• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Summary
 Introductory remarks
 Sin-eater: The process of...
 Flatrock: The Monolith of southern...
 Monet rather than Monolith: Inspiring...
 Stones on a harvest moon: Qualified...
 Nuck. Nuck muck! Beyond the language...
 Racing the moon: From diagramming...
 End notes














Title: In the halo of the moon : significance of AmericanSouth.Org for research
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Title: In the halo of the moon : significance of AmericanSouth.Org for research
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Creator: Kesse, Erich J.,, 1959-
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Table of Contents
    Summary
        Page 56
    Introductory remarks
        Page 56
    Sin-eater: The process of information
        Page 57
    Flatrock: The Monolith of southern culture - A tool for understanding and collection development
        Page 58
    Monet rather than Monolith: Inspiring research
        Page 59
    Stones on a harvest moon: Qualified metadata
        Page 60
    Nuck. Nuck muck! Beyond the language of old school
        Page 61
    Racing the moon: From diagramming the process of information to the heuristics of interfaces
        Page 62
    End notes
        Page 63
Full Text







In the Halo of the Moon:

Significance of AmericanSouth.Org

for Research

Erich Kesse (Digital Library Center, University of Florida)






These comments consider research as a dialogue between resources and their users.
OAl is viewed as the first of a series of toward a desired research utility. Next steps and
fantastic possibilities are considered, among them enlarging the field of contributors,
targeting qualified metadata and additional data types, and enriching the interfaces for
research utility.

Introductory Remarks

I am not a southemer. I should offer this much in confession and preface to these
remarks on the research significance of AmericanSouth.Org.

I am not a southerner, though I can trace my ruts back to the foothills of Kentucky. My
maternal grandmother used to say of an impending storm, 'Pears a holler up the road,
it's a-fixin' ta come up a cloud!' That much I still readily understand. But, the meaning of
some words is nearly lost. "Seems we yar stars," she intoned with sounds my vocal
chords cannot find. "Seems we yar stars Wethin a hayla of the moon." Perhaps, it was the
poetry of a people, too long isolated. "Wrench a cup, boy," she demanded, "an fetch me
some rainwader when it comes a cow peein' on the flatrock of the rough." I can recall the
first time I heard those words. Cows jumping over the moon was the stuff of children's
stories, sure enough; her way of speaking to a five year old boy. But, did she intend to say
that the storm would be so bad that it would heave a frightened cow onto her roof?
Perhaps for lack of understanding, my father sent me to live on a dairy farm in southem
Indiana the next summer. There, I came to appreciate the manners of cows and
comparisons to a hard rain. And, there, I lived among other migrants, like my
grandmother, who had crossed the Ohiya but continued to count the days to a good
soaking by the number of stars they could count in the halo of the moon.

It seems a fitting analogy, in looking to the significance of AmericanSouth.Org today, to
say that we stand in the halo of light that both embraces and illuminates a distant but
familiar object: southern cultural heritage. Today, we've spent a considerable amount of
time talking about the moon. In bringing together this cultural information, it seems fitting
also that we should take stock of why we shine a light on the moon.


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In the Halo of the Moon:

Significance of AmericanSouth.Org

for Research

Erich Kesse (Digital Library Center, University of Florida)






These comments consider research as a dialogue between resources and their users.
OAl is viewed as the first of a series of toward a desired research utility. Next steps and
fantastic possibilities are considered, among them enlarging the field of contributors,
targeting qualified metadata and additional data types, and enriching the interfaces for
research utility.

Introductory Remarks

I am not a southemer. I should offer this much in confession and preface to these
remarks on the research significance of AmericanSouth.Org.

I am not a southerner, though I can trace my ruts back to the foothills of Kentucky. My
maternal grandmother used to say of an impending storm, 'Pears a holler up the road,
it's a-fixin' ta come up a cloud!' That much I still readily understand. But, the meaning of
some words is nearly lost. "Seems we yar stars," she intoned with sounds my vocal
chords cannot find. "Seems we yar stars Wethin a hayla of the moon." Perhaps, it was the
poetry of a people, too long isolated. "Wrench a cup, boy," she demanded, "an fetch me
some rainwader when it comes a cow peein' on the flatrock of the rough." I can recall the
first time I heard those words. Cows jumping over the moon was the stuff of children's
stories, sure enough; her way of speaking to a five year old boy. But, did she intend to say
that the storm would be so bad that it would heave a frightened cow onto her roof?
Perhaps for lack of understanding, my father sent me to live on a dairy farm in southem
Indiana the next summer. There, I came to appreciate the manners of cows and
comparisons to a hard rain. And, there, I lived among other migrants, like my
grandmother, who had crossed the Ohiya but continued to count the days to a good
soaking by the number of stars they could count in the halo of the moon.

It seems a fitting analogy, in looking to the significance of AmericanSouth.Org today, to
say that we stand in the halo of light that both embraces and illuminates a distant but
familiar object: southern cultural heritage. Today, we've spent a considerable amount of
time talking about the moon. In bringing together this cultural information, it seems fitting
also that we should take stock of why we shine a light on the moon.


56


I









Sin-eatern The Process of Information


In plain language, today, we have looked at OAI and AmericanSouth.Org, in particular, as
an information gathering and warehousing technology. We have talked about it in the way
that farm equipment engineers talk about the latest in combine design. There's nothing
wrong with that. Efficient harvesting of information saves the researcher's time. And, isn't
that a fundamental law of library and information science? Today's discussions have been
a kind of Sunday among the Shakers.

But, now, we need to consider selling the harvest! To be certain, there is a fair amount of
marketing to be undertaken. With the launch of new interfaces, the integration of an
Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, and the commissioning of articles, now is the perfect
time if not to sell then to consider what folks will do with the harvest. Of course, they'll
consume it. But, what of that? The fundamental question is what do we do with the
energy we gain of eating? Or, plainly, what will people do with this information harvest?

Two of the folk customs that most fascinated me among my grandmother's Pandora's-box
of southern wisdom were the bottle-tree and the sin-eater. (I expect these will have
prominent place in the Encyclopedia.) The bottle-tree, literally, a tree hung with empty
bottles, bestowed voice upon the spirits,' their sounds whistling across the mouths of
bottles. Every OAI project AmericanSouth.Org, RLG's Cultural Materials2, the University
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Digital Gateway to Cultural Heritage Materials3, the
University of Maryland and the Internet Archive's International Children's Digital Library4,
and others, is a tree hung with bottles.

Ignoring the more disturbing purpose of the bottle-tree' for the moment, I am proud to say
that the University of Florida (UF) has its bottles hanging in several trees. OAI gives us an
uncanny ability to be heard well beyond our primary market, the UF campus, where our
resources, our produce are consumed. This most obvious significance of OAl is
appreciated by faculty who understand that our contributions encourage others to bring
forth their goods. OAl is a grocery store with resources brought to them by whatever
means; they don't care. Its importance rests in the proximity, volume, and diversity of the
collected resources. These information objects, from hither and yon, are literally at their
fingertips. But, this is to say nothing of the information process.

Love is a sickness, boy, my grandmother would say. Others have called it hunger. Both
sickness and hunger are words ascribed to the sin-eater, a kind of middle-earth Santa
Claus. A sin-eater eats anything you leave him, whatever the symbolic sickness or sin
you've baked inside. Sin-eating is one of those professions that have a most immediate
vitality. The engine of language hasn't removed it from the verb, from the thing that it
does. The objects and the process are conjoined. A sin-eater eats. It seems to me that
AmericanSouth.Org, less so than other harvesters, lacks a particular vitality. Harvesters
don't have sin-eaters, for a start. They harvest, certainly. But, they've got information
scientists and librarians. And, we describe and order other people's information.
Harvesters need someone to make something of the produce filling the stock rooms they
lay open.

The prospect of AmericanSouth.Org, more than any other OAI harvester, except maybe
the Intemational Children's Digital Librarys, is that it might teach directly through its articles,
Encyclopedia entries, and other contributions generated through use of the harvested
resources. So, in the life cycle of research, the process of information,
AmericanSouth.Org has brought us to the harvest and has begun baking the possum into
the pie.


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Flatrocic the Monolith of Southern Culture:
A Tool for Understanding and Collection Development

AmericanSouth.Org lends the impression of circumscribing a monolithic culture. Yet, we
need only review linguistic and dialect diversity maps of American English6 as spoken in
the South to remind ourselves that the monolith is not homogenous or sweet as my
grandmother would have it, sweet as possum pie7. AmericanSouth.Org's articles, in
particular, reflect the region's cultural diversity. But, let's, for the moment, assume that
southern culture is a flatrock, a monolith that is somewhat homogenous.

Bittersweet, the demographics of the American South are such that southemers already
have been out numbered within this fast growing region. The southem culture of
American history that ends with my grandmother's generation might be made to seem a
closed chapter. Digitization of southern cultural materials, too, sometimes seems akin to
restoring a Mayan temple. We build on the evidence of a found architecture, allowing
each new block, each digitized object, to find its place, sometimes by suggestion. Many of
the several southern statewide digitization programs have constructed admirable temples
of culture with the guidance of humanists, scientists and educators. No doubt, some of
the pieces are out of context but none are without purpose. We hope to preserve the
evidence of our past and to facilitate its use for the benefit of the present. All teach as well
as gather resources; some better than others. Most of the learning moduless are a
monologue rather than truly didactic. The common sense of country folk suggests that
one sows seed following a harvest. Leading modules, articles and Encyclopedia entries
should engage the researcher in the (harvested) collection, an engagement that should
result in the creation of new objects.

To the extent that AmericanSouth.Org begins to outline southern culture, we builders of
state and local collections can look to it to more easily see the lacunae among our own
collections, constructing both better local collections and, in the process, a better, more
complete regional collection. The topical approach to collections, available in former
versions of the AmericanSouth.Org interface, will presumably be restored with the
development of the Encyclopedia of Southem Culture. The former version listed
resources under gross subject headings. With topics the likes of "Agriculture",
"Geography", "Literature", etc., they were too broad for quick analysis by either collection
builders or patrons. Assessment of the coverage for a particular religious movement, for
example, was difficult. The Encyclopedia, I would hope, should provide contextual
narratives and refine topics to lower levels of aggregation. Each should be a little nut of
leading to explain the resources gathered under it. And, each should offer value to young
researchers at levels K-12, if not to researchers at higher levels or to collection builders
themselves. Topical analysis and continued development of topical collections will then
be guided by knowledgeable interpretation from the regional perspective.

Missing, yet, are the tools needed to statistically analyze topical strengths and weakness,
one digital library provider to the next. Everyone knows that a measuring cup is requisite
to baking the perfect pie.

For the benefit of its users, I trust that Encyclopedia entries will be linked with the research
resources located by AmericanSouth.Org for the topic. Currently, a glance at the articles
commissioned by AmericanSouth.Org quickly reveals links to electronic resources web
pages, mostly beyond AmericanSouth.Org. Articles infrequently reference the
harvested collections. It is a curious indicator of AmericanSouth.Org's success that unlike
the majority of harvester websites it provides wholly new information but does not
reference the information it, itself, has collected. Curious, too, that it comes at a time when


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K-12 educators struggle to teach their charges evaluative techniques9 that question the
value of the many unvetted Internet resources. Intemet resources cited by the articles, by
the way, are of excellent caliber. Perhaps, we assume too much of our audience.

Monet rather than Monolith:
Inspiring Research

Linking articles and Encyclopedia entries to the content of AmericanSouth.Org suggests
opportunity for the enhancement of OAl. Automation of this task is an area for
development. Subject assignment is an art practiced differently, with varied thesauri and
descriptive practices, among the collections harvested. Reports from nearly every
harvesting project, AmericanSouth.Org among them,'0 have described metadata as
heterogeneous. Some librarians have privately suggested that, regardless the care taken
in subject assignment, patrons just don't use the same language in searching library
collections digital or otherwise. And, at least one OCR engine" even hides variant word
forms and common mis-spellings within the bitmap references/tags for individual words-
all for the benefit of discovery by the widest possible audience. While this takes us far
a-field, to another harvest, it seems to suggest that what we strive for with OAl stands at
the gates of research support.

Topical searches across AmericanSouth.Org's harvested resources are limited now to
keyword searches of the too-limited information gathered. Perhaps, scholars authoring
Encyclopedia entries might eventually find themselves working with programmers to
develop analytical tools that process harvested records to automate topic assignment. Or,
perhaps less ambitiously but more immediately, they will work together after the harvest to
normalize resource descriptors the subject headings used in the harvested records. I
envision, in effect, the creation of an automated means of sorting the various harvested
resource records into virtual peas and com, or avocados from oranges, a means of
associating resources with Encyclopedia entries.

For the researcher who relies upon point-and-shoot methods, with or without the cross
hairs of a thesaurus, more information increases the odds on successful discovery,
engenders more comprehensive research and, ultimately, makes possible more thoughtful
teaching. AmericanSouth.Org, like the digital libraries upon which it relies, is more a
Monet than a monolith. The closer you get, the more apparent that nothing but mission
and programming connect the dots. The observation looks both ways.
AmericanSouth.Org needs to increase the harvest yield both in terms of contributions and
the amount of information collected. More providers -- more information -- the more able,
the researcher to shed new light, to find new interpretations, to tell new stories that teach
and enlighten.

SOLINET's Kate Nevins, during a June 2003 project-planning meeting, suggested that
AmericanSouth.Org wants for expansion, to encompass college and public libraries,
museums and other cultural institutions across the American South if it is to more nearly
characterize southern culture. Research, after all, is in large part a search for information.
And, the smaller institutions often hold, in relative obscurity, pieces of a puzzle. Consider
research in to the life and eventual insanity of Mary Todd Lincoln, First Lady, Kentucky
belle. AmericanSouth.Org harvests little information on Mrs. Lincoln. We find Elizabeth
Keckley's scandalous tell-all Behind the Scenes, which was removed from sale shortly
after it was published in 1868. But, the researcher is left to discover elsewhere and
independently letters of a younger Mrs. Lincoln. One letter written, seemingly in blood
drawn by a sharp tongue, describes the curiously insane burial of a honey-glazed ham.


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The letter, hidden among the archival collections of Lexington, Kentucky's Transylvania
University, alma mater of Todd men, underpins the rage of a woman all but abandoned.

Similar jewels, some grand, others small, are found in smaller institutions across the
South. At Centre College in Danville, Kentucky, Doris Betts, a North Carolina writer, can
still be heard advising writers of southern fiction; but, no reference to her can be found in
AmericanSouth.Org. And, AmericanSouth.Org is blind to the complete and completely
digitized WPA Florida Writers Project collection at Jacksonville University in Florida. For
the researcher not familiar with AmericanSouth.Org's fellowship, AmericanSouth.Org is
one church among a multitude.

For those of us now contributing, there is more, as well, to be given to southern research
studies. The University of Florida, for example, is only now acting to open the Spanish
borderlands collections. My state's history cannot be told without Spanish and French
voices or British accents. The first Confederate state subdued, the only Confederate
govemment not to have fallen to Yankees. Florida was a contradiction well before the last
presidential election. The import of Spanish and British opinion on slavery through the
acquisition of the Florida territory was reviled throughout the American South prior to the
War Between the States. And, yet, these opinions are largely unknown to
AmericanSouth.Org.

Providing more information is requisite to the research success of AmericanSouth.Org, but
doing so means instituting the Project more widely. As Emory University acts to extend
the utility of the harvester in processing information, perhaps it is incumbent upon
institutions to seek partnerships and funds that will bring their resources into
AmericanSouth.Org. A challenge for us here, today, and for scholars seeking funds is to
share our knowledge about repositories though OAl for the benefit of future research.

Stones on a Harvest Moon:
Qualified Metadata

I see the greater research-supporting role for Emory and its technology partners to be in
extending OAI to harvest more qualitative or, rather, qualified metadata. In the field of
research, rich metadata yields a stronger research return. OAI needs to dig deep to more
aptly support research.

Among the PALMM Collections12 of Florida's cooperative digital library program, the
University of Florida and our partners have elected to build under shared technology with
common standards. We ingest rather than harvest. This strategy provides us with access
not only to the basic bibliographic metadata commonly harvested under OAl but also to
richly qualified metadata, using a variety of multi-layered thesauri, codes and
classifications, and other knowledge systems. And, with implementation of new, fast and
highly accurate OCR in combination with semi-automated tagging scripts, the strategy will
soon allow our researchers to dive into a larger number document texts as well.

Until OAI, targeted query engines, and other systems are adept at, first, query of qualified
and structural metadata and, second, query inside of tagged finding aids and text, I would
hope that PALMM would continue to ingest. The researcher is limited within harvested
collections by the small set of information now gathered. These limitations suggest future
venues for development by Emory University, the Universities of Illinois and Maryland, the
Research Libraries Group, the National Science Foundation, and other harvesting
agencies. Development of harvesting for qualified metadata and tagged text, of course,


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would also include extending the benefits of the additional harvest yield to research in the
form of new utilities.

A harvest of qualified metadata will certainly reap everything that the Dublin Core
Metadata Initiative places under its stylized logo sun. Two of these added elements seem
to me to be more essential than others on the periodic table of research: time and space.
No metaphysic of information can be complete with out them. History is a series of events
spread over time and space. And, in no American region is time and space more
important than it is in the American South.


When I moved to Florida, an elderly gentleman would grab me on my nightly walks around the
neighborhood that once had been the University of Florida campus. He would hold me by the elbow
and guide me from block to block as though I might have been naughty child. In front of each house,
he'd shuffle to a stop. Miss Emma lived here when I was a boy, he might say. She was an upright
woman. 'would boll-up peas she planted'herself. Don't ya know, her husband, Jimmie, was a no
account ..." And of course, I didn't know. The marvel of those walks, night after night traveling the
same blocks, was that the stories were never the same. Each night, he would bring the neighborhood's
characters back to life in a sequence spread like peanut butter over time.


Doris Betts, the North Carolina novelist, once remarked13 that though she researches the
motivations of her characters, be they doctors, lawyers or common folk, moving them
across a room in time to discover the details of plot is the most challenging aspect of work.
Plotting data on time-layered maps whether tangible or held in the mind of the
researcher in the course of work -- has been the labor of linguists, historians, scientist, and
writers. Eventually, it should be ours as well if we intend to serve their research interests.

The anticipated utilities go beyond OAI in that they will not be about simply harvesting
information. They will be about manner of using harvested data. Several projects point
the way. The Alexandria Digital Library's Gazetteer14 at the University of California -
Santa Barbara (UC-SB), for example, utilizes a harvest of geographic data pointing to
maps. The Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University15 plots the location of resource
repositories, using the language of Space/Time. And, the recently IMLS-funded
Ephemeral Cities project among the PALMM partners in Florida, promises to pilot a
harvest of Florida's cultural information and artifacts as historic layers into a geographic
information system (GIS). We trust that the Geo-Temporal Core, as we call it at the
University of Florida, will be a reactor and a catalyst for research and, particularly, for
developmental histories. The concept is simple in theory: isolate the geographic and
temporal metadata in our records and tagged text, normalize it, and subject it to query by
text, by timeline, or by map interfaces.

Nuck. Nuck Mucl
Beyond the Language of Old School

Searchable text documents remain a challenge for harvesters as well. Access to machine
searchable text is a holy grail among researchers seeking to save themselves time.

To some extent, OAI is antiquated. It does for digital libraries what the National Union
Catalog and the National Union Catalog of Manuscript Collections did for brick-&-mortar
libraries. At the moment, OAl is a divining rod for researchers. It now needs to dig deep,
to be a well. I say this with the full understanding that wells are dug one shovel at a time
and that Emory and other harvesting agents are now struggling with qualified metadata.


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But, as a first step beyond qualified metadata harvesting, OAI might harvest structural
metadata tables of contents perhaps using METS and EAD. Ultimately perhaps, OAl
might ally itself with the OpenURL Framework or technologies yet to be developed to
broadcast researcher's queries.

When researchers dig deep, they search for the fine detail of texts and tables. Three
types of text seem most essential: manuscripts and letters, newspapers and oral histories.
These sources embody history in personal and immediate manner. Within a collective
framework, challenges are several to the construction of research-support utilities for
these materials. Text Encoding Initiative (TEI-DTD) tags are employed commonly to
mark-up manuscripts, letters and oral history transcripts. But, implementations and
qualifications of tags vary as widely as do implementations of qualified Dublin Core for
bibliographic metadata. The same is true of newspapers. While cherry picking from the
Newspaper Industry Text Format (NITF-DTD), vendors offering newspaper solutions have
made proprietary modifications outside recognized standards-making processes.
Whether to enable functionality or to maintain a market, these modifications make sharing
and migrating text, let alone remote query of it, difficult. Scientists, particularly
agriculturalists and climatologists, at the University of Florida would have us consider the
numeric data trapped in text-document tables as well. Parsing a table means
understanding the structure of the table.

Racing the Moon:
From Diagramming the Process of Information to the Heuristics of Interfaces

Research support utilities are perhaps best first-tested among the content providers,
where controls can be imposed to scientifically test hypotheses and to explore the
heuristics of interface design. Doing so means diagramming research processes, having
imposed upon the content providers the responsibility for understanding how research is
done. Content providers, many of whom still consider themselves to be content builders,
are still struggling to provide research-supporting resources. Many of us buy utilities out of
the box and modify their behaviors for specific uses. At the University of Florida, for
example, we knew that the aerial photograph collection was in high demand. We were
familiar with the research products as well. Interviewing the collection's curators and
patrons, we were able to diagram and duplicate collection uses in a digital environment.16
Reviewing use in test and with exposure to new audiences, unanticipated uses were
diagrammed and additional utilities are now being programmed. Together these dots
painted a lovely picture that we quickly sold for content production dollars.

Aerial photography is an extreme example. But, the thought of exposing the collection's
metadata to harvesting leads to serious questions for any collection with special, research-
supporting functionality. Whether aerial photography, an herbarium specimen collection17
or a collection of state and local history with geo-temporal tagging, today's OAI leaves
functionality unexposed. It focuses upon the objects of research rather than the research
itself. It has sins to eat. The researcher still has to visit each and every site of interest. If
my grandmother were here today, she would probably observe that it's like attending a
wake via videophone. It has the feeling of racing the moon or being told, "you can't curl up
with a computer in bed ..." Sure you can; give the technology time to catch up with the
talkies!

Can't you just see the cow pee'n on the flatrock the rough? Research processes are the
science fiction of OAl.


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End Notes

SBlue and green glass bottles could capture evil spirits. A bottle-tree's primary purpose was to catch evil spirits
as a Native American dream-catcher was to capture bad dreams. Today, we'll speak only of clear glass bottles
and of good spirits.
2 Research Ubraries Group: Cultural Materials Initiative (http//www.rlg.org/culturalres/).
3 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Digital Gateway to Cultural Heritage Materials
(httpY/nergal.grainger.uiuc.edu/cgi/b/bib/bib-idx)
4 International Children's Digital Ubrary (http//www.icdlbooks.org/).
5 International Children's Digital Library does not endeavor to teach as much as it endeavors to lure. It allows the
child to control and manipulate the reader interface as a means of ensuring reading and to promote
comprehension.
6 E.g., Telsur Project at the Linguistics Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania (cf,
http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atlas/home.html)
7 Possum pie, for those who may not understand the reference, is a very sweet nut pie. Sweet, as in the sweet
milk used in making possum pie, is used to mean homogenous.
8 Learning modules can be found in various forms of exhibit-like structures such as The Valley of the Shadow
(http//valley.vcdh.virginia.edu/) to the field exercises of the Paleontological Research Institution's Mastodon
Matrix Project (httpJ//www.priweb.org/mastodon/matrix_directions.html) and to the traditional lesson plan
structure of Unking Florida's Natural History (httpi/palmm.fcla.edu/lfnh/currmat/EdModindex.html) or of the
National Park Service's The Invention Factory: Thomas Edison's Laboratories
(httpI/www.cr.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlpsAessons/25edison/25edison.htm).
9 The Kentucky Virtual Library, which attempts to provide young researchers with evaluative techniques (cf,
http://www.kyvl.org/htmVtutoriaVresearch/), might be taken as a model.
10 Cf, Halbert, Martin. 'The MetaScholar initiative: AmericanSouth.Org and MetaArchive.Org." Library Hi Tech.
21:2, pp. 182-198, particularly, pp 191-193.
This technique is employed by the iArchives (httpJ/www.iarchives.com/). Unfortunately, its web site does not
provide information on the technique, which can be seen clearly in the tagged text-behind-image product. This
method is especially useful in conversion of low resolution and high density resources such as newspaper
microfilm. For purposes of accuracy-in-discovery, it is extremely accurate, perhaps more so than any other
product currently available.
12 PALMM Collections (http://palmm.fcla.edu/) Publications of Archival, Library, and Museum Materials was
founded as the collaborative digital library of the State University System of Florida. PALMM members and
partners now include each of the state's public universities, several private universities, historical societies,
government agencies and archives at state and local levels, and art and science museums, as well as cultural
institutions in the Caribbean.
13 Her remarks are recorded in multi-media archive of the Centre College (Danville, KY) Souther Women Writers
Conference.
14 Alexandria Digital Library's Gazetteer may be found at httpY/testbed.alexandria.ucsb.edu/gazclient/index.jsp
i5 Perseus Digital Library at Tufts University may be found at http//www.perseus.tufts.edu/
6 Aerial Photography: Florida is not yet available in public release, now planned for late spring 2004. When
available, it will be listed among PALMM Collections (http//palmm.fcla.edu/).
17 Research, regardless the field, acts on all manner of objects. OAl as expressed in AmericanSouth.Org is
largely a portal to textual objects. The research experience will be enriched when OAl is also able to harvest
metadata expressed in Darwin Core, CIMVCHIO standard, and other specialized metadata. OAI-PMH is
enabled to harvest well beyond Dublin Core (DCMI) and Encoded Archival Description (EAD), including Darwin
Core and other metadata standards (cf, http://amol.org.au/oai/files/AMOL_CIMI_OAI-
PMH_Workshop_BD_Enabling_lnteroperability_20020618.pdf). N.B. RLG is currently working with CIMI to
harvest museum metadata (cf, httpJy/www.cimi.orc/waq/metadata/Metadata long desc.html)


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