• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Half Title
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Mother's story of Christmas
 One Christmas night
 A letter from a Christmas...
 The Christmas dinner-bell
 Santa Claus does not forget
 The Christmas carol of the...
 A turkey for one
 Little Christmas carollers
 Round the Christmas tree
 Frankie's letter
 A ragged Christmas feast
 A Christmas ride fifty years...
 A Christmas hymn
 A Christmas surprise
 Heigh-ho the holly!
 Santa Claus at sea
 Christmas carol
 Susy's Christmas present
 An old English game
 A Christmas hymn
 Christmas carol
 A grand surprise
 Our Christmas tree
 How Nan earned Christmas money
 The dolls' Christmas party
 Grandma's Christmas gifts
 Santa Claus's letter
 A Christmas carol
 A Christmas problem
 A message to Santa Claus
 Back Cover














Title: Christmas stories and poems for the little ones
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00079977/00001
 Material Information
Title: Christmas stories and poems for the little ones
Physical Description: 80 p. : ill., music ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cheney, C. Emma
Peters, DeWitt Clinton, b. 1865 ( Illustrator )
Andrew, George T ( Illustrator )
Sheppard, William Ludwell, 1833-1912
Hutchinson & Co ( Publisher )
Lippincott's Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Hutchinson & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Lippincott's Press
Publication Date: 1890
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1890   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by C. Emma Cheney, Sydney Dayres, Miss V. Stuart Mosby, and others ; illustrated.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by Andrew and W.L.S. after D. Clinton Peters.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00079977
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224200
notis - ALG4461
oclc - 182580202

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Half Title
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    List of Illustrations
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Mother's story of Christmas
        Page 13
        Page 14
    One Christmas night
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    A letter from a Christmas turkey
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The Christmas dinner-bell
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Santa Claus does not forget
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The Christmas carol of the birds
        Page 26
    A turkey for one
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Little Christmas carollers
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Round the Christmas tree
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Frankie's letter
        Page 34
    A ragged Christmas feast
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    A Christmas ride fifty years ago
        Page 38
        Page 39
    A Christmas hymn
        Page 40
        Page 41
    A Christmas surprise
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Heigh-ho the holly!
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Santa Claus at sea
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Christmas carol
        Page 48
    Susy's Christmas present
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    An old English game
        Page 52
        Page 53
    A Christmas hymn
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Christmas carol
        Page 56
        Page 57
    A grand surprise
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Our Christmas tree
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    How Nan earned Christmas money
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The dolls' Christmas party
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Grandma's Christmas gifts
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Santa Claus's letter
        Page 70
        Page 71
    A Christmas carol
        Page 72
        Page 73
    A Christmas problem
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    A message to Santa Claus
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text


















17


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MOTHER'S STORY OF CHRISTMAS.







CHRISTMAS


STORIES


AND


POEMS


FOR


THE LITTLE ONES


BY
C. EMMA CHENEY. SYDNEY DAYRE,
MISS V.,STUART MOSBY,
AND OTHERS


/


LONDON
HUTCHINSON & CO.
25 PATERNOSTER SQUARE
S890







































































LIrrINwCTT's IRESS,
PHIILAD)I.I'HIA, U.S.A.














CHRISTMAS


STORIES AND POEMS
FOR


THE LITTLE


ONES













-I~s
- - - - -


CONTENTS.


Mother's Story of Christmas
One Christmas Night
A Letter from a Christmas Turkey
The Christmas Dinner-Bell .
Santa Claus does not Forget
The Christmas Carol of the Birds
A Turkey for One
Little Christmas Carollers
Round the Christmas-Tree.
Frankie's Letter
A Ragged Christmas Feast.
A Christmas Ride Fifty Years Ago
A Christmas Hymn .
A Christmas Surprise .
Heigh-ho the Holly!
Santa Claus at Sea
Christmas Carol
Susy's Christmas Present
An Old English Game
A Christmas Hymn .
Christmas Carol


PAGE
13
S 15
20
22
24
26
27
30
32
S34
S35
S38
40
S42
S44
S46
48
49
S 52
S54
56







8 CONTENTS.
PAGE
A Grand Surprise 58
Our Christmas-Tree 60
How Nan earned Christmas Money 63
The Doll's Christmas Party. .. .. 65
Grandma's Christmas Gifts 68
Santa Claus's Letter 70
A Christmas Carol 72
A Christmas Problem 74
A Message to Santa Claus 78






















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

DRAWN AND ENGRAVED UNDER THE SUTl'ERVIBION OF
GEORGE T. ANDREW.


Mother's Story of Christmas
" Mother is telling a beautiful story"
" The figure of a small child" .
"Around a beautiful green tree"
" She was growing very, very sleepy"
" And together they flew up "
From the Christmas-Tree
"Alone in the little pen"
" And said I was a nice, big fellow"
"The Christmas Dinner-Bell"
"Bertie wept for an hour"
" Santa Claus does not forget" .
" Tying them on slender poles "
" Lura's was a papier-mach6 turkey"
" A hidden spring was touched "
" Inside was a gold chain and locket"
Little Christmas Carollers .
Round the Christmas-Tree .
"I find mine just full"
"A great feast in Dublin"
"They were seated at long, narrow tables"
"There were small gifts".
"Sitting between grandpa and grandma"
"Angels the song renew"
"For there lay Cousin Jack"
Day Dreams


PAGE
. Frontispiece.
13
14
S16
17
S18
S19
S20
S21
23
S24
25
S26
S28
S29
S30
31
33
S34
S35
S36
37
38
41
42







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


"Here's to the green holly!"
Heigh-ho the Holly!
"I harnessed my reindeer to a little boat"
"Tell us a story, nursie; please do"
"The children were wild to see "
" Snapdragon .
A Christmas Hymn
" We wish you a Merrie Christmas" .
"And play they were ladies"
" What a joy for girls and boys"
" Dancing round the Christmas-tree!"
Our Christmas-Tree
"Nan planted her ground"
' As long as the flowers lasted"
"We ought to have a party" .
" They danced in one of the great shop-windows"
"This did very well"
' To climb into a horn of plenty"
" Mother Hubbard and the two black waiters"
" Sprang up as high as he could"
"But boys must slide, that's certain"
"Both were angry"
" Oh, Ted, here's a letter!"
A Christmas Carol
" She thinks (she really told me so) "
" Ho, ho for good little girls and boys"
"But all to girls"
"Who could have filled it?"
Santa Claus at the South
" The telephone was in the hall"
" October saw the red leaves fall"


PAGE
44
. '. 45
S47
S49
51
S53
55
S57
S59
S60
S61
S62
S63
S 64
65
65
S66
S67
S67
S67
S69
S70
S71
S73
S74
S75
75
S76
S77
S78
79


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MOTHER'S STORY OF CHRISTMAS.

BLOW, winds of the winter, o'er valley and hill-top,
Oh, never at all care we;
Mother is telling a beautiful story,
As we gather so close to her knee.
And the firelight falls on the baby's face
With a soft, weird beauty and magic grace.

For just such a baby as this of ours,
With eyes of violet and hair of gold,
Was born in a stable one winter's night,
In the wonderful days of old.
Oh, listen! that dear little blue-eyed thing,
Of lords was the Lord, and of kings the King.


(13)


~t~i~p






MOTHER'S STORY OF CHRISTMAS.


Mother says that a bright star, far from the East,
Guided three men who were wise and true,
And she says they knelt on the stable floor,
And looked deep down in the eyes of blue,
That they smiled and prayed, while the tears fell slow,
For He was their Lord and their King, you know.

And the shepherds, guarding their flocks on the hill,
Saw the wings of angels glancing bright,
And they fell on their faces, while hymns of peace
Rang out through the Christmas night.
And the lingering light's soft radiancy
Was a wonderful, glorious thing to see.

Mother says she thinks all the babies know
That Jesus once was a baby too;
That the angels whisper it in their dreams, -
The sweet, sweet story, forever new;
And she calls us to gaze on the dimples deep,
As the baby smiles sweetly in his sleep.
KATHARINE HULL.


ie Tl ('-"^
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THIS is what the
stars saw one Christ-
mas night: A stream
of silvery light steal-
ing far out into the
windy street, throw-
ing into bold relief
each snow-covered
object, and the
figure of a small I
child crouchin -
close up to thb -
III -uncurtaine d-
i~ eeSFwindow.
T 1h

c. ,.t t(: h-
ing at her
scanty frock in
rude playfulness,
and somewhere
in the air a voice
sang pityingly, A child of the people."'
And this is what Christine saw: Around a beautiful green
( 15)







ONE CHRISTMAS NIGHT.


tree, lighted by a hundred tiny lamps, a band of laughing
fairies, dancing to the sound of glad, delicious music.


f


-'. shini-ng glI;-s:. an.i.
the blue eyes grew
k wide and wistful.
The frolicsome wind
threw back the scarlet hood and tossed the yellow ringlets
wildly about.


3,


4 ; r
I
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-r._

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:-;-~






ONE CHRISTMAS NIGHT.


One of the fairies turned a joyous face towards the window.
Christine started. Surely it was Gertrude, the little girl who
gave her the great piece of golden cake. Was the Christ-child
pleased, she wondered, and is that why he sent her those lovely,
spangled wings ?
Oh, how happy the fairies were! The white, gauzy dresses,
covered with stars of silver and gold, sparkled, and gleamed,
and flashed in the colored light of the tiny lamps. One fairy
stood up on a great, high table, spread her wings and fluttered
down. One flew into a beautiful lady's lap, and the lady clasped
her in her arms and kissed her.



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: ...I;... ..b~.~..... .



Sleigh-bells jingled along the streets, and the fairies, hearing
them, laughed and screamed and fell to giving good-bys at a
wonderful rate. Then the stars saw another stream of silvery
light, and little Christine drew back and shut her eyes, the
fairies were so near.
The sleigh-bells tingled, and jingled, and grew faint, and died
away. The stars looked down on Christine, and Christine looked
up at the stars.
"Oh, Christ-child," she murmured, "I gave my bread-and-butter
to Fritz."
Would he give her a pair of wings? She was growing very,
very sleepy.
"Christ-child," she called again, loudly, "I gave my bread-and-
butter to Fritz."







ONE CHRISTMAS NIGHT


- -



i- --
---- i


Listen! A flutter of wings. 0 stars, what did you see there?
I hear you, little Christine," said a voice sweeter than the
sweetest music; "you will never be cold and hungry again."
And the Christ-child fastened a pair of spangled wings upon
her shoulders, and together they flew up to the smiling stars.

KATHARINE HULL.


--;i
i--


































































FROM THE CHRISTMAS-TREE.
(19)













A LETTER FROM A CHRISTMAS TURKEY.


.", "7 ,i DEAR LITTLE ONES,-


I/1/VERY suspicious-looking man
4 came into the barn-yard
the other day. He looked
all around among my
brothers and cousins.
Then he pointed at me
Sand said I was a nice,
big fellow. This made
me feel very proud.
..t W T When he put his hand
into his pocket I sup-
posed he was going to
give me some corn. Instead of that he counted out money to my
master. Then I knew he would take me away, and I began gob-
bling good-by to my relatives and friends of the barn-yard.
Now I am alone in the little pen he brought me to. I have been
thinking of all this fuss over me, and having so many good things to
eat must mean something. I gobbled to some other fowls running
about in a yard, and found out from them that it was almost
Christmas-time.
Now let me ease your tender little hearts about my career being so
suddenly cut short. I want to tell you that in Turkeydom it is con-
sidered a great glory to be the centre of attraction at a Christmas
dinner-table, to be dressed up in a nice brown coat, to be sur-
rounded by sparkling jellies, rich cranberry sauce, and all the other
good things; to hear the children cry, Oh Oh!" and the papas
(20)





A LETTER FROM A CHRISTMAS TURKEY.


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and mammas say,
for, my little dears.
be sorry for


What a fine turkey!" This is what we live
So, when I have gobbled my last gobble, don't


Yours, when fat,


TURKEY GOBBLER.


N~


4

~ir









THE CHRISTMAS DINNER-BELL.


Now listen for the Christmas bells that ring out,, loud and clear,
A welcome for the holidays, the best of all the year.
From the smallest to the greatest they add their cheery song
To swell the living chorus which gayly floats along.
Oh, the merry Christmas bells!
Oh, the cheery Christmas bells !
There's nothing like the music of the merry Christmas bells.

There's a tiny little tinkle when the moon is shining bright,
When Santa Claus comes travelling with his. reindeers prancing light,
And they ring a hearty promise of the treasures to be found
When the breakfast-bell shall waken happy youngsters,- blessed sound!
Oh, the merry midnight bell!
Oh, the early morning bell!
When the children rub their sleepy eyes and hurry down pell-mell.

But a bell is ringing later, and the echo of its noise
Is the jolliest in all the world to merry girls and boys.
Does any music ever heard such wondrous visions bring
Of everything delightful, as that jingle, jingle, jing ?
If you listen you will hear
All its promise of good cheer,
As it adds its i-ling of greeting to this crowning of the year.
How it laughs amid its din,
As it rings the people in!
How the children wait and wonder, all impatient to begin
And their bonny eyes are bright
At the gay and goodly sight
Of the dainties and the dainties and the sparkle and the light.
Oh, of all the bells the bell
With a tale of joy to tell!
Oh, the jolly, jolly jingle of the Christmas dinner-bell!
(22) SYDNEY DAYRE.











Q0 F


THE CHRISTMAS DINNER-BELL.
(23)






SANTA CLAUS DOES NOT FORGET.


BERTIE was a very good boy. He was kind, obedient, truthful, and
unselfish. He had, however, one great fault,-he always forgot.
No matter how important the errand, his answer always was
"I forgot." When he was sent with a note to the dress-maker
his mother would find the note in his pocket at night. If he was
sent to the store in a great hurry, to get something for tea, he
would return late, without the article, but with his usual answer.
His father and mother talked the matter over, and decided
that something must be done to make the little boy remember.
Christmas was near, and Bertie was busy making out a list of
things which Santa Claus was to bring him.
"Santa Claus may forget some of those things," said his mother.
"He cannot," replied Bertie; "for I shall write sled, and
(24)






SANTA CLAUS DOES NOT FORGET.


skates, and drum, and violin, and all the things on this paper.
Then when Santa Claus goes to my stocking he will find the list.
He can see it and put the things in as fast as he reads."
Christmas morning came, and Bertie was up at dawn to see what
was in his stocking. His mother kept away from him as long as she
could, for she knew what
Santa Claus had done.
Finally she heard him '
coming with slow steps "
to her room. Slowly he
opened the door and came
towards her. He held in
his hand a list very much
longer than the one he
had made out. He put
it in his mother's hand,
while tears of disappoint-
ment fell from his eyes. ,
"See what Santa Claus "'b .a
left for me; but I think
he might have given me ., H"
one thing besides."
His mother opened the ___
roll. It was a list of all
the errands Bertie had
been asked to do for six -V-
months. At the end of
all was written, in staring capitals, "I FORGOT."
Bertie wept for 'an hour. Then his mother told him they were
all going to grandpa's. For the first time he would see a Christmas-
tree. Perhaps something might be growing there for him.
It was very strange to Bertie, but on grandpa's tree he found
everything he had written on his list. Was he cured of his bad
habit? Not all at once; but when his mother saw that he was
lartl''hl:a'1ly heedless she would say, "Remember, Santa Claus
does ir..,t forget."
M. A. HALEY.








THE CHRISTMAS CAROL OF THE BIRDS.

Do you know, when we are having such good times at Christmas,
what sweet music they have in Norway, that cold country across


the seal:' One day in the year
the simple peasants who live
there make the birds very happy, so that they sing, of their own
free will, a glad, joyous earol on Christmas morning.
And this is why they sing on that morning more than on any
other. After the birds have found shelter from the north wind
(26)






A TURKEY FOR ONE.


on Christmas-eve, and the night is still, and bright with stars;
or even if the storm be ever so severe, the good people bring out
sheaves of corn and wheat from their storehouses. Tying them
on slender poles, they raise them from every spire, barn, gate-
post, and gable; then, when the Christmas sun rises over the
hills, every spire and gable bursts forth into joyous song
You can well believe that these songs of the birds make the
people of Norway very happy. They echo, with all their hearts,
their living, grateful anthem, Glory to God in the highest, on
earth peace, good-will to men!"
MRS. G. HALL.














A TURKEY FOR ONE.

LURA'S Uncle Roy is in Japan. He used to take Christmas
dinner at Lura's home. Now he could only write her papa to
say a box of gifts had been sent, and one was for his little girl.
The little girl clapped her hands, crying, Oh, mamma! don't
you think it is the chain and locket dear uncle said he would
sometime give me?"
"No," replied her papa, reading on. "Your uncle says it is a
turkey for one."
"But we do not need turkeys from Japan," remarked the little
daughter, soberly.
Her papa smiled, and handed the open letter to her mamma.






A TURKEY FOR ONE.


" Read it aloud, every bit," begged Lura, seeing her mamma
was smiling, too.
But her mamma folded the letter and said nothing.
On Christmas-
'' i-I"e taeve the box,
r n In w bil, which had just
....... arrived, w as

dItnif" r eces. a gtoe every one in the
I" "" house was made
glad with a
present. Lura's
was a papier-
Pll romachi turkey,
nearly as large
.. as the one
brought home
Sat the same
time by the
market boy.
Next morning,
while the fowl
in the kitchen
was being roast-
ed, Lura placed
hers before a
window and
watched people
admire it as they
passed. All its
imitation feathers, and even more its red wattles, seemed to wish
every man and woman, boy and girl, a Merry Christmas.-
Lura had not spoken of the jewelry since her uncle's letter was
read. It is not nice for one who receives a gift to wish it was
different. Lura was not that kind of a child.
When dinner was nearly over, her papa said to her, My dear,






A TURKEY FOR ONE.


you have had as much of my turkey as you wanted; if you please,
I will now try some of yours."
Mine is what Uncle Roy calls a turkey for one," laughed Lura.
She turned in her chair towards where her bird had been strutting
on the window-sill, and added, in surprise, Why, what has
become of him ?"
At that moment the servant brought in a huge platter. When
room had been made for it on the table it was set down in front
of Lura's papa, and on the dish was her turkey.
"Oh, what fun!" gayly exclaimed the child. "Did uncle tell
you to pretend to serve it?"
"I have not finished what he directs me to do," her papa said,
with a flourish of the carving-knife.
"But, papa oh, please !" Her hand was on his arm. You
would not spoil my beautiful bird from Japan! "
A hidden spring was touched with the point of the knife. The






LITTLE CHRISTMAS CAROLLERS.


breast opened, and disclosed the fowl filled with choice toys and
other things. The first taken out was a tiny box; inside was
a gold chain and locket; the locket held Uncle Roy's picture.
It was a turkey for one, for only Uncle Roy's niece. But all
the family shared the amusement.
LAVINIA S. GOODWIN,










LITTLE CHRISTMAS CAROLLERS.

WE are a band of carollers,
We march through frost and snow,
But care not for the weather
As on our way we go.

At every hall or cottage
That stands upon our way,
We stop to give the people
Best wishes for the day.

We pray a merry. Christmas,
Made bright by Christmas cheer,.
With peace, and hope, and gladness,
And all they may hold dear.

And for all those that happen
To pass us on our way
We have a smile, and wish them
A merry Christmas-day.
L. A. FRANCE.



























































LITTLE CHRISTMAS CAROLLERS.
(31)


"




























ROUND THE CHRISTMAS-TREE.


THE Christmas bells in many a clime
Their joyous peals are ringing,
And sweet in cot and palace chime
The children's voices singing.
While-here we see the Christmas-tree
Its gay fruit bending o'er us,
We, glad of heart, will bear our part,
And swell the Christmas chorus.



We bless His birth, who came to earth
And in His cradle lowly
Received the earliest Christmas gifts, -
The Christ-child, pure and holy.
To Him we raise our thanks and praise
For all the love He bore us;
For His dear sake our hymn we make,
And swell the Christmas chorus.


(32)


And while we strip these laden boughs
Of all their shining treasure,
He from above will look with love
Upon our harmless pleasure.
He gave our friends, our joys He sends,
He ever watches o'er us;
He bends His ear our song to hear,
And loves our Christmas chorus.



Still, "Peace on earth, good-will to men,"
The heavenly choirs are singing;
And Peace on earth, good-will to men,"
Through earth to-night is Tinging.
We catch the strain with sweet refrain
That angels sung before us,
And join the song with heart and tongue,
The holy Christmas chorus.
E. F. F.




























































ROUND THE CHRISTMAS-TREE.


*1


(83)













































\ASHINGTOW ARNUARY IKSW
DEAR LITTLE 1O HOPE YOU HAD A MERRY &RISTMAS. DID YOU ALL HANG UP YOUR
8TOCKINGST .1 FOUND MINE JUST FULL OF CANDY UP TO THE TOP. A\NNIE WONT LET
MtE HAVE BUT THREE LITTLE PIECES A DAY 80 HAVE SOME. OF THAT CANDY STILL LEFT
SNTP LAUS BROUGHT ME A LOT OF OTHER THINGS TOO. I HAD A SORE THROAT ON,
C(HRISTMAS DAY AND I HAD TO STAY IN BED ALL DRY COULD NOT GO TO PETS
CHRISTMAS 7kEE AND THAT MADE ME FEEL BAD. PET SENT ME P GREAT BIG ORANGE
AND A BOX OF C tNDY AND A PAIR OF ROLLER SKATES. T LIKED THE ROLLER SKRTE
.BEST. "T-EY ARE TOO BIG FOR ME NOW 80 TCANT USE THEM TILL AM BIGGER
MYSELF. I SENT PET A BOX OF LEAD SOLDIERS AND R POUND OF ANIMAL CMKERS.
MAM A DIDN'T THINK PET WOULD CARE FOR MY PRESENTS BUT NEW ,,WOULD
;HE TOLD ME BEFORE CHRISTMAS JUST WHAT SHE WANTED MOST. MOST ALL THE SOL-
DIERS ARE BROKEN NOh. PET' GOT A GREAT BIG DOLL. 8HE SAYS ITS NAME IS
.ELLE PARIS AOTER THE PLACE IT CAME FROM. I HAVE MADE A PICTURE OF BELLE
IN THE CORNER OF THIS PAPER, JT LOOKS A GOOD DEL LIKE HER ONLY HER
HAIR 18 REALLY YELLOW AND HER DRESS IS BLUE. COULDN'T MRKE THOSE
RIGHT. MY THROAT IS ALL WELL NOW AND I DON'T HAVE TO TAKE
ANY MORE MEDICINE. THIS IS A QHRISTMAS LETTER AND THAT IS
THE ON IT IS SO LONG. MUST STOP NOW. YOUR FRIEND, / Rs
M- -KE.


(34)














A RAGGED CHRIST

ON Christmas-day there is a great
know, is the chief city of Ireland.


dAS FEAST.

feast in Dublin. This, you
The feast is made for the


children. There are in that city a great many little ones who are
very, very poor. There are kind people there also, who look after
these poor children. They have what they call "ragged schools,"
(35)


II






A BAGGED CHRISTMAS FEAST.


where many of them are taught to read; and to sew, and other
useful things.
Dr. Nelaton is a famous minister in Dublin, and every year he,
with other good people, gets up this great feast for the children.
About eight hundred of them came last year. Some of these were
only half clad, and all were very ragged. They were seated at long,
narrow tables, which were covered with a white cloth. The children
from the ragged schools wore



















the children felt very fine in them. But
there were two long rows without any aprons. These were little
ones who had been picked up along the streets. Each ragged
scholar had permission to bring all the children he could find.
And oh, how ragged and dirty these two rows were!
But they brightened up, just like the children with aprons, when
they saw the feast. A huge mug of steaming tea and an immense
bun to each child Rarely did they have such a treat as this. And
how they did eat! Each child had all he wanted. It would have






A RAGGED CHRISTMAS FEAST.


done you good to see their poor, pinched faces beam with delight.
During the meal a large throng of orphan children in the gallery
























S and little speeches
-- I S %V e0A
-A! t t er


tHie l '1t4t lhei'e

and little speeches
and prayers, and
mnre songs. The little ragged ones seemed like new beings, in
this atmosphere of love. Such a glad day as that Christmas was
a rare event in their sad lives. Children who live in happy homes
know little about the sufferings of the poor. Perhaps if they knew
more, such little ones would try harder, by gifts and kind acts, to
carry sunshine to sorrowful hearts.
C. BELL.














































GRANDPA and Grandma Linn were going to spend Christmas at
their son's house. It was a long ride, the snow was deep and the
air sharp and crisp.
They travelled in a sleigh. The best road was on the river; it
(38)






A CHRISTMAS RIDE FIFTY YEARS AGO.


was frozen solid. They could go the whole thirty miles on the
beautiful snow-track.
Sitting between grandpa and grandma was little Bessie West; she
was going to see her. cousins Jack and Sue.
Grandpa Linn had a fur cap and mittens, and all that anybody
could see of Grandma Linn was a quilted hood and a green veil.
Bessie was tucked away almost out of sight, to keep her warm.
Over the white lace cap she wore in summer she had a blue woollen
hood; over her cloak was her mother's best shawl, and her mittens
and leggings had been knit for this very journey.
Besides, they had warm fur robes, a foot-stove, and hot bricks. In
one corner of the sleigh was a basket of presents,-apples, nuts, and
,pretty things that the aunties had made. There was a lunch-basket;
they often wanted a bite, especially Bessie.
In her lap Bessie held a cunning little kitty, rolled up in a baby-
blanket. A small red cap covered its head and ears. You could see
nothing but its eyes; it was to be a Christmas present to little Sue.
Once in a while Bessie and kitty had little naps.
A great many other sleighs and big sleds were also on the river.
The latter were laden with lumber or ice. They all had four horses,
and each horse had bells around his neck.
At five o'clock their journey was over. How glad they were to sit
down to supper, and warm themselves by the bright, blazing fire!
How the wood crackled and snapped! and what beautiful talks they
all had!
This was a Christmas journey fifty years ago, in Maine.
F. P. CHAPLIN.





















A CHRISTMAS HYMN.

GRACIOUS and heavenly star,
Which shines on us afar,
Still, wheresoe'er we are,
Watch o'er His fold.

Calm was that holy flight
Through the far lonely night,
When first your radiant light
Spoke of His birth.

In the still midnight air,
Silent you sparkle there,
Hovering with loving care
Over the spot.


Hark! from the cloudless, blue,
Sweet music stealing through,
Angels the song renew,
"Glory to God! "


(40)


Hail, blessed Christmas morn,
When Christ, a child, was born,
Let us the strain prolong
For evermore!
FANNIE M. HALL.
































ik


________


-J -'4 A


Hail, blessed Christmas morn,

When Christ, a child, was born.
(41)


,r


' I


It~"'

























A CHRISTMAS SURPRISE.


THE night before Christmas, Ned and Mamie hung up their stock-
ings. Ned's was red, and Mamie's was blue. Ned's was the larger,
because he was two years the older; but Mamie said Santa Claus
could put some of her presents under her stocking.
They woke up very early on Christmas morning. They ran
downstairs, and there hung their stockings, so full that they were
running over. Right under the stockings lay a large package, done
up in paper and tied with a string. It was larger than Ned. They
could not think what it could be. Mamma said they would have to
open it and find out.
They thought they would see what. was in their stockings first,
but before they got half-way down to the foot they concluded they
could not wait, but must open the package right off.
Papa gave them his knife. Ned cut the string. Then Mamie
began to pull open the wrapper. There were several papers, for the
package was very long. Finally they got to the last one. Then
what a shout there was! for there lay Cousin Jack. He was red in
the face, from being covered up so, and trying to keep from
laughing.






A CHRIISTMXAS SURPRISE. 43

How they did laugh, and what a merry time they had Jack had
come the night before, after they had gone to bed. It was mamma
who thought of making a Christmas surprise out of him. She did not
wrap him up until just before Ned and Mamie got down, and papa
had watched to see that they did not get in until all was ready.
L. A. FRANCE.










-- ',





_.. >



._, -? ,























We will say good-by to the old, oid year,
And greet the new with a shout of cheer,
Singing "Heigh-ho the holly, the holly,
Here's to the green holly !"

With holly sprigs the pudding crown,
Sing Heigh-ho the holly! "
Roast the big turkey, so juicy and brown,
And load the table with dainties down,
Singing Heigh-ho the holly, the holly,
Here's to the green holly! "

Oh, high hang the mistletoe,
Sing Heigh-ho the holly!"
With evergreen leaves and berries like snow
Under it let the true lovers go,-
Singing "Heigh-ho the holly, the Holly,
Here's to the green holly! "

Pile the blazing yule-logs higher,
Sing Heigh-ho the holly! "
Dance shadow-dances before the fire,
Dance, little maidens, and never tire,
Singing "Heigh-ho the holly, the holly,
"Here's to the green holly !"
(44)






































































HEIGH-HO THE HOLLY!


(45)









SANTA CLAUS AT SEA.


A LETTER FROM HIM.
CHRISTMAS EVENING.
MY DEAR CARL, I love you so much that I must write you a few
words, though I really hardly have time. My reindeer team are
pawing with their little hoofs, and the wind is so high that I'm afraid
half my toys will be blown away.; and then what will the children
say ?
I filled the stockings that were hung up in Boston first, and then I
came very fast overland, filling all the stockings as I came along.
After San Francisco was well supplied, I had to cross the Pacific
Ocean, to get to you in Honolulu. I had been riding in a sleigh;
but now I harnessed my reindeer to a little boat, and they swam
over here very fast. When we were nearly here, we passed a big
steamer, and I went close to it to see who was there. I found one
gentleman who was thinking of his little boys and, loving them very
much and longing to get home to them. I saw, peeping out of his
coat-pocket, two little cannon; and just then I heard him say, "I
wonder if I shall get home to Ernest and Carl and Kenneth and Baby
on Christmas-day!" I was just about to shout out, Oh, I know
your boys, and I'll tell them you are coming! when my reindeer
began to swim very fast indeed, and, before I knew it, I was out of
sight of the steamer. When your papa comes, ask him if he saw a
funny little man sailing away very fast.
I think, my Carl, that you are a dear boy, but I don't like that
habit you have of crying when you are playing. Boys who play hard
ought to expect to get hurt sometimes, and you must try to see how
much you can bear without crying.
Good-by, dear.
Your loving friend,
SANTA CLAUS.
(46)





























H~::




ii'


III


SANTA CLAUS AT SEA.


.r


"'
i.:~1


~


~r:c~c
-~-~
I-;-


b x'~`


R-k-n










Words by JAMES THOMSON. Music by T. CRAMPTON.


_--;. : ------------- _: -
p----i- --? -- "" I i --- --r,---- 1 --- I ---,--

Christ was born. In a low ly, hum le shed Was his man ger cra dle bed;
all from woe. When we deck each home this day With the hol ly and the bay,


(48)


Crtistmas (arol
























SUSY'S CHRISTMAS PRESENT.

"TELL us a story, nursie; please do," begged two little golden-
haired girls, as they snuggled on the soft rug before the fire. "Did
you ever have just what you wished for at Christmas, when you
were a little girl ?"
"Yes, I did once. I was the oldest, and had two brothers and
three little sisters. We did not have a beautiful home like this.
We lived in a little cottage. It was pretty, though, in the sum-
mer-time, when the roses and pinks were in bloom. My father
was dead, and mother worked for the rich people around the
village. There was plenty to do about holiday times.
"It was the day before Christmas. Mother was at the house of a
very rich and kind lady. She was going to have a grand party
in the evening.
Mother told me, when she went away, to- mind the children,
and perhaps I might have a nice Christmas present. I knew we
should have plenty of candy and cake, and other nice things, from
Mrs. Reid's. We often had pretty clothes, too, that Mamie and
Robbie Reid had outgrown.
"I had been wishing for a muff; but I knew mother could not
afford to buy one. It was hard enough even to get shoes for us
all. I thought I should have to be satisfied with mittens.
(49)






SUSY'S CHRLSTMAS PRESENT.


"It was quite dark, and we all sat around the fire. I had rocked
Tilly to sleep, and put her to bed. Willie and Joe were playing


cat's-cradle. The rest of us were making believe we were rich,
and could have all' we wanted for Christmas.
"All at once there was a heavy step on the porch, and a
knock at the door. I opened it with Margie and Amy clinging
to my dress. A boy shoved a big box into the room, and






SUSY'S CHRISTMAS PRESENT.


shouted, 'A Merry Christmas to you!' He then ran out at the
gate.
The box had all our names on the cover, and the children were
wild to see what was inside.
"' Wait till mother comes,' I said, and pretty soon we heard her
at the gate. She seemed surprised,
and said Santa Claus had remem-
bered us early. .l
"Mother advised us to go to bed
and wait until morning to see our
presents. It was pretty hard; but .
we had some oranges and candy,
and I put the boys to bed. Margie
and I wondered and guessed what
was in the box; but at last we fell
asleep.
You may be sure we were up
early in the morning. There were
dolls and toys for the little ones,
with hoods and mittens, and for me
a lovely squirrel muff, lined with
blue, with a soft little boa for my
neck. I was a happy girl that
Christmas, I can tell you.
"And now, my dears, you must
go to bed, or Santa Claus will .
not be able to find your stock- .
ings."
SOh, I hope I shall have what I want to-morrow!" said
Gracie.
And I, too," echoed Helen. And your story was very nice,
nursie."
Good-night, and call us early in the morning."
MRS. A. D. BELL.












AN OLD ENGLISH GAME.


HUNDREDS of years ago, even before any people but Indians lived
in America, the children used to play games, just as they do now. In
England they had plays for the little ones at Christmas, Michaelmas,
and other holidays. The young folks had "good times," just as they
do now, though not always in the same way.
Oliver Goldsmith wrote a great many poems, histories, and stories,
which are read now. One of them was the story called The Vicar
of Wakefield," which the little ones ought to read when they grow'
up. On Michaelmas-eve the vicar's family played "Blindman's Buff,"
" Hunt the Slipper," Hot Cockles," and, very likely, Snapdragon,"
for this last game was used on all such occasions.
The picture of Snapdragon, on another page, will almost explain
itself. A quantity of brandy is put in a shallow dish on the table.
Then they set the brandy on fire, for the alcohol in it will burn.
From the pan will rise a bluish blaze, into which some one drops
raisins, almonds, or sweetmeats. The game is to pick out the raisins,
or other eatables, and put them into the mouth. It is quite exciting,
and the little ones scream and laugh with delight. Of course they do
not burn their fingers very badly, or they would not laugh.
You may learn from the picture how people dressed in England
one or two hundred years ago. Perhaps you will be glad that you
do not have to wear such great, stiff collars as the children who are
playing the game. In those days the men did not wear trousers, as
they do now, but "tights" and "trunks," like the man-servant who is
bringing in the refreshments.
Papa and mamma in these times will not think that "Snapdragon"
is a very pretty game, for they all teach the little ones not to play
with fire. It is not a safe game, and it is just as well that it is not
used now in our homes.
UNCLE FORRESTER.
(52)


















































SNAPDRAGON.












A CHRISTMAS HYMN.


ON the marble steps of a mansion
The crimson-stained gas-light fell.
Through the half-opened door, on the perfumed air,
Came the music's tremulous swell,
While a childish voice sang, sweet and low,
The words of a hymn of long ago.

All within was the glitter of riches,
The gleam of soft velvet and gold;
But without crouched a form on the door-steps,
Clad in tatters, and shiv'ring with cold;
And the beggar-child sank down in the snow,
As she heard the sweet story of long ago.

And the words of the song kept saying
"Let the little ones come unto me."
So the ragged figure crept in through the door,
To see what the meaning might be.
And the child of wealth and the. child of woe
Sang together the song of the long ago.

When the song was hushed, the singer
Caught sight of the shivering form,
And the tender heart with pity was touched;
So she bade her come in from the storm,
And kind hands gave her dainties to eat,
And clad her in clothes soft and warm.
Then together they sang, in tones sweet and low,
The old, old story of long ago.
MISS V. STUART MOSBY.
































































A CHRISTMAS HYMN.


(55)





















CHRISTMAS CAROL.

THE children sing a carol clear,
On early Christmas morn,
Because it is the day on which
Our Saviour, Christ, was born.


The wondrous story o'er they tell,
Of the dear Saviour's birth:
Of how the angels came to say
That peace should reign on earth.


Of how the wise men travelled far
The infant Christ to see,
In the poor manger, where He lay
Upon His mother's knee.


And so at break of Christmas-day
They sing their carol sweet;
And ask a Christmas blessing
From every one they meet.


F. H. S.



























































(CrL


(57)






A GRAND SURPRISE.


MADGE and Edith and Helen had plenty of dolls to play with.
They had a baby-house, a pair of tame rabbits, and a big dog. They
rolled hoop, played at keeping store, and made mud-pies. But better
than anything else they liked to dress up in their Aunt Kate's
dresses and play they were ladies. Aunt Kate did not like to lend
her dresses, for they were always dusty when returned to her, and
sometimes were torn; and it was a good deal of trouble to put
them on the little girls, for of course they did not fit, and the sleeves
were too long. But the kind aunt did not know how to refuse the
children when they begged so hard.
"Make a train on my dress," Madge would always say; and then
Edith and Helen would beg for trains too.
"I wish there were trains to your own dresses," said Aunt Kate;
"then perhaps you wouldn't want mine so often."
"And we wish your dresses fitted us," said Madge; "all the waists
are too big."
While the little girl was speaking a bright idea came into Aunt
Kate's head. Christmas was near at hand, and she had been wonder-
ing what she could give the children, for they already had more toys
than they needed. Now she knew just what to give them.
She was shut up in her own room nearly all day for two weeks,
and kept the door locked. The little girls could not guess what she
was doing.
But on Christmas morning they had a grand surprise. Under the
stocking of each child lay a big pasteboard box. Madge opened hers
first, and found a lovely little dress of blue cashmere, which reached
to the floor in front, and had a long train at the back. The waist
was a perfect fit, and there was a little bonnet to match. Edith's suit
was cardinal, and Helen's was pink; and they had bonnets, too.
They could hardly wait until after breakfast, so anxious were they
to dress up in their new clothes.
"You couldn't have given us anything we would have liked better,
Aunt Kate," said Madge.
And Aunt Kate never again had to lend her dresses.
FLORENCE B. HALLOWELL.
























































AND PLAY THEY WERE LADIES.


"
`C~.h--~.


jn
'' .-l't-~
1 9; ~-~
p~~








OUR CHRISTMAS-TREE.









CHRISTIAS-time has come again!
What a joy for girls and boys,
With its snowballing and fun,
With its sleighing and its noise
Santa Claus's bag is full
Of the sweetest, loveliest things;
Dolls, like babies, beautiful,
Balls, and drums, and glittering rings.







Haste and get the little stockings,
Santa Claus you know don't stay;
Always he flies up the chimney
Ere it's light on Christmas-day.
And at night sweet little eyes
Shut as tight as tight can be.
Santa Claus don't like us looking,-
Leaves us nothing if we see.




-A ii e ,


(60)
















Oh, the candies! Oh, the apples!
Peeping from the stocking-top;
Nuts and raisins here in plenty,
Gorgeous-looking lumps of rock.
Oh, the dolls with golden tresses!
Oh, the glorious big drum!
Let us fill the air with shouting,
Dear old Christmas-time has come!








Every face is wreathed with gladness,
Oh, it is a sight to see
Such a set of lovely fairies
Dancing 'round the Christmas-tree!
Santa Claus has left his treasures
For his darlings, every one.'
Is not this a time of pleasures?
Dear old Christmas-time has come I
















II
\ -- ---i /


(61)



































I IL


(f-^
d.


(62)












LAST spring Nan Dale's
-:.. .' father gave her a small
.1, piece of ground in the garden, to do with as
'.. 0' she liked. It was right beside grandma's
.I ''. eamomile-bed, so that when Nan worked
,'.' ,'il'l. it. she had company. Grandma often
'l .ed her bed, and watered it, and picked
tljh- fragrant sprays.
Nan planted her ground with pansies and
-'IX. ~ -. t-peas. In due time great purple and
i-'" yellow and brown blossoms peeped
Through the green leaves. The peas
..'/ crept up the trellis Nan placed for
/'. them, covered with pale pink
,'".'1, flowers.
.'' A lady from the hotel, in her
'walks, had often noticed the little
-t J girl hard at work. One morning
S she stopped and begged a pansy
f or her hair, for which she gave
Nan a cent.
This gave the child an idea. That very morning she made a little
basketful of bouquets, a pansy, a sweet-pea blossom, and a sprig
of southernwood in each. She tied them with odd bits '.f bright rib-
bon, and took them down to the hotel. There were a-great many
ladies and gentlemen there who were ready to give her a cent, and
sometimes more, for the fragrant little bunches. And there was not
half enough to go around.
(63)







HOW NAN EARNED CHRISTMAS MONEY.


How rich Nan felt as she ran home, jingling the pennies in the
bottom of her basket!
She made bouquets every morning, as long as the flowers lasted.
That was a long time, for it seemed that the more Nan picked off the
more there were blossomed. At the end of the season there were


four dollars and fifteen cents in her store. All of it came from the
little flower-bed.
What did she do with it?
Well, Nan was a real little helper. For a long time she had
wished for money of her very own to buy Christmas gifts. By this
effort not too great for any little girl or boy to make she had
earned it herself.
CHRISTINE STEPHENS.




















THE DOLLS' CHRISTMAS PARTY.


IT was the week before Christmas, and the dolls in the toy-shop
played together all night. The biggest one was from Paris.
One night she said, We ought to have a party before Santa Claus
carries us away to the little girls. I can dance, and I will show you
how."
I can dance myself if you will pull the string," said a Jim
Crow" doll.
",What shall we have for supper?" piped a little boy-doll in a
Jersey suit. He was always thinking about eating.
"Oh, dear," cried the French lady, "I don't
know what we shall do for 1 supper "
"I can get the supper," added a big rag doll.
The other dolls- hld never- liked her
very well, but they
thanked her a now. She
had taken lessons at
a cooking- o'he school, and
knew how to coto make
cake and candy. She
gave French names to
everything she made,
and this made it taste
better. Old Mother Hubbard was there, and she said the rag
doll did not know how to cook anything.
(65)






THE DOLLS' GHRISTMAS PARTY.


They danced in one of the great shop-windows. They opened a
toy piano, and a singing-doll played Comin' through the Rye."
The dolls did not find that a good tune to dance
by; but the lady did not know any other, S-% although
she was the most costly doll in the shop. Then they
w,:ui ,d up .1 rusi- :,:.., ,I ..-. .' danced by
thlit. This dli ir w -1. for some
t,: t '. .-they had
t.:. w 1. 1r around
h ii en i played "Hail
C'. tl" l..i..i "-;-.1 and wait for
iIvet h i ,- .;-' ...' else.
Thi: --Jium ('row" doll had
t. .:. I y himself, for
c,. ,_i- ,:oul: ,1 nothing but a
I, e k-, I n.' He would
,4 1nt d t.ltie at all unless
"ik -:aine tile pulled his
triln.. A toy monkey
S.lidi this.: but he would
H ot ist ::op when the
Li. t to er was tired.
n Tl i- had supper on
i .ie ---t the counters.
'- _- .-_ doll placed
wa ,ye uJti xes for tables.
Th11 supper was of
cav f.' there w-a, nothing in the
shop to eat but sugar hearts and eggs. The dolls
like candy better than 'q i, anything else, and the
supper was splendid. Patsy '.V McQuirk said he could not
eat candy. He wanted to -4 know what kind of a sup-
per it was without any pota- toes. He got very angry,
put his hands into his pockets, and smoked his pipe. It
was very uncivil for him to do so in company. The smoke
made the little ladies sick, and they all tried to climb into a





THE DOLLS' CHRISTMAS PARTY.

"horn of plenty" to
get out of tihe w:iy.
.i 0- Mother Huiil..ard
.r and the tw''',.. I .k
waiters trie'l to 'ini
CI loveLittle PI UV\-"
but the tall one in 1-
brigand ha- ,:,-en,-:l
*, his mouth vm i.le. Ih-I t
the small d-.l1iie:
were -afra iil
they mig-it
fall into it.
"' The clown
both arms
der, and .$ /
tlh, ii:x i:m .:- ui' as high as
to l,:,k duwii iuLo the fellow's 1. .
All the baby-dolls in caps
drsses.. hnd
bed.,:l. Tli,_v w


the others were
at supper,
and began
to cry. The
Sbig doll
brought
them some
candy, and
that kept
them quiet
for some time.
The next morning a
little girl found the toy
pi, no open. She was sure the
dolls had been playing on it. The


VIf


110 won-
J 'ick in

throat.
Sd long
been put to
oke up when






GRANDMA'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS.


grown-up people thought it had been left open the night be-
fore; but they do not understand dolls as well as little people
do.
VIOLA ROSEBOROUGH.













GRANDMA'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS.

GRANDMA BURNS sat knitting busily in the sun one bright morn-
ing the week before Christmas. The snow lay deep, and the hard
crust glistened like silver. All at once she heard little sighs of grief
outside her door. When she opened it there sat Peter and Jimmy
Rice, two very poor little boys, with their faces in their hands; and
they were crying.
"My patience cried grandma. What can be the matter with
two bright little boys this sunny morning ? "
We don't have no good times," sighed little Peter.
"We can't slide. We haven't any sleds," whimpered Jimmy.
Why, of course boys can't have a good time without sleds," said
grandma, cheerily. "Let us look about and see if we can't find
something." And grandma's cap-border bobbed behind barrels and
boxes in the shed and all among the cobwebs in the garret; but
nothing could be found suitable.
"Hum I do believe this would do for little Pete;" and the dear
old lady drew a large, pressed-tin pan off the top shelf in the pantry.
A long, smooth butter-tray was found for Jimmy. Grandma shook
her cap-border with laughter to see them skim over the hard crust






GRANDMA'S CHRISTMAS GIFTS.


in their queer sleds. And the boys shouted and swung their hands
as they flew past the window.
"I do expect they'll wear 'em about through," murmured grand-
ma; "but boys must slide,-that's certain."
And the pan was scoured as bright as a new silver dollar and the
red paint was all gone off the wooden tray when Peter and Jimmy
brought their sleds back.
Grandma knitted faster than ever all that day, and her face was



















bright with smiles. She was planning something. She went to see
Job Easter that night. He promised to make two small sleds for the
pair of socks she was knitting.
When the sleds were finished she dyed them red and drew a yellow
horse upon each one. Grandma called them horses, but no one would
have suspected it. Then the night before Christmas she drew on her
great socks over her shoes to keep her from slipping, put on her hood
and cloak, and dragged the little sleds over to Peter and Jimmy's
house.
She hitched them to the door-latch, and went home laughing all
the way.








SANTA CLAUS'S LETTER.


CHRISTMAS was coming. Jamie and Ted had already begun to
write long letters to Santa Claus. But one thing was rather queer:
both boys asked him for the same things.
Each little letter ended with, -" Just like brother's."


They agreed to ask for only one sled. They would rather ride
together. Now, was not this very sweet and loving?
One night, after they had gone to bed, Jamie said, Ted, if Santa
Claus brings us skates, Jim can teach us.how to use them."
Oh, yes; and if we get fur mittens, it will be such fun to make
a fort."
And a snow-man," Jamie answered.
Ted went on: "I'll always ride the sled down a hill, and you
can ride it up."
I guess you won't," Jamie said, speaking loudly.
(70)






SANTA CLAUS'S LETTER.


"Why not ?" Ted asked.
Because it '11 be as much my sled as yours."
"Yes, 'course," Ted replied; "but I chose it first."
"You are a selfish boy said Jamie.
Well, then, so are you! "
"I don't care. I won't sleep with you. I'll ask mamma if I
can't have the first pick; I'm the biggest," roared Jamie, bounding
out of bed.
"You're a big, crosscry-baby!" Ted shouted, jumping out after his
brother.
Away ran Jamie to mamma, with Ted at his heels. Both were angry.
Both talked at once.
Mamma was grieved.
Her dear little boys had
never been so unkind to
each other before. She
kissed their hot faces and
stroked their pretty hair.
She told them how their
naughty words hurt her.
She showed them how
displeased God was to
see two little brothers
quarrel.
That night they went L..:
to sleep in each other's
arms, full of love and ,f
forgiveness.
Christmas morning
came at last. Very early
the boys crept out of bed
just to "feel" their
stockings.
Papa heard them, and, remembering that he was once a boy,
lighted the gas.
Each little red stocking was full from toe to top. Boxes and






A CHRISTMAS CAROL.


paper parcels were piled around them. Such shouting! Such a
good time! It seemed as if all their letters had been answered.
Suddenly Jamie cried, Oh, Ted, here's a letter "
They put their little heads together, and with papa's help spelled
this out:

"MY DEAR BOs, No sled this year. It quarrelled so, I was
afraid to bring it. I dropped it off the load about a week ago.
Get ready for it next year. Merry Christmas
"SANTA CLAUS."
C. EMMA CHENEY.



A CHRISTMAS CAROL.

WE'RE little lads and lassies gay,
Pray to our song give ear;
We've come a long and snowy way
To sing of Christmas cheer.

There's no day half so dear and glad,
Alike to young and old;
We pray that no one may be sad,
Or want for lack of gold.

That each may have a merry heart
To greet this merry day,
And pass a happy greeting on
To all who come their way.

For Christmas is no time for woe,
'Tis a day for joy and cheer;
It comes with wreathing greens and snow
To round the happy year.
L. A. FRANCE.






























/


(73)


ii,,
" Jii:







A CHRISTMAS PROBLEM.


"WHAT do you think my grandmother said,
Telling Christmas stories to me
To-night, when I went and coaxed and coaxed,
Laying my head upon her knee ?


" She thinks (she really told me so)
That good Saint Nicholas, long ago,
Was old and gray
As he is to-day, -
Going around with his loaded sleigh,
(74)







A CHRISTMAS PROBLEM.


Wrapped about with his robe of fur;
With lots of frolic, and fun, and stir,
A cheery whoop and a merry call,-
,_ Amui never a jolly boy at all!

'* "She thinks he's driven through frost and
Snows,
S As every Christmas comes and goes, ,
t '' With jingling bells and a bag of toys,
Ho, ho! for good little girls and boys,
tWith a carol gay
And a Clear the way!
t For a rollicking, merry Christmas-
day, -
SWith just exactly the same reindeers
Prancing on, for a thousand years!

"Grandmother knows 'most everything, -
All that I ask her she can tell;
Rivers and towns in geography,
And the hardest words she can always spell.
But the wisest ones, sometimes they say. ..
Mistake, and even grandmother may! '

"If Santa Claus never had been a boy
How would he always know so well
What all the boys are longing for
On Christmas-day,- can grandmother '" l
tell ?,

"Why does he take the shiny rings,
And baby -houses, and dolls with.
curls,
And dainty lockets, and necklaces,
Never to boys, but all to girls ?







76 A CHRISTMAS PROBLEM

"Why does he take the skates and
sleds,
The bats and balls, and arrows
and bows,
And trumpets, and drums, and guns
hurrah!
To all the boys, -does grand-
mother know?


"But there is a thing that puzzles
me,-
When Santa Claus was a boy at .
play,
And hung a stocking on Christmas-
eve,
Who could have filled it for Christmas-day?"
SYDNEY DAYRE.








































































SANTA CLAUS AT THE SOUTH.


(77)


k I -a


















A u r .i ." i'..1 i ." : -















CLT,.'K wel t, the b, elan, then Hal-






' .'. By one une',. ma plhinlv f r .ly
A" Ar d th,:n,---r,,,-,d--y."


(78)






A MESSAGE TO SANTA CLAUS.


October saw the red leaves fall,
.And fade like dying ember:
No bird to help-meet chirped his call
In leaden-skied December.


But Christma's-1da wa drawiner near, -
That dlAy t old Kri.s Kriii..le.
When .lhiidre-n lie- ..,wake to hliearz
The t'iry sleih-el'l-~- jingle.

Click went the bell. and tlien -- Halloo !"
"Is that you, D)d All liiht:
Tell Santa Claus just whlio. tI,, o.
So he won't mis ie C'hrist-
mas night."

Her little message, i:iuaint
and queer,
Came to her earthly taither's
ear.
He smiled, but
_.--- -. :: -_ - ..-- ----
sent back this reply. ..
"I'll speak to Santa by v
and by."
-


- _-





80 MESSAGE TO SANTA CLAUS.

.And now dear Chri-t.nlas-d:lv is here; :
; Don't CLil to come, Kri-sM Krinijge,
Foir -l-epy children wake to hear
x Your tiny .skii-lel,_ jingl,- .


A winsome -sprite. in bed-gown white,
A: darling little daughter,
Crept, out of bed before daylight,
To see what Santa brought her.


SHe had not missed the house at all;
Her .-t.,cking-'-soon she found it,
; #" And it was full, but oh! so small,
SAnd gifts were piled all round it.


SThe t.elepl:ihne is in the hall,
And. matter Ireakfast, there's a call.


A little girl cried out Halloo!"
"Tlihanks. Dod ; 1my presents came all right; '
You tiol good- Santa where to go,
And he was in my room Inst 'uniht.


"I wish yv"1 'merry Christm as ti".o,
For that's ju't all that I- :an do."
EGBERT L. BANGO -




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