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 Front Cover
 Red Riding Hood
 Back Cover






Group Title: Petit Chaperon rouge
Title: Red Riding Hood
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080486/00001
 Material Information
Title: Red Riding Hood
Series Title: Sunbeam series
Uniform Title: Petit Chaperon rouge
Little Red Riding Hood
Physical Description: <8> p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Perrault, Charles, 1628-1703
International Art Publishing Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: International Art Publishing Co.
Place of Publication: New York ;
London
Publication Date:
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Text begins and ends on inside front and back cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080486
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002332961
oclc - 38849994
notis - ALT6658

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Red Riding Hood
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text

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RED RIDING HOOD.













SOME hundred, or so, years ago there lived a little girl,
named Rosie. Rosie was a very pretty little child, and so
bright and so merry that no one could help loving her.
She was a favourite because of her sweet disposition.
Even her old grandmother, who was rather cross and not, as
a rule, fond of children, made quite a pet of Rosie.
Dear old Granny, as she was called by her grandchildren,
lived in the Red Cottage about a mile from the village, but fine or
wet, scarcely a day passed without seeing the little maiden sitting '
on a stool in the old lady's cottage, listening to the wonderful,
stories which Granny said had happened long,
long ago, when she was a little girl.
When Rosie's birthday came, her
grandmother gave her a pretty red
cloak with a hood of the same colour.
The bright hue pleased the child, and
she put the cloak on at once, looking
'- prettier than ever. Rosie grew so fond
of her pretty red cloak that she always
wore it, and the neighbours gave her the
name of Little Red Riding Hood.



















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RED RIDING HOOD PREPARING TO GO TO SEE GRANNY.


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One day as she was
S' returning from her Gran-
/;, ny s cottage, a little dog
a it followed her home.
;---i Rosie took a great
Q3, .fancy to the dog, and
Begged her mother to
let her keep it.
Sv Red Riding Hood
S~ l called her dog Scrap,
was a band it grew so fond
of. its little mistress
that it followed her wher-
ever she went and never seemed quite happy away from her side.
.1I have told you what an engaging child Red Riding Hood
was, but, like all children, she had her faults, and one of these
was a bad habit of inattention.
Without meaning to be disobedient, she sometimes
got into scrapes by only half listening while her
mother was speaking .to her.
One day her mother called her, saying, "Granny t'
is ill and I am too busy to go to see her, so I want
you to take her some wine, soup, fresh
butter, and new laid eggs. Go at once,
and.be sure you do not talk to anyone
you meet. Do not loiter on-the
way, for Granny will be glad to
see you, and you must be i
back before sunset." -
Rosie only half lis- s -
tened to what her mother
said, and having put on
her red cloak she went away "
in a Sedan chair, with a big basket






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RED RIDING HOOD AND THE WOLF


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i and Scrap in front, scampering
through the woods.
S.It was a most beautiful day,
S-- and Rosie, quite, forgetful of her
mother's wishes, got out of her
Chair and loitered about. She
S.i was very much taken with a hare
Sshe saw sitting up and washing
"- tik its face, but which when it saw
t*ill _l '." ---t the dog, was soon off.
She ran about where all the
prettiest flowers were growing,
and gathered a lovely nosegay
for her Grandmother.
When she was tired of running about and swinging on the
branches, she sat down on the trunk of a tree to rest, and then a
sly old Wolf came up and began to talk in a friendly manner.
Rosie told him she was going to see her Grandmother, who
lived in the Red Cottage close to the village.
"Let's have a race," said
the Wolf, "you go that way, and
I'll go this, and see who can get .1
there first."



Red Riding 1 ""11
Hood, forget- O '
ting all about
the Sedan -
chair. for -the ;
moT ntt, thought it
wo d be very good fun, so'she c pi
and the Wolf started off by
different paths.






As soon as Red Riding
SHood was out of sight,
the Wolf set off at a
tremendous rate, and, run-
Sning with all his might,
he very soon arrived at
the Red Cottage.


SHe knocked gently at
the door.
"Who's there?" cried Grandmother.
"It's I, Granny dear?" cried the cunning Wolf, making
his voice as like Red Riding Hood's as he could.
"Pull the bobbin, and that will lift the latch, my dear,"
said Granny.
The Wolf did so, and opened the door.
The poor old lady was lying ill and helpless in bed, and the
cruel Wolf no sooner caught
sight of her than he made a
spring and ate her up in two
mouthfuls!
Then the crafty animal
dressed himself up in poor i '--
Granny's things, admired him-
self in the glass, chuckled, and
got into bed, pulling the sheets
well round his neck.
When the Wolf left Red
Riding Hood, the little girl too,
set off briskly, but she soon
began to dawdle again, and time ':,:";
passed quickly as she loitered on -
the road plucking more flowers.






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THE WOLF DRESSED IN GRANNY'S CLOTHES. '


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The consequence was she did not arrive at the Cottage until
a good hour after the Wolf.
Just then a voice from the Cottage cried: "Is
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"Yes, Granny."
SPull the bobbin and lift the latch, my dear."
Red Riding Hood entered without noticing that Scrap had
run away whining dismally.
"Poor Granny," said Red Riding Hood, "what a bad cold
you have.. I have brought you some soup to make you better."
"Thank you, my dear," said the wolf in a weak voice, I
like you better than soup."
Red Riding Hood bustled about preparing her Grandmother's
supper; then she
drew near the
bed.
"What large
eyes you have,
Granny," said the
child.
"The. better to
see you, my dear," i4
said the Wolf,
with a grin.









""And Granny, how
long your ears have
.grown.
i"The better to
hear you, my dear."
"And, oh Granny,
what sharp. white
teeth you have!"
"The better to eat
you," cried the
Wolf, and up he
jumped out of bed and sprang upon the terrified child.
But just' at that moment a dog's bark was heard; the
door burst open, and in rushed the two attendants, that carried
her Sedan chair, who had been looking for her in the woods
thinking she was lost, and who were guided to the spot by
Scrap's barks. The cowardly Wolf let go his
hold of Red Riding Hood and tried to make
his escape, but the attendants set upon him
and soon killed him.
As for Little Red Riding Hood, she
was more frightened than hurt. She
went home to her mother, a very
repentant little girl. She had learnt
a lesson which she never forgot,
and, after this, when she saw any
children inclined to be dis-
obedient. she told them, as a
warning, her own story of
" Little Red Riding Hood
and the Wolf."




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