side ................................... ........ 6 6 1 5 ........
Paralysis of arm ..................................... ........ 2 2
Paralysis of arm and leg..................................... 1 1 ........ 1 ........
Hemiplegia............................................ .. .. 5 ...... 5 ........
Paralysis of lower extremities.............................. 13 13 2 9 2
Paraplegia ........................-.. ................ ........ 2 2 ........ 2 ..
Paresis of limbs............................................. 2 2 ....... 2 ....
Spinal paralysis..................................... ........ 1 1 ........ 1 ........
Infantile paralysis......................................... 9 9 ........ 9 ..
Paralysis agitans............................................ 34 3-1 6 27 1
Locomotor ataxia.................................. 1 12 13 3 10 ...
Partial hemiplegia.................................. 1 ........ 1 ........ 1 ...
Spastic paraplegia ............................ ....1 ........ 1 ........
Injury to spine ............................ ........ ..... 1 1........
Inflammation of nerves.............................. ........ 1 1 ........ .
Muscular atrophy.......................................... 1 1 ....... 1........
Paresis of back muscles............................. ........ 1 ....... ........
Disease of spinal cord............................... ........ 5 5 2 3 .......
Deafness....... ........................ .... ........ ........ 26 26 2 24 .......
Impediment of speech..................................... 7 7 1 6........
Dum b.............................................. ........ 1 1 ........ 1 ........
Deafand dumb.................................... 1 22 23 4 19 .......
Hydrocele ................................ .............. 7 7 2 5.......
Hernia............................................. 7 829 836 19 607 33
Weak abdominal ring........................................ 5 5 2 3 ...
Tumor of scrotum......................................... 1 1 ...... 1...
Piles ....................................................... 1 1 ........ ........ 1
Marasmus.......................................... .......... 1 1 ........ 1........
Chronic nervous disease.................... ................ 1 1 ........ 1........
Injury to back and hips ............................. ........ 1 1 ...... 1........
Arthritis deformans ......................................... 1 1 .......
Aneurism of subclavian artery ................... ......... 2 2 1 1........
Obesity ....................... ................ ........ 2 2 ....... 2
Disease of antrum ................................. ........ 1 1 ........ 1
Atrophy of liver ............................................ 2 2 ........ 2 ........
Rheumatism....................................... ........ 5 5 4 1........
Deformity of chest............ ....................... ........ 3 3 2 .
Dwarf....................................... ....... ....... 2 2 ........ 2
Rickets ............................... ............... 8........ 8..
Hunchback dwarf ........................ ........ ........ 1 1 ........ 1.
Curvature of spine.............. ................... 2 273 275 27 245 3
Chronic inflammation scroiliac joint........................ 1 1 ........ ........
Rhinoscleroma ........................................... 1 1 ......... ..
Psoriasis .................................................... 12 12 2 10 .........
Ringworm ................................................. 3 3 1 ..
Eczema ............................................. 1 1 2 1 1........
Ichthyosis .............................. ..... ..... 1 ........ 1..
Keloid face and hand...................................... 1 1 1...... .......
Extensive chancroids........................................ 1 1 .... 1
Tumor of groin ................ ................ ........ 1 1
Defective vision ..................................... ....... 24 24 3 20 1
Cataracts ............................................ 2 76 78 8 69 1
Conjunctivitis ............................... ....... 8 8 2 6 .
Keratitis ............................................ ........ 1 1 ........ 1......
Opacity of cornea.................. ........ .. 10 10 5 5........
Ectropion..... ................................ ...... 6 6 2 4 .......









REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 77


DISPOSITION OF CASES CERTIFIED DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903,
INCLUDING CASES PENDING FROM PREVIOUS FISCAL YEAR-Continued.


On Certi- De- Land- e-
Disease or condition. nd. fled total ported ed. n-


Loss of eye......................................... 1 5 6 3 3.
Blindness.................................................... 32 32 5 27 ........
Tumor of eyelid ................................. ........ 1 1 ........ 1........
Inflammation lymph glands axilla ................. ....... 1 1 1 .............
Progressive muscular atrophy of arms....................... 1 1 ........ 1 .
Contraction skin of arm ............................. ....... 1 1 ........ 1.
Deformity of arm.......................................... 4 4 2 2 ........
Atrophy of arm............................................ 2 2 1 1........
Loss of arm .................................................. 1i 16 1 15 ........
Deformity of elbow .................................. ........ 1 1 ........ 1.
Anchylosis of elbow joint........................... ........ 6 2 4 .....
Fracture of radius ......... ........................... 2 2 ...... 2.
Deformity and mutilation of hand .................. 1 113 114 31 82 1
Loss of hand.............................................. 9 ........ 9 ..
Injury to hand ...................................... ...... 1 1 ........ .
Dislocation of wrist .......................... ........ ...... 1 1 .
Synovitis tendons wrist and hand ............. ........ 1 1 ........ 1..
Loss of thumb ............................................. 7 7 1 6 ....
Loss of fingers ............................................ ....... 17 17 5 12 ........
Deformity of fingers .................................... 2 2...... 2 ....
Acromegalia, fingers and thumb ............ ..... 1 ....... 1 1 ..............
Pregnancy....................................... 1 1 2 2 ...... ......
Effects of abortion ....................................... 1 1 1 ..
Affection of face............. ............................ 1 1 1
Deformity of forehead................................... 1 1 ........
Deformity of face.................................... ....... 1 1 1 .
Deformity of lips and nose ......................... ........ 1 1 1 ......
Disease of nose............................................. 1 1........ .......
Tum or of nose ...................................... .. ...... 1 1 1.... 1 .
Loss of nose.......................................... ........ 1 1 1
Atrophy of jaw ............................................. 1 1 ........ 1
Deform ity of jaw ................. ................ ........... 3 3 ....... 3 ...
Cleft palate .......................................... ........ 11 11 1 10
Tumor of nose ................................... .... ....... 1 1 1
Inflammation glands of neck................................ 20 20 2 18 ........
Hypertrophy of tonsils............................. ........... 1 1 1 ..
Enlarged glands of neck ........................... .....[.. 5 5 2 3 .
Deformity of neck ........................... ......... 1 1 ...... 1.
Cicatrix of neck ............................................. 1 1 ........ 1 ....
Tumor of neck...................................... ........ 4 1 3 .
Goitre ............................... ....... .......... .. ...... ... 43 43 4 39 .
Loss of both legs............................................. 1 ........
Loss of leg ......................... ... .... ..... 22 ... 22 .
Bowlegs ..................................... ........... .... 3 .......
Lameness ............................. .............. ........ 1 1 11 135 ........
Lack of development of limbs ............................. 1 1........ 1.
Shortness of leg and deformity of hands ............ ........ 1 1 ....... 1
Shortness and deformity of leg ............. ........ ....... 9 9 6 ........
Chronic ulcers of legs..... ............................. 1 1 ........ 1 ........
Fracture of leg..................................... ........ 1 1 1........
Atrophy of leg ......... ............. .......... ........ 12 12 3 9
Weakness of legs............................... ........... 1 1 ...
General debility, hydrocele, (dema of legs ................. 1 1 1
Varicocele ..................... .............. .. ...... 1 ........ ..... ...
Varicositis ........................ ............... ... 1 1 ...
Varicose veins .............................................. 1 1 .
Fracture of femur.................................. ........ I 1 ........ 1 .
Fracture of thigh ........ ................... ...... ... 1 1 1. .
Anchylosis of hip joint .................................. 4 4 ........ 1
Hip joint disease ......... ........ ................... 9 9 ........ 8 1
Dislocation of hip........................................... 6 6 1 5.
Deformity of hip........................................... 2 2 1 1 ........
Disease of knee .......................................... 2 2 ........ 2 ........
Inflammation of knee joint ....................... ....... 3 3 1
Chronic inflammation knee joint............... ............... 1 .. 1 ...... ..
Anchylosis of knee joint ........................... ......... 8 48 4 42 2
Tubercle of kneejoint ............................... ...... 1 1 ................ 1
Deformity of knee............................................ 4 1 3
Knock-knees .......... ...... ....................... 1 1 1
N ecrosis of tibia ............................................. 1 1 ........ 1 .....
Weak ankle......................................... I I ...... 1 .... 1 ........ ....
Anchylosis of ankle joint................................... 4 4 ........ 4
Fracture of ankle..................... .................... 1 1 ....... 1
Flat feet ..................................................... 3 3 .... 3 ..
Loss of foot ............................. ........... 3 .... .. 3 .......
Deform ity ........................................... ........ 9 9 1 8
Club foot ................................................ 48 48 1 45 2

Total......... ............................ 65 4,121 4,186 1,318 2,754 114









78 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


MEDICAL AND SURGICAL REPORT OF DISEASES AND INJURIES TREATED BY UNITED
STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE (MEDICAL DIVISION), PORT OF NEW YORK, N. Y.,
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903.


og
|.i

0

Smallpox ................................ .....
Cow pox .................................. ......
Cowke pox -----------------------------
Chicken pox ............................. ......
M easles ............. .......-.. ....... ... 17
Scarlet fever .......................--..- 5
Influenza......................- ...... ......
Whooping cough ............................
Mumps........................................
Diphtheria .............-...---..........- 1
Cerebrospinal fever ...........................
Morphine habit ......................... ......
Starvation.....................................
Alcoholism .............................. ......
Simple continued fever ................. ......
Enteric fever......................... .....
Dysentery ................................ .....
Malarial fever, intermittent.............. ......
Erysipilas .................................
Tubercle of lung ......................... 2
Tubercle of larynx ........... ............ ......
Tubercle of kneejoint.........................
Tubercle, general, miliary.....................
Inflammation peritoneum, tubercular ... ......
Syphilis, secondary ...................... 1
Gonorrhoea................................
Lumbricoides ........................... ......
Hookworms............................. ......
Rheumatic fever ...............................
Rheumatism ............................ ......
Osteoarthritis ................................
Cyst:
Eye.......................................
Face............................ ......
Chalazion ............................... ......
New growth, nonmalignant..................
Diabetes mellitus ....................... ......
Immaturity at birth..................... ......
Debility .................................. 1
Old age (debility from) .................. ......
Inflammation of nerves, sciatic ......... 1
Disseminated sclerosis ................... ......
Degeneration of spinal column ...............
Inflammation membranes brain ........ ......
Paraplegia................ ............ .....
Hemiplegia ......----........ ....... 1
Partial paralysis seventh nerve ....... .....
Paralysis agitans........................ .....
Epilepsy.................................. ......
Headache ........ ... ... ......
Neuralgia sciatic nerve .................. ......
Neuralgia, intercostal .................... ......
Hysteria..... .................... ......
Nervous weakness.................. .... 1
Insanity....................................
Melancholia ..-......-....................
Mental stupor................................
Conjunctivitis:
Acute ....-----------................. 13
Chronic ............................. .....
Purulent ...................................
Follicular ............................ ......
Granular ............................. 42
Keratitis ........... ..................... ......
Ulcer of cornea.......................-... 1
Opacity of cornea .............................
Panophthalmitis, chronic................ .....
Abscess of lachrymal sac.......................
Blepharitis marginalis................... 1
Sty ..................................... ...
Abscess of eyelid...................... ......
Entropion................ ............ ......
Ectropion ................................ ......


32

439
3-5






3




5
16
11
17






4
1





19
32
439






38






1
1
16
11
7
1

1
4
11













19
2
24
38






44
1
1
1
1
7














1
8





1
11






23
1










5
1
1










2
1
2
7






1
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59
2






1
1






2
1
2








1
17
9
96
924
19
7
2
1
1
17
9
1
1
3


17 14
1 1
32 28
456 371
40 25
3 3
5 1
16 16
12 7
7 4
1-
I .......
4 4
1 ...
19 8
2 2
24 21
38 35
46 .......




8 .......


6 .......
46







11
23 10
1 .......

1 1
1 .......



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1-














3 .......
7 .......
1 1
1 .......
27 ----10
1 1. ..

1 1..





2 .......
1 1
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19 4
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1













3 ......
177

96 5
19 61

1 1

1 1
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3 .7.....

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1. ..... ..... ...... .
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...... 2 ...... ...... 2
4 3 ...... ...... 6
...... 2 ...... 1 2

117 2 ...... 45 .
134 15 .... 25 2
14 ....... -..... 5 1
27 1 ...... 18 ......
10 779 ...... 116 746
10 3 ...... -......
1 2 ...... 2 2
2 ....... .. .... ......
. .-. 1 ..... 1 .. ... ......
2 ..................


15 1 --
2 . ......








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 79


MEDICAL AND SURGICAL REPORT OF DISEASES AND INJURIES TREATED BY UNITED
STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE (MEDICAL DIVISION), PORT OF NEW YORK, N. Y.,
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903-Continued.





I is
0 -I I5 I




Ptosis .................................... .... 2 2 ----- ..... 2 ....
Inflammation middle car ................ ..... 5 5 2 ....
suppurative ............... ...... 5 5 2 1 2 .
mastoid cells, suppurative. ...... ....... ...... ....... ..
nose, soft parts........... ..... 4 4
Perforation of nasal septum .............. ...... 1 1 ....... 1 .
Endocarditis, ulcerative .................. ...... 1 1 ............. .... 1 ...
Valvular disease of heart, mitral......... ...... 9 9 ....... 2 5 --.. 2 2
Syncope.......................... ...... .. 1 1 ................
Phlebitis ................................ .... 1 1 1.. ... ....
Varix, legs and abdomen ................ ..... 1 1 ...... ....... 1 ...... ... 1
Bronchitis:
Acute ................................ 1 7 ..... 1
Chronic .............................. 15 16 2 1 11 2 ...... 8
Pneumonia:
Lobular ...................... ..... .... .. 3 3 2 ------. .... ....
Lobar ................................ 3 118 121 90 1 1 23 .
Broncho pneumonia ..................... ...... 12 12 ...... ....... 5 1 .
Phthisis, chronic ........................ ...... 2 2 ....... 1 1 --... ......- 1
Pleurisy:
Acute ................................ 1 14 15 11 1 ....... 1 2 1
Chronic .............................. ..... 5 5 ....... ...... 4 ....- 1 3
Empyema................................ 1 2 3 1 1 ...... ...... 1 ...
Caries of dentine cementum............. ...... 1 1 ... 1
Inflammation of dental periosteum...... ...... 1 1 1 ............ .
Abscess of dental periosteum ............ ...... 3 3 3 .........................
Inflammation of tonsils:
Follicular -...........-- ............... ...... 1 16 14 ...- 1 1 ......
Suppurativc.......................... ...... 1 1 1 --......
Hypertrophy of tonsils................... ...... 2 2..... 2...
Inflammation of glands, parotid......... ....... 1 1 ... .... ...... ......... 1......
Inflammation of pharynx...................... 4 4 2 2........................
Inflammation of stomach:
Acute ................................ ...... 12 12 10 1 ----.. .--- 1 ......
Chronic .............................. ..... 1 1 ....... 1 ... .....
Inflammation of stomach and intestines .-...... 1 1 .....- ....... ............
Dilatation of stomach.................... ...... 1 1 ............. .. ....
Indigestion............................... ...... 24 24 20 4 .......... .....
Vomiting (seasickness)................. ...... 3 3 3 .... .......
Inflammation of intestines, chronic...... ...... 1 1 --....... ......-....... ..... 1.
Fecal accumulation ...................... ...... 1 1 1
Inflammation of intestines................. 1 16 17 13 ...... ------- 3 1.
H ernia ................................... ...... 4 4 ------- ... 4 ...... ...... 1
Intestinal dyspepsia...................... 1 ....... 1 1
Constipation ............................. ...... 12 12 10 2.......................
Coli ..................... ... .......... .. ..... 3 3 3 ........... ....
Diarrhea ................................. ...... 5 5 5 .........................
Abscess of rectum ................ ...... ..... 1 1 1 .
Gangrene of scrotum..................... ...... 1 1 ... ...... ...... 1 ...........
Piles, internal............................ ..... 1 1 ..... 1
Inflammation of liver, chronic.......... ...-.. 1 1 1....... 1 ........
Acute yellow atrophy of liver............ ...... 1 1 ....... ...... .-.... 1 .....
Jaundice ....................................... 3 3 2 1 ........................
Inflammation of hepatic ducts............ 3 ...................
Inflammation of lymph glands of neck:
Chronic ............................... 15 ..15 5 4 5 ......1
Suppurative.......................... ..... 2 2 1 ...... ....... ...... ... ...
Hypertrophy of lymph glands of neck... ...... 2 2 1 ...... 1 .. .... .....
Nephritis, acute.......................... ...... 2 2 1.....- ...... ... 2.. .
Inflammation of bladder:
Acute ................................ ...... 1 1 1 ............ .............
Chronic .............................. ...... 2 2 ....... 2 .. .
Gleet ..................................... ......---- 2 2 1 1------- -----------------
Stricture of urethra, organic ............. ...... 1 1 .-----..--. ...... 1 ...... ...... 1
Phimosis ................................. ------...... 1 1 1 ..............................
Ulcer of penis ............................ ...... 5 5 4 ...... ....... ...... 1 .
Hydrocelec............................... .. ... 3 3 1 ...... 2 ...... ...... 2
Epididymitis.............................. ..... 2 2 1 1.............
Pregnancy ............................... 3 17 20 6 ...... 14 ...... ...... 4
Abortion ................................ ...... 1 1 1 ...... ....... ................
Effects of childbirth ..................... 1 39 40 38 1 ......------ 1 ......
Parturition ............................ ........ 7 7 7...... ............. ..........
Periostitls, circumscribed ..................... 1 1 1 ...... ....... .... ..........









80 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.


MEDICAL AND SURGICAL REPORT OF DISEASES AND INJURIES TREATED BY UNITED
STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE (MEDICAL DIVISION), PORT Or NEW YORK, N. Y.,
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903-Continued.


Necrosis of bone of jaw ..................
Ununited fracture of tibia ...............
Inflammation of sacro-iliac joint, chronic
Inflammation of kneejoint ..............
Morbus coxe ............................
Ankylosis of-
Hip joint...........................
Elbow ...............................
Kneejoint ........................
Fibrous phalangeal joint.............
Angular curvature of spine ..............
Myalgia ................................
Inflammation of the connective tissue
of-
Eyelid...........................
Face............................
Axilla.............................
Axilla, suppurative ..................
Arm................................
Hand...............................
Hand,suppurative ...................
Finger..............................
Knee ............................
Foot.............................
Leg .............................
Abscess of the connective tissue of-
Scalp.............................
Eyelid...............................
Nose...... ......................
Jaw ...............................
Face................................
Neck ............................
Thigh ...........................
Axilla ...........................
Hand...............................
Finger..............................
Leg ................................
Undue formation of fat..................
Pityriasis............................
Urticaria ...........................
Eczema.............................
Impetigo ............................
Psoriasis.............................
Herpes ...............................
Herpes facialis .....................
Dermatitis................ ..............
Sycosis ..............................
Seborrhoea............................
Chilblain............................
Frostbite of-
Toes ..................................
Feet ..................................
Ulcer of-
Mouth...............................
Skin of lip........................
Skin of face .......................
Skin of arm.......................
Skin of leg........................
Boils ........... .........................
Of face .........................
Of lip.............................
Of neck...........................
Of abdomen.......................
Carbuncle of neck.....................
Whitlow................................
Lupus ..............................
Scabies .............................
Phthiriasis ..........................
Ringworm...........................
Scalp ...........................
Face...............................
Neck ...........................
Favus ........... .................


. .. ...... ......








REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 81


MEDICAL AND SURGICAL REEPORT OF DISEASES AND INJURIES TREATED BY UNITED
STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE (MEDICAL DIVISION), PORT OF NEW YORK, N. Y.,
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903-Continued.


Burn of-
Scalp ................................. ...... 1
Leg and body ........................ ...... 3
Shock following operation ............... ...... I
4a 's.









Scald of--

Foot ............................... ...... I
Face ................................ ...... I
So-






Burn of ski of-
Scalprm ................................. 1
Leg and body.....................................
Shockfollowing operation.............. .. 1



Foot-..----------------_---------------1


Wound ofPealp-
Contused ........................ .. ...... 1
Incised ............................... 2
Lacerated ...........................- ...... 1
Fracture of skull, vault and base -... .....
Contusion of-
B r a i n - - - - -. - - -. .- - - - - - - - - -1. .


Brain ................................. ...... 1
Face ......-.. ---...... ...- ....-.. ......
Wound of forehead- --------------................
Fracture of nasal bone, compound ....... ...... 1
Dislocation of lower jaw ...............--. ...... 1
Contusion of eyelid ...........................
Foreign body in eye...........................
Wound of cornea, incised ............. ...... ..
Contusion of chest ........................ ...... 1
Gunshot wound of leg (old) .............. ...... 1
Contusion of back ........................ ..... 1
Sprain of back ............................ ...... 1
Contusion of-
Shoulder -......... ..................... ..... 1

A rn d ---------------------------------1-
HFac e..................... .... ....... ...... 1

Sprain of wrist..eh....................... ...... I1
Wound of-
Fation of low............ ..................... ..... 1

Facger------------------------------ ------ 2
Neck, incisedyelid ............................ 1
Finger body in eye..................................
Hand of .........--- ................-.. .. ...
Suppurating-------------------...................... ------1
Incised ......................... ...... 2
Infected b k....................... ......
Knee, lacerated ...................... ...... 2
Fracture of-
Clavicle ...................-....-..... 1 2
Radius ...........................--------------------.... -----I
Ulna ........ ............. .......... ...... 1
Forearm, both bones-.................. ......

Cotusion of-
Thigh .c.................................... 4
H ip.n ................................ ... -
Leg ....... ............................ 1 1
Foot.................................. ... 1
A nkle .. ............................. ... ..-
Sprain of-
FootR ... ................................... 1
Ankle ................................ ...... 7
Wound of- I
Thigh, lacerated ................. ...... 1
Leg-
Punctured -- -- -- -- -
Fi nctured .......................... ...... 1
IThnb, cisedommin ......................... ..---

Foot -2
Infected....... ...........-----------------------... ...----
Fracture of-

Fratueloa------------------- *------- ------ 1
Patll................................. ..........
Tibiae .......... .... .... ... ...... ......
Fibu ----- ---la- - ---.-.-..... - -
nk e ....... ............ .. .......... ......


Fem ur............. .................... i...... 3
556F--03--6
5567-03 --


1 1



3 1

1 1



2 2
1
1 ......



1
1 1

1 1







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1 .





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:i ii i .ii ii ii i







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............

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82 REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF IMMIGRATION.

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL REPORT OF DISEASES AND INJURIES TREATED BY UNITED
STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE (MEDICAL DIVISION), PORT OF NEW YORK, N. Y.,
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1903-Continued.








observation .............................. ...... 636 636 ....... ...
GEO. W. STONER,




Surgeon, Public Health and Marine-Hospital Service,
Fatty tumor of face Charge of Medical Division ..





As illustrative of the conditions under which the immigration and
Chinese-exclusion laws are now being enforced in the island of Porto
bseRico, the report of the commissioner of immigration at San Juan is884






given.
UNITED STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE,
Infancy-------. ................. .....-.. ....... 37 17---------------17..................
Accompanying..................-........ 49 826 875 828 -.......----..-...... 47 ......







ICE OF W. STONER,
Sgeo, Pbli San Jan, ri e-Hos., July Ser0, 1903.
: I have the honor to forward statistical report on form 1582 A, covering theMedical Diisio
entire fiscal year ending June onditi30, 1903, for the district ofh the immigration and
Chinese-exclusion laws arsteamship now beines bring enforced ins to the portisland of Porto Rico:




Campafifa Transatlintica (Spanish), from Barcelona, Cadiz, Malaga, Las Palmas
(Canary Islands), and Genoa, Italy; on return voyage from Habana, Cuba, Vera
icou, the reportlon, of the commissioner of immigration at San Juan is
given.
UNITED STATES IMMIGRATION SERVICE,
OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER,



Line, from Caruna, Barcelona, Cadiz, and Canary Islands ports; on return voyage,, 1903.



from ports of Cuba and Mexico. Larrinaga Line from Liverpool. Serra Line from
SIR: I havepool, touching at Spanish ports en route; Campagni form 1582 A, oveTransatlantique
entirenh) fromscal year ending June 30, 1903,and St. Thomas, Danish West Indies; on return trip
Vessels of the following steamship lines bring aliens to the ports of Porto Rico:


fCam ports in Haiti and Santo Domingo. Intercelonial Line (French) from Havre,lmas
Franary Islands), and Genoa, ItalyThomas; on return trip,voyage from Santo Dominican ports. Hamburg-
Cruz, Mexico, Colon, and other ports of South America. Pinillos, Yzquierdo & Cia.
Line, from Caruna, Barcelona, Cadiz, and Canary Islands ports; on return voyage,


American Line,from portsof Cubaand Mexico. Larrinaga Lineom Line fromver. Seifro
Liverpool, touching at Spanish ports en route; fampagnie (ihnerale Transatlantique
(French) from Havre, France, and St. Thomas, Danish West Indies; on return trip
from ports in Haiti and Santo Domingo. Intercolonial Line (French) from Havre,
France, and St. Thomas; on return trip, from Santo Dominican ports. Hamburg-
American Line, from Hamburg, Germany, and St. Thomas. Red "D" Line, from
South American ports of La Guayra, Maracaibo, and Danish West Indian Island of
Curacao. Herrera Line (Cuban), from Cuba and Santo Dominican ports. In addi-
tion to these regular lines, sailing vessels come from Nova Scotia, ports of Spain, and
many of the West Indian islands.
The greatest percentage of immigration to Porto Rico, as in the fiscal year 1901-2,
is of the Spanish race, some of whom were here before the American occupation and
retaining property interests, others coming to seek employment, desiring the better
wages which they see prevail under the American form of government. As a class
they are healthy, in good financial condition, and make desirable additions to the
population, although they retain their allegiance to the Spanish Government.
The percentage of African (black) from the West Indies is small, which, in my
judgment, is as it should be, principally on account of their being the strongest com-
petitors of the native labor element. The provisions of the immigration act approved
March 3, 1903, having greatly aided in restricting immigration of this character, the
steamship lines interested in this class of business having adopted the policy of
accepting as passengers only those who conform to the provisions set forth on the
manifests under the new act and whom they are reasonably certain will be eligible
to land in Porto Rico.
A few illegal entries have been made on the coasts of Curebra and Vieques, but
with the assistance of the insular police officials and customs guards we have been
enabled to detain them until Treasury warrant could be received for their arrest and
deportation. These islands are situated so close to St. Thomas and other foreign
West Indian islands that entrance to them is easy by small boats. The predominance




























TYPES OF ALIENS AWAITING ADMISSION AT ELLIS ISLAND STATION,


"^~







REPORT OF COMMISSIONER-OENERAL OF IMMIGRATION. 83

of the criminal class among those who have attempted entrance in this manner indi-
cates the necessity of the most restrictive measures to prevent this character of immi-
gration. The effectiveness of this branch of the service would be greatly improved
were permits obtained that the immigration officials be granted transportation on the
navy vessels plying between the ports of Porto Rico and Curebra.
A great many islanders from other West Indian islands would like to come to Porto
Rico on account of the difference in wages paid here and in their own countries, but
as there is sufficient Porto Rican labor this immigration is discouraged and prohibited
to the full extent permissible under the immigration laws.
In this connection I desire to quote from Governor Hunt's report for the year
1902, as follows:
"Ever since the civil government was established there has been a complaint by
the inhabitants of the island of Vieques that they could not secure laborers to har-
vest their sugar crop. In the days of the Spaniards these planters brought cane-
field hands from the neighboring French and English West Indian islands, but now
that the immigration laws obtain they are forced to obtain labor upon the main
island of Porto Rico. They have several times requested that modifications be
sought from Congress of the present immigration laws, but we believe that that is
unnecessary. It is said by the Vieques planters that the native from the main island
complains that his health is not good in Vieques; but with the vast amount of labor-
ers that there are here a sufficient number can surely be had to do the necessary
work in Vieques."
After personal investigations of the conditions existing in Vieques, and being
assured by the planters that they cculd use some of the surplus labor of Porto Rico,
an effort was made to interest the various labor organizations that were continually
complaining of the lack of employment in adopting means to cooperate with the
planters, but as yet there have been no results, due to the fact that the planters do
not offer a sufficient rate of wages to interest the laborers of the island of Porto Rico
proper.
The two principal labor organizations are the Federacion Regional and the Amer-
ican Federation of Labor, each having many branch organizations and members.
The greatest difficulty they have to contend with is the lack of good feeling, owing
to the desire of both societies to take active part in the local politics of the island.
Wages have materially increased under American administration, especially at the
larger "centrals,"such as Aguirre and Guanica, where considerable attention is given
to the wish of the employees. These and other estates pay at the rate of from 50
cents to $2.50 per day, in proportion to skill and experience, common laborers receiv-
ing 50 cents, foremen from 75 cents to $1.25, sugar boilers $1.50, and machinists from
$2 to $2.50.
The extension of the service by the appointment of an inspector for Ponce has
been of practical benefit in that the work is entirely in charge of immigration offi-
cials. With headquarters at Ponce the inspector has supervision over the south and
west coasts, taking in the port of Mayaguez, making official trips there when neces-
sary. The presence of an inspector in this field has caused more strict observance
of the immigration laws and regulations on the part of the steampship lines bringing
passengers to these ports. Under-the present arrangement careful and thorough
examination is made of every alien applying for admission, prompt hearings before
the board of special inquiry are had, and the service generally is in good condition.
Several debarments and deportations of aliens attempting to gain admission for the
purpose of taking employment under contract at sugar centrals have been made, and
careful observation is maintained over this feature of immigration.
Under the provisions of section 4 of the act of Congress approved April 29, 1902,
entitled "An act to prohibit the coming into and to regulate the residence within
the United States, its Territories, and all territory under its jurisdiction, and the
District of Columbia, of Chinese and persons of Chinese descent," certificates of reg-
istration have been issued to 35 Chinese laborers and persons other than laborers,
the duplicates and applications for which being kept on file in the office of the com-
missioner of immigration at San Juan, together with an alphabetical record of all
such certificates issued. There have been no recent admissions of Chinese into Porto
Rico, and, with a few exceptions, those now living on the island were transported
from Cuba as prisoners by the Spanish Government. They follow the occupation of
cooking, weaving, gardening, cigar making, and common laborer.
Very respectfully,
FRED V. MARTIN,
United States Commissioner of Imnmigration.
Hon. F. P. SARGENT,
Commissioner-General of Immigration, l nashington, D. C.




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