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The Arcadian ( December 30, 1964 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Arcadian
Uniform Title:
Arcadian (Arcadia, Fla.)
DeSoto sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
DeSoto County Pub. Co., Inc.
Place of Publication:
Arcadia DeSoto County Fla
Creation Date:
December 30, 1964
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly[jan. 13, 1927-<1997>]
weekly[ former -feb. 18, 1926]
semiweekly[ former feb. 23, 1926-jan. 7, 1927]
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Arcadia (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- De Soto County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- De Soto -- Arcadia
Coordinates:
27.2175 x -81.86

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved. Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579554
oclc - 33424602
notis - ADA7400
lccn - sn 95047230
System ID:
UF00079901:00072

Related Items

Preceded by:
De Soto County news
Preceded by:
Arcadia enterprise

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Arcadian
Uniform Title:
Arcadian (Arcadia, Fla.)
DeSoto sun herald
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
DeSoto County Pub. Co., Inc.
Place of Publication:
Arcadia DeSoto County Fla
Creation Date:
December 30, 1964
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly[jan. 13, 1927-<1997>]
weekly[ former -feb. 18, 1926]
semiweekly[ former feb. 23, 1926-jan. 7, 1927]
weekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Arcadia (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- De Soto County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- De Soto -- Arcadia
Coordinates:
27.2175 x -81.86

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved. Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579554
oclc - 33424602
notis - ADA7400
lccn - sn 95047230
System ID:
UF00079901:00072

Related Items

Preceded by:
De Soto County news
Preceded by:
Arcadia enterprise


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Full Text

PAGE 1

Serving DeSoto County since 1887 ARCADIANThursday, October 31, 2013 24 pages / 50 centsTEEN DRIVING CHALLENGEDeSoto teens learn the hazards of impaired or distracted driving.PAGE 8 A section of the SunINSIDE Arcadian 50 Editorial ...............4 Calendar ..............6 Family Album ..........7 Police Beat ............8 Obituaries .............9 Religion ..............10 Sports ...............14 Agriculture ...........18 CLUTTERBUGS: New business will ehlp bust that clutter ................................................. 5 RICHARDSON RETURNS: James RIchardson is welcomed back to Arcadia .................................. 10 OPERA HOUSE ARTIST: Featuring Diana Croys ethereal, mystical landscapes .............................. 22 ARCADIAN PHOTO BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.comThe 2013 DeSoto County volleyball team and their District 5A-11 trophy. Turn to page 14 for more.Lady Bulldogs: Queens of the court In Judi Jankoskys waning hours as Arcadia City Administrator Oct. 18, she approved generous severance packages for ve department heads and raises for 23 city employees. A stunned and frustrated City Council gathered during a special meeting Tuesday to clean up the mess the former city manager left behind. Interim Administrator Tom Slaughter presented a detailed summary of Jankoskys actions, along with options and recommendations from staff for solutions to each situation.ResignationsSlaughter began by addressing Jankoskys acceptance of resignations from City Clerk Gia Lancaster and Finance Director Renee Green. He said although Lancasters resignation was given without notice, Jankosky offered her six months of city health benets, four weeks of severance pay totaling nearly $4,000 and eligibility for unemployment compensation. The move conicts with Section 22.10 of the citys Personnel Policy Manual, which states, Resignation without a written, minimum two-week notice also waives the employees right to payment for and all leave balances, benets and future Council addresses city hall exodusBy STEVE BAUERARCADIAN ASSISTANT EDITORre-employment. Slaughter said staffs recommendation was to deny Lancaster all benets provided by Jankosky. Councilman Bob Heine moved to deny the benets, saying, I asked her three times in the past few weeks if she was staying, and she told me she loved it here, wanted to stay and retire here. The next thing I know, shes gone. Councilman Keith Keene seconded the motion, saying, its pretty clear the policy speaks for itself. The council voted unanimously to deny Lancaster any benets. Although Green also tendered her resignation Oct. 18, Slaughter said she has offered to stay on until at least Nov. 30 to assist with the citys nancial matters until a replacement can be hired and trained. Green also declined a pay raise offered by Jankosky, saying it would not be proper for her to accept it. One item Green did request in her resignation, however, was an additional six months of paid city health insurance after her departure. Jankosky approved the request, but when questioned during the meeting Slaughter said the decision to award or deny the request will be deferred because Green is still currently with the city. The council also accepted the resignation of Administration and Planning Specialist Christi Pence. She tendered her resignation effective Nov. 7. Pences resignation is not directly associated with Jankoskys Oct. 18 actions.LayoffsOn the same day Human Resources Director Sandy Vitella and Public Works Director Cathy Miller were laid off by Jankosky. In the termination letters to both employees, Jankosky cited an increase in the citys health insurance costs as the reason for the layoffs. In Millers ter mination letter, Jankosky also included that the rehire of Steve Underwood as wastewater plant supervisor prevented the need for her position as Public Works Director. The severance packages offered to both women were identical: six months of paid health insurance, four weeks severance pay, eligibility for unemploy ment and the option to be rehired by the city. Slaughter said according to city policy, all layoff agreements must be reviewed by the citys attorney before they can be offered, and he was unaware whether Jankosky had ever talked with city attorney T.J. Wohl about it. Wohl conrmed he had not been consulted EXODUS | 2The Mosaic Co. announced plans Monday to acquire CF Industries phosphate operations, which company ofcials say would make Mosaic the only phosphate company operating in central and south Florida. The sale, which Mosaic expects to be ofcially approved by the Department of Justice by the summer of 2014, will allow Mosaic to cancel the construction of a $1 billion beneciation plant in Ona to separate phosphate from soil. Instead, Mosaic will expand the existing CF beneciation plant in Hardee County. The deal will also likely delay the opening of a mine in DeSoto County, which was slated to open by 2021. Mosaic paid $1.4 billion, including $200 million reserved for the long-term care of CF Industries phosphogypsum stacks a radioactive byproduct of phosphate mining in Plant City and Bartow. Bo Davis, senior vice president of operations for Mosaic, said in a telephone press conference that the deal would push (the DeSoto mine) out past the 2021 period that we looked at but we have not looked at that totally and denitively. We still have work to do on it. DeSoto ofcials were not concerned the sale would adversely affect employ ment opportunities in the county. Were still talking about something thats seven or eight years out, Mandy Hines, DeSoto County coordinator, said, referring to the proposed mine, and pointed out that with the Mosaic to buy CF IndustriesBy IAN ROSSSTAFF WRITERMOSAIC | 3 Ftc l D I ANF 2N 1-!" VAf If yy 2 {< Fi rzG7 -052521,516216

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Arcadian | Page 2 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 The DeSoto Memorial Hospital board of directors voted 4-2 to change the hospitals contributions to its employee retirement plans. Currently, the hospital provides a four percent contribution to its employees retirement plans, regardless of whether they contribute or not. Under the new policy, which is effective Jan. 1, the hospital will match employee contributions up to three percent. The move was not without opposition, as board members Jerry Waters and Dan Presilla voiced their concerns over further cutting employee benets in order to save the hospital money. We need to explore options to put the onus on something other than our employees, Waters said. Were asking them to donate part of their future, and Im very uncomfortable with that. Presilla wanted the board to have the ability to increase retirement contributions once the hospital becomes profitable again. Can we put some type of time limit on this, that if someday if we make money, then Id like to go back to the original four percent. He also requested the board enact a policy that requires them to review the contribution program annually at a minimum. Human Resources Director Lois Hilton said a new policy can be created with exibility built in, allowing the board to modify it as needed. That will not be a problem; we can make it so the plan can be adjusted according to the boards wishes, she said. Currently, about half of the employees contribute to their own retirement,. The hospital contributes about $426,000 annually. With the policy change the hospital could save $200,000 if participation numbers remain constant. Among other options available to the board was the choice to suspend the retirement plan indenitely, which would result in a savings of approximately $500,000. In other business, DMH CEO Vince Sica said he recently attended a conference to learn what effect the Affordable Health Care Act would have on hospitals in the region. There were many concerns regarding what impact the Obamacare subsidies would have, and how much insurance rates would increase in the near future, he said. Sica said about 1,500 DeSoto County residents would be eligible for Obamacare subsidies. Sica also reported the hospitals outpatient service revenue has been increasing, and DMH is looking to reduce the number of people admitted to the hospital from outpatient services. Hospital cuts retirement contributionsBy STEVE BAUERARCADIAN ASSISTANT EDITOR Strolling 4 A Cure will hold its fourth annual walk on Saturday at the Brookside Bluff Community. The event is a fundraiser to help pay for cancer screenings for DeSoto and Hardee county residents. To date, Strolling 4 A Cure has helped to pay for 20 mammograms. A portion of the proceeds will go to the Arcadia Tidewell Hospice House. The event, started in 2010, is the idea of Janet Preston, whose sister, Susan Buehler, passed away from cancer in 2008. Preston is also dedicating this years walk to her father who recently lost his own battle. Registration begins at 9 a.m. and the walk commences shortly after. There will be individual challenges, music and lots of fun. Walkers are encouraged to raise $30 each ($15 for children under 16). There will also be door prizes and a reverse auction. Plan to attend a great community event to help your fellow residents. For more information, call 863-303-1690 or email Janet at strolling4acure@hotmail.com.Strolling 4 A Cure is SaturdayBY JANET PRESTON about the offers. Yes, I can conrm that I was not aware of any layoff agreements for Ms. Vitella or Ms. Miller, he said. Slaughter said one legal remedy the city could pursue was to offer both employees open positions within the city. Based on her skill set, Vitella could be offered the position of planning specialist, and Miller a labor position in the Public Works Department. Both positions would no longer be management roles, and would be at a reduced salary. Our recommendation is to offer both employees these positions, and if they refuse, then proceed to deny them the previous severance offers, he said. Wohl said he agreed with Slaughter that the move was legal and recommended it be approved Mayor Alice Frierson said she thought it was strange that Vitella was one of the employees who had been giving a pay increase, saying she heard Vitella had rst had handed in a resignation letter but then asked for it back. Councilman Joe Fink said he also heard Vitella was preparing to resign, but changed her mind at the last moment. Slaughter said he, too, heard that but had not found any documentation to prove Vitella had attempted to resign. Well, thats because she literally went back and grabbed the physical letter from ofce staff, Frierson said. Fink then moved to recommend the transfer offer to both employees, with the understanding that if they refuse re-employment, all benets would be denied. Council unanimously approved the motion. Pay raise dilemmaThe toughest decision the council faced Tuesday was Jankoskys approval of 23 pay raises to various city employ ees. The raises ranged from 50 cents to $3 per hour, and including payroll taxes would cost the city approximately $75,000. The only employee who rejected a pay increase was Green. Slaughter said there was no indication that any evaluations were performed to justify the increases. He learned from discussions with several city employees that many of the raises were negotiated during their hire to coincide with the employees passing the citys standard probationary period for new hires. He also noted the personal action forms that approved the raises were signed off by Jankosky more than a month ago, but not presented to staff until Oct. 18. During our review of the les, most of them were signed off and dated over the course of several days in mid-September, he said. I have no idea why they were not given to staff until Oct. 18. There was no advance notice or written explanation for justifying the raises and there is no indication a merit system was involved. In fact, there were several employees who received nothing. Wohl said the only two legal ways pay increases can be implemented is if they are recommended and approved by council, or if they are approved as part of the budget process. Those are the only two avenues available when it comes to provided pay increases, he said. The councils decision became even more difcult when Frierson asked if the pay raises have been implemented, and Accounting Clerk Ashley Killmon indicated employees received the raises effective Oct. 1. Although acknowledging the negative impact retracting the raises would have on city employees, Fink said the city needs to follow mandated protocol. The state is clear that any raises need to be based on merit. We need to follow the methodology, he said. Heine agreed, saying the council recently denied Arcadia Police Department Marshal Matt Andersons request for pay increases for several ofcers receiving promotions. I want the record to show we have not allowed raises to anyone during this time. We should go by the book; we have to be fair to everyone. Council learned some of the raises might have been meant to compensate employees who suffered pay cuts when their overtime or on-call pay was curtailed. Other raises might have been meant to increase supervisors pay above that of supervised employees. But no documents explaining the raises has been found. Council asked the Finance Department to conrm whether the increases were an increase to the city budget, or merely a transfer of money from one department to another. Council voted unanimously to table the issue until its Nov. 5 meeting to allow time to calculate the impact the pay raises would have on the budget.Staffing changesSlaughter also proposed a plan to ll the vacancies left by the recent departures. His rst recommendation was to transfer Code Enforcement ofcer Carl McQuay to the position of interim city planner. Slaughter said McQuay satises the educational requirements needed for the job, and has prior experience in the areas of land use regulations, public hearings and development applications. He also mentioned McQuays pay would be split between the APD and the city. Instead of replacing Vitellas position, Slaughter said he would like to split her duties three ways among current administration and nance employ ees. Insurance would be handled by Killmon, payroll would be taken over by Carol Jones in Administration and Shelley Peacock from Public Works would be in charge of personnel. Slaughter said the move makes sense because all three have prior experience handling these tasks. These employees will receive out-ofclass pay for the extra duties they are taking on, but it wont affect the budget because the funding will come from the salary of my vacated position as city planner, he said. The council unanimously approved Slaughters recommendations. Two key positions that need to be lled immediately are city clerk and nance director. Slaughter asked the council for guidance on advertising and recruitment for the positions,. He suggested forming an in-house committee to help interview prospective employees, along with working closely with County Administrator Guy Maxcy to nd qualied candidates. Keene told Slaughter it was up to him to decide the best direction to take to ll the positions quickly. its incumbent on you to advertise these positions, Keene said. I like the idea of an in-house committee, but we all know time is of the essence here.Preventing future incidentsBefore adjourning, Frierson said the council was completely stunned by the events of Oct. 18. I want everyone to know this council was completely blindsided by this. We had no knowledge of anything until Monday, she said. To the council, we might want to have a discussion in the near future on how to prevent something like this from ever happening again. After the meeting, Wohl said the city isnt considering taking legal action against Jankosky. Unfortunately this isnt an uncommon in city government, he said. We have no plans to pursue her from a legal standpoint, but if in the future we discover something illegal did take place, our position could change. Jankosky did not return several calls from the Arcadian for comment. EXODUSFROM PAGE 1 50457207 NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP The Board of County Commissioners of DeSoto County, Florida will hold a Public Workshop on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at 10:30 AM or as soon thereafter as it may be heard in the County Commission Meeting Room 103, Administration Building 201 East Oak Street Arcadia Florida, to receive a report from the Fire Committee and to discuss Public Safety issues. If special accomodations are required in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, individuals should contact the County Administrators Office by calling 863-993-4800 at least forty-eight hours prior to the meeting.

PAGE 3

The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 3 | Arcadian The DeSoto Arts and Humanities Council is getting ready to paint the town red and alizarin crimson, quinacridone orange, Paynes Gray and hansa yellow. On Nov. 16, DACH is hosting its first-ever Arcadia Plein Air PaintOut, when several artists will spread throughout downtown Arcadia to paint the scenes they see, and compete for cash prizes. Plein Air is French for painting outdoors, and the plein air movement has been growing in this country in recent years. Because of the variety of interesting architecture, from the imposing courthouse to charming Victorian homes, artists are expected to nd many intriguing subjects. DAHC President Jane Hilton said, We talked with some avid plein air artists in Charlotte County, where theres a whole group of painters who work outdoors. They agreed Arcadia had a lot to offer, so the idea of having a plein air competition was born. The event will take place on Nov. 16. Artists will sign in that morning, have their canvas or paper stamped, and find a place to paint. To help them, DAHC has prepared a map of downtown with suggested locations, although artists arent limited to only those sites. The entry fee is only $20 for those who pay by Nov. 4. Artists may work in a variety of media, including oil, acrylics, water colors or mixed media. They can paint several pieces, but will select two for the contest. They will frame them (so artists must come prepared with framing materials, or have made advance arrangements with a local framer). The paintings will then be hung at the Martin Art Gallery, and well known professional artist Joseph Palmerio, from Sarasota, will judge the entries. In the evening, a reception will be held and prizes will be awarded: $200 for first place, $100 for second, $50 for third and $150 for Peoples Choice, to be voted on by everyone attending the reception. Artists can set prices for their work and sales will be encouraged. Plein air has become popular in recent years there is even a magazine devoted strictly to painting out-of-doors. We hope to capitalize on this interest, Hilton said, and draw artists from all over the area. Once theyre here, of course, we hope they enjoy Arcadias charming historic structures. The DeSoto County Tourism Development Department awarded DAHC a matching grant of up to $750 funded solely by the bed tax to help the council advertise and promote the event. The aim is to draw more people to the area. For those who have not experi enced this type of painting before, noted plein air painter Sharon Yarbrough from Charlotte County will be giving a workshop on techniques on Saturday. Her website at http:// sharonyarbrough.fineartstudioonline. com displays her skills in this method of painting. Artists will come equipped with their supplies (a list of recommended materials is included on DAHCs website), and Yarbrough will give tips and critiques. For a $25 fee, artists receive advice, encouragement and lunch, too. For more information and to sign up and pay online, visit http:// desotoartscouncil.org/events.html.Outdoor artists to compete in ArcadiaBy SUSAN E. HOFFMANARCADIAN EDITOR ARCADIAN PHOTOS BY SUSAN E. HOFFMANPort Charlotte artist Sharon Yarbrough paints a scene in downtown Arcadia. She will be teaching a workshop in plein air painting Saturday in Arcadia, in advance of the Arcadia Plein Air Paint-out, set for Nov. 16 and hosted by DeSoto Arts and Humanities Council. PHOTO PROVIDEDA scene on Polk Avenue, Arcadia as painted by Sharon Yarbrough. DeSoto General Manager .................. Joe Gallimore .........................................863-494-2434 Arcadian Editor / Art Director ............. Susan E. Hoffman .................................863-494-0300 Assistant Editor .................................... Steve Bauer ............................................863-494-0300 Office Manager / Advertising ........... Tami Jewell ...........................................863-494-2434 Graphic Artist / Customer Service ..... Jackie Bierman ......................................863-494-2434 Graphic Artist / Page Designer .......... Kyle Gallimore .......................................863-494-0300 SUN NEWSPAPERSMember of the Audit Bureau of Circulation DeSOTO CIRCULATIONCustomer Service863-494-2434Fax: 863-494-3533 tjewell@sun-herald.com jbierman@sun-herald.com DISPLAY ADVERTISINGDeSoto ...............................863-494-2434 Joe Gallimore jgallimore@sun-herald.com Susan Hoffman shoffman@sun-herald.com Steve Bauer sbauer@sun-herald.com Tami Jewell tjewell@sun-herald.com Jackie Bierman jbierman@sun-herald.com Kyle Gallimore kgallimore@sun-herald.com DEADLINESEditorial: Monday Noon Classified & Legal Ads: Wednesday 11 a.m. Display Ads: Friday 5 p.m. (or Noon Monday for camera ready ads only) Classified & Legal Advertising 863-494-2434Fax: 863-494-3533 jbierman@sun-herald.com ONLINE www.yoursun.net Like The Arcadian on Facebook development of a mining operation on this scale, any number of factors could delay it. Rather than worry about whether the mine is delayed, Hines said a large part of the working population is nearing retirement, and they will create openings as they leave. As for the Hardee County plant, Hines said the county is focusing more on what theyre trying to construct in DeSoto when considering the local job market. Hines also said DeSoto County is try ing to look beyond mining to increase job opportunities, and is using redevelopment funds to invest in economic growth initiatives. Mining might bring great job prospects, but its not a forever x, she said. Davis said the assets Mosaic purchased included a 22,000-acre South Pasture mine and beneciation plant in Hardee County, a phosphate manufacturing facility in Plant City, and an ammonia terminal and warehouses in Tampa. Davis said that as a result of the agreement CF Industries will be basically out of the phosphate business but still operating as a nitrate business. The nearest competing phosphate company, Potashcorp, has operations in White Springs, Fla. It was not immediately clear whether the purchase would lead to layoffs. Davis said the new employees Mosaic will acquire are very much a part of the assets that we need to run the business and the operations once this is approved. When asked whether any job loss was anticipated, Davis said, We still have to go through the integration process to see if there are any overlaps or overlays, but I wouldnt expect there to be much overlap there.Email: iross@sun-herald.comMOSAICFROM PAGE 1 1121 E. Oak St., Arcadia, FL 863-494-4404 Open 24 Hours 7 Days a Week! $5.99 LUNCH SPECIALS 11AM-4PM 1 Cup of Soup & 1/2 Sandwich (Tuna, Ham, Turkey) Fries, Onion Rings or Slaw 2 Bistro Ham & Swiss Sandwich, Fries, Onion Rings or Slaw 3 Veggie Plate OR Fried okra, fried eggplant, cucumbers, tomato or onions 4 Turkey Rueben Sandwich. Fries, Onion Rings or Slaw 5 Crispy Chicken Wrap. Fries, Onion Rings or Slaw CARRY OUT AVAILABLE Two Dinners, One Price $19.59 24 hrs 1 N.Y. Strip Steak 2 Chicken Tenders 3 Roast Turkey 4 Chicken-N-Shrimp 5 Pork Chops 6 Grilled Tilapia Your choice of 2 sides, soup or salad and pudding or ice cream Add a coffee, tea or soda to both meals for $1.99 BREAKFAST SPECIALS Mon-Fri, 6AM-3PM 1 Clock Touchdown Breakfast 2 eggs, 2 pancakes, 2 links, 2 bacon.........$4.99 2 1/2 order Biscuits & Gravy w/coffee, tea or soda.......................................$4.99 3 Country Fried Steak & Eggs 2 eggs, potato or grits & toast or biscuit..$5.99 4 Spanish or Ham-N-Cheese Omelet w/potato or grits $ toast or biscuit...$5.99 5 Bagel-N-Cream Cheese, Fruit Cup w/coffee, tea or soda..........................$4.99 ALL YOU CAN EAT FISH OR SHRIMP! Friday & Saturday Nights Choose from Fried Swai Fish, Shrimp or Tilapia Served with fries and cole slaw Add $2 for beverages including water (No sharing please) $ 7 99 GOLFERS Bring in your completed score card and receive 10% discount on your entire bill! 50457184 II

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VIEWPOINT DeSoto The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Arcadian | Page 4Derek Dunn-Rankin President David Dunn-Rankin Publisher Chris Porter Executive editor Brian Gleason Editorial page editor E-mail letters to letters@sun-herald.com | OUR VIEW | GRITS & PIECES A woman scorned leaves the city in chaosOur view: Council made sound choices to undo the damage and resolve the dilemma logically.That loud sucking sound you heard was the vacuum created at City Hall by the sudden departures of several key city staff. Along with the City Administrator Judi Jankosky, Arcadia lost Public Works Director Cathy Miller, Human Resources Director Sandy Vitella, and City Clerk Gia Lancaster. And Finance Director Renee Green submitted her resignation, too, although she graciously gave ample notice and agreed to stick around to help us through this rough patch. Some of the recently departed hoped to take some nice benets with them. As we learned over the past few days, Jankoskys nal act was giving them generous severance payments (generally four weeks of their current pay), six months of city-supplemented insurance benets, and a promise the city would not object to them ling for unemployment compensation benets. And for Gia Lancaster, who resigned without giving the required two-week notice, Jankosky said it didnt matter, and authorized generous benets, despite city policy to the contrary. For those whose positions were terminated (Miller and Vitella), Jankosky said because of insurance premium hikes, the city could no longer afford to pay them and had to let them go. For Miller, she also noted that, with Steve Underwood (who was previously red by Miller) coming back, the city couldnt afford to pay her and him. Are you wondering why, if the city cant afford to keep these people, it could nevertheless give them something in the neighborhood of $35,000 to $50,000 in parting gifts? On top of those generous payments, Jankosky also gave several city employees raises ranging from 50 cents to $3 per hour. The raises to 22 employees could amount to an estimated $50,000 more per year. Jankosky may have thought she had the last laugh. A review of the records including emails exchanged on city accounts among the key staffers, and personnel les reveals a very curious chain of events. The raises, it seems, were noted as effective in September, weeks before they were ofcially bestowed by Jankosky or recorded in the personnel les. Whats not recorded in the personnel les are any evaluations or other justications for these raises. If youre thinking this does not add up, you are right. First, some of these steps are contrary to the citys own employment policy. For instance, Section 22.10 says, if someone resigns, they must give at least two weeks notice in order to be eligible for the balance of their leave (sick/vacation time), any post-employment benets, and eligibility for reemployment with the city. Section 22.15 of the manual says any separation agreement must rst be reviewed the city attorney. Neither of those steps seems to have been followed. Clearly, city council has its work cut out for it as does the Interim City Administrator, Tom Slaughter, who seems to have inherited this mess through no fault of his own. But Slaughter and the remaining city staff did a terric job of investigating the facts, assembling the paper | LETTERS TO THE EDITORAnti-Americans are at workEditor: I believe it is time that the elector ate in this nation wakes up and if the awakening has to start within a city as small as Arcadia, so be it. In the words of Joseph Stalin during World War II, many years ago: Well never have to engage the United States militarily, because they will destroy themselves through their political and educational system. This present administration, forget Democrats, Republicans, Conservative etc., this administration is leading this country down the road to oblivion. All citizens, whether they be black, white, or Hispanics better wake up. This President we have now is the epitome of narcissism. He is not a leader, he does not know what he is doing. Has anyone ever asked themselves where did a man without experience of any kind get to be president of the United States? Obama and his administration, not all Democrats or Republicans but this particular Administration is bent on destroy ing our Constitutional form of government. Its been a long time coming but Joe Stalin was right. The anti-Americans put their chess piece in place and are relying on an ignorant electorate to obtain their goal. Those who are still alive since World War II* know exactly what I am talking about. Small example: we have two human landlls in the country: New York and California, with New York City being a virtual cesspool. I know these comments are harsh bit I have 85 years of watching. In the 64 years I have been voting, both Republican and Democrat, I have never witnessed such a disgusting, degrading administration. This letter is not meant to be anti-American, just anti-administration. A sad testimonial to a great nation.George Pratt ArcadiaCouncil did the right thingEditor: Tuesday nights City Council Meeting had the Council going over issues left by previous City Administrator Judi Jankosky. It was a very productive meeting. Interim City Administrator Tom Slaughter made a very impressive presentation on the issues and options that the Council needed to address. It was well The great pumpkin cut-upLoad up on the candy, batten down the hatches, and get ready for the invasion. The trick-or-treatersmay have their night to howl tonight! There are always some neighborhoods that get over run with the mini-monsters each year, who must spend a fortune on candy, and I feel for those folks. They give and give until they run out, and then they turn off their porch lights and hunker down in the dark, hoping it appears no one is home. Ive never had a lot of Halloween trafc. It helps to live on a very short road that many dont even know about, and its great being the last house on a dead-end dirt road thats dark and near the cemetery as well. Out of sight and out of mind is better than being out of candy! Im glad that many churches and other organizations have Halloween parties for kids (and adults too) this time of the year. I remember how some families would host parties in their homes for relatives, neighborhoods and friends, and how fun that was as a tradition. Wed roast hot dogs and marshmallows, tell ghost stories around the re, bob for apples, and play games. My daughters dressed up nearly every year for Halloween and it was always a big deal deciding what theyd be. Just about every year wed do costumes from scratch, whether they were clowns or vampires, hobos or hillbillies, or even pregnant housewives wearing curlers and facial cream while brandishing rolling pins. I suppose my favorite memory of those days was carving pumpkins with my girls, something we made Grits & Pieces Luke Wilson troubador55@embarqmail.com | LETTER SUBMISSION POLICYLetters are welcome on virtually any subject, but we do have some rules. Please keep them to less than 250 words. Letters will be edited to length as well as grammar and spelling. All letters must be signed with full name not initials. An address and telephone number must be included; they are not for publication, but must be provided so we may verify authorship if necessary. Due to the number of letters received, we reserve the right to run only one letter per person per month. The Letters to the Editor section is intended as a public forum for community discourse and the opinions and statements made in letters are solely those of the individual writers. The Arcadian takes no responsibility for the content of these letters. Please send or bring correspondence to the Arcadian, 108 S. Polk Ave., Arcadia FL 34266, or fax to 863-494-3533. Readers with access to the internet may e-mail Letters to the Editor at shoffman@sun-herald.com.GRITS & PIECES | 18 LETTERS | 11 OPINION | 11 NEWS i T&M : OUTGOINGCITY ADMINISTRATOR R YOU (',0... Lois o1HA5FIRED CITYEPA?WYEES GOODIES Fop EVERY$ODY\4b 5M5QW / T-AKEiT WNYou..T 3AWSKYr r1 / I l ^(YYf4Y jtALd yi a -7c zcADAvAIL;

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 5 | Arcadian Running out of room? Too much stuff? Well, Arcadia native Lewis has just the answer for you. Parker has begun a new business here in Desoto County called Clutter Busters, and its name defines exactly what it is relief for pack rats and many others. We all know someone who has a barn, an outer building, or even just a room that is overflowing with countless items that have turned into clutter that they could live without. Perhaps youve inherited the trappings of a hoarder or collector due to the death of a spouse, family member, or friend. Or maybe youre just fed up with having too much stuff and not enough space for it. Parkers new endeavor appears to be your answer to it. Lewis Parker is a descendant of the Parker family who helped settle DeSoto County in the 1800s, and is a 1973 graduate of DeSoto High School. He attended college at the University of South Florida, receiving AA and BA degrees in 1979 and 1980, respectively. He came home to Arcadia, wondering what to do next, and one day while riding past the jail, Sheriff Frank Cline saw him and motioned him to come with his finger. What are you doing, boy? Cline asked. Well, Im looking for a job, Parker said. Come inside, and Ill give you one, was the reply. The Parkers and Clines had been friends for generations, and Parker credits this encounter as the thing that got his career started as an EMT/jailer. Cline was adamant about training, and kept his budget low by having employees who could do various jobs. I think he mightve hired me just so he could keep an eye on me, he jokes. Parker went on to work in Glades and Sarasota counties as a probation officer before moving back to Arcadia around 1983, where he also served as a probation officer until 1986. He then went to work for the Florida Parole Commission. In 2004 he became a correctional offi cer with the local road camp, overseeing a labor crew of inmates, and retired from the state on January 31, 2013. Parker had always wanted to work for himself, and after some warehouse auctions caught his attention, he came up with his idea for Clutter Busters. He reasoned that many people collect exceptional amounts of possessions, only to leave it behind to family who have no idea what to do with all of it. Thats where he comes in with his idea and services. Ive heard people say theyve been people pack-ratting for years, said Parker, and they dont want to put their kids through that (the disposal of items, after theyre gone). Clutter Busters is a means to transport items to someones storage units or haul items to the landfill, and Parker can assist with an estate sale or yard sale as well. He is licensed and insured, well-versed in state laws and regulations, and willing to even trade off his services for items in some cases, and no money would change hands. He may also be willing to purchase items himself. His consultations are free and he will work by the job or by the hour, depending on the customers preference or situation. Parker, 57, married Stella Parnell in 1979. The couple has two sons and a four-yearold granddaughter. He cares deeply about local history and heritage, and has a passion for old buildings and the old ways of Florida living. Parkers business card claims he is the solution to all things hoarded in sheds, barns, storage units, and residential and commercial DeSoto native sets his sights on local pack ratsBy LUKE WILSON ARCADIAN CORRESPONDENT ARCADIAN PHOTO BY LUKE WILSONDeSoto Countys new answer to local hoarders is native son Lewis Parker, pictured with granddaughter Sydalee Taylor.items, and that he specializes in disposing of unwanted junk. It even has an illustration of the actual pack rat mammal, as well as a definition of it. The second definition is of the two-legged variety, the kind we all know personally, or perhaps the kind we are ourselves. As the old saying goes, One mans trash is another mans treasure, so pack rats (or family members of pack rats), Clutter Busters may be just the answer to your need to get your space back. Call Parker at 863-990-0273. Y o u c a n t c a t c h t h e m i f y o u d o n t k n o w w h e r e t h e y a r e C h e c k o u t t h e F i s h F i n d e r e v e r y T h u r s d a y o n l y i n W a t e r L i n e o n l y i n Eye Exams Medical Eye Care Surgery Full Optical Boutique Contact Lenses We accept Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross and all major medical plans 863.491.7777 2442 NE Highway 70, Arcadia (across from Walgreens) Dr. Ronald O. Sevigny Dr. Mark D. Sevigny Ronald O. Sevigny, O.D. Mark D. Sevigny, O.D. Robyn Russell, O.D. Daniel Welch, M.D. Hablamos Espaol (24 Hour A Day Emergency Eye Care) www.7eeye.com Evening Hours Now Available! Call Today! We fill Medicaid Eyeglass Prescriptions. 50457189 Blinky MCIawl 40%,AlSEVIGNYASSOCIATESEV 1 G N y 'aocze Sevign yEYE CARE,170 '4 44mB4 mCheck out the Fish Finder eryThursday, only In Water Line,evonly OnSUNni

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Arcadian | Page 6 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 NOTE: All area codes are 863 unless otherwise indicated. TODAY The annual Turner Center Trick or Treat takes place at the Turner Center from 6-8 p.m. Oct. 31. Kids costume contest (age 12 and under) at 6:45 p.m., youth costume contest (ages 13-17) at 7 p.m., and adult costume comtest (18+) at 7:15 p.m. AA Second Tradition Anniversary Night is the last Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church, 327 W. Hickory St. Potluck/barbeque before the meeting. AA Second Tradition Anniversary Night is the last Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church, 327 W. Hickory St. Open speaker. Drop-in Yoga Class every Thursday, 5 p.m.-5:15 p.m., registration and yoga tea; 5:15-6:15 p.m., yoga class. Ave. Drop-in $7/class, 8-class package $40 ($5 per class). Bring your own mat. For more information, call Christine at 244-1925. DeSoto County Library story time is at 3 p.m. at 125 N. Hillsborough Ave., Arcadia. Call 993-4851 for more information. Faith Mission provides free lunches for anyone in need, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 1109 S.E. 9th St., Arcadia. Donations gratefully accepted. Alcoholics Anonymous Second Tradition meets at 7 p.m. at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church, 327 W. Hickory St. Arcadia Quilt Club meets from 9-11:30 a.m. at the Palace Dance Hall, 1627 N.E. Floridian Circle, Arcadia. FRIDAY Friends and family of Johnny Georges will gather at Pine Level United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. for a casual dinner, followed by a screening at 9 p.m. of the TV program Shark Tank on which Johnny appears as a guest. Friday Night Live the City Takers for Christ presents Friday Night Live with Rev. Troy Rowe, every Friday. Come and experience what God is doing in this season through His word and praise and worship. 37 W. Magnolia St. (across from SunTrust drive-through). For information call 244-4341. Faith Mission provides free lunches for anyone in need, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 1109 S.E. 9th St., Arcadia. Donations gratefully accepted. Sabbath service begins at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth El, 3840 S. Biscayne Dr., North Port. Oneg Shabbat follows. SATURDAY Today is the Family Fun Fair from 9 a.m. to noon in McSwain Park. Fun activities for the entire family, information, freebies, ways to save money, and learn about available community services. Please bring a nonperishable food item to donate to local food banks. For information, call 990-0387. DeSoto Arts and Humanities Council is hosting a Plein Air Workshop from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 2. Taught by well known Charlotte County artist Sharon Yarbrough. Only $25, includes lunch at Last Chapter Coffee Shop in Arcadia. For information including a recommended supply list, or to sign up, visit http:// desotoartscouncil.org/events.html. Arcadia Main Street Down Home Downtown BBQ is Saturday at the Tree of Knowledge Park. This seasons cook-off is bigger and better than ever with a top payout of $500. Also, fresh produce,pickled products,jams, jellies, homemade granola bars, baked goods, fresh and dried herbs, arts, crafts, woodworking, quilts, sewing, plants and other goodies. For vendor info call the Arcadia Main Street office at 494-2020 or 941-204-5540. DeSoto Memorial Hospital Foundation is holding a golf tournament on Nov. 2. For details email agriffis@dmh.org. Strolling 4 A Cure takes place on Nov. 2 at The Brookside Bluffs Community. The event raises funds for mammograms and PSA tests for local residents who cannot afford to pay for them. For details, email jataney@hotmail.com. Boaters Get-Together meets at 1 p.m. on the first Saturday of every month at Nav-A-Gator Grill, 9700 S.W. Riverview Circle (off Kings Hwy/C.R. 769). For more information, call 941-627-3474. DeSoto County Library story time is at 10:30 a.m. at 125 N. Hillsborough Ave., Arcadia. The first Saturday of every month is Book Buddies, when children read to dogs. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Call 993-4851 for more information. Sabbath service begins at 9:30 a.m. at Temple Beth El 3840 S. Biscayne Dr., North Port. Kiddush will follow. SUNDAY Freedom Fellowship Christian Ministries will hold its 8th Year Anniversary Service at 11 a.m. on Nov. 3, featuring Charlyce Simmons, nationally known recording artist and her newly released CD titled All of Me. 1528 N.E. Turner Road. Dr. Sharon Goodman, senior pastor. Telephone Reassurance and Friendly Visitors available to those over 55 and homebound. Phone Senior Friendship Centers at 863-494-5965 to sign up for these free services, staffed by trained volunteers who have had background screenings. Phone also if interested in becoming a volunteer for either program. Alcoholics Anonymous Serenity Group meets at Grace Lutheran Church, W. Oak St. (State Road 70) at 8 p.m. Sunday. MONDAY 4-H county council, leaders and volunteers meet at 6 p.m. the first Monday of each month at the DeSoto County Turner Center extension office. The AA G.I.R.L.S. business meeting is held the first Monday at 7:15 p.m. at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church, 327 W. Hickory St. The Arcadia Garden Club meets at noon on the first Monday of each month Oct. through June at its office, 1005 W. Magnolia St. Bring a covered dish to share. AA Brown Bagger meetings are offered every Monday at noon at Trinity United Methodist Church, 304 W. Oak St. Women of Worship WOW Womens ministry meets at 6:15 p.m. Monday at Freedom Fellowship Christian Ministries, 1528 N.E. Turner Ave. All are welcome. A women-only G.I.R.L.S. AA meeting is held at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church at 6 p.m. on Monday at 327 W. Hickory St. Alcoholics Anonymous Second Tradition meets at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church at 8 p.m. Monday at 327 W. Hickory St. Al-anon, offering help for families of alcoholics, meets at 7:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fort Ogden Methodist Church, 6923 S.W. River St. in Fort Ogden. Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the same time. For information call 941-426-7655 or visit www.district13soflal-anon.org. The DeSoto County Homeless Coalition Community Resource Center is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday at 1425 Martin Luther King St. The center provides referrals for mainstream resources, elderly food stamps (by appointment) and computer service. Salvation Army has office space on Wed. by appointment. For more information, call 491-5683. A faith-based addiction recovery ministry meets at 7:30 p.m. every Monday at the Nocatee Baptist Church (red brick church) on U.S. Highway 17 in Nocatee. Prescription Assistance holds walk-in office hours at the DeSoto Center for Health and Disease Management from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday at 519 W. Hickory St., Arcadia. For more information, call 491-7580. TUESDAY Arcadia City Council meets at 6 p.m. at the Margaret Way Building, 23 N. Polk Ave., Arcadia. Freedom Fellowship Christian Ministries Support Group meets at 7 p.m. Tuesday at 1528 N.E. Turner Ave. Every Tuesday night, line dance class at the Palace Dance Hall (17N). Beginners welcome. $3 donation. For more info, call Jennie Martin at 494-2749. Weight Watchers meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Calvary Baptist Church, 1509 E. Oak St. For details visit www. weight watchers.com and find a meeting or call 800-651-6000. The DeSoto Amateur Radio Club meets at 8 p.m. Tuesday (except the third Tuesday) of the month, on the 147.075, W4MIN repeater with a pl of 100. All amateurs are invited to participate. Faith Mission provides free lunches for anyone in need, at 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 1109 S.E. 9th St., Arcadia. Donations gratefully accepted. DeSoto County Library holds story time at 3 p.m. Tuesdays at 125 N. Hillsborough Ave., Arcadia. Call 993-4851 for more information. The Peace River Woodcarvers meet from 9 a.m. to noon every Tuesday, starting Nov. 12, at the Speer Center, U.S. Highway 17 North, Arcadia. For information, contact Bill or Mary Morse at 207-418-4687. ACCESS office is open from 9 a.m. to noon today at Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church, 319 S. Lee Ave., Arcadia. Call for appointments at 494-0320. Alcoholics Anonymous Second Tradition meets at 8 p.m. at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church, 327 W. Hickory St. Prescription Assistance holds walk-in office hours at the DeSoto Center for Health and Disease Management from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday at 519 W. Hickory St., Arcadia. For more information, call 491-7580. Suncoast Community Blood Bank is open from noon to 6 p.m. today at 710 N. Brevard Ave. (U.S. 17 North), Arcadia. For more information, call 993-9366. WEDNESDAY DeSoto County Homeless Coalition Mobile Pantry is on the first and third Wednesday of each month at the Smith Brown Gym starting at 9 a.m. until the food is gone. The only requirement is to be a DeSoto County resident. Sponsored by the All Faiths Food bank of Sarasota. The AA Serenity Group Business Meeting is held at 7:15 p.m. on the first Wednesday of the month at Grace Lutheran Church, 1004 W. Oak St. The Arcadia Writers Group meets from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. the first and third Wednesday of each month at the Arcadia Village Clubhouse. For more information, call Sarah Hollenhorst at 244-1663. The Retired Law Enforcement Association of Southwest Florida meets first Wednesday monthly at the Fraternal Order of Police Hall, 23300 Harper Ave., Port Charlotte. Dinner is at 6:30 p.m.; meeting is at 7:30 p.m. For information, call 941-423-0902. Hour of Power Prayer time is held at noon at Freedom Fellowship Christian Ministries, 1528 N.E. Turner Ave. AA Brown Bagger meetings are offered every Monday at noon at Trinity United Methodist Church, 304 W. Oak St. The Arcadia Eagles, 150 S. Polk Ave., now offers Bingo from 7-9 p.m. Wednesday evenings. Alcoholics Anonymous Serenity-Big Book meets at 8 p.m. at Grace Lutheran Church, W. Oak St. (State Road 70). Alcoholics Anonymous open discussion at Trinity Methodist Church, 304 Oak Street. Art for Kids is at 3 p.m. every Wednesday in the DeSoto County Librarys childrens wing. This program, sponsored by the DeSoto County Arts and Humanities Council, is for elementary school-aged children. THURSDAY The DeSoto Chamber of Commerce Early Bird is at 8 a.m. Nov. 7 at Horizon Coach. The DeSoto Arts and Humanities Council Board of directors meeting will be heading to Port Charlotte for a presentation at the Mid-County Library at 5:30 p.m., by Patrick Smith, Florida Is a Land Remembered. Anyone interested in car-pooling to the talk can meet at The Arcadian parking lot ready to depart at 4:30 p.m. The group will stop for a bite to eat afterward. No charge for the talk; dinner is Dutch treat. Chamber of Commerce Early Bird Breakfast is at 8 a.m. the first Thursday monthly. Each months location will be announced. The 4-H Stitch in Time sewing club meets every first Thursday at 5 p.m. Drop-in Yoga Class every Thursday, 5 p.m.-5:15 p.m., registration and yoga tea; 5:15-6:15 p.m., yoga class. Come enjoy an hour of serenity focused on breathing, gentle yoga poses, peaceful stretching and quiet relaxation. Held in the Health Dept,. conference room, 34 S. Baldwin Ave. Drop-in $7/ class, 8-class package $40 ($5 per class). Bring your own mat. For more information, call Christine at 244-1925. DeSoto County Library story time is at 3 p.m. at 125 N. Hillsborough Ave., Arcadia. Call 993-4851 for more information. Cocaine Anonymous meetings are held every Thursday from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church. The first meeting is scheduled for Feb. 3. For information, call Charles Godwin at 941-357-3945, Mildred Daniels at 993-0373, or Curtis Clark at 263-2935. Faith Mission provides free lunches for anyone in need, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 1109 S.E. 9th St., Arcadia. Donations gratefully accepted. Alcoholics Anonymous Second Tradition meets at 7 p.m. at St. Edmunds Episcopal Church, 327 W. Hickory St. Arcadia Quilt Club meets from 9-11:30 a.m. at the Palace Dance Hall, 1627 N.E. Floridian Circle, Arcadia. Prescription Assistance holds walk-in office hours at the DeSoto Center for Health and Disease Management from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday at 519 W. Hickory St., Arcadia. For more information, call 491-7580. ACCESS office is open from 1-4 p.m. today at Pleasant Hill United Methodist Church, 319 S. Lee Ave., Arcadia. Call for appointments at 494-0320. COMING EVENTS On Nov. 9, Chapter 16497 Modern Woodmen meet at Solomons Castle for lunch about 11:30 a.m. To carpool, meet at Pine Creek Chapel at 10:45am. For more info or to RSVP, call Jane Powers at 494-1679. Browse for Bargains at the Historical Societys Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Nov. 9, at the Fairgrounds Exhibition Building, 124 Heard St., Arcadia. The contents of several homes have been donated and are priced to sell. Baked goods, coffee, hot dogs, and cold drinks will also be available. Donations will be accepted before noon, Monday through Wednesday, Nov.4-6, at the Fair Grounds or call 863-494-6607 or 863-494-4325. All proceeds will benefit the Societys efforts to preserve and promote the history of DeSoto County for future generations. To donate or help with the sale, call Norma Banas at 494-4325. Sarasota author Liz Coursen will present Having Fun, Wish You Were Here! An Illustrated History of the Postcard in Florida at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 9, 10 a.m., at the DeSoto County Library in Arcadia. Free and open to the public. For information call 993-4851. DeSoto County residents will not have trash collection on Monday, Nov. 11, in honor of Veterans Day. Monday customers will have their next pickup on Thursday, Nov. 14. The Arcadia Elks Lodge will host a Veterans Appreciation Dinner and Marine Corps Birthday Celebration at 5 p.m. Nov. 10 at the Elks Lodge, 1028 W. Oak St. All veterans and their guests are invited to attend. RSVP to 993-0011 after 4 p.m. For details, call Mary Lyne at 245-5150. The dinner is free. The annual Veterans Day Parade takes place at 10 a.m. on Nov. 11. Line-up is at 9 a.m. at W. Oak St. and S. Orange Ave. To participate, call Jackie Tucker at 993-0083. School Superintendent Karyn Gary will assure lots of children from DeSoto schools will be taking part this year. The parade will be followed by a Veterans Day ceremony sponsored by the DeSoto County Veterans COuncil at 11 a,m, at the courthouse. Nature Talk: John Reynolds, Creative ways early residents used plants, 10 a.m. on Nov. 13 at DeSoto County Library. Free. Nov. 13 is Spirit Night at Beef OBradys; with a special coupon, when you have dinner at the Arcadia Beefs, a percentage of your meal price will be donated by Beefs top the DeSoto Arts & Humanities Council. Nature Walks: Deep Creek Preserve, 8:30 a.m. Nov. 14. With naturalists John Phillips and Jamie Reynolds. Free. Nov. 14: Lettuce Lake. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Dec. 10, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Dec. 27, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Paddle through the wooded maze of channels from the Lake out into the Peace River, then downstream, exploring side lagoons, and on to the Nav-a-Gator for a leisurely lunch, and then back through a different route. Master Naturalist Rick Fried guides you through the tricky channels here. The outing is free to the public. Voluntary donations to the local Charlotte Harbor Sierra Club are gratefully accepted. Call Rick for reservations and info. 941-637-8805. NOTICE The Lettuce Lake Boat Ramp will be closed starting Nov. 1 for up to six months, through May 1, while the new boat ramp is constructed. SPECIAL Your clutter may be someone elses treasure, so please donate your gently used items to the DeSoto County Historial Society for its annual Yard Sale, from 8 am. to 2 p.m. Nov. 9 at the DeSoto County Fairgrounds Exhibition Building. 124 Heard St. Drop off your donations on Thursdays before 1 p.m., at the Howard and Vedlma Melton Historical Research Library at the Ingraham Seed House, 120 W. Whidden St., or call 494-6607 or 494-4325 to arrange pick-up or drop-off. Proceeds benefit the societys efforts to preserve and promote DeSoto Countys history for future generations. The DeSoto County Literacy Council will hold its annual Yard Sale in November. They are collecting donated items (books, household items, electronics and small appliances) now, and will accept clothing starting in November. Donations can be brought to 1365 S.E. Airport Road. Trick or treat at the TurnerFILE PHOTO BY SUSAN E. HOFFMANDont forget Trick or Treat at the Turner Center from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. tonight! Pick up your free coloirng book from The Arcadian and lots of treats from local businesses. Clutter Busters Licensed and Insured Running out of room? Too much stuff? We have the solution! Specializing in disposing of unwanted junk. Residential Commercial Sheds Barns Storage Units FREE consultations, appraisals & estimates Call Lewis H. Parker at (863) 990-0273 50449716

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 7 | Arcadian Family Album Family Album FAMILY ALBUM PHOTOSSend us a photo to celebrate a birth, birthday, engagement, wedding, anniversary, etc. The Arcadian will run it free. We must have it no later than noon on Monday. Bring your photo to the office or e-mail to Arcadian.editor@gmail.comHave you ever wondered how much Grandmas silver tea service might be worth? Or what could you get if you sold your collection of first edition books? Your chance to find out is coming with Antiques Appraisal Day on Nov. 9. For a fee of $7 per item (two-item limit per person), you can being your items to one of several appraisers. The professional appraisers will include: Certied Appraiser Michael Logan of the International Society of Appraisers, 30 years experience as an antique dealer and show dealer, and 10 years as an appraiser; Algie and Wolf Didlaukies, porcelain and glass, 25 years as antique dealers; Kit McNabb, Orientalia; Tim Kilkelly, military and tools, 16 years as an antique dealer; Dan Sheppard, books and furniture, 16 years as an antique dealer; and researcher Renee Otto, 16 years as an antique dealer. The appraisal runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will be held at Rattlers, 111 West Oak Street.Antique appraisals coming to ArcadiaBy RENEE OTTODOWNTOWN MERCHANTS ASSN. Thank youWe would like to thank everyone who participated in the benet for George Beard held at Jim Space Ball Fields on Oct. 26. We want to recognize the following businesses and individuals who contributed: Summit Roong, Clean Cuts LLC, Fussells Frozen Foods, K & J Produce, Slims BBQ, Beef OBradys, Bullz-Eye BBQ, As Sub Shop, Lous Paint Spot, Ricky Morales Lawn Care, Arcadia Moose Lodge, Gary Mills Inc., Motts Auto Repair, Sutton Timber, James Rummer Timber Harvesting, Alexcazam Electric, DeSoto Ford, DCAAA, Lester Hornbake Jr., Wade Huckaby, Mike Young, Darren Winfrey, Nate Lee, John Daughtery, Paul Beckham, John Schaefer, Sears Coker, William Walker, Julie Nunez, Esmeralda Castillo, Jessica Price, Cindy Zamora, Mary Jane Marcos, Hailey Hafer, Juanita Gaitan and Leslie Johnson. Thank youThe family of Harry Eagerton would like to thank everyone for the owers, cards, words of kindness, and most of all their prayers for our family during the loss of our loved one. He was a great Christian man who never met a stranger. He is greatly missed by us all. Your acts of kindness during this time will never be forgotten. The family of Harry Eagerton DeSoto County, the city of Arcadia and the DeSoto County School District declared Oct. 26 through Nov. 2 as The Week of the Family. To celebrate, a Family Fun Fair will be held from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Nov. 2, at McSwain Park. There will be something there for everyone, including information on ways to save money, and activities for all ages. Find out what community services are available here. Scheduled events include Free Movie Night at Habitat ReStore, 114 N. Polk Ave., from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 1. Participating organizations with presentations or displays include 4-H Community Club, American Cancer Society, American Red Cross, ARC Angels Flag Team, Catholic Charities, Coastal Behavioral Health, DeSotoArcadia Regional Transit, DeSoto County Fire Rescue, DeSoto Co. Sheriffs Ofce Victim Advocate, DeSoto Co. Health Dept., DeSoto Memorial Hospital, DMH/ACS Access Room, DMH Auxiliary, SMH/SLIP, Drug Free Celebrate at Family Fun FairSUBMITTED BY CINDY SIEGELYouth, Early Learning Coalition, Early Steps, Full Circle Jujitsu, Goodwill, Guardian ad Litem, Habitat for Humanity, Hand of Angels, Healthy Families, Homeless Coalition, Integral Quality Care, JROTC, Links2Success, MedSol, Mt. Zion Methodist Church/ Women in Fellowship, Rangerettes and Flag Team, RCMA, Safe Children Coalition, Screaming Rocks, SHINE, SPARCC, Sprawling Oaks Farm, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, TIdewell Hospice, Toys for Tots and United Way 211 of Manasota. Special thanks go to Arcadia Printing, Tim and Pam Vowels, The Mosaic Co., and Jerrys Pest Solutions LLC. For more information, visit www. desotocounty.weekof the family.org or call 863-990-0387. PHOTO PROVIDED BY CINDY SIEGELDeSoto County Commissioners, along with the City of Arcadia and the DeSoto County School Board, declared Oct. 26-Nov. 2 as Week of the Family. The event culminates in a Family Fun Fair Saturday at McSwain Park. Magnolia Street Seafood celebrates openingARCADIAN PHOTO BY JOHN BLACK, photeke@gmail.comMagnolia Street Seafood & Grill held its open house and ocial ribbon cutting during the DeSoto Chamber of Commerce Networking at Noon luncheon for October. The restaurant oers fresh seafood and other meals prepared to order. Children sing for school board Children from the Early Childhood Coalition sang several songs for the DeSoto County School Board at their Oct. 22 meeting. Children from the Early Childhood Coalition, led by Dr. Sharon Goodman, director, take part in the Pledge of Allegiance during the DeSoto County School Board meeting on Oct. 22. The children opened the meeting with several of their favorite songs as board members looked on. 1 1 0 9 N B r e v a r d A v e 1109 N. Brevard Ave. 8 6 3 4 9 4 6 0 0 0 863-494-6000 The helpful place. HOME IMPROVEMENT CENTER Home Owners Supply NEW STORE HOURS Mon. Fri. 7:30am 6pm Sat. 8am 4pm Sunday 9am 3pm 50457191

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Arcadian | Page 8 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 Raymond Kugler, formerly the Jail Captain for the DeSoto County Sheriffs Ofce, pleaded guilty to one count of lying about a material fact during an investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. He is expected to enter a plea agreement on Oct. 31, but details on what it will entail were not available at press time. The charge stems from an incident in which a detainee, Jody Holland, claims to have been beaten by deputies at the DeSoto County Jail last May. Holland had been arrested on a charge of battery of his then-girlfried, who at the time was a nurse at the jail. Holland alleges two deputies beat him, causing black eyes and severe bruises on his head. He also claims other deputies either saw or knew of the beatings and did nothing, or that he asked for medical treatment and was denied. Holland claimed that his civil rights were violated by the beating and subsequent failure to get him medical treatment. A federal grand jury was convened and began hearing witness testimony in August. The FBI and FDLE investigated Hollands charges, and the DeSoto County Sheriffs Ofce also mounted its own investigation. As a result of the DCSO inquiry, three DCSO deputies were terminated, Kugler resigned before the investigation was completed, and three others were given warnings. According to papers led Oct. 21 in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida, FBI and FDLE agents interviewed Kugler in connection with the civil rights case led by Holland. The agents asked Kugler whether he was aware Holland had asked for medical treatment while he had been in custody on May 25. In response, Kugler denied knowing of Hollands request to be taken to DeSoto Memorial Hospital for treatment. Kugler also stated the corrections ofcer had called him but had not told him about Hollands request for treatment. Further investigation showed Kugler had been aware of Hollands request, and was so informed by a corrections Kugler agrees to plea in federal caseThe DeSoto County Sheriffs Ofce reported the following arrests: Patrick Duncan Gammage, 49, 3900 block of N.W. Valencia St., Arcadia. Charges: sale of methamphetamine, possession or use of drug equipment, possession of a controlled substance without a prescription and out-of-county warrant. Bond: none. Charles Richard Hatcher, 34, no address, Arcadia. Charges: fraudulent use of credit cards more than twice in 6 months to obtain more than $100, grand theft between $300-$5,000, violation of probation, and failure to support child or spouse. Bond: none. David Arthur Henderson, 42, 3900 block of N.W. Valencia St., Arcadia. Charge: violation of probation. Bond: none. Tyshawn Jermain Pressley, 31, 1100 block of S.W. Rainbow Ave., Arcadia. Charge: battery. Bond: $750. Jennifer Ann Schlogl, 38, Lake Placid. Charge: contempt. Bond: $1,000. Elena Gutierrez Alviso, 44, 1600 block of N.E. Floridian Circle, Arcadia. Charge: battery. Bond: $1,500. Tommy Wayne Anderson, 37, 200 block of S. Hillsborough Ave., Arcadia. Charge: violation of probation. Bond: none. David Allan Carr, 51, 11800 block of S.W. Loop Terrace, Arcadia. Charge: felony aggravated battery. Bond: $5,000. Joseph Edward Castaldi, 29, 5200 block of E. Pine St., Arcadia. Charges: unarmed burglary of an occupied dwelling and grand theft between $300$5,000. Bond: $11,000. Iris Olivia Jackson, 44, 200 block of Harris Road, Arcadia. Charge: driving while license is suspended. Bond: $120. Yobani Miguel, 21, 6400 block of W. Pablo Ave., Arcadia. Charge: failure to appear. Bond: $4,000. Aron Moreno Santis, 23, 1000 block of 5th Ave., Arcadia. Charges: failure to appear and giving false ID to law ofcer. Bond: $2,500. Matthew Allen Waldron, 27, Newton, N.J. Charge: out-of-state: fugitive. Bond: none. Jay Allen Lingo, 48, 2900 block of N.W. Pine Creek Ave., Arcadia. Charge: battery. Bond: $1,500. Jason Michael McCumber, 30, 2000 block of N.W. County Road 661, Arcadia. Charge: criminal mischief with property damage over $1,000. Bond: $5,000. Hugo Mendoza, 58, rst block of Park Place, Arcadia. Charge: battery. Bond: $2,500. Marvin Allen Washington, 50, 800 block of Court St., Arcadia. Charges: two out-of-county warrants. Bond: $650. Gregory Williams, 48, 100 block of S. Watson Ave., Arcadia. Charge: failure by sex offender to report name or address change. Bond: $5,000. Amanda Ester Zuniga, 24, 1600 block of 3rd Ave., Arcadia. Charge: battery. Released on recognizance. Benjamin Jay Carpenter, 26, Moore Haven. Charge: failure to support spouse or child. Purge: $1,500. Kimberly Ann McDonald. 31, 1400 block of S.E. Airport Road, Arcadia. Charge: violation of probation. Bond: none. Caleb Williams, 22, 2300 block of N.E. Snow Street, Arcadia. Charge: outof-county warrant. Bond: none. Walter Lyndon Gray, 36, Raford, Fla. Charge: grand theft between $300$5,000. Bond: none. Manuel Coleman Allen Sr., 41, 2100 block of N.W. Richards Ave., Arcadia. Charge: felony domestic battery by strangulation. Bond: none. Eve Martinez, 30, 1900 block of Oak Trails., Arcadia. Charge: petty theft. Bond: $120. Jesse Muniz, 32, McAllen, Tx. Charge: aggravated felony battery with a deadly weapon. Bond: none. Hamen Mathew Pettyjohn, 37, 2900 block of N.E. Ouray Drive, Arcadia. Charges: felony aggravated battery, felony battery, violation of domestic injunction order, and resisting an ofcer DeSoto County Sheriff Will Wise wants everyone to have a fun and safe Halloween tonight. He reminds everyone that it is against the law for children to ride in trailers not intended for passengers. We expect that there will be many who will be out enjoying the festivities that come with this day, Wise said. Our primary concern is for safety, especially the safety and well-being of children. As such, we would like for everyone to be informed that riding children in a trailer is not allowable by state statute. Wise said, Section 316.2015 states in part, No person shall ride on any vehicle upon any portion thereof not designed or intended for the use of passengers. This statute is considered a non-moving infraction and subject to a ne of $111. Additionally, he said Florida statute 316.613 states that every operator of a motor vehicle transporting a child must provide for protection of the child by properly using a crash-tested, federally approved restraint device. For children through age 3 the device must be a separate carrier or a vehicle manufacturers integrated child seat. For all other children a separate carrier, an integrated child seat, or a seat belt may be used. Violation of this statute is a moving violation subject to a ne of $161and three points could be assessed on the drivers license. To ensure the safety of children, Wise said deputies will be issuing tickets if they see violations of this type.No kids in trailers on Halloweenofcer, despite denying knowledge to the agents. The maximum possible penalty for this violation includes ve years imprisonment, a ne of up to $250,000, supervised release for up to three years and a special assessment of $100. without violence. Bond: none. Falencia Rochelle Hatcher, 21, 1800 block of S.E. 2nd Ave., Arcadia. Charge: petty theft. Bond: $120. The Charlotte County Sheriffs Ofce reported the following arrests: David Franklin Morrison, 65, 3800 block of N.W. Pineapple St., Arcadia. Charge: violation of probation. Bond: none. Brandon Lawrence Povia, 19, 10700 block of S.W. County Road 761, Arcadia. Charge: felony battery. Bond: none. Compiled by Susan E. Homan |POLICE BEATThe information for Police Beat is gathered from police, sheriffs office, Florida Highway Patrol, jail and fire records. Not every arrest leads to a conviction and guilt or innocence is determined by the court system. Teens learn about the perils of driving Above: Cpl. John Barraco, Ken Vila, DARE Ocer, Sgt. Thad Nrodes and Sgt Je Boyd of the Collier County Sheris Oce assist DeSoto County in conductin the Teen Driving Challenge held at the high school last week. Left: Drug Free DeSoto Coalition members pose in front of the helicopter to reinforce the need for teens to stay safe while driving. Assistant football coach Richard Koonce gets to wear the handcus, which gets him a big cheer from the students. Cassie Lawrence of State Farm, Cindy Tanner from Blake Medical, Flight Nurse Jenn Jackson, Pilot Ed Bader and Becky Schlabach of State Farm in front of the medical evacuation helicopter. State Farm Insurance has teamed with the Florida Sheris Assocation to help teen drivers learn how to handle a car more safely. Visit http://teendriving.statefarm.com/ for details. Students loved the built in Xbox Super Stereo on the custom car conscated from a drug dealer. DeSoto County High School students learned about driving hazards and distractions during a special event at the school last week. DeSoto County Sheris Deputy Darrell Massey explains the Drunk Driving Simulated Glasses to student Amanda Damasocan. The glasses let a teen driver experience what its like to drive after consuming alcohol.ARCADIAN PHOTOS by John Black photeke@gmail.com tooCHA LENGE+Jr/I(IC,f r 1Drug-FreeDeSoto Coalition

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 9 | Arcadian Ann Norris April 2, 1933 to Nov. 2, 2003 It has been 10 years since we last saw you on this earth. Every day brings a reminder of how much we miss you, but we know we will see you again in heaven. We nd comfort in your motto: Lifes challenges are designed not to break us but to bend us toward God. Our eternal love, Pete, your loving husband of 50 years; Gail; Jimmy; and your special granddaughters Jaime, Jennalee and Kaylee. In loving memory | OBITUARIESDonald E. HoffmanDonald E. Hoffman, 101, of Arcadia, Fla., passed away Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013. He was born in Fremont, Ohio, Aug. 16, 1912, and moved to Arcadia 25 years ago from Toledo, Ohio. Donald worked in the industrial construction eld as a carpenter and was a member of the Carpenters Union. He was of the Lutheran faith and member of Grace Lutheran Church of Arcadia. Donald was also a member of Arcadias Senior Friendship Center. He was a compassionate and giving man, always helping someone in need. He enjoyed gardening, traveling and singing. Donald is survived by his daughters, Nancy (Michael) Goff of Jacksonville, Fla., and Sheri (Richard) Luedtke of Whitehouse, Ohio; and 12 grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Albert and Jesse Cunningham Hoffman; wife, Alice Hoffman; and daughter, Linda Schwartz. A visitation was held Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, at Ponger Kays Grady Funeral Home, and the funeral service followed, with the Rev. Nablinger ofciating. Mr. Hoffman was to be laid to rest at Williston Cemetery in Williston, Ohio. Online condolences can be made at www.pongerkaysgrady.com. Arrangements are by Ponger Kays Grady Funeral Home of Arcadia.Richard W. BiehlRichard W. Biehl, 77, of Arcadia, Fla., passed away Friday, Oct. 25, 2013. Arrangements are by Kays-Ponger Uselton Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Punta Gorda Chapel.Gwendolyn Garner JohnsonGwendolyn Garner Johnson, 95, beloved mother, grandmother and local farmer, died Saturday, Oct. 19, 2013. She was a fourth-generation DeSoto County native, who lived her entire life in the Owens, Fla., community. Gwendolyn was a citrus grower and cattle rancher who loved the land, a true cowgirl. Known for her determination, honesty and generosity, she served as the rst committee chairwoman of the Farm Service Agency in the United States and the rst woman committee member in Florida. Gwendolyn also served on the board of the Farmers Home Administration. Her life was a testament to hard work and resilience, and she survived drought, pests, canker and several hurricanes. Throughout her life, Gwendolyn supported her fellow farmers and participated in efforts to make positive changes in the agricultural community. She deeply loved her family and is survived by a son, Richard Dick (Karen Ames) Johnson of Lakeland, Fla; two granddaughters, Ginny (Stephen) Inman of Greensboro, N.C., and Alice (Chip) Nuttall of Nashville, Tenn.; two great-grandsons, Eli and Samuel Inman; and her brother, Felton Garner of Arcadia, Fla. Gwendolyn was preceded in death by her husband, Richard Hardee Johnson; and her parents, Rosa Alice Morton Garner and Daniel Whitley Garner. A memorial service to celebrate Gwendolyns life was held Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, at The Church of St. Edmund Episcopal, 327 W. Hickory St., Arcadia. Burial followed at the Mt. Ephraim Cemetery. A gathering of family and friends was held following the service at the family home in Owens. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to Tidewell Hospice, 919 N. Arcadia Ave., Arcadia, FL 34266, or charity of your choice. Online condolences may be made at pongerkaysgrady.com. Arrangements are by Ponger-KaysGrady Funeral Homes. OBITUARY POLICY Obituaries are accepted from funeral homes only. Theres no charge for publishing an abbreviated death notice. Full obituaries and repeat death notices will be subject to an advertising charge. Obituaries must be submitted to the Charlotte Sun; call 941-206-1000 for details. Please send e-mails to obituaries@sun-herald.com. The American ag accompanying and obituary indicates a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces. 1963: Surprised Royalty! Senior Sue Boring, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Boring, showed her surprise at the announcement Friday night of her selection of DHS Homecoming Queen. Later there were tears and congratulations for the popular young lady. Five local planes and 13 cadets of the Arcadia Civil Air Patrol left from Municipal Airport Sunday afternoon to witness the impressive Air-Sea Rescue Operations demonstrated by the 8th Wing of the Civil Air Patrol. Pilots of the ve planes were Col. John Dowd, R.D. Welles, B.F. Welles, George Ola and Ed Watson. Mr. and Mrs. Elsworth Keen, sons Buddy and Kayo spent Sunday at Silver Springs near Ocala, attending the trip to Six Guns Territory. The Arcadian today is proud to present two four-page supplements on the formal opening of the new Tinsley IGA Foodliner. May we add our congratulations and best wishes to all those others in the community. Thanks, Jerry, to you and your staff for this ne new asset to our business district. 1973: The 1973 DeSoto High School Homecoming Festivities will get under way tomorrow when the much improved Bulldog Marching Band This Week in DeSoto County Hayley Mercer hayleymariemercer@gmail.comCompiled from back issues of The ArcadianTHIS WEEK | 18 Mt. Ephraim Baptist Church 2865 SW Co. Rd 661 Expository Preaching Sunday Prayer Time 9:20am Sunday School/Bible Study 9:45am Morning Worship 11:00am Evening Worship 6:00pm Wed. Fellowship Meal 5:45pm Prayer Meeting 6:30pm West on SR 70, left on SR 72, left on CR 661, 3.5 miles on right Office Phone: (863) 494-0307 See Your Church in this spot For Only $ 7 5 0 $7.50 a week! Call Tami at 4 9 4 7 6 0 0 494-7600 for more details. May the Lord fill your heart with love. First Baptist Church of Arcadia 1006 N. Brevard Ave. Loving God, Connecting with People, Expanding His Kingdom 9:30 Sunday School 10:45 Morning Worship 6:00 Evening Worship Wednesdays 6:00 AWANA & YOUTH 863-494-3622 www.firstbaptistarcadia.com Grace Lutheran Church 1004 W. Oak Street 494-7008 Pastor David E. Nabinger Saturday Prayer Service Starting at 4PM Sunday School 8:45 AM Sunday Worship 10 AM All Welcome! Pastor Ellis Cross 863-494-3455 Worship 11:00 AM Evening Worship 6:00pm Wednesday 6:30pm Thursday Youth Group 6pm North Hillsborough Baptist Church (253 N. Hillsborough Ave.) NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Evangelist D.W. Jackson 3877 Highway 70W (1 mile west of Hwy 72) 863-558-0982 Principal Worship 10:30 A.M. and 5:30 P.M. Wednesday Service 5:30pm FREEDOM FELLOWSHIP CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES, INC. Where the Holy Spirit Reigns Freely Worship Center located at: 1528 NE Turner Ave. 863-244-2933 SERVICE TIMES Sunday Bible Study @ 10:00am Sunday Worship Service @ 11:00am Monday Woman at Worship @ 6:15pm 2nd/4th Tuesday Support Group @ 6pm Wednesday Bible Study @ 6:00pm Thursday Choir Rehearsal @ 6:00pm Rev. Dr. Sharon T. Goodman, Pastor See your Church in our Directory for only $7.50 weekly 494-2434 Fort Ogden United Methodist Church 6923 SW River St. 863.494.3881 Sunday Worship 10:00am (Childrens Church Provided) Bible Study 5pm Mondays A.A. & Al-Anon Starting at 7:30pm Wednesdays Youth Ministries K-12 5:30 7:30pm Elizabeth M.B. Church A Place of Worship 101 S. Orange Ave. 9:30am Sunday School 11:00am Church Worship Wednesday 7:00pm Bible Study 993-4212 elizabethmissionarybaptistchurch.org Celebrative Worship Challenging Bible Study Connection With People Sunday: Life Groups 9:30 AM Morning Worship: 10:45 AM Evening Small Groups 5:30 PM Wednesday Activities 6:00 PM 863-494-4345 www.cbcarcadia.org 5104 NW Oak Hill Ave. 863-494-6224 Pastor Dr. Howell Upchurch Sunday School 9:30 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am and 6:00 pm Wednesday 6:30 pm for Prayer Group, Youth & Children Arcadia, Florida FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 209 W est Hickory Street Mission: Take Jesus with you wherever you go Worship: 9:45am Sunday School 11:00am Traditional Worship Casual, Family Oriented Arcadia Church of the Brethren, est. 1915 Serving God.... Peacefully, Simply, Together Worship 11 a.m. Sunday School 10 a.m. 25 N. Mills Avenue Arcadia, Florida Rev. Joseph Longenecker Sr. Come worship Christ with us Sunday Morning Worship Starting at 9:30 am Sunday School 10:45 am Sun. 4:30 p.m. UMYF Wed. 6:30 pm Bible Study Nursery Available Pastor Jim Wade View Service at: trinityarcadia.com Trinity United Methodist Churc h To know Christ and to make Him know n 304 W. Oak Street 494-2543 St. Edmunds Episcopal Church 327 W. Hickory Street (70 W at Manatee) 863-494-0485 www.EpiscopalArcadiaFL.com HOLY EUCHARIST Sunday 8 & 10 am Misa en espanol Dom 6pm PINE LEVEL UNITED METHODIST CHRIST CENTERED, CHRIST LED. 9596 Pine Level St., Arcadia 863494-0044 Sunday School 10 AM Morning Worship 11 AM Childrens Church 11 AM Wednesday Adult, Youth & Childrens Programs 7 PM Nursery Always Available www.pinelevelumc.com DeSoto DeSoto Church Church Directory Directory ... And Make Your Choice from our Church Directory 50457208 See Your Church in this spot For Only $ 7 5 0 $7.50 a week! Call Tami at 4 9 4 7 6 0 0 494-7600 for more details. 17000

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Arcadian | Page 10 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 Fear is an enemy that stalks us all. This opponent of faith limits horizons, causes depression and robs its victims of the joy of living. Here are ve faith builders to enable us to overcome fear every day. 1. God loves us. Fears defeat us when despair leads us to conclude that some areas of life lie outside the circle of Gods love. This kind of thinking limits expectations of His care. Gods love is unchanging in all circumstances. A farmer once had God Is Love placed on the weathervane on the roof of his barn. When asked why he had done so, he replied it was to remind him that God is love no matter which way the wind is blowing. A woman who had endured a long period of excruciating pain told me she had been able to stay on top during her suffering by remembering the suffer ings of Jesus on the cross. This made her condent of Gods love in spite of her pain. 2. The future is arriving one day at a time. C.S. Lewis wrote the following to a woman overcome by fear: The great thing with unhappy times is to take them bit by bit, hour by hour, like an illness. It is seldom the present, the exact present that is unbearable. The great thing as you have obviously seen (both as regards pain and nancial worries) is to live from day to day and hour to hour not adding the past or the future to the present. How many things have you worried about that did not happen? Most things that make us fear and fret are those that havent happened yet. You must take one day at a time, I advised a grieving widow. Im down to 45 seconds at a time, she replied. And her moment by moment faith brought her peace. 3. Tomorrow is uncertain. You do not know what will happen tomorrow (James 4:14). So make tomorrows uncertainties work for you. Since you cannot be absolutely sure your fears will be realized, refuse to be intimidat ed by them. God has promised strength to those who trust Him for whatever happens but not for the many things we imagine may happen. Things may turn out better than you think. 4. Take care of your body. Overwork, lack of sleep and improper diet can cause emotional problems. No amount of counseling will enable you to conquer your fears if you neglect your health. Consider the importance of our bodies to God. All of creation, except the human body, was simply spoken into existence by our Creator: And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul (Genesis 2:7). The promise of resurrection also proves our Lords concern for our bodies. But we must care for them also and proper diet and health habits are vital for overcoming fear. 5. All trials are temporary. This too shall pass. Whatever the trial, faith insists: The best is yet to come! Roger Campbell is an author, a broadcaster and columnist who was a pastor for 22 years. He can be reached at rcministry@ameritech.net.Five faith-builders to drive our fears away Roger Campbell As the holidays begin their approach, Sheriff Will Wise and all the staff of the Sheriffs Ofce would like nothing better than for the entire community to have a crime-free holiday. To that end, since my responsibility is the program that deals with scams and frauds, I would like to share with you some ideas to avoid becoming a victim of such crimes. Many of the scams that occur during the holiday season are the same ones that occur throughout the year. The difference is that because many of us have so much to do at holiday time. We are under more stress and are more easily distracted, thus becoming more vulnerable to becoming a victim of fraud or scam. The secret is to try and remain calm, think things through and be extra vigilant for opportunities that could leave you open to crime. A big activity for most everyone is shopping-for gifts, clothing, food and home decorations. The best advice is, whenever possible, use cash as it is not quite as desirable to criminals. Just remember to count the cash you are taking before leaving home. This will eliminate the necessity of opening a wallet to make sure you have enough in a crowded store and run the risk of someone unscrupulous eying your money. If it is a choice between using a debit or credit card, it is safer to use the credit card. Should someone gain access to the information on the debit card, your bank account can be emptied almost instantly. If a credit card is used without your authorization, you have 60 days from the statement date to report it to the card issuer, without being held responsible for the charges. That is why it is critical to check the monthly statements for accuracy. Women should wear purses with long straps that can slip over the head with the purse hugged close to the opposite side of the body. Men should move wallets to front trouser pockets, where they are less likely targets for pickpockets. Charities know people are in a more giving mood at this season and unscrupulous ones will take advantage of our generosity. By all means, if you can af ford to contribute do so, but make your donations count. Give to established charities with long histories of being true to their mission. Resist contributing to a charity because it has sent you something in the mail. Anything you receive is yours to keep, no strings attached. Be aware that many charities sell names and addresses of people who contribute to them. You are then on the lists of even more charities. If this happens and you no longer wish to receive solicitations, contact the charity and so inform them. There are many, many more cautions I would like to share, but space doesnt allow it. However, there is one that is so important, I do want to remind you of it. If you are leaving home, even for the day, or friends and family are leaving their homes to visit you, please resist the temptation to share the plans with each other over the Internet on the social networking sites. Sites are easily hacked and there are criminals just looking for homes that will be unoccupied for the purpose of burglary. For more information about these and other scams and frauds or for an informative program for your group, remember the CASE Program is here for the community. Call Sheriff Will Wise or Lt. Curt Mays at 863-993-4700 and they will be happy to work with you.Ideas for a happy, scam-free holiday season C.A.S.E. Manager Phyllis Schwartz DeSoto County Sheriffs Office James Joseph Richardson returned to Arcadia Sunday, exactly 46 years after the death of his seven children. The last time he was in Arcadia, he was followed by hordes of reporters and onlookers. He had only recently been released after spending more than 20 years in state prison four of them on death row. When he was finally released from custody at the DeSoto County Jail, controversy still swirled around his case. Almost 25 years later, he was welcomed warmly to Arcadia by a small group of friends and others who hoped to heal old wounds. Its very emotional to be here, Richardson said. He was worried about his heart, having gone through a triple bypass many years ago. But he made it clear, he was here only for a visit and would be returning to his home in Kansas. Despite the freezing cold and snow, he said Kansas was better for his health. Richardson was greeted by Dr. Sharon Goodman, principal at the Early Childhood Center, and other friends and associates. At her office, they were just a few short blocks from Oak Ridge Cemetery, where the graves of his seven children lie in what was once the colored section, beyond the paved roadway at the end of a dirt lane. But Richardson was too emotional to visit their graves and afraid of the effect it might have on his fragile heart. In a quiet, high-pitched quavering voice, he said, Ive been hurt. I dont want to be hurt no more. In Arcadia Sunday to greet Richardson were several who had helped him in the past, or were working now on his behalf. Charles Flowers, a freelance writer who co-authored a lengthy 1988 expos about Richardsons case for the Miami Herald, shared memories with Richardson. He was my best friend, Richardson said of Flowers. Wed chat while I was in prison. Hed speak to me, very serious-like. Richardson had been sentenced to death after his seven children, ages 2 to 8, died on Oct. 25 and Oct. 26, of pesticide poisoning apparently from their lunchtime meals. Flowers story drew attention to Richardsons case, which ultimately was examined by former states attorney Janet Reno. Due to inconsistencies, withheld evidence and questionable testimony, Richardson was eventually released from prison, his case nolle prossed from the Latin, nolle prosequi, meaning that the state declined to pursue charges. Also here to meet him were state Senator Geraldine Thompson from Orange County, and Representative Dave Kerner from Palm Beach County, both of whom have sponsored bills to compensate Richardson for his Richardson returns to warm welcome in ArcadiaBy SUSAN E. HOFFMANARCADIAN EDITOR ARCADIAN PHOTO BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN, shoffman@sun-herald.comSeven dead children of James and Annie Mae Richardson are buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery: James Jr., 2; Diane, 3; Venessa, 4; Dorene, 5; Susie Mae, 6; Alice, 7: and Betty, 8.WELCOME | 23 WE SPEAK SPANISHAlejandro Salgado SantiagoImmigration Attorney We O er Immigration Legal Services In: rf Work Visas, Investors Visas & Others ntbt Your Satisfaction is Our Pride rfntbrnb 2946280 Ale,`1

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 11 | Arcadian You may ask, What in the world is Sansevieria? You might call it Motherin-Laws-Tongue or another more appropriate name. It is one of the oldest house plants. These plants were used by our grandparents and still today many folks still use them. This plant came from Africa in the 1460s. There are many varieties of this plant. Some have soft leaves due to being in wet areas and hard leaves from places that are dry. They also come in very small varieties as well as large ones. It is best to plant these in containers as they tend to get out of control. They have white, fuzzy blooms. These plants do have some value. They produce oxygen and can be placed by the bed of a per son who has a problem breathing. It seems to help them. It is also is of antiseptic value and absorbs contaminants. They can be use in ower ar rangements as a background. They all are of different colors, some plain, some striped and of different shapes. Thanks to Wilda Meier for bringing this plant to our attention and teaching us that all plants have some special quality about them that we are unaware of. Wilda is from Sarasota and works with cacti. The Cooperative Extension, Parks and Recreation, DeSoto Library, and the school board are starting Walks and Talks: Sharing DeSoto Natural Wonders. The talks are on the second Wednesday of the month at the library and the walks two each month are at various natural wonders of DeSoto County. Morgan Park and Brownsville Park are both recognized as great Florida birding trail locations. You can call the library or extension ofce for more information. They also have brochures with a schedule of talks and walks. This will also help you get your exercise for the day while learning about nature. The club is collecting Campbells soup labels for our Wekiva childrens summer camp. A lot were collected in the October meeting so plan to ll it up in November. These coupons are used to buy equipment and other things for this camp. The club also collects Penny Pines to replace trees destroyed by res and other disasters. In 2011, 11,000 acres were destroyed by re. The garden clubs of Florida support the planting of new pines by giving our pennies each month. Members are sorry to hear that Hazel Farwells son, Richard Farwell, passed away suddenly. Sympathy goes out to her and her family. Five new members attended the October meeting. New member Jamie Pipher volunteered to become the new Publicity Chairman. For the November meeting, Gil MacAdam will speak on butteres. The club continues to work on the Native Garden. With a grant from the Charlotte Harbor Estuary Program, John and Forest Reynolds have made it possible to plant this garden. The Boy Scouts worked hard last summer with help from Ken Johnson, the former county agent. The next meeting will be at noon on Nov. 4. Members should remember to bring a petunia to plant for the winter around our entrance to the front of the club. Visitors come as our guest. * * Here is a favorite quote from Ralph Waldo Emerson: Do not follow where the path may lead go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.Garden Club learns about SansevieriaBy HAZEL STROMSNES ARCADIA GARDEN CLUB PHOTOS PROVIDEDA walkway in the native plant garden by the Arcadia Garden Club. A bench provides a comfortable resting spot in the shade of the native plant garden. The Twentieth Century Literary Club met at Peddlers Boutique on Oct. 17. Hostesses were Linda Williams and Pam Ames, assisted by DeAnna Smith. Following the years theme of Oh, The Places Youll Go, a sign proclaimed Welcome to the Worlds Fair, Chicago, 1893 setting the theme for the evening. Table decorations featured foods introduced at the fair including Cracker Jacks, Juicy Fruit gum and candied apples which were also distributed as favors at the conclusion. A Worlds Fair dinner consisted of hamburgers, hot dogs, French fries and ice cream cones. President Connie Bateman greeted everyone and thanked the hostesses. Roll call and the reading of the minutes followed. Betty Aaron presented the evenings program on the 1893 Worlds Fair using The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic and Madness at the Fair That Changed America, a nonction book by bestseller Erik Larson. A erce competition waged among New York City, St.Louis and Chicago for the privilege of hosting the Worlds Fair A visit to the 1893 Worlds Fair in ChicagoBY IRENE POOSERcommemorating the 400th anniversary of Columbus trip to the New World before Chicago was chosen. Immense efforts were required to remake Chicago, a city not known for its sanitation and culture, and many premier achievements emerged. Walt Disneys father was responsible for constructing many of the buildings. Westinghouses bid for lighting the fair was chosen over Thomas Edisons. Fredrick Law Olmstead, outstanding American landscape architect, created amazing parks and lagoons at the fair and Gale Ferris introduced the rst Ferris Wheel, a 264-foot tall ride created to rival Paris Eiffel Tower. Aunt Jemimas pancakes, shredded wheat, Kodaks snapshot pictures and Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer rst emerged. Chapters of Larsons book alternate between good and evil as they present and contrast the deeds of the two main characters: Daniel H. Burnham, the gifted architect of the fair who accomplished the seemingly impossible, and H.H. Holmes, perhaps the rst American serial killer, who used his charm to prey upon visitors and workers at the fair. Bettys program succeeded in bringing to life a unique piece of American History. Larsons book was suggested for reading along with Me Before You by Jojo Moyes. The next meeting is set for 5:30 p.m. Nov. 19at the home of Marcia Brown, co-hosted by Sue Ellen Smith. Ladies present were Linda Waldron, Betty Aaron, Amy Sorrells, Lavenia Carter, Frances Pooser, Linda Williams, Cynthia Mizell, Pam Ames, Stephanie McAnly, DeAnna Smith, Debbie Hackney, Connie Bateman, Lois Heine, Ruth Dunn, Marcia Brown, Shelly Baumann and Irene Pooser. trail, and laying out the choices for council to make. Council agreed not to honor these last-minute unauthorized benets. They also voted to look into the raises that were given. There seemed no clear basis for why some employees got a raise and others didnt, and whether some of the raises were meant to make up for lost overtime and on-call pay. We wonder whether these bonuses and raises were Jankoskys way of thumbing her nose at the people who she thought were dissing her, or just her way of trying to compensate her friends? In either case, it failed. Council also needs to ll the Administrators chair, and some other key spots, with people capable and qualied to do the job. To do so, council should seek help from qualied professionals. Slaughter has already begun to reach out to others (such as County Administrator Guy Maxcy) who might offer ideas or guidance. We were impressed with how throughly he prepared for Tuesdays special meeting and feel more condent that, with his help, the listing ship can be righted again. Finally, this time the city must per form a thorough investigation of their chosen administrator candidate. They didnt investigate Markae Rupp and look what happened there. They didnt investigate Lawrence Miller very throughly, although he seems to have been capable and qualied; that was more of a personality conict. They didnt investigate Jankosky and now we wonder, what might have been found? This time, lets do it right.OPINIONFROM PAGE 4thought out and he gave the Council a list of options that it could take on each issue. On top of that he actually gave them a recommendation of what staff felt was the best option on each issue. That is something that I have never seen at a Council meeting. He actually had the guts to make a recommendation to Council. What a concept. Great job, Tom.George Chase ArcadiaLETTERSFROM PAGE 4 M i c h a e l D e r h o d g e O D Michael Derhodge O.D. T h o m a s Q u i g l e y M D Thomas Quigley M.D. FREE EYE EXAM FOR NEW PATIENTS Complete medical exam with one of our board certified eye doctors includes prescription for eyeglasses, and test for cataracts, glaucoma and other eye diseases. Offer applies to US Citizens 59 years and older. Coupon Expires 12/31/13 No Hidden Charges: It is our policy that the patient and or any other person responsible for payment or be reimburse by payment or any other service., examination or treatment which is performed as a result of reimburse with 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Offer does not apply to Avantica managed insurance plans including Freedom, Optimum and some Universal. 50457185 B o a r d C e r t i f i e d P h y s i c i a n s a n d S u r g e o n s B o a r d C e r t i f i e d P h y s i c i a n s a n d S u r g e o n s 3 3 0 N B r e v a r d A v e ( 8 6 3 ) 9 9 3 2 0 2 0 330 N. Brevard Ave (863)993-2020 N e x t t o F a r m C r e d i t b u i l d i n g Next to Farm Credit building Code: AR00 fTea1tLDovCop481M Plbqeawxl <3mpj---------------Nq,

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Arcadian | Page 12 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 Some fun facts to get you prepared for tomorrow nights 7:30 p.m. game against Hardee. Memories die hard in this rivalry. Former Hardee Middle School coach West Palmer remembered a play late in the game in 1987 when the Wildcats trailed by four points. They scored to take the lead, but a holding penalty was called and they had to run the play over again. This time the play resulted in an interception for the Bulldogs to seal the 28-24 win. Palmer even pointed to the spot on the eld where the interception occurred. I asked him what position he played. He hung his head and as he walked away he said, I was the quarterback. The Wildcats hold the lead in the series, 57-30, with ve ties. DeSoto County won the first game in 1923 by the score of 9-6. Back in the day, the teams met twice a season and the Hardee coach took his team off of the field during the second game because he didnt like the officiating. Hardee won their first game in 1924 20-0 and a few weeks later DeSoto won by the same score. Hardee won every game in the 1930s. DeSoto scored 12 points in 1930 and six the following year. They never scored again until 1939 when they scored seven points in a losing effort. In 1941 Bob Whitlock played for DeSoto but moved the following year to play for the Wildcats. This seasons Bulldog team has Arturo Ramirez who played at Hardee last season but has seen the light and proudly wears number 64 for the Bulldogs. DeSoto County has never lost to Hardee in a war year. From 1942-1945 the Bulldogs won every game during WWII. They continued that trend during the Vietnam war, winning from 1970-1974. Hardee started a 10-game winning streak after the Vietnam war ended, when the Bulldogs only scored 60 points from 1975-1985. Ten years later in 1995, the Wildcats scored 60 The Arcadian recently had the chance to talk with former Bulldog players about their memories of the DeSoto-Hardee football rivalry. Al Blackwood and Arthur Wiley are now longtime assistant coaches at the DeSoto County Middle School. Darrel Nicklow and Bumper Hay are assistant football coaches at the high school. They all had vivid memories of what they called the game of the year. One remembers almost wetting his pants because of all of the excitement and noise from the crowd. Another recalls nearly going deaf in the game because Coach Bowers was yelling at me all of the time. Have the statute of limitations passed? asked Al Blackwood when questioned about any stunts he or his teammates may have pulled on the Hardee football team. Blackwood said some of his teammates may have borrowed the Hardee jerseys and had them hanging in the locker room when the Wildcats arrived for the game, but of course he never was involved with anything like that! I played defensive tackle and tight end behind Johnnie Rembert in 1978, and We played some good games but we lost like 8-7 or 8-6. They were all good games. I got hit pretty good but I delivered some licks too. We werent friends with them until after the game was over and then wed hang out and go to parties, Blackwood said. He continued that even though DeSoto could be winless for the season, that if they beat Hardee then it was considered a good year. That was the game of the year for us: nothing else mattered, just beat Hardee, he said. The kids nowadays take it too lightly and arent as serious about it as we were. Pulling out all the stopsArthur Wiley is also one of the coaches on Monty McLeods middle school football staff. As an offensive and defensive tackle on the 1982-83 DeSoto County football teams, Wiley vividly recalled the games with the Wildcats. No sir, we didnt win either year. I do remember hitting the quarterback and getting a penalty for it, he said. I remember Coach Bowers was not happy with me. He wanted to talk to me but I wouldnt come off of the field. I was too afraid! Wiley also agreed the rivalry came down to who had the most pride on the field that game. The game has to be about pride. Our pride has to be bigger than theirs for us to win, he said. He also remembers a play named The Zebra Coach Bowers called when he needed a timeout but didnt have any left to use. Coach would call it and one of us would have to pretend we were running after some body and bump into the referee, he said. We wouldnt knock him down, just hit him enough to make him call timeout to talk to us while Coach was thinking up a play! When asked if the players ever pulled any pranks on the Wildcats like stealing the mascots uniform or anything like that, Wiley said, Oh no, Coach Bowers would never let us do that. He was laughing when he said it, however, as if he was remembering something that might have happened. Perhaps the memory of Coach Bowers discussion from many years ago is still too vivid for Wiley to want to get into any trouble with the coach. A Hardee sweepDabbo is a nickname Darrel Nicklow doesnt even know how he got. The kids in the neighborhood gave it to me when I was growing up. he said. Nicklow is one of the rare athletes who never lost to Hardee his entire high school career. Nope, they never beat us, never did, he said. I played here from 1989-92. I was quarterback and safety, and my freshman year I got moved up to varsity. Nicklows best memory was the year when the fans didnt think there was going to be a game. The DeSoto players didnt arrive until game time. My sophomore year nobody thought we were coming to the game. We warmed up at our field and stretched in the church parking lot. When the bus arrived at the field in Hardee, the crowd erupted and the place went wild, he said. We ran straight out onto the field. I caused a fumble on a big-time hit and quarter backed that game after starting at wide receiver. For a tenth grader in that big rivalry, that was big time for me. Nicklow says hes seen a change in the rivalrys intensity in the past few years. I dont know about the kids today but back then that was the game to win. It seems like it was life or death, he said. It was either us or them playing for the district championship. I dont think the kids care about it as much as we did back then. I dont know why it isnt as big now as it used to be. The stands would be filled at 6 p.m. for a 7:30 p.m. game. If you werent there, you missed something.Regaining the prideBumper Hays football career overlapped Nicklows, as Hay was a linebacker from 1990-94. Hay claimed that Nicklow must have been hit in the head because he remembered his sophomore year as being the season the team showed up late at the Hardee field. Nicklow reminded Hay that in his senior year (which was Hays sophomore year) they did it again. You were just copying what we did two years earlier, Nicklow said. Hay was an all-area selection at linebacker who only tasted defeat once. It was in his senior year. It hurt, it really did, he said. We were in a three-way tie for the district championship and lost on a field goal in the tie-breaker. We played them in back-to-back games. The changes in the rivalry from Hays playing career to now are differ ent than they used to be. It doesnt seem like the kids take it as seriously now as they did back then, he noted. Maybe it is a different age now, Four memories of the rivalry: DeSoto coaches recall past battles By STEVE KNAPPARCADIAN SPORTS DIRECTOR A disap pointed Bumper Hay sits on the band bleachers after a Bulldogs loss. Al Blackwood, middle school football coach, takes a few minutes to talk about his experi ences as a player for DeSoto County. ARCADIAN PHOTOS BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.comDarrel Dabbo Nicklow listens to the post game talk after the Southeast game. PHOTO PROVIDED BY CAROL MAHLERAbove, the 1923 DeSoto squad which beat Hardee 6-0. Below, the 2013 DeSoto Bulldog football team. The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 13 | Arcadian points in a 60-6 win, which is the widest margin of victory in this rivalry. The Bulldogs have struggled in the past few years and they lost last seasons game 21-13. Hardee is on top of the district this season with a powerful defense that has allowed only eight points a game. The Bulldogs have allowed over 30 points a game and everybody knows how defense usually wins games. The Bulldogs have a slightly better offense than the Wildcats and the speed and athleticism of the Bulldogs outshines Hardee. Hardee is 7-1 this year, with their only blemish coming in the first week against Fort Meade 18-6. DeSoto is 2-6 and on a five-game losing streak. If this sounds pretty grim for the boys in blue and white, just remember that in rivalries like this, records dont mean a thing. Richard Bowers is known as Dean Bowers to those younger people who remember him as a Dean in the school. The older people remember him as Coach Bowers. I knew him as neither a coach or Dean; I call him Coach out of respect for what he has done as a coach and for the many people who say he has been such a big inuence on them. They have grown up to be responsible and productive citizens who often claim to owe their success to Coach Bowers. We met at Beef O Bradys for lunch and conversation. The nice thing about talking with Coach is that if you ask him just one question, the answer goes into different directions and by the time he is through he has answered questions that I didnt even think about. Also while he was talking it was easier to eat most of the wings that we ordered! Steve Knapp: Tell me about who Richard Bowers is? Richard Bowers: Im just an old man who has had an incredible and very fortunate life. Ive got my health except for a bad right eye and some arthritis and I had a hip replaced. Im 79 years old with a great wife who never complained about my long hours coaching or working with some kid and Ive got nine grandkids. Im from the Mount Dora-Eustis area and played on a championship football team in high school. I played football at Florida A&M for two national championships in 1953-54. We played in the Orange Bowl against Maryland State University. I got knocked out in that game! Im glad nowadays they watch out for that but when we played our coach always told us to knock his head off. I got knocked out several times and went back in there to play. I came here and taught at the Smith Brown High School. Then I went to DeSoto High to teach health and physical education and be the head baseball coach. I was the assistant coach for football and basketball, too. Those were different days back then. Oh no, you didnt have many black coaches then but the people in Arcadia accepted me right away. That gave me the desire to stay here forever. Those were perilous times with black/white relationships. Ive been here since I was 24 years old. Ive seen championship performances in high school and college and I wanted to bring that experience to Arcadia. Now I tell everybody Im from Arcadia and not Mt. Dora. If I got cut Id bleed DeSoto blue in a heartbeat. Im not saying I was the best coach in the world but I hope I had a positive impact on some of the lives of the young boys who played for me. Sometimes I didnt know what to do on the football eld. I wasnt sure of what play to call so Id have a sign for one of my players to fall down like he got hurt. Then Id run out there and talk to him and drag him off the eld and by the time I got back to the sidelines I had thought of the play to run. (Bowers sat back and laughed so hard he had tears in his eyes) Of my nine grandchildren, one of them is coaching at the school (Richard Koonce assistant football and head basketball coach along with weightlifting coach). Ive told him that your name is Richard Koonce and not Richard Bowers so go out and carve your own path in life, dont follow me. I talk to him every day. Another grandson (Dequan Richardson) is on the football team. Wooo that boy can run! SK: What about the DeSotoHardee rivalry? RB: Its been dwindling for the last ve to eight years and I dont know why. My record was 5-5 against them. I had them cornered three times and lost, so we could have been 8-2. We played them in the Jamboree ve times and ve times in the real deal. I beat them every time in the Jamboree, but they beat me in the real deal. I dont like that one bit, not one bit. You want me to just say it like it is? Im an American and I got to win every time. Id tell my kids that this is a real game and we got to beat them. They (Hardee coaches) may have devalued it but I didnt. A win against them anytime is good. Those games were always close. You got to go crazy from start to nish when you play them. We just couldnt hold them for some reason. They never kicked my butt. But close dont count; Im mad they got more points than I did so we lost. I dont care how close it was, we lost. Maybe we dont play it up as much as we used to. We used to have pep rallies for the game. Once in awhile the principal and even the athletic director would get the kids out of school early so we could work on some things. Maybe we are too familiar with them. I buy that a lot. On the gridiron you cant shake out the difference from a friend and a player. You have to want to beat them all. It isnt that we hate them or their city, we have to have an athletic hate for an hourand-a-half on Friday night. If they beat you, you never forget it. I want to do my portion to restoring the rivalry. I might ask Coach Egloff if I can talk to the boys before the game and light a re under them. I got a rule: Never to mess with a coach and his team. Im not the coach but maybe I can help. Im no Richard Koonce (enthusiastic, visible, loud and emotional) Ill stay out of the way. I just want to do my part. You know I believe in the Lunar cycle and it is our turn to win. Weve got talent and we have to use it all from the beginning to the end. SK: If you believe we are going to win then what will the nal score be? RB: I believe it will be 24-14. We need the win. You know it is all about the children. If you want this society that were living in now to mesh over to be better citizens, you better keep sports. You learn so much from them and they bring back memories that last a lifetime. That is of course if you have coaches like Richard Bowers to lead them and to be the example for them to follow.Looking back with Coach BowersBy STEVE KNAPPARCADIAN SPORTS DIRECTOR ARCADIAN PHOTOS BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.comCoach Bowers recalls some of his favorite memories as coach for the Bulldogs. maybe a more peaceful world now, I dont know. It was serious then. It was that sophomore year (Nicklows senior year) that Hay remembers best. That was the year that we came late again. I think there were flags on the field because we were so late, he said. I remember Dabbo and a few others hurdling the fence that surrounds the field before the gates were opened. That crowd absolutely went crazy. Ive played in Raymond James Stadium and Ive never had a feeling like that. I had chills down my body. We dominated them that year. More memories will be made this year as the Bulldogs and Wildcats meet to continue the states oldest ri valry. Will the current Bulldogs be able to tell stories like Nicklow and Hay about the wins they had and be able to hold on to those exciting lifelong memories? Maybe they will end up like Blackwood and Wiley without a win to their credit. It would be nice to have this Bulldogs squad to look back and say, Remember that season when we werent doing so well and we were in last place in the district and Hardee was in first place? Remember how we beat them up in their own house? Memories like that last a lifetime, and it could happen tomorrow in Hardee. Four memories of the rivalry: DeSoto coaches recall past battles DeSoto middle school football coach Arthur Wiley laughs as he remembers some of the games he played against Hardee while wearing the Bulldogs uniform.PHOTO PROVIDED BY CAROL MAHLER Above, the 1923 DeSoto squad which beat Hardee 6-0. Below, the 2013 DeSoto Bulldog football team. PHOTO PROVIDED DESOTO COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL p CILDEST C] Cl f. DGlS mtvI INU'_ TJ1t _: : 'J I \jb \ ,T I51Ik 1: qyf ,I \J ;Jr it 'r ;?, +. : lirho, "::i;':_,r J:: '

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SPORTS DeSotoEXTRA The Sun/Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Arcadian | Page 14SOCCER SEASON BEGINS PAGE 16The Lady Bulldogs varsity soccer team begins its season with a new coach at the helm. There was no doubt about who is the best volleyball team in the 5A-11 district. After losing to Lemon Bay on a controversial ve-set match and then winning the rematch in ve sets on another controversial call, the DeSoto County Bulldogs took no chances on there being any doubt as to who is the best in the district. Maybe the letters DC shouldnt stand for DeSoto County, but District Champions. Its becoming a habit, and a good one to have. The Lady Bulldogs dominated the visiting Mantas last Thursday winning 3-1. DeSoto County started out with two Tishonna Riley kills and a tap to get them started. Riley also served for ve straight points. Bethany Bonville had eight points in a row to get the Bulldogs up to a 24-13 lead before she had a net serve. I sometimes just hit the ball too low and thats what happened that time, Bonville said as the Bulldogs cruised to a surprisingly easy 25-14 rst set win. Riley put the nishing touches on the set with a kill shot that nobody in the gym would want to try and block. In the second set the Bulldogs took a 17-12 lead and after a mild comeback attempt by Lemon Bay, Riley again was the one to put out the re with a couple of kills. She also made a spectacular save on a ball that went way out of play, yet she tracked it down near the concession stand and got it back onto the court. The nal score of the second set was 25-21. The Bulldogs never trailed at any point until the third set. After taking their biggest lead in the set at 11-5, the Mantas rallied to score seven straight points to take the lead for the rst time in the match. Lemon Bay won that set 25-20. After losing the third set, the ladies in blue and white took a 9-1 lead in the fourth set. As they have done all season, they failed to have the killer instinct and the Mantas came back and actually took a two-point lead at 17-15. Then DeSoto found the eye of the tiger and scored 10 of the nal 12 points of the set to win 25-19. The contest was a breakout game for sophomore Josie Deriso, who undoubtedly had her best performance of the season. She was a threat at the net with several blocks which forced the Mantas to try and shoot around her. Deriso scored on several put-backs and showed there is another weapon in THREE-PEAT!By STEVE KNAPPARCADIAN SPORTS DIRECTOR The DeSoto County volleyball team reacts as the nal point is scored, making them the district champs for the third straight year.ARCADIAN PHOTOS BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.com Tishonna Riley and Josie Deriso hold the District 5A-11 trophy along with the Beef OBradys Athlete of the Week award, which they shared for their contributions in the championship tournament.Coach Laura Whites arsenal. Thats all we wanted from her, just be that net monitor out there, White said. It was by far her best game. She was unstoppable as far as getting the ball past her. They had to change their game plan because of her. With the two strong matches for the district crown by Riley and the outstanding nal match by Deriso, they split the Beef OBradys Athlete of the Week award. Riley had 17 kills while Deriso led with ve blocks. Bonville led the team with 29 assists while Riley and Lucero Perez had 12 digs each. Casey Hall had 11 digs. Perez was coming off an ankle injury which caused her to miss the Hardee game. Its 99 percent healed now, she said. The players went into the hospitality room for a post-game meal. With a plate of food in one hand and a cupcake in the other, Deriso smiled and said, That was the most fun game Ive ever played. They went one way or the other but they wouldnt hit it straight at me. We ushed that Hardee game out of our memories but we wont forget this one. DeSoto County seniors Jillian Deriso, Tishonna Riley and Casey Hall celebrate when the District 5A-11 Championship trophy is given to them. In the CLASSIFIEDS! Find The Perfect Companion 58457182 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE 2013 TAX ROLL IS OPEN FOR COLLECTION The tax roll has been delivered by the Property Appraiser to the Tax Collector for collection. During the month of November 2013 a 4% discount applies, 3% discount in December 2013, 2% discount in January 2014, 1% discount in February 2014. The net amount in March 2014. Penalty and advertising are added April 1, 2014, Florida Statute 197.322 A-/ v + \EWSPAPERSo ppurrrr, -FC .,Desoto CountyP. 0. Boa 729ArrnWia. Florida ?4265, -Talcs: 1.863.993-{Sb l,.: rts: 1 863993 4\64DmLn license: 1463-993-471PFax: 863993 486?\ ,ctcr.tlcwL,a,unHlaatnllt.'hr..ioir.Kathryn J. Hill. C.F.C.1A < COL:_ECTOR

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 15 | Arcadian It has been a good fall season for all of DeSoto County High School sports except for the football team There have been several athletes advance through the district play and qualify for the regionals. From the boys golf team, Brad Bonville was tied for rst place going into the last hole in district action. While Bonville didnt win the district match, he qualied for regionals. There Bonville had trouble with his short game which is usually his strong part of the game. It was just one of those days when everything just didnt go right. On the ladies side of the course, Fayth Warren qualied for regionals. She didnt get past regional competition but it is the rst time in a long time since a Lady Bulldog has gone beyond the district tournament.DeSoto athletes reach regionalsBy STEVE KNAPPARCADIAN SPORTS DIRECTOR WARREN BONVILLEREGIONALS | 17 The first step on the road to the district crown started with a less than inspiring performance by the Bulldogs as they swept Hardee 25-12, 25-20 and 25-16. The Bulldogs have beaten the Wildcats 9-0 in the three times they have met this season, but Tuesdays performance was not how DeSoto County Coach Laura White wanted to start the playoffs. Even though we won tonight, we didnt execute very well. We didnt have the fire in our eyes. We cant continue to play like this and expect to go far in the tournament, she said. Part of the problem for the Bulldogs may have been from an injury suffered by the starting Libero Lucero Perez. Perez stepped on a ball while serving in practice on Monday and twisted her right ankle as she fell. She went to the hospital and was told she could not play for two or three weeks. Perez sat on the bench watching her teammates warm up before the game. Its the worse timing possible. Im going to play on Thursday though, she said. Perez was an all-area team selection last year as a freshman for the Bulldogs soccer team, which started its season Monday. I cant believe as to how much influence Lucero has on the team. She is the glue that holds the team together, White said. I was expecting some others to step up tonight but they didnt. Martha (Pelham) stepped up and had a good game. Casey Hall, senior captain for the Bulldogs, thought the fact that they were playing a team that they had dominated nine times this year may have been a problem. We dropped to their level which is something weve done a lot this year. Well be back to play better Thursday, she said. The Bulldogs started the match with a boom and ended it with a wimper. The first two points of the game came on Tishonna Rileys kill shots as the crowd yelled boom when she hit it. Riley was serving when Casey Hall and Jillian Deriso ended the game on successive kills. The second set ended on a Riley DeSoto blanks Hardee in district openerBy STEVE KNAPPARCADIAN SPORTS DIRECTOR ARCADIAN PHOTO BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.comTeam captain Casey Hall crushes the ball during the district tournament win over Hardee. Hall had ve kills and was second with eight digs in the DeSoto County 3-0 win against Hardee.DISTRICT | 17 SeriousMedicineforYourSkinrfnffnrrfnrtbfrfftbbb btb n frrnrbrfrrrftfnnrfftrnrn 50457186 Asp,John Mmn1. 00.WATER'SOERAUWLOOPE Cypress St j. rte fM A 0 O mz Za)Hickory StLewellyn Cassels Dr John MinniARNP

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Arcadian | Page 16 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 The DeSoto County girls soccer team has a new varsity coach. Twentyfour-year-old Narcy Hinojos is from Lakeland and graduated from Kathleen High School in 2008. While at Kathleen she was the assistant coach for the var sity soccer team. Hinojos is currently a substitute teacher in the DeSoto County school system. The team will be in District 2A-11 this year after nishing 11-10 last season. Returning for the Bulldogs will be Sun All-Area members Lucero Perez and Angelica Garcia. Other key members of the team will be Lucy Ruiz, Celeste Lira and Adriana Olvera. Returning for another season as the teams keeper is Diana Moya. The Bulldogs will be home tomorrow night as they host North Port. They will also host Lake Placid on Monday and Hardee on Tuesday. Games times are 5:30 p.m., except the Lake Placid match which will begin at 6 p.m.Lady Bulldgos soccer starts new seasonBy STEVE KNAPPARCADIAN SPORTS DIRECTOR ARCADIAN PHOTO BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.comNew varsity head coach Narcy Hinojos poses with her team during a recent practice. It was a quiet week at the high school as the varsity football team had their bye week. They are preparing to battle with Hardee tomorrow night in the continuation of the longest running football rivalry in the state. It hasnt been so quiet for the DeSoto County varsity volleyball team. They defeated Hardee 3-0 to make it to the nals against Lemon Bay. The Bulldogs beat the Mantas 3-1 to win the district championship. The squad then defeated Cypress Lakes Tuesday in the rst round of regional action. Junior Varsity teams in football and volleyball have completed their season. The DeSoto Youth Football teams ran into some tough competition against Sebring. The ag team came the closest to winning as they dropped their game 25-13. There was some good news for PHOTO BY MELANI BONVILLE The DeSoto County varsity volleyball team won the district championship last week Here are the members of the team. The junior varsity phot that ran in last weeks edition of The Arcadian was also taken by Melanie Bonville. By STEVE KNAPPARCADIAN SPORTS DIRECTORthe Mighty Mite cheerleaders. They nished third out of 21 teams in the classic non tumbling division of the cheer competition last Saturday.Upcoming gamesThe granddaddy of all of the state football rivalries resumes as DeSoto County travels to Hardee 7 p.m. tomorrow to play the Wildcats. If you are unable to attend be sure to listen to Joe Gallimore and Steve Knapp on WFLN 1480 AM radio or on the Internet. Also, visit the Arcadian Facebook page to see the video of the game. The Frostproof and Southeast games are on the site now and are worth watching. You never know who you will see in the video, as many fans and others are featured. The varsity volleyball team will host Lely 7 p.m. Tuesday in regional semi-nal action. The DeSoto County girls junior varsity and varsity soccer seasons begin this week. The Lady Bulldogs are busy as they host North Port tomorrow night. On Monday Lake Placid will come to Arcadia and the next night Hardee will come to Bulldog country. The boys JV and varsity soccer teams will visit Lake Placid Monday for a 6 p.m. game. RIGHT WAY 8J t oo's 8 WRONG WAY!Contact your Sun Newspaper Advertising Account Executive Today.Their job is... making sure your advertising stays on the right track.-' Sun Newspapers Advertising Department SU.NlNlm-:)NSl,Al,FRS

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 17 | Arcadian The boys cross country team placed second in an eight-team district and the entire team qualied for regional play. The Lady Bulldogs volleyball team beat Lemon Bay for the district crown and have advanced to the regional semni-nal game against Lely. The most important thing we know is that the Trojans are from Naples and they will be playing at Desoto County High School Nov. 5 at 7 p.m. The winner of that game will advance to the regional championship game. Soccer and basketball for both boys and girls, along with the girls weightlifting season are starting now with more regional hopes for our winter sports athletes. Be sure to check the roundup column in the sports section for a lineup of upcoming games so you can show your support for the Bulldogs.REGIONALSFROM PAGE 15 ARCADIAN PHOTO BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.com The DeSoto Lady Bulldogs varsity volleyball team. blast that found the corner of the court. The 20 points scored by the Wildcats was the most they had scored in a game all season against the Bulldogs. The third and final set ended with a wimper on a weak Hardee return that bounced harmlessly on the floor to wrap up the Bulldogs sweep. Riley led the club with 20 kills while Bethany Bonville led with 34 assists and five aces. Pelham did a good job as a starter with 12 digs to lead the team.DISTRICTFROM PAGE 15 ARCADIAN PHOTO BY STEVE KNAPP, sbigdaddyknapp@aol.comTeammate Josie Deriso watches as DeSoto Countys Tishonna Riley goes up for one of her gamehigh 20 kills in the 3-0 win over Hardee in the rst round of the district matches Oct. 22. The Bulldogs host Lemon Bay tonight for the district crown. | COMMUNITY NEWS BRIEFSBrowse for Bargains at the Historical Societys Yard SaleThe DeSoto County Historical Societys Yard Sale is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, November 9, at the Fairgrounds Exhibition Building, 124 Heard St., Arcadia. The contents of several homes have been donated and are priced to sell. Baked goods, coffee, hotdogs, and cold drinks will also be available. Donations will be accepted before noon, Monday through Wednesday, November 4-6, at the Fair Grounds or call 863-494-6607 or 863-494-4325. All proceeds will benet the Societys efforts to preserve and promote the history of DeSoto County for future generations.Gary earns Superintendent certificationDeSoto County School Superintendent Dr. Karyn E. Gary earned a certicate of completion for the Florida Association of District School Superintendents Florida Superintendent Special Certication Program. The certicate was present ed to Superintendent Gary by FADSS President Dan Boyd, FADSS Chief Executive Ofcer Bill Montford and Florida Education Commissioner Pam Stewart in September at the FADSS fall conference. The Special Certication Program is an extensive training program designed specically for Florida Superintendents that includes training in school law, school nance, collective bargaining, the superintendents leadership role in improving student achievement and core concepts of leadership. In addition, the superintendent must complete the Florida Superintendents Examination to demonstrate a rm understanding of the information presented through the training course. Superintendent Gary should be commended for her efforts to expand and build upon the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the school system in todays challenging and complex society, said Montford. DeSoto County School District is fortunate to have a leader like Superintendent Gary who is committed to public education and to the continuous growth and enhancement of their own leadership skills in order to better serve their school system.Lecture, sale of Highwaymen artGary Monroe will be the featured guest speaker at the 28th Civilian Conservation Corps Festival, which at Highlands Hammock State Park, 5931 Hammock Road, Sebring, Florida. The festival will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 9.Monroe will present The Highwaymen: Floridas AfricanAmerican Landscape Painters at 1 p.m. in the parks recreation hall. The program is sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council. Highwaymen artists Mary Ann Carroll, Al Black, and Kelvin Hair will be exhibiting and selling paintings. Lisa Stone, who promotes contemporary Southern artists and outsider art, will be exhibiting and selling vintage Highwaymen works including those of Harold Newton and Al Hair. The lecture is free. Park entry fee is $6 per vehicle (up to 8 people per vehicle). The public is invited. Other Festival highlights include CCC history, an antique car show, Mountain Dan Chainsaw Art, traditional frame quilting and antique quilt display, Python Hunter Greg Graziani and Graziani Reptiles, Cracker Cowboy Poet Hank Mattson, tram rides, and childrens activities. Featured folk and bluegrass bands Back Porch Revival, Wiregrass, Roadside Revue, and Grant Livingston will provide live entertainment all day. 50457187 Be sure and stop in and thank these local businesses who believe that a well-informed citizen is important for our community: Home Owners Supply DeSoto Automall Sevigny Eye Care & Associates These businesses have made 2,500 additional annual subscriptions to the weekly Arcadian Newspaper po ssible. SITUPs4.Viovr v r C rc ^ -? pol Keep Your Dollars In DeSoto

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Arcadian | Page 18 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 Probably no mammal has more superstitions, misconceptions and mysteries to it than the helpful and harmless bat. Their nocturnal habits, eerie behavior such as swarming out of caves, and their darting swift ight punctuated by high pitched squeaks, plus that some species dine on blood, makes them feared and reviled. A few bat facts: Most people, including those who fear bats, have never seen a bat. Bats are the only mammal that can truly y. Bats are not rodents; they belong to the order Chiroptera, which means "hand-wing. Fossil records indicate bats have been around for 65 million years. Bats are not blind. Bats navigate by echolocation they use ultrasonic sounds that echo off solid objects. Bats are timid and do not attack people. They won't get tangled in your hair. Bats are capable of carry ing rabies, but probably less than 1/2 of 1 percent carry the disease. When bats do get rabies they usually die within a few days. If an infected bat is handled it may bite in self-defense and transmit the disease. All young bats are fed milk from their mothers until they are capable of foraging on their own. The wings of bats are actually the hands the ngers of bats are extremely elongated and webbed between. At rest the bat neatly folds its wings. The hind limbs are also modied to allow bats to hang upside down by their toes. In this position bats consume very little energy. Bats are uniquely adapted to catch night-ying insects. World-wide there are over 1,000 species of bats. The largest bat in the world is the Malayan ying fox, a fruit-eater. It may weigh over 2 1/2 pounds with a wing span of over 6 feet. The smallest bat is the Bumblebee bat of Thailand, an insect-eater, which weighs less than a penny with a wing span of only 5 inches. All Florida native bats are insect eaters. Some bats specialize in eating other items such as fruit, nectar, and pollen, vertebrates, and even blood. A few of the species that occasionally show up in south Florida feed on fruit, nectar, and pollen, but you wont nd any vampire bats in Florida. There are only three species in the world that feed on blood. Bats rest during daylight hours, taking shelter in a variety of places such as caves, mines, buildings, bridges, culverts, rock crevices, under tree bark, and amongst foliage. Some species congregate in colonies; other bat species usually rest solitary. Colonies may be from a few dozen to thousands of individuals. Their social behavior and roosting location choices are useful keys to identifying species. Colony-roosting bats tend to have only one pup at a time, while bats that roost solitary usually have more than one pup at a time. Bats play an important role in natural ecosystems. They prey upon insects, and also create nutrient-rich guano. Most insectivorous bats eat their body weight in insects each night. One bat can devour up to 3,000 insects in a night. Thirteen species of bats live in Florida year-round. Several other species are occasionally found in north or south Florida. Many bat species look very similar and identication is difcult unless you can measure their body parts, but handling bats is not advised. A good source of bat infor mation is http://www.oridabats.org/ FloridaBats.htm. The most common bats found in our area are the Northern yellow bat (Lasiurus intermedius), Seminole bat (Lasiurus seminolus), Evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis), Tricolored bat (Perimyotis subavus), and Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis). The Tricolored is Floridas smallest bat. It roosts in caves primarily in winter in small groups, usually fewer than 20 individuals. The Evening bat has a body length of 1.9 to 2.6 inches and a wingspan of 10 to11 inches. The Northern yellow bat is slightly larger and roosts primarily in the dead fronds of sabal palms. Seminole bat is a rich mahogany color. This solitary bat commonly roosts in pine trees and Spanish moss. The Brazilian free-tailed bat roosts in large colonies in buildings or under bridges. Other Florida bat species are found in the northern and extreme southern part of the state. A few of Floridas bat species are endangered or threatened. Bats occasionally take up residence in attics. If you need to remove the bats from your house or a building, it should be done by excluding entry into the buildings, not by killing them. While the bats are roosting during the day, a piece of screen may be attached above the opening where they have entered. Let the tail end of the screen hang loose bats will gure out how to crawl out, but will not be able to get back in. Once the bats are gone, the openings may be sealed properly. Since bats are such great insect eaters, many people try to attract bats by putting up bat houses. Bats are a bit nicky about where they roost, and need space that is humid and stays within a certain temperature range. Many people are disappointed when they put up a bat house and bats fail to use it. Most of the bats found in our area are solitary dwellers, or only congregate in small groups, and most prefer natural roosting areas. If you do put up a bat house and it remains unused, move it to a new location. Bat Conservation International (BCI) has excellent tips on building bat houses, purchasing completed bat houses, and bat-related information and merchandise. Their phone number is 1-800-538-BATS and their website is http://www.batcon.org/.Bats are helpful and harmlessOver the Garden Gate Al & Karen Smoke ksmoke@embarqmail.com PHOTO PROVIDED BY COMMONS WIKIMEDIA.ORG (U. S. ARMY)The Evening bat has a body length of 1.9 to 2.6 inches and a wingspan of 10 to11 inches. Bats can deliver a erce bite and should not be handled. into a family tradition and repeated almost every year. As a kid, Id always wanted for my family to do that, but it never happened. So with children of my own, I decided my time had come. Grab a butcher knife and a candle, and what else would anyone need? I found out that pumpkins dont come with instructions, as far as carving them into jack-o-lanterns or making pumpkin pie either. So gathering my daughters on the front porch to undertake this for the rst time was interesting, to say the least. Halloween is a time for make-believe. And I was making believe I knew what I was doing. First, you shouldve seen me nding the right pumpkin to buy. How do you know when you have a good one? Is it the weight? Do you shake it and listen? Do you thump it like a watermelon? I examined every one of them at the fruit and vegetable stand, making believe I was a pumpkin procurer from way GRITS & PIECESFROM PAGE 4 back. More than likely, I was perceived to be The Great Pumpkin Bumpkin. This is it! I exclaimed with as much glee as I could muster. And we were off for the slaughter. Plunging the butcher knife in a few inches from the stem, I proceeded to saw what I thought was a circle. It turned out more like the shape of Nevada by the time I was done. And reaching inside to grab the seeds and other squishy stuff (pumpkin guts, for lack of a better description), I was having ashbacks of cleaning sh or rabbits in my youth. I mustve been out of my gourd for taking this project on. The face wasnt so bad, since I drew it on the outside rst. Before long, I had triangular eyes and a not-so-toothy grin on the pumpkins face and was quite proud of myself. The candle added a lot of credibility to my lack of experience, dancing with the breeze and bringing the grinning gourd to life. But I did learn one lesson. Never carve them too early. This was probably the weekend before Halloween. By the time the night of the candy snatchers nally arrived, it had begun to wilt and collapse, and was crawling with bugs who were glad I was starting the tradition too. But at least it looked pretty scary. My girls are long grown and on their own, so now the tradition (known as The Great Pumpkin Massacre) continues with my four grandchildren. I pose them outside my front door for the annual photo, just like I did with my girls, and capture their smiles, as well as those toothy or toothless grins of their pumpkins. Whatever you choose to do, have a safe, fun Halloween, and make lots of boo-tiful memories with those you care about! will lead a bevy of local beauties and oats through the streets of Downtown Arcadia. The Senior Queen candidates, who were selected by their fellow classmates are JoAnn Dozier, Terri Gambrell, and Beth Hollingsworth. In the junior car will be Cathy Newton and Kim Waggoner. Charlotte Bible and Dawn Spring were elected by the sophomores and the freshmen chose Linda Herbert and Janice McQuay as their honorees. Arcadias Brad Scott has been selected as a defensive end for the University of Missouri-Rolla Miner Football team. Scott, son of Mrs. and Mr. Jeremiah Scott, is a sophomore in mining engineering. Deborah Mercer, of Rt. 2, representing Lambda Chi Alpha frater nity as Homecoming Queen for the University of Missouri-Rolla. 1983: Senior Class President Melba Hill was crowned Homecoming Queen by last years queen Julie Boggess during halftime festivities at the DeSoto/Lake Placid game last Friday. The Queens escort for the evening was Calvin Boggess. This year as a senior, Miss Hill is also Sub Deb president, Sub Deb nominee for Miss Growl, Interact reporter-historian, a FFA member and voted Most Popular Girl in the Senior Hall of Fame. Other nominees for the title of Homecoming Queen were Kim Douglas and Julie Platt. There were escorted by Vincent Schreibner and Mark Mizell respectively. The Homecoming Court consisted of Sharon Allen escorted by Alonzo Nightengale, and Elba Pera escorted by Bard Calcagino as the junior class representatives. The DeSoto High School advisory committee for the 1983-84 school year has been named. Those on board include Delma Allen, George Bellamy, Art Brough, Franki Davis, Joe Graham, Nancy Hall, Verlene Hickson, William Kendall, George Lane, Bonnie Molloy, Genie Martin, Rita McElroy, Helena Muller, Sue Overcash, Ann Ryals, Sadie Thomas, and Susie H. Williams.THIS WEEKFROM PAGE 9 $$ S AV E MONEY $$ Shop the Classifieds

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 19 | Arcadian SP20648 Arcadia Englewood North Port Port Charlotte Punta Gorda Venice classifieds Sunsational Sellers Classifications 4 Ways To Place an Ad Real Estate 1000 Employment 2000 Notices 3000 Financial 4000 Business Service 5000 Merchandise/Garage Sales 6000 T ransportation/Boats 7000 LOCAL CALL 863-494-7600 LOCAL FAX 863-494-3533 tjewell@sun-herald.com EMAIL SUN NEWSPAPERS NET / CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE $ 8.00 Merchandise value up to $500. Private Party Ads. 3 Lines for 7 Days. Price must be in ad. No Refunds. Some restrictions apply. Merchandise valued up to $501 to $1,000. Private Party Ads, 3 Lines for 7 Days. Price must be in ad. No refunds. Some restrictions apply. $ 9.95 PHOTO SPECIAL ADD A PHOTO FOR ONLY $10 FREE ADS! Go to sunnewspapers.net and place your FREE 3 line merchandise ad. Your ad will run for 7 days in print and online. FREE ADS are for merchandise under $500 and the ad must be placed online. One item per ad and the price must appear in the ad. Some restrictions apply. HOMES FOR SALE1020 26336 Nadir Rd Deep Creek GORGEOUS2/2 TURNKEY FURNISHEDGOLFCONDO. ENDUNITW/ SKYLIGHTS PANORAMICGOLFCOURSE VIEWS. $1500 BUYER REBATEIFPURCHASED THROUGHFla Golf Properties Inc 941-698-4653 PORTCHARLOTTE MOVE IN ready -Clean and partially updated 2/2 home, great location, lovely lot. 1452 Pulaski St. $72,500.00 Peggy Mardis, Broker REMAXEXCEL863-990-1877 GOLFCOURSE COMMUNITY1035 55+ Active Community Affordable Manufactured Homes!!! 1 Year FREEGolf Membership With New Home Purchase! Call Ted @ 800-538-2590 for details or please visit our websitewww .ar cadia villa g e .com MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE 1090 ARCADIA 2bd/2ba 50+, $312/mo lot rent, CHA, Carport, 2 sheds, handicap ramp asking $32.5K 863-473-1599 MANUFACTURED HOMES FOR SALE1095 ARCADIA, Nearly New 3BR/2BA Manufactured Home on 1/2 Acre. Financing Available! Prestige Homes, Punta Gorda 941-637-1122 COMMERCIAL/ INDUSTRIALPROP1620 ARCADIA 4.4 ac By Owner! House & Shop, 800 ft. Hwy 17 Frontage, Zoned Comm. Info. 863-494-5540 or 863-244-3585 PROFESSIONAL2010 NOW HIRING POLICE OFFICERThe City of Bowling Green is accepting applications for a full time police officer. Applications may be obtained at City Hall, 104 E. Main St. The city of Bowling Green is a drug free workplace and an equal opportunity employer. T urn your trash into cash! Ad vertise y our yard sale! CLERICAL/OFFICE2020 PA YROLL SECRETARY F/T position. Must be proficient in computer and typing skills. Please submit your resume in person. No phone calls please. 1192 NE Livingston Street Arcadia, FL 34266 MEDICAL2030 CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS CARE MANAGERS FULL TIME P ART TIME ALL SHIFTS TIREDOFBEINGJUSTA NUMBER... ATHARBORCHASE WECARE ABOUTOUREMPLOYEESAS MUCHASOURRESIDENTS. ***************************** HARBORCHASECOM-PETITIVEWAGESANDAN EXCELLENTBENEFITSPACK-AGESUCHASMEDICAL, DENTAL, VISION& 401K ***************** PART-TIMETEAMMEMBERS RECEIVEBENEFITS AT20+ HOURS. ***************** FORCONSIDERATIONPLEASE APPLYINPERSONTO: HARBORCHASE OF VENICE ASSISTEDLIVINGANDSKILLEDNURSING950 PINEBROOKROADVENICE, FL 34285 (941) 484-8801 PH(941) 484-3450 FAXEOE M/F/D/V SKILLED TRADES2050 INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICIAN Citrus Processing facility has an immediate opening for a person who has the ability to work with 480 3 phase as well as PLCs. Overtime and weekends are r equired. This is a year-round full time position. Peace River Citrus Products offers to eligible employees a full benefits Package including;Medical, Dental, Life and LTD InsurancePaid Holidays and vacationProfit Sharing Plan & 401(k) with match To apply Please send resume via fax (863) 993-3161 or Apply in person at: Peace River Citrus Products 4104 N.W. Hwy 72 Arcadia, Fl 34266 EOE/DFW IN THE CLASSIFIED YOU CAN..... Find a Pet Find a Car Find a Job Find Garage Sales Find A New Employee Sell Your Home Sell Your Unwanted Merchandise Advertise Your Business or ServiceClassified its the reliable source for the right results MANAGEMENT2060 ARC/DESOTO MANAGER for group home of 3 adult males. Call 863-494-2328 GENERAL2100 CUSTOMER SERVICE ASSOCIATEResponsible for assisting customers with their parts, sales and service needs. Also responsible for administrative assistant duties. Must have very strong customer service skills. Drug and tobacco free workplace. Horizon Coach 2885 SE Highway 70, Arcadia PUT CLASSIFIEDS TO WORK FOR YOU!FIND A JOB! BUY A HOME! BUY A CAR! GENERAL2100 V alencia Harvesting 24 Temporary workers needed in Arcadia, FL from approximately Nov. 10, 2013 June 7, 2014 Following Supervisors instructions, the worker will place a picking sack over their shoulder and carry an 18 to 22 ladder from the field truck to the particular area of the grove to be harvested. (Equipment/tools provided at no cost to worker) A fully loaded sack weighs approximately 80 and 100 pounds, depending upon the size, condition and variety of fruit. W orker positions ladder against the tree and within reach of the fruit in a leaning position, taking care not to break limbs, damage the tree, knock off fruit, or interfere with other workers, in a secure position to prevent slipping or falling and possible injury to themselves or other workers. Remove fruit from the tree and place into pick sack. When picking sack is full take full sack to fruit container located in the grove and drop fruit from pick sack into container. In order to perform this kind of work, worker must be able to work outside for at least 6 hours a day in all kinds of weather and be in possession of the requisite physical strength and endurance to repeat the picking process rapidly, working quickly and skillfully with their hands, and carrying a large number of sacks of fruit from the area in which the fruit is being harvested to the location of the container. Workers may be required to perform miscellaneous grove clean-up work. These activities may include removing ladders, debris, boxes, discarded fruit from fields to clean growing areas, pruning, painting trees, r epair and or replace irrigation equipment, may maintain fence lines. The highest of $9.97 per hr or applicable piece rates depending on crop activity, ? guarantee, 35 hrs per week, maybe required to work additional hours, housing and transportation provided at no cost to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent r esidence at the end of each work day, must be 18 years or older. T ransportation and subsistence expenses to the worksite will be r eimbursed upon completion of 50% of the work contract or earlier if appropriate. We participate in the E-Verify program and workers must have valid identification for I-9 preparation when they r eport to begin work. Apply or send resume to the nearest State W orkforce/Job Center in your area: FL 863-993-1008, AL 256259-1835, GA 404-656-6000, MS 662-842-4371, using job order FL 9819349. NOTICE OFACTION3116 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 14-2013-CA-000162 METLIFE BANK, NA AS SUCCESSOR TO EVERBANK REVERSE MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY M. LAWRENCE; DANIEL G. BLAIR; CHARLES V. HARRIS; NATHAN R. HARRIS; ARIANNE RACHEL; LUCAS DOYLE; SARAH DOYLE; ELIZABETH HEYWOOD; RONNIE M. STUBBS, JR.; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; DOROTHY M. LAWRENCE, PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF FRANCES M. HARRIS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DOROTHY M. LAWRENCE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIEL G. BLAIR; UNKNOWN NOTICE OFACTION3116 SPOUSE OF CHARLES V. HARRIS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NATHAN R. HARRIS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ARIANNE RACHEL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUCAS DOYLE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SARAH DOYLE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ELIZABETH HEYWOOD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONNIE M. STUBBS, JR.; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: LUCAS DOYLE 1044 SE 6TH AVENUE ARCADIA, FL. 34226 OR 106 DICKHART STREET ARCADIA, FL 34266 SARAH DOYLE 4902 SE APACHE DRIVE ARCADIA, FL 34226 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUCAS DOYLE 1044 SE 6TH AVENUE ARCADIA, FL. 34226 OR 106 DICKHART STREET ARCADIA, FL 34266 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN And any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the above-named Defendant(s), if deceased or whose last known addresses are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: LOT 9, 10, 11 AND 12, BLOCK 18, KING & BAKER SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 105. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Giselle M. Hugues, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 15th day of July, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the DeSoto County Clerks Office, 115 East Oak Street, Arcadia, Florida 34266, (863)993-4876, at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon r eceiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ N. Daughtrey Deputy Clerk Published 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 109392 2956279 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No.: 13 CA 405 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPINOTICE OFACTION3116 T AL I INC. TRUST 2007 HE5 MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007 HE5, Plaintiff, vs. Robert Rivers; Jacquelyn B. Rivers; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Robert Rivers Residence Unknown Jacquelyn Rivers Residence Unknown If living: if dead, all unknown parties claiming interest by, through, under or against the above named defendants, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other claimants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in DeSoto County, Florida: Lot Number Ten (10), Harlem Heights, Arcadia, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in plat Book 6, Page 82, of the Public Records of De Soto County, Florida. Parcel Number: 013824018600000100 Street Address: 1248 SW Harlem Cir, Arcadia, Florida 34266 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Clarfield, Okon, Salomone & Pincus, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice, on or before December 2, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the r elief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on August 12, 2013 Mitzie W. McGavic Clerk of said Court BY: /s/ B. Wynn As Deputy Clerk CLARFIELD, OKON, SALOMONE & PINCUS, P.L. Attorney for Plaintiff 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730 W est Palm Beach, FL 33401 T elephone: (561) 713-1400 Published 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 349874 2958361 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13DR603 DIVISION: James T. Galliher, Petitioner and Lisa Rose South, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR T emporary Custody By Extended Family TO: Lisa Rose South Last known address: 12001 Belcher Rd. Apt G101, Largo, FL 33771 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Temporary Custody has been filed against you and that you are r equired to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on James T. Galliher whose address is 4810 NW Hwy 72, Lot 134, Arcadia, FL34266 on or before November 25, 2013, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 115 East Oak St. Arcadia, FL34266 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, 'Serving DeSoto County since 1887'ARCADIANo a,.WoooooooooCi sl[7gISbHARBORCHASE/ lebratingr niut

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Arcadian | Page 20 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 NOTICE OFACTION3116 are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, FLorida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated October 23, 2013. MITZIE W. MCGAVIC CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ N. Daughtrey Deputy Clerk Published 10/24/13, 10/31/13, 11/7/13 & 11/14/13 131159 2955581 Great Deals in the Classifieds! NOTICE OFADMIN3118 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA FILE NUMBER: 142013CP000086 IN RE: ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION ALAN WAYNE HOOKS Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRA TION T0 ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the administration of the estate of ALAN WAYNE HOOKS, late of DeSoto County, Florida, File Number 142013CP000086, is pending in the Circuit Court in and for DeSoto County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is, DeSoto County Courthouse, Arcadia FL 34266. The personal repr esentative of this estate is TOBY JUNIOR HOOKS, who address is P .O. Box 1204, Nocatee, FL 34268 The name and address of the attorney for the personal repr esentative is set forth below. All persons having claims or demands against this estate are r equired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written statement of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney, and the amount claimed. If the claim is not yet due, the date when it will become due shall be stated. If the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient copies of the claim to the Clerk of the above styled court to enable to Clerk to mail one copy each to the personal representative. All persons interested in the estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has been mailed are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objections they may have that challenge the validity of the decedents Will, the qualifcation of the personal representative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the court. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Dated at Arcadia, Florida, on this 28th day of October, 2013. /s/Toby Junior Hooks Personal Representative, Petitioner /s/ Frank Ribel, Jr. Attorney for Petitioner 25 East Oak Street Arcadia, FL 34266 (863)494-7139 Florida Bar No. 0290981 Published 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 131159 2958789 NOTICE TO CREDITORS3120 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013CP000081AXMA Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF MARJORIE T. GOIKE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Marjorie T. Goike, deceased, whose date of death was August 27, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for DeSoto County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 115 E. Oak Street, Arcadia, FL 34266. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 24, 2013 Attorney for Personal Repr esentatives: Guy S. Emerich Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives Florida Bar Number: 126991 Farr, Farr, Emerich, Hackett and Carr, P.A. 99 Nesbit Street Punta Gorda, FL 33950 T elephone: (941) 639-1158 Fax: (941) 639-0028 E-Mail: gemerich@farr.com Secondary E-Mail: mlavine@farr.com and probate@farr.com Personal Repr esentatives: Judith E. Goike 12320 SW Austin Avenue Lake Suzy, FL 34269 Christine C. Sheran 12222 SW Austin Avenue Lake Suzy, FL 34269 Published 10/24/13 & 10/31/13 114849 2955027 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013-CP-083 Division Twelfth IN RE: ESTATE OF Joe F. Colding a.k.a Joe Francis Colding, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of Joe F. Colding a.k.a Joe Francis Colding, deceased, whose date of death was September 1, 2013, and whose social security number are xxx-xx-8615, is pending in the Circuit Court for DeSoto County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 115 East Oak Street, Arcadia, Florida 34266. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF THE COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER NOTICE TO CREDITORS3120 THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 31, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Eugene E. Waldron, Jr. Primary Service E-mail: Service@eewj.com Secondary Service E-mail: Ewaldron@eewj.com Florida Bar No. 0794971 Eugene E. Waldron, Jr., P.A. 124 N. Brevard Ave Arcadia, Florida 34266 T elephone: (863) 494-4323 Personal Representative: Julie P. Colding 6041 NW County Road 661A Arcadia, Florida 34266 Published 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 228541 2958371 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 2013CP000084 IN RE THE ESTATE OF: MORGAN, THOMASENA THEDOSIA Deceased. Notice to Cr editors The administration of the estate of THOMASENA THEDOSIA MORGAN, deceased, whose date of death was May 5, 2013, is pending in the Twelfth Circuit Court for DeSoto County, Florida Probate Division, the address of which is 115 East Oak Street, Room 201, Arcadia, Florida 34266. The estate is testate. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent=s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is September 26, 2013 Attorney for Personal Representative: Jeffrey A. King, Esq. Florida Bar No. 342238 1800 Second Street, Suite 895Sarasota, Florida 34236 T elephone: (941) 954-5585 Personal Representative: Samuel J. Morgan, Jr. 3048 SE Brown Road Arcadia FL 34266 Published 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 121861 2944320 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE3122 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000153 WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC., Plaintiff, vs. SHIRLEY ANN ADAMS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHIRLEY ANN ADAMS; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 10th day of October, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2012 CA 000153, of the Circuit Court of the 12TH Judicial Circuit in and for Desoto County, Florida, wherein WELLS F ARGO FINANCIAL SYSTEM FLORIDA, INC. is the Plaintiff and SHIRLEY ANN ADAMS, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE3122 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHIRLEY ANN ADAMS and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, SOUTH DOOR OF THE DESOTO COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 115 EAST OAK STREET, ARCADIA, FL 34266, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 1, BLOCK B OF DESOTO MOBILE ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, P AGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 23rd day of October, 2013. By: Carri L. Pereyra Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 T elephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 T oll Free:1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com Published 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 107507 2956197 F i n d i t i n t h e C l a s s i f i e d s IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 12TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 2012CA000523 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC, Plaintiff, vs. GRACIELA CENDEJAS A/K/A GARACIELA CENDEJAS; JORGE L CENDEJAS; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 3rd day of October, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000523, of the Circuit Court of the 12TH Judicial Circuit in and for Desoto County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is the Plaintiff and GRACIELA CENDEJAS A/K/A GARACIELA CENDEJAS, JORGE L CENDEJAS and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, SOUTH DOOR OF THE DESOTO COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 115 EAST OAK STREET, ARCADIA, FL 34266, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: ALL OF LOT 14 AND SOUTH 38 FEET OF LOT 12 BLOCK Q MILLS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF ARCADIA ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESOTO COUNTY FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 23rd day of October, 2013. By: Carri L. Pereyra Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 T elephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 T oll Free:1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com Published 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 107507 2956181 NOTICE OFSALE3130 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14 2008 CA 000470 SEC.: CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v. TODD ZELLARS A/K/A TODD R. ZELLARS ; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Reset Foreclosure Sale dated October 1, 2013 entered in Civil Case No. 14 2008 CA 000470 of the Circuit Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit in and for DeSoto County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 10th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the South door of the DeSoto County Courthouse, 115 East Oak Street, Arcadia, Florida 34266, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statutes, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 18, BLOCK 7, SECTION 1, SUNNYBREEZE HARBOR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. A TTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: DeSoto County Clerk`s Office 115 East Oak Street Arcadia, FL 34266 Phone: (863) 993-4876 At least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon r eceiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT ARCADIA, FLORIDA THIS 3rd DAY OF October, 2013 By: /s/ N. Daughtry MITZIE W. MCGAVIC CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA Published 10/17/13 & 10/24/13 276862 2953988 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 142011CA000153 JUDY M. OWENS Plaintiff, vs. MOHAMMED M. RAHMAN and MD Z. ABEDIN, and their unknown assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, or other claimants by, through, under or against said Defendants, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause and number case, Mitzie W. McGavic, Clerk of the Circuit Court, DeSoto County, Florida, will sell the property situated in DeSoto County, Florida, described as: The North 149.54 feet of Lot 4 of GENES LITTLE ACRES, an unrecorded plat more particularly described as: The North 149.54 feet of the following described lands: Begin at the NE corner of the SW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 28, Township 37 South, Range 24 East; thence S 00 W, 102.98 feet to a point on Southerly right-of-way line of State Road 70; thence N 89 W along above said right-of-way, 420.44 feet to Point of Beginning; thence continue N 89 W, 243.22 feet to a p oint; thence S 00 W, NOTICE OFSALE3130 249.54 feet; thence S 89 E, 243.20 feet to a point; thence N 00 E, 249.54 feet to P .O.B., Less 33.00 feet of the WEst side for road right-of-way. Parcel Number 28-37-24-0164-0000-0040 at public sale, to the highest bidder for cash, at the South door of the DeSoto County Courthouse in Arcadia, Florida at 11:00 A.M. on November 21, 2013. MITZIE W. McGAVIC Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ B. Wynn As Deputy Clerk Published 10/24/13 & 10/31/13 120581 2955206 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 2013-CA-000211 Division: U.S. BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF MID-STATE TRUST XI BY GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, A FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA AS SERVICER WITH DELEGATED AUTHORITY Plaintiff, vs. MARCUS W. DODD A/K/A WAYNE DODD A/K/A MARCUS WAYNE, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the judgment of foreclosure entered in the above cause, the clerk shall offer for sale the property situated in DeSoto County, Florida, described as: BEGIN AT THE NW CORNER OF SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 39 SOUTH RANGE 24 EAST, DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE N 89 E ALONG NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT 449.25 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SAME LINE, 150.00 FEET; THENCE S 00 W 180.00 FEET; THENCE S 89 W 150.00 FEET; THENCE N 00A9 E, 180.00 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO INCLUDED A 30-FOOT EASEMENT ALONG NORTH SIDE AND ALSO SUBJECT TO RESERVA TIONS, RESTRICTIONS AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on December 3, 2013, at 11:00AM at www.desotoclerk.com. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSIST ANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE DESOTO COUNTY CLERKS OFFICE, 115 EAST OAK STREET, ARCADIA, FL 34266, (863)993-4876 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING IMPAIRED CALL (TDD) 1-800955-8771, IF VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-9558770, OR YOU MAY ALSO CALL 711. Dated: 10/21/13. V eschio Law Group, LLC By: /s/ Mark D. Smith Bar No. 0069698 2001 W. Kennedy Blvd. T ampa, FL 33606 Phone (813) 258-8741 Email: foreclosure@vlgfl.com Published 10/24/13 & 10/31/13 114982 2955054 T AX DEEDS3132 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice is hereby given that US BANK, AS C/F FL DUNDEE LIEN INC LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 1365 Issuance Date: MAY 28, 2010 T ax Deed File #: 13-33-TD MVdl iREOM fireadnS.la^IV

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 21 | Arcadian T AX DEEDS3132 Description of Property: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTH 3/4 OF THE NE1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 39 SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST, DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE S 89 DEGREES 35 W ALONG NORTH LINE OF SAID TRACT, 1129.15 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF THE RYALS PROPERTY A S RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 273, PAGE 584, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE CONTINUE A LONG SAME LINE, 15.06 FEET; THENCE S 00 DEGREES 37 W 249.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE S 00 DEGREES 37 W, A DISTANCE OF 249.50 FEET; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 41 W A DISTANCE OF 174.56 FEET; THENCE N 00 DEGREES 00 E, AS DISTANCE OF 249.50 FEET; THENCE N 89 DEGREES 35 E, A DISTANCE OF 174.56 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Names in which assessed: ANDRE POLK PO BOX 1546 NOCATEE, FL 34268 A ll of said property being in the County of DeSoto, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the South Courthouse Door on NOVEMBER 6, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 11th day of OCTOBER, 2013. MITZIE W. McGAVIC CLERK OF COURT DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA By:CRYSTAL HENDERSON, Deputy Clerk Publication Dates: 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13 & 11/7/13 112132 2951477 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice is hereby given that TC T AMPA 1, LLC; PNC CUS TC T AMPA 1, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 1027 Issuance Date: MAY 27, 2011 T ax Deed File #: 13-42-TD Description of Property: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE NW1/4 OF THE SW1/4 OF THE NE1/4 OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 38 SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST, DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE SOUTH 127 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 225.07 FFET; THENCE W EST 150.14 FEET; THENCE NORTH 230.90 FEET; THENCE EAST 150 FFET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, ALL LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 38 SOUTH, RANGE 24 EAST, DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 1973 CHAM SINGLE WIDE MOBILE HOME. IDENTIFICATION #0439694904D. TITLE #5595633. RP#R581868. Names in which assessed: MILTON T. SHIRLEY PO BOX 1292 NOCATEE, FL 34268 A ll of said property being in the County of DeSoto, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the South Courthouse Door on NOVEMBER 20, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 7th day of OCTOBER, 2013. MITZIE W. McGAVIC CLERK OF COURT DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA By:CRYSTAL HENDERSON, Deputy Clerk Publication Dates: 10/17/13, 10/24/13, 10/31/13 & 11/7/13112132 2951479 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice is hereby given that TC T AMPA 1, LLC; PNC CUS TC T AMPA 1, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 1575 T AX DEEDS3132 Issuance Date: MAY 27, 2011 T ax Deed File #: 13-43-TD Description of Property: LOTS 1 AND 26 BLK A IN OMOHUNDRO PLACE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 14, LESS THE EAST TEN (10) FEET THEREOF; ALSO THE FIFTEEN (15) FEET PLATTED ROAD RIGHT-OFWAY LYING WEST OF LOTS 1 AND 26 REFERRED TO HEREINABOVE AND EAST OF SECTION LINE BETWEEN SECTIONS 5 AND 6, TOWNSHIP 38 SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST, DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA. Names in which assessed: BRINKERHOFF 411 ASSOCIATES LLC EDGEWATER, NJ 07020 All of said property being in the County of DeSoto, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the property described in such certificate or certificates will be sold to the highest bidder at the South Courthouse Door on DECEMBER 4, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 23rd day of OCTOBER, 2013. MITZIE W. McGAVIC CLERK OF COURT DESOTO COUNTY, FLORIDA By:CRYSTAL HENDERSON, Deputy Clerk Publication Dates: 10/31/13, 11/7/13, 11/14/13 & 11/21/13 112132 2955726 ARCADIAAREA GARAGE SALES6001 2 -Family FriS at, Nov 1st 2nd, 8am-2pm 1533 N. Arcadia Ave. Collectibles, furni ture, hsld & kitchen items, clothing, tools, & good junque. SAT 8 3 L arge Yard S ale, Little bit of everything, Stuff a bag of clothes $5, $1 0 or $20. 343 N Wilson Ave. T urn your trash into cash! Ad vertise y our yard sale! FURNITURE6035 Y our Hometown Furniture Store Quality Furniture at affordable prices! Best Prices Anywhere! 126 S. Parker Ave. (one blk S. of Moose Lodge) TREES & PLANTS6110 University Of FLR&D PEACH TREES $15 & $20 per tree, 3 gallon cont. Open Fri. & Sat. W eekly 863-494-6933 CATS6232 FREE to Good Home, Tuxedo Kitten, Male, 5 to 6 mths old, Friendly 863-993-9049 AUTOS WANTED7260 WE BUY & PICK UP JUNK CARS 941-661-1928 A Mad Hatters Tea Party was held at Peace River Seafood, 5337 Duncan Road, on Oct. 23 in conjunction with the annual area high school art show at the Punta Gorda restaurant. This years theme is Lewis Carroll, the author of Alices Adventures in Wonderland, Jabberwocky and Through the Looking Glass. Each year, the seafood restaurant gives $300 to the winning art student. The results will be announced this week. Mad Hatters Tea Party showcases student artBy BETSY WILLIAMSPHOTOJOURNALIST HERALD PHOTOS BY BETSY WILLIAMSThe White Rabbit, played by Debbie Lowe, views the work of Port Charlotte High School senior Brianna Burkhart. The piece, representing Through the Looking Glass, is being held by Reed Coey, a sophomore at Charlotte High School who attended the Mad Hatters Tea Party with his mother, Tiny Coey, an art teacher at PCHS. Jessica Iglesias, a Port Charlotte High School senior, stands in front of her entry, Touching Time. She is joined by Max Wessels, 6, who is featured in his sister Abbigals Teatime entry, shown hanging on the wall at the Peace River Seafood restaurant. Charlie Silvia and Jim Mills are attended to by Kaitlyn Legg, who is dressed as Alice, at Peace River Seafood in Punta Gorda. Bobbie Opalach, dressed as the Cheshire Cat, poses for a photo with her family Matt, Kalie, 13, and Jaden, 11. Peace River Seafood server Gabby Midolo dressed as a mouse from Alices Adventures in Wonderland. Here, she admires the work of Jonathan Brown and Matthew Oliveira, art students from DeSoto County High School. Six-year-old Chloe Bo and Jacqueline, her 7-year-old sister, join a few other court/ card members for a photo. Also shown here are Tori Opsaho and Sarah Engman, employees at Peace River Seafood. Surrounded by Alice portraits, DeSoto County High School senior Kaylee Shaver submitted this drawing of a Jabberwock. It is based on the writings of Lewis Carroll. Kelly Beall, the owner of Peace River Seafood, dressed as the Queen of Hearts for the event. She poses for a photo with Selina Perez, a senior at DeSoto County High School. Perez submitted a chalk pastel representing Alices Adventures in Wonderland. Seven-year-old Olivia Baker sips her tea while Audrey Plaisted, 4, is craddled in the arms of the Queen of Hearts, played by Kelly Beall, the owner of Peace River Seafood. She is waiting for her tea to be poured by the Mad Hatter, played by Chris Barron. 00,Alf"owl soon`1 1 kfrr' f -4W AWL-. r,\-4 _

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Arcadian | Page 22 www.sunnewspapers.net The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 Diana Croy loves the creative process of art. Having studied with many talented artists, she has mastered the craft. Her landscapes invite you to explore tranquil settings. Her palette uses primarily cool colors offering a soothing balance. She has always wanted to be an artist, dreaming of becoming a Walt Disney artist as a child, never without a pencil or crayon in hand. Croy was born in West Virginia, lived in Michigan as a young child, then in 1964 moved to Florida. She graduated from Charlotte High School, later earning a BA and MA from the University of South Florida. Croy has studied ne art in acrylics with Jerry Yarnell of Yarnell School of Fine Art, Brenda Harris and Michael Darr. She is a certied instructor with Grumacher and a certied one-stroke instructor with Dewberry Designs & Crafts. Croy has taught elementary school for 20 years. She is married, has three adult children and six grandchildren. She is an original member of the Opera House Artists. She is a member of the Decorative Artists Society, the Team SE Region art teachers organization and The Arts & Humanities Council of Charlotte County. She will be at the Opera House Gallery in downtown Arcadia from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday and would love to meet with you. You can view her work at www.arcadiaoperahouseartists.com.Opera House Artist: Diana CroyBy BECKY VAN PELT OPERA HOUSE ARTISTS Artist Diana Croy creates dreamlike landscapes in acrylic paints. She has studied with several master painters and is a prominent artist in the region. PHOTOS PROVIDEDDiana Croys landscapes have a soothing, almost mystical quality. She favors cool colors to depict Floridas iconic scenery. October 26 was Make A Difference Day and local volunteers and friends as well as volunteers from coast to coast improved communities on this day, a national day of service. Modern Woodmen Chapter 16497 members from Arcadia made a difference by donating socks and underwear to the Redlands Christian Migrant Association. Walmart donated a gift card toward this purchase. Modern Woodmen groups nationwide helped communities and individuals in need by delivering light bulbs and stationery to shut-ins, conducting winter clothing drives, donating books to local libraries and other activities. Coordinated by local Modern Woodmen members, each chapter provides opportunities to connect through social activities and volunteer projects. Youth service clubs provide young Modern Woodmen members with opportunities to volunteer, be patriotic, earn new skills, make friends and have fun. As a tax-exempt fraternal benet society, Modern Woodmen sells life insurance, annuity and investment products not to benet stockholders but to improve the quality of life of its stakeholders members, their families and their communities. This is accomplished through social, charitable and volunteer activities. Annually, Modern Woodmen and its members provide more than $23 million and nearly one million volunteer hours for community projects nationwide.Local Modern Woodmen take part in Make a Difference DayBy JANE POWERSMODERN WOODMEN CH. 16497 PHOTO PROVIDED BY JANE POWERSModern Woodmen Chapter 16497 participated in Make A Dierence Day. Shown is Gloria Kendricks, RCMA coordinator, seated, with, from left: Jane Powers, chapter secretary, Janis Hanus, Henrietta Marshall, social services, Mihaela Tessmer, center director, and Pete Powers, WMA member. Sarasota author Liz Coursen will present Having Fun, Wish You Were Here! An Illustrated History of the Postcard in Florida at 10 a.m. on Nov. 9 at the DeSoto County Library in Arcadia. Coursens 75-minute PowerPoint program is presented in conjunction with Viva Florida 500, the State of Floridas celebration of the states 500th birthday. You wouldnt imagine that there could be any connection between Ponce de Leons arrival in Florida, Florida postcards, and Floridas history, says Coursen, but, as it turns out, there are three direction connections, which I will share with my audience. Coursen continues, Perhaps no states growth and development is as beautifully and fully documented in vintage postcards as is Floridas. In fact, one type of postcard, the linen card, became synonymous with Florida and a Florida vacation. This a great program for adults and young people alike. Coursen, who grew up in Sarasota and Brunswick, Maine, is a four-time author who has lectured about postcard history all over the country. Her rst book was a history of Brunswick, illustrated with vintage postcards drawn largely from her own personal collection. Her other books are howto books for authors and aspiring authors: how to write, how to edit, and how to market. Coursen is also the editor of 17 autobiographies and memoirs. I like history, and I enjoy helping people tell and share their stories, she says. Everyone has interesting stories to tell. Coursens fth book, Shade in the Sunshine State: Reections on Segregation in Florida, will be published in January. The Desoto County Library is at 125 N. Hillsborough Ave., Arcadia. For more information, call 863-9934851 or visit the librarys website at http://myhlc.org/nd-a-library/desoto.Wish You Were Here! at DeSoto LibrarySUBMITTED By LOREN REINSTROMDESOTO PUBLIC LIBRARY PHOTOS PROVIDEDA postcard from Arcadia from the 1940s from the collection of Liz Courson. A 1944 linen postcard of Arcadia from the collection of Liz Courson. U'A kr 7 rYI1I} ) _. I, f. S .1 t1 L'.YSSLt :, .1y. !+t' I1,i) I I 1 Y a ''------------Ir INA-8 Looking Down Oak Street, Arcadia, Fla.It,(,,Z-ZY T+h1DR4T+:T"K4Y"!'7W F', j 1 I1 2 I':4Fi7+C. 9 I r..,c : i.. ,,_T&y,Myr.t. d'. P,f -'::' 0 5,;3 IPA--, _. 1 d `rrvrzIIi II 1.I u?T, .Ji 1' ,'!R ,f ;r`'t ----, iii.-,i r'>ias:-. VOW

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The Sun / Thursday, October 31, 2013 www.sunnewspapers.net Page 23 | Arcadian 21 years of wrongful imprisonment. Richardsons bid to receive $2 million from the state for wrongful imprisonment failed because he had not proved he was innocent as the statute required. Thompson and Kerner, concluding he could never make such a proof because his case was simply dropped, have proposed bills to help Richardson. Thompsons bill, S-36, filed with the Senate Judiciary Committee in August, would pay him $3 million, while Kerners bill, HB-227, would essentially allow the nolle prosequi as conclusive proof of Richardsons innocence to qualify him for payment from the state. One person not present at the gathering was Arcadian Remus Griffin, but Richardson remembered him as the man who had taken a box of documents from the courthouse that included evidence favorable to Richardsons case which had not been provided at his trial. I appreciate the help he gave me, Richardson said. Asked what he might do if the state ultimately awarded him money, Richardson said he wanted to start his own church. He turned to the Lord while in prison, with the belief that God has something for me to do. Life and death is not a plaything, he said. Its real I know its real. I know what God will do for people if they have that faith. In the evening. Richardson went the few blocks to the Mount Zion AME Church where a special service was held to welcome him back. City Councilman Joe Fink attended, and Goodman gave Richardson a plaque representing the keys to the city. Thank you, God, for Brother Richardson, and his life and his legacy, she said. Goodman sang out, Amazing Grace and How Great Thou Art as she had 46 years before, as a 10-year-old singing at the funeral for the seven children. The night was humid and several people were using Newt Keen for Property Appraiser campaign fans as they prayed and sang in the packed church. Richardson himself rose to the altar to speak in a strong, confident voice. Ive been condemned by my fellow man; I was on death row. I heard the judge and jury say guilty of first degree murder. But I talked to the Lord. He kept me alive and gave me the opportunity to speak here today, Richardson said. My seven little children are dead, for no reason. My heart aches, not only for them but for you all. But I know Ive got a home in heaven when I leave.WELCOMEFROM PAGE 10 James Richardson, right, talks with Charles Flowers, who co-authored an expose on Richardsons case for the Miami Herald. Richardson came back to visit Arcadia after many years and was greeted warmly at a service at Mt. Zion AME Church. ARCADIAN PHOTOS BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN, shoffman@sun-herald.comDr. Sharon Goodman welcomes James Rich ardson back to Arcadia. She also gave him a plaque representing the keys to the city. 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