• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 To the sea-side
 To the sands
 Play on the sands
 The true tale of Pat, the kind...
 What the boy wanted Pat for
 What Pat ran away for
 Another game
 Jack in a long coat
 Hide and seek
 Amy hides away
 Papa and Mama look for Amy
 Amy's hiding-place
 Amy is found
 Amy is taken home
 What made the sand fall
 Story of the dogs and cats
 Of the dog that is old
 Where the dogs had gone
 How the dogs got home
 List of words
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Prize story book series
Title: The sand cave
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00080012/00001
 Material Information
Title: The sand cave
Series Title: Prize story book series
Alternate Title: Story book readers for six year old scholars, the sand cave
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rooper, Wilhelmina L
Sergeant, G. H ( Editor )
Griffith, Farran and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Griffith, Farran & Co.
Place of Publication: London ;
Sydney
Publication Date: 1891
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Caves -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Missing children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1891   ( local )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1891   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1891
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Australia -- Sydney
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Wilhelmina L. Rooper.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00080012
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236743
notis - ALH7221
oclc - 182861673

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    To the sea-side
        Page 5
        Page 6
    To the sands
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Play on the sands
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The true tale of Pat, the kind dog
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    What the boy wanted Pat for
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    What Pat ran away for
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Another game
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Jack in a long coat
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Hide and seek
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Amy hides away
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Papa and Mama look for Amy
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Amy's hiding-place
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Amy is found
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Amy is taken home
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    What made the sand fall
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Story of the dogs and cats
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Of the dog that is old
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Where the dogs had gone
        Page 56
        Page 57
    How the dogs got home
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    List of words
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text


















THE SAND CAVE












THE PRIZE STORY BOOK SERIES.


















2


-*.i'


THE SAND CAVE.








THE SAND CAVE



BY
WILHELMINA L. ROOPER
AUTHOR OF
"CHATS WITH THE CHILDREN," "ACTION SONGS," "RECITATIONS," ETC.



EDITED BY
G. H. SERGEANT
(Late Head Master, St. James' Boys' School, Dover.) -


ILL USTRA TED












GRIFFITH, FARRAN & CO, LIMITED,
NEWBERY HOUSE
CHARMING CROSS ROAD, LONDON
AND AT SYDNEY
1891















































Zhe Rights of Translation and of Reprodutction are Reserved





THE SAND CAVE.
I.
TO THE SEA-SIDE.
I. E-va, Jack, and A-my
Grey went once up-on a time
to stay by the sea-side.
2. They had been ill, and
Pa-pa and Ma-ma took them
to the sea-side, as sea-air is
ve-ry good for a ny one who
has been ill.
3. When E-va, Jack, and
A-my had been by the sea for
a few days they felt well, and
were a-ble to walk, and run,
and play.
4. One day Jack came to
his Ma-ma to say, "Ma-ma,




THE SAND CAVE.


may we go to the sea? It is
so fine and nice out of doors."
5. "Yes, Jack," said his Ma-
ma, "you may'go. It is now
four by the clock, you may
stay on the sands till six.
6. "I will give you some
buns, a can of milk, and a
mug, and then you will not
want tea when you come in.
7. "Oh, thank you, Ma-ma,
what fun we shall have!" And
Jack gave her a hug, and a
kiss, and put her cap all on
one side, but she did not mind
that.
8. She said, "Come with
me for the buns. I have put




THE SAND CAVE.


them in this bag, and here is
the milk, with the mug."
9. I will take the milk,"
said Jack. "Yes, do, for it is
in a big can, and a boy of
nine, like you are, is more fit
to take it than E-va or A-my."
10. Oh, yes," said Jack,
"they can take the buns and
the mug, and E-va will bring
her new book. I will go and
tell them to come."

II.
TO THE SANDS.
i. E-va and iA-my were ve-ry
glad to come with Jack, and
they set off. Jack had the




THE SAND CAVE.


milk, E-va the buns, and A-my
the mug, and the book."
2. They had not far to go
to reach the sands. Just up a
lane and down a hill, and they
were on some nice hard sand.
3. "How blue and still the
wa-ter looks," said E-va. "I
like to see it wash the sand
with its ti-ny waves.
4. It is as still out at sea,
as if it did not care to move
to-day. It is like me, for I
would wish to sit still, as it is
so hot in the sun.
5. Let us put the milk,
and the buns, in the boat, till
we want them." Jack did so,





THE SAND CAVE.


and then said, "Now we will
have a game.


Let us put the milk, and the buns, in the boat.'
6. "Let us take it in turn
to name one. We will do so
by age, so, E-va, say, what
we shall play at first."
7. E-va was ten, Jack nine,




THE SAND CAVE.


and A-my six years old. Jack
was big of his age, but E-va
was small, so that he, as a
rule, us-ed to take the lead in
all that went on.
8. "Well, then," said E-va,
"we will play at cats." Play
at cats, what game is that?"
9. "Why we will be like
cats, and lie down in this big
hole in the sand, and op-en
and shut our eyes, and mew, as
cats do, and by-and-bye we will
get the milk, and lap it up."

III.
PLAY ON THE SANDS.
I. "But if we are cats, we





THE SAND CAVE.


can not eat buns," A-my said,
"and I shall wish to have one."
2. "Oh, yes, we will be cats
that like buns: now just hear
me purr and mew. Will you
not try to be a cat, Jack?"

3. Not I," said Jack.
"That is a slow game. You
can be a cat, E-va, if you
please, but A-my and I will
have a race.
4. A-my and Jack had a
race, but Jack won it be-fore
A-my had gone ve-ry far, so
she told him she did not
want to run a-ny more just
then, but would like to play a
game of her own.




THE SAND CAVE.


5. "What is it?" said Jack.
"Well it is not a game, but I
want to look at this crab in
the hole. It walks in a ve-ry
odd way. See it can on-ly get
a-long side-ways."









"Jack won the race be-fore A-my had gone very far."

6. E-va call-ed Jack and
A-my back to the boat, and
said she would read to them
a tale from her new book.




THE SAND CAVE.


7. They sat down on the
sand, while she read The
True Tale of Pat, the Kind
Dog." As some boys or girls
may wish to hear this tale, they
may now read it.


IV
THE TRUE TALE OF PAT, THE
KIND DOG.
I. Pat and Mat were two
ve-ry -wise dogs. They took
care of a yard, and did not
let a-ny one come in, that they
did not know.
2. Some wood was kept in
a shed in the yard, and Pat
had to take care that 'no one




THE SAND CAVE.


came near it, but the man who
had cut it for his own use.
3. Mat's work was to take
care of a barn, full of corn,
which stood not far from the
wood-shed.


"Pat and Mat were two ve-ry wise dogs."

4. If a-ny one went in-to the
yard that Pat and Mat did not
know, they would bark ve-ry
loud, as much as to say :




THE SAND CAVE. I5
5. "If you have come here
to take a-way our wood or our
corn, we will not let you do
it. We will bite you if you try
to do so."
6. Pat was ve-ry fond of
Mat, and Mat was ve-ry fond
of Pat. The two dogs were
the same size, and both were
grey, with dark eyes.

7. Pat and Mat did not
have much to eat, for they did
not live with a rich man, but
with a poor man.
8. The poor man had not
much food to give Pat and
Mat. He fed them on sop
and bits of fat, and now and





THE SAND CAVE.


then he gave them a bone
each. They were ve-ry glad
when he did this.

9. One day Pat went for a
walk. He had not gone far
when a boy saw him, and said
"Come here, Pat."


v.
WHAT THE BOY WANTED PAT FOR.

I. The boy's name was
Ned. He had hurt his leg,
and had to lie on a so-fa.
His aunt Ma-ry had been to
see him, and when she went
a-way she gave him a nice
plum-cake.




THE SAND CAVE.


2. Ned lay on a so-fa near
the op-en door, so that he was
a-ble to see out in-to the road.


"Ned lay on a so-fa near the op-en door."


That was how he was a-ble to
;ee Pat.

3. "Why did Ned want
Pat ?" "We shall see." Pat




THE SAND CAVE.


ran to him and put his nose
in his hand, as much as to
say, Poor Ned, I hope your
leg will soon be well."

4. Ned let Pat lick his hand
too, for he was ve-ry fond of
the dear kind dog. Then Ned
said, Pat, my old pet, give
me a paw.
5. Pat sat up on his hind
legs, and. gave Ned a paw.
" Good dog," said Ned, "now
look what I have got for you;
here is a bit of plum-cake for
you, Pat."
6. How poor Pat did wag
his tail, when he saw the cake.
He ate it, and Ned gave him




THE SAND CAVE.


some more, but he did not
take it this time. He ran off.

7. Pat! Pat! come back!
here is more cake for you,"
Ned said, but Pat ran on.
He did not e-ven turn his
head to look back. Ned felt
sad when Pat left him thus.
8. He was dull, for he had
no one to play with just then,
and he had been so glad to
see Pat come in.


VI.
WHAT PAT RAN AWAY FOR.
i. A tear came in-to Ned's
eye, but he did not cry. He




THE SAND CAVE.


took up a book and read it.
Ve-ry soon what did Ned
hear ? "Bow-wow bow-wow-
wow!
2. Up ran ,Pat, trot, trot,
trot, and by his side came
Mat, trot, trot, trot. Wag,
wag, wag, went Pat's tail;
wag, wag, wag, went Mat's
tail.

3. They ran to Ned on the
so-fa, and Pat's eyes said,
" Here we both are, Ned.
Are you glad to see us ?"

4. Mat's eyes said, "May I
come, Ned? Pat told me to
come." Ned said, Why,
what have you come for ? It




THE SAND CAVE.


must have been Pat who told
you to come. And do you
want a bit of plum-cake ?
5. Yes, I see you do.
Your tail says 'Yes,' and so do
your eyes. Good Pat! as he
was so kind, he must have
some more cake, and then,
Mat, I will give you a bite."
6. So Ned held out a bit
of cake to Pat, but Pat did
not take it. He did not e-ven
look at it, he look-ed on-ly at
Mat. Then Ned gave the
bit of cake to Mat, and Mat
ate it.

7. "Ah! you do like cake,
do you not, Mat ?" said Ned;




THE SAND CAVE.


"but what a kind dog Pat is
to go and call you, and wait
for more cake till you have had
some. Now Pat! see Mat has
had a good big bit, so do
come and have some more."

8. Pat was ve-ry glad to
eat more plum-cake, now that
Mat had had some, and Ned
-fed the two dogs in turn till
the cake was all done.

9. Just then a call of Pat!
Mat!" made Pat and Mat
jump up and run off. They
were let out for a run each
day, but they had to go back
to the yard, when the call to
come in told them to do so.




THE SAND CAVE.


So. I hear now and then of
a boy who will take all he can
get, and tell no one, lest he
may have to give part of it
a-way. And there are some
girls who do the same. Will
they not think of -the kind dog
Pat ?

VII.
ANOTHER GAME.

i. Jack and A-my had a
nice rest while E-va was read-
ing to them, and they were
ve-ry glad to hear of such a
kind good dog.
2. "Now," said Jack, "let
us have my game. It is such




THE SAND CAVE.


fun, on-ly you will have to run,
if you join it, Miss E-va."
3. "Well, I do not mind if
I run now. It is not so hot
as it was. What is your
game ?"
4. "I will get up-on this
sand-hill near the boat, and
when I have made my tie
fast to a stick, I will put it
up for a flag. You and
A-my must run up and try
to get hold of it, and I must
take care of it, and not let
you get it."
5. This game went on till
E-va said, Oh! I am hot,
let us sit down and rest a bit."





THE SAND CAVE.


6. The two girls sat down,
while Jack went to have a
game with the sea. The sea


"' I will get up-on this sand-hill near the boat."'


was not so still now, big waves
came up on the sand.

7. Jack ran to meet them,
and was quick to get out of





THE SAND CAVE.


the way when they came near.
But one big wave put a stop
to his play, for it came all




I
` No


"But one big wave put a stop to his play."
o-ver him, and made him so
wet, that E-va told him he
must go home.

8. "Oh! no," said Jack, "I




THE SAND CAVE. 27
need not do that. I can go to
Bob's hut in the lane." Who
is Bob? said E-va. "The
man Pa-pa buys fish of. He
is a ve-ry nice man, and will
let me get dry at his fire."


VIII.
JACK IN A LONG COAT.

1. Off ran Jack, and be-
fore long he was back in a
coat that came down to his
feet.
2. "Well, Jack, you do look
a guy," said A-my. Ha!
ha! ha! He! he! he!"
3. Yes, I know I look a




28 THE SAND CAVE.
guy," said Jack. "You see
Bob lent me this big coat
of his son's. He said -mine
would soon dry by his fire,
but I did not want to wait
till it was dry."
4. Now let us have the.
buns and. milk," said E-va.
"We can sit here on the
sand." So Jack got the can
of milk and the bag of buns.
5. Then from his red mug
he took a drink, and next
came a gasp-ugh !-ow !-ah !
"Why, Jack, what is it ?"
said E-va. Sour milk," said.
Jack, with ma-ny a wry face.
6. Oh, dear! we must












A---


I, -


"'You do look a guy.'"


lf


5;gt~j~7P
L;f;j
;;Lo~*




THE SAND CAVE.


have left it too long in the
hot sun," said E-va, "and the
heat has made it sour. We
must not drink a-ny of it or
it will make us ill."

7. What a pi-ty," said
A-my. "I. did want some
milk so much."

8. "Well you must wait till
we get home. The buns are
ve-ry good. Now make haste,
A-my," said Jack, "and do
not be all day o-ver your buns.
I want to play hide and
seek. I see a cave or two to
hide in; eat as fast as you
can.




THE SAND CAVE.


IX.

HIDE AND SEEK.

1. "I can not eat fast," said
A-my. Ma-ma told me not
to do so. Pigs may eat fast,
but I am not a pig."

2. Pray, Miss, do you
mean to call me a pig ?" said
Jack, red with rage. "Oh,
no!" E-va said, "A-my does
not mean that, she does not
like you to call her slow."

3. "I did not call her slow.
I told her to eat fast."

4. Well, see her bun is all
gone now, and so is mine.




THE SAND CAVE.


Let us play at hide and seek.
Do not let us spar and jar, as
Pa-pa says, but kiss and make
it up."
5. A-my put up her face to
Jack for a kiss, but he said,
"Oh, no! A-my, I do not
want to kiss. I am a boy,
and boys do not kiss much;
but we need not spar and jar,
as you call it. Run off and
hide, E-va."
6. E-va went off to hide.
7. "Do not peep, A-my,"
said Jack, "we will soon find
her, will we not ?"
Oh, yes," said A-my, who
was now quite gay, "we will




THE SAND CAVE.


soon find her. I did not
mean to peep at the way she
went, Jack."


"E-va went off to hide."


8. "Oh, no, I am sure you
did not. It is such fun to
have a good hunt for the one
who goes to hide."




THE SAND CAVE.


9. The game of hide and
seek went on till E-va said
they must go home.


x.
AMY HIDES AWAY.
I. Just at this time A-my
had gone to hide in her turn,
and Jack and E-va were not
a-ble to find her.

2. "Do call her, Jack, as
loud as you can," said E-va,
"she must come to us, we
have not time now to look' for
her."

3. Jack call-ed out "A-my!
A-my!" but no A-my came.




THE SAND CAVE.


Then E-va said, Oh, dear!
what are we to do ? We
must go and tell Pa-pa and
Ma-ma that A-my is lost."

4. "Wait a bit," said Jack,.
"you have one more look all
round, while I go to the hut,
to ask the man if he has seen
her. At the same time I can
get my own coat, as I think it
is dry now."

5. Jack went to the hut,
but came back to say that
Bob was out, and that he had
not seen him. He had gone
in-to -the hut, and had put on.
his own coat, which was quite
dry.




THE SAND CAVE.


6. Then in a ve-ry sad way
E-va and Jack left the sands.
In a short time Jack said,
"See, E-va, there come Pa-pa
and Ma-ma o-ver the hill; let
us run to meet them."

7. When Pa-pa and Ma-ma
saw Jack and E-va a-lone they
ask-ed, "What have you done
with A-my ?"
8. And E-va told how that
A-my was lost. Her Ma-ma
grew pale with fear, and her
Pa-pa said, "Why did you not
take more care of her, and
such a ba-by as she is ?"




THE SAND CAVE.


XI.
PAPA AND MAMA LOOK FOR AMY.

i. Both Jack and E-va felt
sad when Pa-pa said these
.words, and E-va be -gan to
cry.
2. But Ma-ma said in her
kind way, "I am sure, dear
John, that Jack and E-va took
all the care of A-my that they
could.' Go home, E-va and
Jack, and stay till we come.

3. "I hope that we may find
dear A-my safe and well, in
some hole or cave, that you
do not know of." Jack and
E-va went home. Pa-pa and




THE SAND CAVE


Ma-ma be-gan to look for their
lost pet.
4. Here is an old man,"
said Pa-pa, let us ask him if


"' May be she fell in-to the sea o-ver by that rock.'"

he has seen A-my." But the
old man said, "No, I have
not seen a-ny lit-tie girl. May




THE SAND CAVE.


be she fell in-to the sea o-ver
by that rock."
5. These sad words made
Ma-ma feel so ill, that she had.
to sit down for a bit. But
Pa-pa said, Do not 'give
way, my dear; take no heed
of the words of the man.
6. "Let us be brave, and
look for the child, and if we
see some men or some boys,
we will get them to help us."
7. And they went on, full
of fear that some harm had
come to lit-tle A-my, or e-ven
that she was dead.
8. But A-my was not dead.




THE SAND CAVE.


XII.
AMY S HIDING-PLACE.
I. When it was A-my's turn
to hide, she went up a path
that led a-way from the sea,
and got in-to a cave a few
feet from the path.
2. "They will not soon find
me here," A-my said. "What
fun it will be to jump out on
them when they pass by."
3. Then she gave a call,
to tell Jack and E-va she had
hid, but just then some sand
from the roof fell up-on her,
as she lay down, and she
was not a-ble to move.
4. The hole that led in-to





















Ii'



2I


"She got in-to a cave."





THE SAND CAVE.


the cave was fill-ed up by the
fall of sand.
5. It did not fall on A-my's
neck, or on her face, so that
she was a-ble to feel the air
that came to her from the now
op-en top of the cave.
6. It was well that A-my
could get this air or she must
have di-ed, for we can not live
long with-out pure air,
7. Who would think of look-
ing for A-my in this place ?

XIII.
AMY IS FOUND.
I. Be-fore long A-my was
found. I will tell you how.





THE SAND CAVE.


2. Bob, the man who had
lent Jack his coat, went to the
town to sell his fish. He had
seen the cave in which A-my'
lay ma-ny times.
3. On his way home, he
took the path that led by this
cave, and saw that the hole
was full of sand.
4. He did not think much
of this, un-til he met A-my's
Pa-pa and Ma-ma. They told
him of their loss, and he at
once said, "She may be in the
cave all the time, and, if she
is, she can not get out, for it
is full of sand.
5. I will dig a-way the sand."





THE SAND CAVE.


The sand was dug a-way, and
poor A-my was found.
6; Her Pa-pa and Ma-ma
went into the cave, and saw
her on the floor. Her Ma-ma
said, "Oh, she is dead! she
does not move! My pet-my
dear A-my!"
7. Oh, no, she is not
dead," said her Pa-pa. Let
me take her in-to the air.
See, she op-ens her eyes! I
fear she is hurt a good deal,
but we will hope for the best."

XIV.
AMY IS TAKEN HOME.
I. Then Pa-pa told Bob




THE SAND CAVE.


to come to his house next
day.
2. "1 will pay you well for
what you did," he said, "and,
I must ev-er thank you, for,
had it not been for you, my
dear girl must have di-ed."
3. Then he took A-my in
his strong arms, and set off
home.
4. When Pa-pa got to the
door, E-va and Jack met him,
and said, Oh, Pa-pa, do let
us look at A-my."
5. Here she is," said
Pa-pa; "let us take her in-
doors. "How pale you look,
A-my," said E-va. "Do not





THE SAND CAVE.


talk to her now," said Pa-pa,


"it will be best


go to bed at once.
6. "Here, Ma-ma,


for her


will


"When Pa-pa got to the door, E-va and Jack met him, and
said, 'Oh, Pa-pa, do let us have a look at A-my.'"


come, and


take


your big


ba-by?" When A-my
her Ma-ma, a look of


you


saw
joy




THE SAND CAVE.


came on her face, and she
said in a low voice:-

7. "Oh, Ma-ma, I did so
want you in the cave." "Yes,


"_ Let. u s
" Let me hold your hand, and you sing to me.'"


my -pet, but do not talk now.
I will put you to bed, and
sit by your side." "Yes do,




THE SAND CAVE.


Ma-ma, and let me hold your
hand, and you sing to me."

XV.
WHAT MADE THE SAND FALL.
1. "A-my will not be ill,
Pa-pa, will she ?" said E-va,
when Ma-ma and A-my had
gone.
2. "Oh, no, she is not much
hurt. She told me, as we
came home, how the sand fell
up-on her, when she was in the
cave. A great deal fell that
did not come near her, or 'she
might have been kill-ed."
3. "What made the sand
fall ?" put in Jack.




THE SAND CAVE.


4. And his Pa-pa said,
"Sand may fall at a-ny time.
The cry A-my gave tr. tell
you to come and look for her,
may have made the ,and fall
from the roof of the cave.
5. "Now, mind this E-va
and Jack, you rr.ust not go
in-to a-ny cave here, when I
am not with you.
6. "If you jump, or call out
in a cave, that is not safe,
the sand may fall up-on you,
and hurt, or e-ven kill you.
7. Be-fore you go to bed,
as you did try to take care of
A-my, I will tell you a short
tale a-bout some dogs and cats."





THE SAND CAVE.


XVI.
STORY OF THE DOGS AND CATS.
i A la-dy is so fond of
dogs and cats, that she has
more of them than a lit-tle
girl can count.
2. It is great fun to see the
cats play on the grass, grey
cats, white cats, black cats.
The dogs do not like the cats.
3. When they run at them,
and bark, as much as to say,
"I will bite you! I will bite
you!" the cats run from the
dogs, oh, so fast, and they run
up some steps to their house,
where the dogs can not come
to bite them.


















































STed -o
" The dogs do not like the cats."





THE SAND CAVE.


4. Then they look at the
dogs, from out of their house,
and put up their backs, and
spit, and say, in their way,
"Ah, ah! you dogs, you may
not come here; here we are
safe, and here you can not
bite us."
5. And the dogs stand and
look up at the cats, and wag
their tails, and bark and jump;
but for all that, they can not
hurt the cats, for the cats are
in their house quite safe.
6. "Are there more dogs
than cats, or more cats than
dogs ?" said Jack.
7. "There are more cats




THE SAND CAVE.


than dogs. But I do not mean
to tell you of the cats; it is of
the dogs I am a-bout to tell
you.


XVII.
OF THE DOG THAT IS OLD.

I. The rest of the dogs love
one old dog ve-ry much, and
when this old dog says in her
way, Do this," or "do that !"
the dogs do just what the old
dog tells them to do.
2. One day the old dog
said, "I will go and take a
walk," and eight of the dogs
said, "Let us go with the old




THE SAND CAVE


dog, and take care that no
harm comes to her."

3. So the old dog set out
for her walk, and the eight


"So the old dog set out for her walk, and the eight dogs
went with her."
dogs went with her, and did
walk, some on the right side,
and some on the left side, to

-~F~--1-------1cl11 _l~~~__j




THE SAND CAVE.


see that no harm came to
her.

4. Now, no one in the
house saw the dogs go for a
walk, and by-and-bye the la-dy
miss-ed them.
"Where are the dogs?" said
she.
"Where are the dogs ?" said
the men.
"Where are the dogs ?" said
the boys.

5. But no one had seen the
dogs, no one could say where
they were gone. The la-dy
fear-ed they were lost, and that
she should not see them a-ny
more.




THE SAND CAVE.
6. She sent by this road,
and by that road, to see if her
dogs could be found, but no
one could say where the dogs
were gone.
7. And the day went by,
and the night came, and the
dogs had not come home.


XVIII.
WHERE THE DQGS HAD GONE.

i. When the old dog had
gone some way from home, she
must have said, in her way,
to the dogs, "We will not go
home yet, we will go and see
the land."




THE SAND CAVE.


2. And the dogs bark- ed
and said, "Yes, we will not
go home yet, we will go and
see the land."

3. So the old dog walk-ed
on, and the eight dogs walk-ed
slow by her side. And they
went, and they went, and they
went, till they had gone a long
way from home.

4. Still the old dog walk-ed
on, and the eight dogs walk-ed
by her side, some on the right
hand, and some on the left.
5. At last the old dog could
walk no more, so she sat down
and said, "Oh! my dear dogs!
I must sit still. I can walk
E




THE SAND CAVE.


n6 more. Why did I come
so far from home ?"

6. And the eight dogs sat
down by the old dog, and said
in their way, "Oh! what shall
we do?" And they sat a
long, long time, but the old
dog did not move, and the
dogs kept by her side.


XIX.
HOW THE DOGS GOT HOME.

I. Now there came by that
way, a man with a cart, and
when he saw the old dog by
the road-side, with the eight
dogs round her, he said, "I




THE SAND CAVE.


know that dog. How did she
get here? I will take her
home in my cart."

2. And he put the old


"Now there came by that way, a man with 9 cart."
dog in the cart, and the eight
dogs ran by the. cart, and did
jump and bark for joy, that




THE SAND CAVE.


they, and the old dog, could
all go home at last.

3. It was late at night when
they got home, but the la-dy
came out to meet them, and
was ve-ry glad.

4. The old dog said in her.
way, "Ah, my dear dogs,
now we will stay at home.
We will nev-er go so far
a-way any more.

5. E-va and Jack gave
Pa-pa a good night kiss, and
went off to bed.


THE END.






LIST OF WORDS IN THIS BOOK.

I.
E-va Pa-pa were some
Jack Ma-ma a-ble buns
A-my air walk milk
Grey ve-ry play want
went good came tea
once a-ny fine come
up-on one nice thank
time when doors kiss
stay few said mind
sea days four nine
side felt clock bring
been well sands new
II.
glad wa-ter wish small
reach looks boat rule
just like game us-ed
lane wash take lead
down ti-ny turn hole
hill waves name op-en
hard care age shut
blue move first eyes
still would years mew
III.
shall won crab read
hear be-fore odd tale
purr gone way while





b2 LIST OF WORDS IN THIS BOOK.

slow told on-ly true
please more a-long boys
'race own call-ed girls
IV.
two use loud grey
wise work much rich
yard barn a-way poor
know full bite food
wood corn fond bone
shed which size each
near 'stood both here
V.
hurt plum hand tail
lie cake hope back
so-fa in-to soon e-ven
aunt road lick head
Ma-ry how paw thus
gave nose hind dull
VI.
tear why ate hear
took must wait lest
what held made there
trot look-ed jump think
VII.
rest now flag need
read-ing your hold hut





LIST OF WORDS IN THIS BOOK.


such tie meet buys
join fast quick fish
Miss stick o-ver fire
VIII.
coat drink wry make
feet next face haste
guy gasp heat hide
son sour pi-ty seek
mine ma-ny home cave
IX.
pigs rage jar gay
pray does peep sure
mean spar quite goes
X.
dear ask a-lone pale
lost seen ask-ed fear
round short grew ba-by
XI.
these John rock child
words could feel hdlp
be-gan safe heed harm
kind lit-tle brave dead
XII.
path pass fill-ed with-out
from call neck pure






64 LIST OF WORDS IN THIS BOOK.


roof
fell


lent
town
sell


XIII


find
them


long
found
tell


then
house
ev-er


up-on
great


grass
white


right
left,


di-ed
live


un-til
their
loss


in-doors
talk
joy


look-ing
place


saw
floor
deal


low
voice
sing


XV.
might fall
kill-ed a-bout


XVI.
black
steps


where
stand


XVII
miss-ed should
fear-ed night

XVIII.


bark-ed still

XIX.


kept


nev er off


XIV
thank
strong
arms


ill
how


la-dy
count


says
eight


land


late


cart




m




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