• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I
 Chapter II
 Chapter III
 Chapter IV
 Chapter V
 Chapter VI
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Redfords : an emigrant story
Title: The Redfords
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00079895/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Redfords an emigrant story
Physical Description: 127, 8 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cupples, George, 1839-1898
Blackie & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Blackie & Son
Place of Publication: London ;
Glasgow ;
Edinburgh ;
Dublin
Publication Date: [1886?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Ranch life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Business failures -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Inheritance and succession -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Courtship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- New Zealand   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1886   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1886
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Glasgow
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Ireland -- Dublin
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. George Cupples.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in sepia.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00079895
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225118
notis - ALG5390
oclc - 21310985

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Chapter I
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Chapter II
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Chapter III
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Chapter IV
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Chapter V
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Chapter VI
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Advertising
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
        Page A-4
        Page A-5
        Page A-6
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




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THE REDFORDS:

AN EMIGRANT STORY.








































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THE REDFORDS:


AN EMIGRANT STORY.



BY

MRS. GEO. CUPPLES,
Author of "The Little Captain;" Tappy's Chicks;" "Grandpapa's Keepsakes;'
"Alf Jetsam;" &c. &c.


ILLUSTRATED.


LONDON:
BLACKIE & SON, 49 & 50 OLD BAILEY, E.C.;
GLASGOW, EDINBURGH, AND DUBLIN.















THE REDFORDS:
AN EMIGRANT STORY.

----- c.:-- --



ILL my readers allow me to conduct
Stem to the pretty village of P- ,
n1 -ar to the great seaport town of
CI f ~Liverpool. The particular spot we
S intend to visit is The Elms, the old
mansion-house of successive generations of the
squires of P-, which is now let to Mr. Red-
ford, a wealthy merchant in the city.
We wonder, as we stand at the gate and look
up the beautiful avenue, with its old and stately
trees, that the present squire was not content to
live here like his forefathers, but preferred to
build a great hall, with no trees of any height
near it, making it look as if it did not belong to







THE REDFORDS:


that part of the country, and had no business
there. No doubt it would be a grand-looking
house when the young trees grew to their full
size; but it would take years and years before
they reached a state of perfection, and the house
would never be so beautiful as The Elms.
Walking in at the gate, passing the lodge
smothered with clematis and roses, and up the
avenue, we come to the lawn, so green and smooth,
that it is like velvet under your feet. Here we
find a group of eight children busy at play, and,
seated under the spreading branches of a noble
walnut-tree, are two ladies. The time is early
summer, and the soft west wind is scarcely felt,
but fills the air with sweet scents, which mingle
with the warbling of birds and the busy hum of
insects, while butterflies flit around like frag-
ments of the sunshine
The two smallest boys are Bernard and Charles
Redford, who, along with Herbert and Arthur
Mortimer, the squire's sons, are enjoying a game
at cricket. The other four children are girls
-Lily, Helen, and Marjory Redford, and the
fourth is Emily Mortimer, who with her two
brothers spend much of their spare time in the







AN E1IGRANT STORY. 7

society of such congenial companions. It is
Mrs. Redford and Miss Jones, the governess
from the Hall, who are seated under the tree;
and when the game is done, and the girls are
released from their laborious task of "fielding,"
all the children fling themselves down to rest
from their exercise at the ladies' feet; and seated
thus, we will join the group also, and listen to
their conversation.
Oh! I do wish-we had a tree like this at the
Hall," said Herbert, rubbing his hot face with
his handkerchief; "it's so cooling. I'm sure I
wonder papa ever left this place; I like it twenty
times better than our house."
"But if your papa had not built the Hall, you
would not have known us," said little Helen.
" We must then have lived in that horrid crescent
in Liverpool; and we all hated it so much."
":Oh! don't you remember how happy we
were when papa came home and told us he had
taken this house?" said Lily.
"Yes, indeed," said Mrs. Redford laughing;
"we won't forget that day in a hurry. I thought
my head would never recover from the screams
of delight when papa mentioned the rabbits and







THE REDFORDS:


poultry that could be kept, and especially the
pony."
"It was such fun to see the girls," said Charley.
"They packed up their toys every day in a little
box mama gave them, and unpacked it again
every night; and such washings they had at their
dolls' clothes-they nearly drove nurse crazy."
"I'm sure, Charley," said Lily, "you and Ber-
nard were just as bad, for you had your fish-hooks
constantly out repairing them; and if we did
torment nurse, you boys nearly made her mad
by losing your hooks, and making her fancy
they would stick into us."
"I'm so glad papa did build the Hall, though
I don't like it so well as this place," said Emily.
" It is so nice to have you here. We never heard
of the games we play at now; and the nice
picnics we have! Mama used to be so afraid
to let us have one, for fear of cold; but she isn't
now. Oh! and that reminds me I have a message
to deliver. Mama would like us to have a
holiday on Friday; it is Arthur's birthday.
Would you, please, Mrs. Redford, allow all the
children to join us and have a gypsying to the
ruin? Mama wishes very much you would."







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


"It is very kind of your mama," said Mrs.
Redford, stooping to kiss the pretty, eager face;
" if the boys are very industrious, and all are good,
we may say yes."
"Oh! but do say yes now, dear Mrs. Red-
ford," said Emily; "and, please, mama would
like if you and Mr. Redford would come also,
as both she and papa mean to be there. Oh!
do say yes."
"Papa go a-gypsying!" said Bernard laughing.
"Papa never takes a holiday now. I almost
wish he hadn't so much money, for .then he
might go with us an excursion, as he used to do
sometimes with George and Dick; but that was
before he made so much money."
At this moment a post-chaise was seen coming
up the avenue at great speed, and drew up at
the front door, when a gentleman got out, and
hurried into the house.
"It's papa!" was the general exclamation from
the Redfords.
"He is home long before his time, without
waiting for the dog-cart," said Charley.
Lily, who had been much nearer the house at
the time, now came running back, almost out






THE REDFORDS:


of breath, to say, "Can papa be ill, mama? I
thought he looked pale, and he almost stumbled
when he went up the steps."
Mrs. Redford rose at once, and hastened to-
wards the house, while Miss Jones bade her pupils
prepare to go home.
"Remember to be very good, all of you," said
little Emily; we mean to have such a delightful
time of it at the ruin; and, only think, mama
says we may kindle a fire, and make tea all by
ourselves, if we are very careful. Won't it be
fun?"
"And, I say, Bernard, be sure and bring your
rods," said Herbert; "we shall try to catch some
fish for you girls to cook for tea."
"Do not stay longer now, my dears," said Miss
Jones; "you will have plenty of time to make
arrangements before Friday."
"But Mrs. Redford did not say yes, exactly,"
said Emily; "and I ought to know that I may
tell mama."
"Stay, I'll run in and ask her," said Charley;
and away he ran, but returned in a very few
minutes with a grave face to say, his mama was
in the library with his papa. Papa must indeed







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


be ill," he said, his lips quivering, or else there's
something dreadful the matter, for mama looked
so queer when she opened the door, and she
pushed me away almost crossly, and bade me say
none of us are to go near the room till she comes."
A shade of gloom seemed to fall upon the
party; still, as they separated, they endeavoured
to keep up each others' spirits, by fixing the time
for their next meeting, and talking as if they
counted on all their projects being carried out.
The Hall children now bade their friends
good-bye, and the Redfords crept quietly into
the house, and waited patiently for their mother's
reappearance. The dinner hour arrived; but
instead of bringing her, Miss Taylor, their gov-
erness, took her place, saying, their papa was
not very well, and had gone to bed, and mama
was sitting beside him till he slept."
Miss Taylor was not a particular favourite
with any of the children, being rather severe and
exacting; but seeing how -distressed they were
about their papa, and how they scarcely took
any dinner, she exerted herself to drive away the
gloomy looks, talking lightly of papa's illness,
and of the probability of his being present at the







THE REDFORDS:


picnic. She also planned how the lessons could
be managed easily, so that, by the time for tea,
they seemed as if nothing had occurred to inter-
rupt their happiness.
Mr. Redford had received news of the failure
of a great bank in the city, along with other
speculations he was then engaged in, so that he
found himself utterly ruined, which, for the time,
prostrated him completely. Before the day fixed
for the picnic, the children were informed of this,
and also, that very soon they would have to leave
the pleasant Elms, to settle down again in town,
perhaps in a smaller and more crowded district
than even the despised crescent.
There is a saying that troubles never come
single, and it proved true in the experience of the
Redfords. They had scarcely recovered from
the first shock, when one morning a telegram
was brought for Mrs. Redford. The children,
at the time, were playing about the lawn, not
quite so merrily as of old, perhaps, but it was not
to be expected they could retain the dulness for
any lengthened period in their young hearts.
Indeed, if the truth were told, they felt rather
happy than otherwise, for their two elder brothers,







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


George and Dick, were to return from school im-
mediately, without waiting for the holidays; and
Maud, kind, loving Maud, their eldest sister, was
coming home also from her school in London.
With such a prospect before them, it was impos-
sible to feel otherwise than happy. The sight of
the boy from the telegraph office was nothing
unusual at The Elms, for Mr. Redford was con-
stantly receiving such despatches; but when
Bernard heard it was for his mama, he called
to Charley, and ran forward to see if he had
heard correctly. Yes; there was not the slight-
est doubt about it, and he hastened up the stair
after the servant to his mama's parlour.
"A telegram for me?" said Mrs. Redford;
" that is strange! It must be a mistake; it is for
papa, no doubt."
"No, mama, it is for you," said Bernard,
handing her the despatch; see, there's the word
'Mrs.' written quite plainly."
Mrs. Redford opened the telegram, still doubt-
ful of it being for her; but the next moment she
turned so pale that Bernard, thinking she was
going to faint, began to scream for help.
"Hush, my boy!" said Mrs. Redford. "It is







THE REDFORD8:


indeed for me-it is to tell me my dear father,
your grandpapa, is dying, and he wishes to see
me. Where is papa, do you know? I must set
out at once."
"But, mama," said Lily, who had been sewing
beside her mother, "are we to be left all by our-
selves? And what is Maud to do? She is com-
ing to-morrow, you know."
"Yes, yes!-I know, dear. I am glad to think
Maud is coming so soon. You must be gdod
children, and help to amuse the little ones. I
may be detained for some days."
Lily-and Bernard would have liked to have
asked a few more questions about their grand-
papa, but Mrs. Redford hurried away to give
directions about the packing. All that the
children knew about this grandpapa was, that
his name was Eyton; that he lived in a very
large house almost as grand as the Hall itself;
and that he was the richest gentleman in all that
county. The children had often talked together
of this relative, wondering why neither their
papa nor mama ever went to see him, and scarcely
ever mentioned his name. Maud, too, who had
once been on a visit to The Grove when a little







AN EMiGRANT STORY.


girl, had very little to say, except that she dis-
liked to speak of that time, not on account of her
grandpapa, whom she seldom ever saw, he being
confined to his room, but her Uncle Henry and
his children were so disagreeable that she said
no amount of money would every induce her to
go near them again. The children could not help
feeling that some mystery existed, but were
forced to let the matter rest, whatever it might
be.
That same evening, after receiving the tele-
gram, Mrs. and Mr. Redford left by the night
train, and the next forenoon Maud arrived from
school, all the children being at- the door to
welcome home the "old mother," as the boys
called her. She was a tall, delicate-looking girl,
about seventeen, with fair hair, and blue eyes,
and a peculiarly soft, gentle voice, that well
expressed her amiable disposition. When she
had read the hastily-written note her papa had
left for her, and brushed away the tears that
filled her eyes at the disappointment at not
seeing her mama, she turned to the children,
who had been clinging round her, and said,
"Well, chickens, what are you all drooping your







THE REDFORDS:


heads for; is it kind to receive your old mother
so?"
"Oh, Maud, we are so glad to have you back!"
said Lily; "we have been so dull since mama
left. I do hope she won't stay long."
"So do I, dear," said Maud; "but we must
not grudge mama going to see our grandpapa.
Mama must feel' so thankful that he sent for
her, even at the last."
"But why did he never invite her to come
before?" said Bernard.
"After tea I may tell you," replied Maud; "I
know mama won't mind me telling you bigger
ones." And accordingly, when Helen and Madge
were safely under nurse's care, Bernard reminded
her of her promise.
"Well, dears," said Maud, as they drew round
her, "you know papa was not always rich;
indeed, at one time he was almost poor, but by
his own patience and energy he became a rich
man at last. Of course, he has become poor
once more, but that is his misfortune, not his
fault; he could not help it, poor dear papa.'
Well, grandpapa Eyton liked him very much,
but because he was poor, he would not give his
(846)







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


consent to mama marrying papa, and so they got
married without his knowledge, which mama
said was very wrong of her to do; but she loved
papa so dearly, and she thought that, being his
only daughter, grandpapa would forgive her;
but he never did. Even after papa became a
rich man he refused to see her, and he would
not allow grandmama to see her either, though
she wrote to mama constantly."
"Oh, how cruel of him!" said Lily; "he must
have been a very unkind man to treat mama so
harshly."
"But you went to see him, Maud," said Bernard.
"Did he invite you?"
"No, it was grandmama; she hoped the sight
of me might make him relent; but, though he
was very kind, any time I was taken into his
room, he never mentioned mama's name. Poor
grandmama! you know she died suddenly abroad,
and so mama never saw her."
"I'll tell you what," said Bernard, "perhaps
grandpapa means to forgive mama now; and
when he hears of papa's losses, he will give him
a lot of money, and we won't need to leave this
house, or sell the pony, or the rabbits, or any-
(s46) B







THE REDFORDS:


thing. How glad Herbert and Arthur would be
if we were to stay!"
"Yes, indeed, it would be nice," said Maud
with a sigh. "Well, you boys must just try to
work hard at your lessons, so that when you are
a little older you can help papa. He will need
us all to help him now."
We must now leave The Elms, and follow
Mrs. Redford to her father's house. When she
reached The Grove she found that Mr. Eyton
was just about dying; but he knew her quite
well, and held out his hand towards her. He
was so weak that he could hardly speak, but he
tried to explain to his daughter something about
his will. Though his voice had almost failed
him, Mrs. Redford understood him to say he
had made a new will, in which her name was
included; and when she asked him if this was
what he meant, he seemed quite relieved. "You
will find it in-" he was just saying, when he
was seized with a violent fit of coughing, and the
nurse stepped forward to administer a strong
opiate, and he then fell asleep with his daughter's
hand clasped firmly in his. Once more he opened
his eyes, and raising himself up in the bed, looked







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


long and steadfastly in her face; then he sunk
back and gradually breathed his last.
-The funeral had taken place, and after that,
Mrs. Redford's brother produced his father's
will; but Mr. Hoskin, the attorney, on examining
it, stated that a new will had been drawn up a
few months before, properly signed and witnessed,
in which old Mr. Eyton had left his daughter the
half of his possessions. All the drawers in the
various cabinets and bureaus were ransacked, but
the new will was nowhere to be found, so that
the old will, leaving everything to his son, which
had been made shortly after his daughter was
married, had to stand for the true will and testa-
ment.
The present Mr. Eyton was a thorough man
of the world, and fearing that some claim might
be made upon him by his sister, he treated her
with careful but cold politeness, as if she had
become estranged from the family. Old Mr.
Hoskin, who had known Mrs. Redford and her
brother since they were children, proposed that,
as the last will of his old friend could not be
found, Mr. Eyton should at least give a portion
to his sister, considering the recent losses her







THE REDFORDS:


husband had sustained. The only answer he
could draw from Mr. Eyton, however, was that
he would consider the matter, and write the
result to Mr. Redford.
The father and the mother had been gone from
The Elms for ten days, when Maud received a
letter from her mama, stating that they would
be at home the next evening, and requesting that
George and Dick's rooms might be in readiness
for them, as they would be met on the way, and
all would return together.
It was not to be expected that the children
could feel any sorrow for the loss of their grand-
papa. They had never seen him, scarcely ever
heard his name; and had it not been for"their
mother's sad face they would have given vent to
a loud demonstration of delight at the return, not
only of their much-loved parents, but of their
two lively and good-humoured brothers.
Mr. Eyton did not keep them long in suspense
as to his intentions. He must have written by
the very next post after their departure, for it
reached The Elms the evening after, just as they
had all gathered round the cheerful fire that had
been lighted, as the weather was damp and chilly.







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


Mr. Eyton stated briefly that, after due reflection,
he did not consider himself bound to do anything
for his sister; and it was plaih, by her name not
being in the will, that his father had intended to
mark his displeasure at her disobedience. Ac-
cordingly he thought it was-a sacred duty to the
dead that his last wishes should be carried out.
But considering the large family they had, and
not wishing to be hard or ungenerous, he would
agree to pay their passage out to some colony,
where the children could be turned to good ac-
count; and also, if this proposal were accepted,
he would not object to advance a further sum to
assist their engaging in some business suitable to
the colonies. Henceforth, however, it was to be
understood that no after claim was to be made
upon him.
"Oh, how cruel!" said Mrs. Redford, "to think
of him treating his only sister so. Banish me
and my children to some savage country! I
could not have believed my brother Harry would
have been so hard-hearted,"
Mr. Redford was silent for a little. All he
said was, after a pause, "My dear, you have not
learned till now how the world can harden the






THE REDFORDS:


heart, unless it has been taught sympathy by
suffering of its own." Having thought for a
little, he added, "Pride might lead us to reject
such an offer-but duty urges rather to submit.
Let us think of the children, my dear."
"Oh, mama! don't look at it in that light,"
said George. "So far as we are concerned, it
would be first-rate, perfectly jolly; the very thing
I should have liked myself."
"Thank you, Uncle Henry. Let's go to the
backwoods of North America," said Dick. We
can shoot all sorts of game there, and a savage
or two occasionally by way of a change, when
we have followed on his trail and caught him."
"'My dear foolish boy," said Mrs. Redford
shuddering, "do not speak in that light way."
"But there's Australia," said George, who was
shrewd for his years. "Many people are going
there. We could have a sheep run; and it pays
splendidly in the end."
"Yes, but after how much toil and risk?" said
Mrs. Redford, beginning to think of the pro-
ject.
Their father had seemingly been considering
the whole matter, and he now gave his opinion.







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


"New Zealand is a much better field for enter-
prise," he said, "in the case of those who have
little money, and must begin as we should. I do
not hesitate to decide on this, if you and the
children resolve to encounter the voyage and the
hardships that may follow. Indeed, I am ready
to go alone, and have no fear but that soon I
should be able to place you in comfort there. I
could obtain the necessary aid from other sources.
I am thankful to say there are friends still left
to me. Mr. Eyton would for the present, doubt-
less, agree to supply the wants of his sister and
little ones, when I, the great cause of offence, am
removed." Mr. Redford's voice had towards
the close almost given way, but he ended with
firmness.
"No, no, my dear Richard," said Mrs. Red-
ford, with strong emotion; "we go one and all,
or never! This shall never be!"
There was a chorus of exclamations fiom the
children, from the eldest to the youngest, of "Yes!
yes! None of us will stay behind! We will sail
anywhere-will do all sorts of work-rather
than be separated from dear papa!"
Mr. Redford was almost unable to restrain







THE REDFORDS:


his feelings, and he suddenly rose and withdrew
to his own room, leaving the children to talk
with their mother as they chose. The boys were
so happy at the thought of the probable adven-
tures by land and sea, that Mrs. Redford could
not long resist joining in their plans. Even the
girls were enthusiastic about the new life, Lily
declaring it would be just like having a picnic
on a large scale; and when Maud spoke of the
fun it would be building their own house, and
doing all sorts of work, both indoors and out,
the boys fairly screamed with excitement. "Not
that you, 'old mother,' will be allowed to work,"
said George. No; mama and Maud must still
be fine ladies. We boys must work for them,
and they must just give orders."
"Indeed, you are very kind, Master George,"
said Maud laughing. "I mean to be the head
of the home department, and look after the cow
we shall have, and all the work indoors. Of
course I shall expect you small boys to fetch
wood and draw water, and catch game-if there
is game to be caught in New Zealand, which I
am doubtful of, but at anyrate there are wild-
pigs."







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


"Oh, such fun!" said Bernard; "but it's the
voyage will be the jolliest part."
"Yes, once you get over the sea-sickness," said
Dick, which made them all laugh, for it was well-
known that every time poor Bernard had been
on the water he had been very sick. It was
therefore decided unanimously that their uncle's
offer should be accepted, and, as George and Dick
said, the sooner they sailed the better.








""~g~Bi~i













CHAPTER II.

THE next day, the letter accepting Mr. Eyton's
offer was despatched; and now that it was
really settled, Mrs. Redford began to take a
more cheerful view of the matter than she had
done the night before. It was impossible to
resist being amused at the remarks made by the
children at the breakfast table, and the sight
of her husband's face, now almost free from its
expression of care, went further than anything
to reconcile her to the great undertaking.
"Herbert and Arthur must know at once,"
said Charley; "I was forgetting them altogether.
Oh, how I wish they could go with us!"
"We'll run over and tell them after lessons
are done," said Bernard; "we have a half-holiday
to-day, you know."
"Ah! I fear there will be too many half-
holidays now," said Mrs. Redford with a sigh.
But great was the delight of the children, Bernard







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


and Charles especially, when they were told that
after that week Miss Taylor was going to leave
The Elms, and afterwards they were only to
have a short morning lesson from their sister
Maud.
"If that isn't almost as good news as the
going to New Zealand," said Bernard. "What
fun it will be to have Maud for our governess!
Will the 'old mother' give us long columns of
spelling to learn if we let our books fall by
accident? or a page of history to write if we are
but five minutes late?"
"No!" said Maud, "she will not have time
to spare for that; but she will have more
severe punishments for any who are naughty.
Miss Taylor has been far too lenient with you
boys."
"I'll tell you what to do, Maud," said Mr.
Redford, trying to look very stern; "if any
are disobedient, just turn them out at once, and
have nothing more to do with them."
"No! no!" cried Helen, "we will never be
naughty so long as the 'old mother' teaches us.
It will just be like having a game at keeping
school. Besides, Maud knows twice as much as







THE REDFORDS:


Miss Taylor; at anyrate, she never grudges the
trouble to make a difficult passage plain."
But Maud had only been installed as governess
two or three days, when large hand-bills, with
the names of several ships, and their time of
sailing, arrived at The Elms. Mr. Redford
had at first made up his mind to go to Auckland,
in the earliest settled part of New Zealand; but,
on inquiry, he found that good land was to be
had more conveniently in the colony of Otago,
the most recently colonized portion of the country.
The first ship sailing from Liverpool was bound
for this new colony; Mr. Redford, therefore,
determined to take passages on board of The
Jura, which was fixed to sail in two months.
What a long time it looked to the children, but
how short to Mrs. Redford! All thought of
regular lessons with Maud were at once aban-
doned, as the assistance of every one was required
to pack the great cases their father sent from
Liverpool; even Helen and little Madge were able
to add their tiny amount of help by carrying the
small things from one room to the other, and as
for the boys, they were head over ears in busi-
ness. They rose with the lark every morning,







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


and set off to the village to take lessons from
the carpenter and smith, and other tradesmen,
who were all very willing to be of service to the
kind-hearted family at The Elms, who had been
so generous to the poor and sick folks in their
days of prosperity; while Maud and Lily were
equally busy receiving instruction from the house-
keeper in the art of cooking and other house-
wifely occupations.
And now all was nearly in readiness for the
long voyage. There were the great deal boxes
painted with the ship's name and the family's,
which were to be put into the hold; there, too,
from parlour to kitchen, and elsewhere, were
gathered things to be put in bags for use at sea.
The small box containing the children's toys,
roped and labelled, was placed beside a large
market basket that little Helen and Madge had
selected to put their pet kitten in, which no one
had the heart to tell them must be left behind.
Their favourite doll also was sitting by the
basket, with hat and cloak on ready for the
journey, a small hand-bag containing her luggage
by her side; quite eager to be off, seemingly, and
ready to play with her little companions all the







THE REDFORDS:


world round. It is not our intention to speak
of the parting with the Mortimers and other
kind friends; suffice it to say, that much though
the children longed to be off, yet, when the last
day came, and they realized that the dear old
Elms, where they had indeed been so happy,
was to be looked upon for the last time, a bitter
sense of the change was brought home to their
inmost minds, even as to those of their parents.
Still they could not, of course, enter into the
pain which older people feel at leaving their
own country, or almost conceive the swell of
emotion which gathers at every stage, till the
emigrant is fairly at sea.
The Jura was a large, fine vessel, of about a
thousand tons, taking out about four hundred
steerage passengers, who, with those in the cabin
and in the intermediate section, when added to
the crew, made in all more than five hundred souls
on board. Amidst the confusion and excitement,
which may be imagined at the departure of such
a ship, the Redfords saw the last of their friends,
and were almost too bewildered to know. of how
they left the river and spread sail down channel,
and at last lost sight of old England. A mist of







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


discomfort and sea-sickness hung over this period
for them, and almost every one else, till they
were far from sight of land.
Mr. Redford had taken their passage in the
intermediate section, much to the vexation of
the boys, who had wished a steerage passage in
order that enough might be saved to let their
parents and the girls go into the cabin. But
they now felt glad that their father would not
agree to it, as they caught glimpses of the dis-
comfort, confusion, and disagreeable crowding of
the steerage passengers' compartment on the
"'tween decks." Their own quarters were in a
small deck-house in the middle of the ship, a
temporary erection, divided into three parts, of
which they had the largest one. It was certainly
very much cramped for a whole family, but
they had it to themselves, and were together.
Their portion was not larger than the inside of
a small caravan. Here they slept, took their
meals, and, except in good weather, had to spend
most of the day within it. At night a division
was made by means of a matting designed for
the purpose, leaving to Mr. Redford and the
boys a space not nearly so large as a compartment







THE REDFORDS:


of a railway carriage-in which, indeed, they
could not have slept at all had it not been for
the system of shelves, one over the other. The
other divisions of this deck-house were still
smaller, and were occupied by two families, the
children of which were principally young, so as
to require less room. One of these families
especially, the Hoopers, was neighbourly and
obliging; and, on the whole, they all got on well
together.
Living in this large ship, with so many people
on board, and all its various occupations going
on, whether sailors' work or mere passengers'
pastime, was like living in a village, with the
addition that it was always moving on its way.
Now the sails swelled gently in the trade-wind,
and now flapped or strained in the more fitful
weather that followed; and all the while the
tediousness was broken by the little incidents
that came out of so many people living so close
together, heightened often by the curiosity every-
body could not help feeling about everybody
else, with the distinct effect it gave to people's
characters. It was singular, too, what an interest
the sailors took in the children, especially -those







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


in the deck-house, who were most in their sight.
But this was still more the case when Helen and
Madge Redford brought out Dolly in full state,
recovering from her supposed fit of sea-sickness,
and now able to benefit from the fine weather.
The rough men never seemed to be able to
understand this enjoyment of the little ones; yet
they would often turn to take a peep at it, or
put their weather-beaten heads together in the
distance, as if considering the matter.
Madge, in particular, had been brought before
the sailors' attention by a trifling incident, which
caused her some distress. Unknown to the
whole family, and, indeed, in direct disobedience
to her mama, she had secretly brought her own
pet kitten to Liverpool, and then hidden it
cleverly in a large basket of things for immediate
use on the voyage. The kitten, however, had in
some way escaped whenever the basket was
opened, and ran off in terror amidst the con-
fusion, no one knew where. She had conse-
quently been in some disgrace with her mama,
as the kitten, when found, would, it was under-
stood, cost no trifling sum for its passage.
Madge's distress was much relieved by the sym-
(848) c







THE REDFORDS:


pathy shown by some of the seamen, who took
opportunities to assure her that pussy would
turn up ere long, and that they would do their
best to find her before she got wild.
But an occurrence soon took place which drove
everything else out of mind. It was at the
beginning of a fine quiet night in the tropics,
when the first watch was set, and everybody else
on board had settled to rest. It was very hot,
and the hatches of the main-hold were partly
open, when, in the silence, one of the steerage
passengers thought he heard stifled groans from
the dark space below. This was succeeded by a
faint cry, and on the alarm being given, a boy
was found, who had managed in some way to
conceal himself, before the ship sailed, among the
cargo and stores, where he had also contrived to
find food all this while. At the same time he
had supplied himself with water by recklessly
boring into the casks with a gimlet. The sur-
prise and indignation were great; every one was
roused in a moment, while the boy was brought
sullenly a prisoner before the captain. He was
a very disagreeable-looking boy, with a large
head and stunted body, dirty, and, as the saying







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


is, hang-dog looking. Indeed, he evidently
belonged to the lowest and poorest rank, if not
to a still worse class. But still his face had a
wistful expression, and there was keen intelligence
in the sidelong glance of his eye, which was in
itself rather a pleasant blue.
So, you're a stowaway, sirrah?" said Captain
Dewsberry, while the boy only hung his head
the more. "What did you do it for? What's
your drift?"
"'Cos I wants to hemigrate, your worship,"
was the husky reply. "I wants out to New
Zealand."
"Do you know," said the captain frowning,
"I could send you back to prison by the first
homeward-bound ship we speak? I shouldn't
wonder if it wasn't the first time either! Why
didn't you tryit honestly, and work your passage?"
"I know'd ye wouldn't take me, sir," said the
boy; "but I can work now-I ain't afraid, I
ain't; not after sweeping the chimbleys that I
has, not to say running' along tiles promiscus like."
"You've bored into three water-casks, I hear,"
said the captain more severely, but inclining to
soften a little. "Less might have served, surely,







THE REDFORDS:


you young vagabond; we may be short of water
yet."
"'Cos it was in the dark, sir," was the faltered
reply, "an' I got hard put to it after my bottle
was dry."
What's your name?" inquired Captain Dews-
berry. "What's your age? Have you got any
friends?"
"Tim Napper, I'm called, sir," said the boy
readily., "I don't know how old I am, and I
ha'n't got no friends-leastways, he didn't look
like it when he kep' me out to sell matches, and
I'd got to steal to make it up,-else I was whipped
at night."
"Try him aloft to-morrow, Mr. Dale," said the
captain-to the second mate; "and hark'ee, bo'sun,
see him scrubbed the first thing when the decks
are washed."
All the assemblage broke up; the quiet of the
night was resumed; and next day Tim Napper
appeared, making his trial of ship duty. He
turned out a sharp and active boy aloft, though
steadily holding to his strange notion to become
an emigrant. Still the prejudice of his first
discovery clung to him, both amongst crew and







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


passengers. Poor Tim seemed to be excluded
from among both, and never to have any proper
place either to sleep in or eat. In his case all
the hardness of sea-manners appeared to come
out, while the selfishness of ordinary people
amidst the annoyance of a voyage fell also upon
him. He was thought ugly, cunning, and not to
be trusted; at one time he would be seen taking
refuge alone in the boats near the pigs; at another
his resort seemed to be up aloft in the round-tops.
But the wayward heart of little Madge Redford
first drew to him in pity; then Helen shared the
feeling; and their eldest sister Maud no sooner
knew of his hard lot than she fully entered into
their concern for him. Maud had been anxious
that the children should not fall behind in their
lessons, thinking, too, that perhaps there would be
little time for school when they landed; so she re-
solved to keep up their studies as much as possible
during the voyage. For this purpose, when the
weather permitted, she assembled not only her
own sisters and younger brothers, but the other
children of the deck-house, to a game of keeping
school, and so attractive did she make this lesson-
hour, that all the children wearied for it to come







THE REDFORDS:


round again. The captain greatly approved of
this plan, and would often come to inquire who
was the best scholar, and would produce some
raisins or a fancy biscuit from his pocket to
bestow as a reward; which was indeed a great
treat at sea.
At these times, if the boy Tim Napper hap-
pened to pass, he would loiter near, seeming to
take an odd interest in the proceedings, as if he
had never seen such a thing before in his life.
He was now trim and clean, looking a great deal
better in the cast-off sailor's suit that had been
made down to him by the sailmaker. He was
clever, too, at sailor's work, and was considered
the quickest boy on board; so that the captain
and chief mate at least looked favourably upon
him, and it might have been thought he was
settling to a sea-life. His attention to Maud's
little school became at length so marked, that,
with the captain's approval, she invited him to
become one of her pupils; which he eagerly did,
and would at any time have lost his dinner in
order to secure his lesson. Poor Tim, indeed,
scarcely knew more than the alphabet, which he
said he had picked up when helping a bill-poster






AN EMIGRANT STORY.


in Liverpool; but he soon became one of Maud's
aptest scholars. After a time she one day asked
him if he meant to continue being a sailor.
"No, marm," said Tim very respectfully, "I
does not. I likes it well enough, but I'm not
one o' themselves, d'ye see-nor never will be.
They can't take to me, like; p'raps its owin' to
the chimbleys, and matches, and sich like I've
had to do with; but anyhow, I doesn't take to
them."
"How is that, Tim?" said Maud. "You seem
quite cut out for it, I think!"
"Why, marm, I wants to be a hemigrant, I
do," said Tim quietly.
"That's a strange fancy at your age," Maud
said. "What do you know about the new country
we're going to?"
"Well, I'm told, marm, a cove needn't neither
beg nor steal there, nor even sleep under dry
arches and in holes. Then he can look to have
a hoss of his own in no time, and he can build a
house for hisself, and have sheep and pigs, and
no end of things of his own making."
If Maud could have said anything against this
idea, she did not wish to do so.







THE REDFORDS:


"Oh, it's prime being a hemigrant!" said Tim,
on more than one occasion. "I wouldn't change
for anything else."
It was strange that this fancy of Tim's should
have been like a light in his dark path-the only
guide leading him to something better. It was
for this he was so anxious to learn reading, and
it seemed to increase his sense of the kindness
shown him by the young Redfords. His grati-
tude was first marked by a service he rendered
to little Madge. She had almost given up hopes
of seeing her kitten again; but one morning,
when Lily opened their cabin door, there stood
Tim with his jacket off, which was rolled round
something that struggled and jumped in his arms
in a most perplexing manner.
"If you please, miss," said Tim, "will you tell
the little lady that I've found her cat-leastways,
it's a black-and-white kitten, if it ain't hers; but
it's uncommon wild through living all alone, and
huntin' the rats and the cockroaches."
"Where did you get it, you good Tim?" cried
Madge, rushing out. Oh! how it has scratched
your poor hands."
"Never mind, miss, so long as she's safe," said







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


Tim; but you'll 'ave to keep her close for a day,
or mayhap two."
The kitten was now, by Mrs. Redford's per-
mission, placed in an empty basket, till she was
tamed down once more, and Tim was dismissed
with many thanks from all the children for his
cleverness.
But Tim had soon better opportunities of
showing that their good offices had not been
thrown away. Rough weather and heavily-rol-
ling seas came upon the ship as they rounded the
Cape of Good Hope, and it was seldom that the
children, or indeed any of the passengers, could
venture along the wet, sloping decks as The Jura
rolled and pitched on her course. All schooling
was at an end. It was often hopeless to get any-
thing from the steward or the cook, or even to
obtain a little water, or get a message conveyed.
On such occasions Tim Napper was always ready,
nay, anxious, to be employed to serve the Red-
fords, though he did not show the same willing-
ness on behalf of others. His feet appeared equal
to the oldest sailor's in balancing him; and if by
any chance he was sent reeling, he always some-
how managed to catch hold of something in time,







THE REDFORDS:


and to save what he had in charge; whilst his
grin of pleasure in succeeding expressed his
kindliest good-will to the whole family.
Once more the fine weather came, and The
Jura steadily advanced through the warmer lati-
tudes of the Indian and Southern Oceans, while
the former occupations were renewed to while
away the growing impatience of all on' board.
The influence of tropical weather brought back
the necessity of depending on trifles for amuse-
ment, along with the gossiping interest which all
took in each other, now rather too closely joined
to weariness. Slight bickerings would at times
break out, and a disposition to ill-natured scandal
would show itself.
The passengers in the cabin were few, all gen-
tlemen, with the exception of two ladies-one,
Mrs. Rugby and her two little girls; the other,
the. captain's wife, a pretty young creature,
scarcely older than Maud Redford. It was
natural- that Mrs. Dewsberry should, almost at
first sight, have become friends with Maud, and
that during the whole voyage they should be
found often together. Mrs. Rugby was a lady
with a rather disagreeable expression of counten-







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


ance, and a harsh voice; and as her husband had
been appointed head of one of the colonial schools,
she considered herself much above the other pas-
sengers, who were all going out on speculation,
as it were. From the very first she seemed to
have rather a dislike to the Redfords, and re-
sented the invitations they received to the cabin.
She tried to rouse the jealousy of the other two
ladies in the deck-house, who were not so often
favoured; but both of them were kind, homely
women, who were quite content with each other's
society, and the treatment they received in gen-
eral. They both declared they were glad when
the Redfords had any attention shown them,
for everybody could see that Mrs. Redford was
a real lady, though she put on no fine airs, like
some, and that a more obliging family was never
seen. All that Mrs. Rugby could do, therefore,
was to keep her two little girls away from the
other children, which was by no means an easy
matter, as they were constantly finding their way
back to the happy little group near the deck-
house. Yet, strange to say, Mrs. Rugby was
never visible during the hour Maud kept her
little school, so that Polly and Sophie were never







THE REDFORDS:


hindered from being of the number. There were
some people who said that Mrs. Rugby knew
quite well what her children were about, and
who advised Maud to send them away. To such
advice sweet, gentle Maud would not listen.
But now, as they passed the tropics, and it was
reported to the captain that they would really
be short of water, Mrs. Rugby's ill-nature towards
the Redfords showed itself more plainly than
before.
"There might be a scarcity of provisions, too,"
she would say; and it would be hard indeed if
she and her children were made to suffer when
intermediate passengers were feasted and feted.
Every time Mrs. Redford or Maud showed them-
selves, she would say something positively in-
sulting, so that the former determined to keep
away from the cabin altogether. They were then
within a comparatively short distance of their
destination, though the weather, being intensely
hot, made every one feel the scarcity of water
the more, and having none to wash with except
what was drawn from the sea.
But much though the passengers had to suffer,
poor Tim Napper came off the worst of all, and







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


if he was seen near the scuttle-butt, where a man
was constantly stationed now, he would be ordered
off with harsh and cruel words, because it was
always brought up against him that he had a
hand in the damage to the casks. The same took
place when his allowance was served out to him,
as if it was grudged even as a charity. But
things instead of improving seemed to get worse;
and Tim somehow appeared to be at the bottom
of all the trouble. First one child in the steer-
age fell ill with a fever, then another, till there
were no less than a dozen ill. One was for sev-
eral days considered by the doctor to be in ex-
treme danger, and fathers could be seen to gaze
overboard with gloomy eyes at the sea, as if
looking forward to the dismal scene of a burial
in the wide ocean; or perhaps some would glance
back at poor Tim Napper as he passed, seeming
to connect him somehow with their fears. While
the child's life was in suspense, Tim would over
and over again make known to Maud Redford
that he would willingly give up his own life to
save the little one, and that he bitterly repented
his unlawful entrance into the ship, with its con-
sequences. Maud soothed him, and took pains







THE REDFORDS:


to show that though a little thing often caused
great distress, still he had not been so much in
fault as this; but she took the opportunity to
speak to him of One who overrules everything,
and she taught him for the first time a little
simple prayer. It was a quiet Sunday, and the
same night the poor boy was seen in a corner of
the deck near the round-house, evidently repeat-
ing this prayer, to which he earnestly added some
words of his own, beseeching that the sick child
might not die.
The pleasant breeze came wafting them on
their way. Rain fell plentifully from time to
time. Happily, too, the ailing infant began to
recover, and the others were fast regaining
strength, when the cry of "Land was given from
the mast-head. It was only two rocks rising out
of the sea, called the Snares," but next day the
hills of New Zealand were plainly visible in the
distance, resting on..the water like clouds.
Hardly anyone went to bed that night. They
waited to see the sky-rockets put off, and the
cannons fired, that were to summon the pilot; and
though this work was begun at three o'clock in
the morning, it was not till three in the after-







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


noon that a little boat was seen, sometimes rising
on the top of a wave, the next moment disappear-
ing, but in the end reaching the great ship, with
its anxious throng of passengers.













CHAPTER III.

THE Jura now received the pilot on board,
along with his four native boatmen, of the
once-terrible race of savages-Maories, as they
are now called. These men attracted general
interest; they were decently dressed and re-
markably intelligent looking, though one had
variegated patterns of blue tattooing on every
part of his dark skin that was visible, as if con-
tinued inside under his clothes; while another
had only an imitation of a moustache drawn in
the same way, and the rest had similar ornaments
according to their fancy. All eyes were soon
drawn, however, to the delight of their approach
to land, with the novelties of the entrance to the
new country, where most were to cast their
future lot.
Outside the Heads" of Otago, as the entrance
to the harbour is called, the aspect was somewhat
barren and desolate, but when the ship had fairly







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


got within the land-locked bay, the scene was
changed. Few of the emigrants were not in
raptures at its appearance, which had an especial
charm for the many Scotch people on board-it
reminded them so vividly of their own High-
land lochs around the opening of the Clyde, only
the mountains that rose to view on every side
were even grander. The ship was too large,
however, to go farther than Port Chalmers, the
place of anchorage. Here they had now to wait
while the government officers came and inspected
the vessel. Fortunately all sickness had dis-
appeared so long beforehand that they were not
obliged to go into quarantine. Two small vessels
had come down river from the town to take the
passengers and their luggage, in addition to
which some of the ship's boats were placed at
their service by the captain. One of the latter
was preferred by Mr. Redford; a sailor was
sent to steer the boat, and several young men
from among the steerage passengers volunteered
to go at the same time so as to give them assist-
ance. The boat was thus almost as full as it
could well hold, but a further addition was yet
made in the person of the boy Tim Napper, who
(46)






THE REDFORDS:


had either been unable to get off before, or still
clung on to the Redfords, the only people who
had shown him much kindness.
The distance was nine miles up to Dunedin,
and the river by no means easy to navigate,
partly from the sand-banks, and still more,
because the wind and tide are generally contrary
to each other. The boat, at all events, soon
proved to be the best mode of conveyance, for
they soon passed both the schooners, which had
successively stuck by the way; they themselves
shortly after could not get on against the'force
of the wind, with the tide failing. Rain was
also coming on, so that it was decided to fasten
the boat, and shelter under the bank; when an
incident took place that was almost as pleasant
as it was unexpected.
"Look, papa!" cried Bernard. "There must
be a house up the side of that hill. Don't you
see the smoke?"
"It's nothing but a feathery tree," said George.
"Bernard's eyes are always sharper than every
one else's."
"But Bernard is right this time," said Dick;
"for, see, there's a man coming down towards







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


us. He can't be a savage, surely, though his
dress is queer enough."
He's making signs to show us where to land,"
said one of the men; and, guided by this friendly
stranger, the boat was soon in a suitable cove,
where Mrs. Redford and the children were
lifted on shore. The stranger was a settler, a
young Englishman named Harkom, and he press-
ingly invited the whole of the Redfords up to
his house, or shanty, as he called it; while the
men in the boat made themselves as comfortable
as they could where they were. After scrambling
for a few minutes up the wet hill they reached
the house, or rather hut, which at first gave Mr.
and Mrs. Redford, and even Maud, a rather
startling idea of colonial accommodations. It
was made of the rudest materials, and consisted
only of one room, so small, that when they had
all entered their host could hardly get in after
them; however, he was so hospitable and good-
hurnoured, and took it so easy, that they at once
liked him, and enjoyed themselves very much.
He first made tea at his little stove, putting in a
quantity that might have served the whole crew
of The Jura. He next brought out bread of his






THE REDFORDS:


own baking, and as he would have it there was
not enough, he next proceeded to mix what he
called slap-jack, and fry it, when it turned out
to be a kind of pancake. He now collected
everything in the shape of a cup or tin that he
possessed, and was going to pour out the tea,
much to the delight of the children at his manner
of doing it, when it suddenly occurred to him
that Mrs. Redford should do this; which she
readily did with all possible form. Mr. Harkom
told them that he liked the colony much better
than Australia, where he had previously been.
Far from objecting to the number of Scotch
settlers, in his opinion they were a kindly and
worthy race of people; still it had seemed to
throw a difficulty in the way of his making
acquaintances, so that he looked upon the Red-
fords, and his introduction to them, with peculiar
interest. He said he now felt quite strange in
ladies' society, and had altogether forgotten how
to get on with young folks; which made the
whole family quite feel for him, though Helen
and little Madge did not seem to agree with this
notion of his, in spite of their first fears at his
great beard, high boots, and cabbage-leaf hat.







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


The rain being now over, and the wind some-
what fallen, they returned to the boat, their host
accompanying them, and giving Mr. Redford
many valuable hints on the purchase of good
land, some of which, he said, was to be had near
him, and now was the time to see about it, as it
was spring. Everybody else felt how odd it was
to be hearing of September as spring. It made
the boys recollect that they were at the Anti-
podes, with the whole globe between them and
Old England. The little girls reminded Maud
that they were now standing with their feet
towards the feet of the people about the dear
old Elms; instead of standing upon their heads
as they used to suppose. Helen laid most stress
upon the fact that it was now night at home,
and that everybody there would be asleep--unless,
to be sure, dear Adelaide Mortimer might happen
to be awake, and think of them. Little Madge
puzzled herself about what would happen if a
hole were bored right through to the opposite
side of the world, so that she could fly back
suddenly; and where she wduld come out exactly,
and what the Mortimers would think of it. As
they parted from Mr. Harkom, he jokingly tried







THE REDFORDS:


to bribe Madge to stay behind with him, and
she, thinking he was serious, was sorry for him,
but was obliged to refuse, saying she hoped they
would see him some time again. Her mama ex-
pressed-the same hope, and so did Mr. Redford;
upon which they pursued their way to the bown.
High hills rose on every side, many thickly
clothed from top to bottom with trees in full
foliage, in reality evergreens; some of the nearest
being covered with wild flax and strange ferns,
or overrun with small brown bush, which gave
them the appearance to the Scotch passengers of
their own heath-clad hills. Suddenly the inlet
terminated as if in another lake, smaller than
the first harbour; and here the town of Dunedin
appeared, only separated by some sand-hills from
the ocean, which again lay beyond. Dunedin
was laid out on the plan of regular streets, on a
most extensive scale; but meanwhile the single
chief street, consisting of wooden buildings, was
the only one that could pretend to the name, the
rest having but a few houses in each; so that,
from many points, there seemed to be no con-
nection between them, or they were almost lost
sight of among the remains of "bush."







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


Mr. Redford succeeded in getting his family
accommodated at a private house where board
was given, though at a very high rate. The
expense of this made him the more anxious to
obtain land of his own at once; and on application
at the proper office, he was advised to purchase
a country section, belonging to a settler about to
leave the colony, which he now did, and became
in a few days the proprietor.
Mr. Redford was informing his wife that all
was ready for their removal, when his attention
was drawn by hearing one of the boys desiring
Tim Napper to do some piece of work in the porch.
"Has that boy returned?" asked Mr. Redford.
"I thought he had got some employment."
"Oh no," replied Mrs. Redford; "he has been
along with the boys, and made himself very
useful about the boxes from the ship; and he
persists in doing- all the little odds and ends we
require here."
"We could never have got on without Tim,
papa," said Maud laughing.
"I think," continued Mrs. Redford smiling,
"that both he and the children have taken for
granted that he is to continue with us."







THE REDFORDS:


Mr. Redford looked doubtful for a moment.
"We must recollect the boy's origin," he said;
"not to speak of the manner in which he left
Liverpool."
"But, papa, all his conduct afterwards was
good," pleaded Maud. "Then he shows attach-
ment, at least to us. Do let him stay, papa!"
"Yes, do, my dear; on trial at all events," said
Mrs. Redford.
"Well," agreed Mr. Redford, "let it be so-
indeed, it seems I have no choice left! It is
really questionable what other employment the
boy might get here; and, so far as we are con-
cerned, it may be a benefit, for I hear that there
is not a servant to be had just now. They had
been all caught up before I applied. We shall
have to wait for the next ship."
"Oh, I'm so glad!" said Lily; "it will be such
fun doing all the work ourselves! and Tim is so
clever!"
The matter was thus decided, and Tim Napper's
lot was so far settled. As soon as the boxes and
packages were brought up from the ship to the
Dunedin jetty, they were placed in a boat pro-
cured for the purpose, and meant to be retained,







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


as the nearest way to their new home lay across
Pelichit's Bay at the end of the inlet. The boat
was large enough to allow of the family being
conveyed at the same time; and it was thus they
reached Poatipa Hook, as the place had been
called by its previous owner. Here a sledge and
bullock were in waiting at the landing-place in
charge of a native, or Maori, who had been in
the habit of often acting as a labourer on the
section, and who had agreed to do the same for
Mr. Redford. He called himself William Tarakua,
and was a tall, rather good-looking man, in
ordinary colonial dress, though his complexion
was swarthy, with some marks of tattooing.
The house, or "warrie," as the native called it,
was not far off; and he pointed out to the boys
a narrow opening in the thick bush, which, he
said, was a foot-track to it, and would let them
get there in a few minutes.
The boat, with the heavy things, was mean-
while left at the mouth of the creek, up which
the full tide would afterwards enable it to be
taken very near the house. "The bush," which
grew thick near the shore, consisted of under-
wood, so close, and sometimes thorny, as to be







THE REDFORDS:


almost impenetrable; though here and there it
showed the most beautiful tree-ferns, shrubs of
curious colours, and flowering plants, while at
other places it rose into tall gum-trees, or other
timber. These were for the most part duller in
their green than English trees; but they were in
full leaf already, if not all evergreen: besides,
their peculiarity made up for any sombre shade,
and there were glimpses of the brightest-coloured
birds fluttering about, although no four-footed
animals were seen as yet. The party hurried
through, however; glad of the track to guide
them, and once or twice getting almost bewil-
dered, till at length the "clearing" came into
view, and they saw their place of abode before
them.
At first sight of it Maud was utterly silent,
but Lily exclaimed in some dismay: "Oh dear!
can that be it?-what a thing!"
"Oh, how jolly!" cried Bernard, running for-
ward with Charley; "such a funny place! Why,
it's just like one of the grottoes at Toxteth Park."
Or like a tool-house," said Charley laughing.
"What will mama think of it?" whispered
Maud anxiously, as she leant on her father's arm.


58 -







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


Mr. Redford smiled and looked more con-
fident, for he had of course seen it before.
"We must try to make it better at once then,
boys; before long I trust we shall have something
rather more like a real house. We can at least
do something to break the surprise to mama. I
bought a tent in town the other day, along with
two or three pieces of canvas awning, and had
them sent on before; they are in the hut."
He and the boys at once proceeded to get
these things out, and erect them at the intended
points, which was easily done with the help of the
stakes which the Maori had prepared beforehand.
At one side of the rough little log-hut, or shanty,
the tent was now raised and fixed; in front, over
the door, a striped piece of the awning was firmly
extended, so as to look something like a verandah.
This quite magnified and brightened it up,
especially at a little distance. Meanwhile Maud
and Lily had been kindling a fire within in the
wide chimney, which made the interior look
really cheerful, with its rude benches on each
side of the hearth. Maud next found an old
broom, and while Lily swept the floor she filled
a kettle that was hanging on a hook over the







THE REDFORDS:


fire, so that they might have a cup of tea along
with the cold meat and bread they were to have
for dinner whenever their mama came.
"I can't think how we are to find room to
sleep," said Lily; "the house is hardly larger
than our cabin in The Jura."
"And didn't we sleep there, Lily ?" said Maud.
"Come, we must be cheerful, and make the best
of it. In a few days we shall like the place very
much, I daresay, and we must try to keep up
mama's spirits. I am afraid both papa and
mama will feel the change for a time."
Maud was interrupted by Charley shouting
that the lazy bullock was turning the corner of
" the clearing," and in a minute or two more they
had drawn up at the door. Mrs. Redford stood
for a few minutes surveying the house. "It is
much better than I had thought," she said.
Maud exchanged glances with her papa.
"I am glad you have such a good impression
of it, dear," said the latter. "It is a poor place
at best, but we shall soon have a very different
one."
When Mrs. Redford moved forward, she could
not help noticing how the favourable effect







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


had been produced, and she fully appreciated the
thoughtful kindness that had been at work to
soften the first view of their rough life. The
boys laughed as their two little sisters peeped
and peered about, poking into the actual nature
of their new residence.
"Oh!" exclaimed little Madge, stopping short
as they scampered round with Bernard and
Charley; Oh, I wish mama would allow me,
just for once, to say 0 how jolly!"
"Well, but you know you mustn't," said
Bernard authoritatively. "You're not to use
such words; they're only for boys."
"Yes, I know," said Madge with a toss of her
sunny hair; "but there is no other word for
what I mean."
The elder boys, with the help of the Maori,
lost no time in getting the smaller boxes dragged
from the sledge and placed round the tent for
seats. They had a large one carried to the cen-
tre for a table, while Maud and the girls, with
Tim as leader of the party, were opening boxes
and crates to procure the crockery and provisions.
With so many willing hands to assist, Maud was
able to place quite a complete and almost elegant







62 THE REDFORDS:

"cold collation," as George called it, on the box-
table. There were only two beds, or rather
'what had served for such, in the house, which
were to serve for Mrs. Redford and the girls;
and when dinner was over, the first thing the
boys did was to go out with the Maori into the
bush, where they cut a quantity of the ferns and
wire-grass. This was brought in and made into
the most delightful elastic beds for the boys and
Mr. Redford; and as the spring weather was
very mild, the boys assured their mama they had
by far the best of it, and were really to be en-
vied.
Every one by this time was so fatigued as to
be glad to retire early to bed; but before doing
so, they all met in the tent while Mr. Redford
offered up, for the first time in their new home,
an expression of gratitude to God, and besought
a continuance of His providential care: not only
so, still more, that they might be the subjects of
His spiritual grace. It was the first opportunity
that poor Tim Napper had of joining on such an
occasion, yet he seemed to have a conception of
the privilege he thus enjoyed; so his troubles and
lessons during the voyage had not been thrown







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


away. It was curious, too, that Maori William
evidently considered he had a right to be present,
and knew quite well how to behave, though his
manner conveyed more an impression of self-im-
portance than of devout feeling.
Next morning the first thing was to go down
and see after the heavy luggage in the boat,
which- had been brought up the creek with the
previous evening's tide, and safely secured. The
united strength of the whole party was scarcely
equal to move some of the heaviest boxes from
the boat into the sledge; but this difficulty was
soon got over by Mr. Redford's contrivance of
an impromptu crane for hoisting, much to the
approval of William especially.
That is very good job," he remarked to George
Redford as they went up with the last heavy
load. "The master have got right stuff here,"
tapping his forehead.
"Well, yes, William," said George carelessly;
"but that's nothing to what papa could do! He
has quite an inventive genius."
The respect of the Maori for Mr. Redford
evidently continued to rise. "Quite right for
Englishmen to have comprehension," continued






THE REDFORDS:


he, in a rather dignified tone. "Last settler here
not got much comprehension-very nice man-
but common fellow!"
Meanwhile the most necessary things were
being taken out, while the boxes were stored
under cover. The sensation was great as each
article of importance was displayed to view, or
some stray thing had found its way into the
wrong box. Some of them had never been seen
before, while others were looked upon for the
first time since leaving home.
"Oh! mama," said Helen, "there's the dear
little drawing-room stool among those dishes-
and-yes! it's the tiger rug, and the lovely china
cups."
"And here's mama's pretty work-box, and
Maud's writing-case," said Madge, "and ever so
many of the nice drawing-room ornaments."
Oh! we've no use for these things at present,"
said Dick, "so I'll just fasten the lid down again.
What a bore it is opening the wrong box."
But the greatest interest was drawn, at least
among the male portion of the household, to the
unpacking of the numerous tools which Mr.
Redford had provided. Dick, Bernard, and







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


Charley shouted by turns, according to their
various preference, at each parcel that was dis-
closed.
"The workshop will be Of great consequence
to us," said Mr. Redford, who was himself fond
of carpentering. "It will be some time before I
can attend to it at all, but you, Bernard, have a
turn that way, and Charley can help you."
"And what shall we make first, papa?" said
the two in high glee-" a nice work-table-a
cabinet-no, a sofa!"
"You forget that we haven't even a rough
table," was the amused reply, "nor a chair, nor
stool, and even to these I am not sure you are
equal."
"Just let us try, papa," said Bernard. "Don't
look for one whole day, then we'll show you!"
To these conditions their father cheerfully
agreed, and for the present he had many other
things to see about; even the improvements on
the rude house had to be postponed to preparing
ground and sowing seed, besides taking measures
to procure the necessary live-stock, and to make
the farm profitable in due time.













CHAPTER IV.

THE weather had been very favourable on
their first taking possession of the property,
but two days' incessant rain showed Mr. Red-
ford that the climate was by no means so settled
as he had been led to believe.
"It will never do for you to sleep in the tent,
papa," said Mrs. Redford anxiously; "you may
have a return of that' dreadful rheumatic fever
you had a few years ago. Something must really
be done."
"That's all very true, my dear," said Mr.
Redford; "but we must get in the seeds, else
we shall have but a poor harvest."
"But couldn't we do something, papa?" said
Bernard; "the hut here seems to be made so.
simply, that I am sure Charley and I could build
an improved addition ourselves, if you would
only draw out a plan."
"I have been thinking, papa," said Maud, that






AN EMIGRANT STORY.


if you and William could drive in the posts,
Bernard and Charley and we girls could finish it
off. Now, don't laugh, Dick. Just let us try,
papa. I am sure we shall work wonders, if you
only will let us have Tim to help."
The Maori approved of Maud's proposal, and
said that the boys were brave workers, and he
was of opinion that the intended addition should
be made on the plan of fern-tree warries.
"We cannot work in the field till the ground
is drier," said* George. "Hadn't we better cut
some posts and drive them in at once?"
Accordingly, George and Dick set to work to
cut down a quantity of fern-trees, and some
young trees for posts, which were laid in the
wagon, and driven over by Tim to the spot Mr,
Redford had selected at one end of the hut.
He himself then proceeded to drive in the frame-
posts, with the assistance of William and the two
younger boys. These posts were placed at regu-
lar intervals; three rails were nailed lengthways
across the outside, and the same thing was done
on the inside; after which the stems of the fern-
trees were pushed down upright between the two
lines of rail, so close together as to make a com-







THE REDFORDS:


pact wall, with the additional advantage of its
rough, hairy-looking bark, which helped to fill
up a few chinks.
"Oh! such a funny-looking wall," said little
Madge. "It's just as if it had been made with
bears' legs."
"How do you know that, Madge?" said Char-
ley laughing. "I don't believe you ever saw a
bear, or its legs either."
"Oh, Charley, how can you say so! Didn't
mama take us to see the Zoological Gardens at
home?"
I forgot that," said Charley. "That was the
time, Madgie, when you saw the splendid 'girafte,'
wasn't it?"
"Come, come, Charley!" said Mrs. Redford,
"Madge was only a very little girl then; but she
can pronounce the name quite well now. I
should like to know, however, the name of the
boy who lost his new cap while teasing a small
monkey?"
Charley hung his head and scampered off after
Tim and the wagon, for the subject of the cap
was rather a painful one to him.
"You won't leave us girls much to do, papa!"







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


said Maud laughing. "We must really be
allowed to do something!"
"And don't you do a great deal, dear?" said
Mr. Redford. "Could we work so well if we
had to cook our own food, and look after the
house? There will be plenty of work for you
all, pasting the paper, and tacking on the calico
inside the walls when we get the roof on."
"I'll tell you what the girls could do, papa,"
said Bernard. "They could collect some stones
into heaps down on the beach; then Charley and
Tim and I could carry them up."
"What do we want the stones for?" said Lily.
For the chimney, to be sure," replied Bernard.
"It is built outside with stones and mud. Didn't
you see Mr. Harkom's? But, papa, what are we
to do for a few bricks? Mr. Harkom said, you
remember, that there ought to be three rows built
inside."
"I must send William with the boat across to
the town," said Mr. Redford; "there are a few
other things we require besides."
"Oh, do let me go too, papa!" said Bernard;
and Charley was also anxious to be of the party;
so it was settled that the two boys, with William







THE REDFORDS:


and Tim, should set out early the next morning,
as the tide would then be in their favour. This
was accordingly done, and the same afternoon
they returned with the bricks in the bottom of
the boat, along with the various small purchases
for Mrs. Redford. The girls had been all the
day at the beach collecting the stones into heaps,
and were awaiting the arrival of the boat. When
it drew near, Lily's sharp eyes noticed they had
a small boat, or skiff, in tow; but it was only
after the sail had been lowered, and they were
very close to the shore, that they discovered there
were now five persons in the boat, instead of four.
This addition to the number proved to be Mr.
Harkom, who had met the boys in town, and thus
heard of their settlement at the Hook," with the
various work now in progress there. As he had
a boat of his own with him, he now came across
with the boys to see if he could be of any service,
either to help or advise.
"I assure you, Miss Maud," he said, as they
walked up from the boat together, "that it is not
an easy matter building a chimney; but I flatter
myself I am rather an adept in that line."
"Then," said Maud laughing, we ought cer-







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


tainly to be much obliged to you for coming to
show us how it should be done."
The chimney, in fact," continued Mr. Harkom,
may be said to be the backbone of a New Zea-
land house. I have seen many a one that had
been built by professed bricklayers blown down
by the first gale of wind; but mine never give
way, because they are done on right colonial
principles."
Then I only hope ours will be of that kind,"
said Maud, "as it would not be agreeable to find
one's chimney falling down so easily."
Both Mr. and Mrs. Redford gave Mr. Harkom
a hearty welcome; indeed, it was curious how
much pleasure every one felt at seeing him again,
as if he had been an old friend instead of a chance
acquaintance seen for an hour or two. It was
not only owing to the instinctive wish for com-
panionship in a strange new scene, but they
already began to be influenced by the hearty
colonial feeling, which inclines to make a friend
of every neighbour, and thinks but little of the
class-divisions of society in the old country.
The next morning the weather was very
favourable for Mr. Redford proceeding with







THE REDFORDS:


the cultivation of his ground; and seeing how
anxious he was, Mr. Harkom bade him keep his
mind quite easy, for he would superintend the
finishing-off of the house, his own seed being
already all in. It was not till the forenoon that
the stones were required for the chimney, and all
the morning Bernard had been missing; but
every one knew they must not inquire too closely
into his whereabouts, as there was some secret
work a-foot. Miss Lily said she was certain she
heard a saw working in the bush, and her idea
was Bernard must be busily at work upon the
sofa he was always talking about; but Mrs.
Redford laughed, and said they would all know
in good time. When the whole family were as-
sembled at dinner, Bernard appeared, and after
a whispered conversation with Maud, she slipped
away with him, and presently they returned,
carrying a most ingenious if rude hand-barrow.
Bernard had got a small empty box from his
mama, to which he had fixed a pole at each side
like a sedan-chair.
"What in the name of wonder is this for?"
cried George laughing.
"Why, sir," said Maud, "it's to carry up the







AN EMIGRANT STORY. 73

stones we have been collecting at the beach. I
could not have believed Bernard was half so
clever. Just feel how light it is."
"We'll have to call him 'Chips' now," said
Dick; "he has earned the title of carpenter sure
enough."
"Certainly it does you credit, my boy," said
Mr. Redford. "It will be much easier to carry
the stones by the footpath, and will save our
wheel-barrow on that rough beach."
Tim Napper now showed that he had not
climbed and swept chimneys for nothing, and
though he had never done more than repair one
at home, he now wielded the trowel as if he had
been a bricklayer all his life. This essential part
of the new structure having been completed, the
main difficulty was over, and the rest was soon
accomplished by active hands and willing minds.
The outside once done, the interior had to be
plastered with mud and sand, made tougher by
fibrous stuff from the fern-tree bark. When this
was dry, ,all the paper that had been used in
packing was' brought into the service, and pasted
firmly on the calico that was tacked round the
walls. Along with a comfortable sitting-room,







THE REDFORDS:


this new portion had a nice bed-room for Mr. and
Mrs. Redford; and, for the purpose of making
it handsome, Helen and little Madge had privately
employed themselves in cuttingout a number of
pictures from all sorts of illustrated papers and
stray magazines, which they now pasted all round
the room, according to a plan of their own, before
anybody could interfere. The effect somewhat
surprised their papa at his first entrance, and he
seemed for a moment to look forward with
dismay to seeing so much of the woodcuts from
the Illustrated London News, mingled with comic
scenes from Punch, and plates of the fashions
from ladies' journals. But the delight of the
children was so great, and their confidence in his
admiration was so undoubting, that he could not
find in his heart to do otherwise than praise it.
"See, papa!" said little Madge, flourishing her
paste-brush, "here's Mr. Punch and Toby at the
foot of the bed. I thought you would like to
see him when you wakened; he is such a funny
little man."
"And look at this, papa," cried Helen. "I've
put this picture called 'The Morning Bath,' over
the basin-stand. I like to look at that boy with







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


the drops of water all over his face, so much.
Don't you, papa?"
They were interrupted by hearing an exclama-
tion, or rather a cry of surprise outside, from
George and Dick, who had just returned home
from the "clearing," as the fields were called;
and Mr. Redford hurried out at once to see what
it could be.
We must explain that the new room was now
ready to be occupied, and it had been arranged
that that evening the piano they had brought
out with them was to be taken from its case and
placed in its appointed corner. Mr. Harkom was
to leave the next morning early, but had post-
poned his departure till this should be done.
Mr. Redford had been called away by the chil-
dren from helping Mr. Harkom and William
to get out the screws, and he now thought the
cry he had heard was in connection with it. On
reaching the door, however, there he saw Tim
and the two younger boys bearing between them
a rude sort of press, which they styled achiffonnier,
constructed out of an old packing-case, and
which Maud had covered neatly with dark-brown
chintz. This they placed at the end of the room







THE REDFORDS:


and hurried off, leaving the others to admire it
at their leisure. In a few minutes they returned
carrying an ottoman, which they loudly declared
was the handiwork of Maud alone.
"It is nothing to be proud of," said Maud, "I
had the box, and it was easy to tack on the
chintz, and lay the cushion on the top."
"Oh! it will do famously till we get Bernard's
sofa," said Dick laughing; "but, for my part, I
can't bear an ottoman-they seem only suited to
stiff-backed old maids; though, Miss Maud, you
do deserve credit for it."
"Ah! but wait till you see the last piece of
work Mr. Harkom and the boys have been busy
with to-day. You won't complain of it making
your back stiff, Mr. Dick, I am very sure."
Bernard now brought in and set by the side
of the fireplace, what looked like a small easy
chair; and on the chintz cover being pulled off,
this proved to be a barrel cut down into the
form of a chair and stuffed all round. When
Mrs. Redford was seated in it, she pronounced
it the most comfortable chair she had ever sat
in, and would never desire a better.
"Really, boys," she said, looking round the







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


room, "what with the white muslin curtains at
the window, and the few old familiar pictures
on the walls, and all these nice pieces of furniture,
it is beginning to feel quite home-like; If we
only had a table'now, we should be complete."
That can easily be supplied," said Mr. Harkom,
who beckoned to George to follow him out.
Meanwhile Mr. Redford, with the assistance
of the others, got the piano removed from its
case; and while they were bringing it in, Mr.
Harkom and George drove four posts into the
earthen floor, on which they nailed the lid of
one of the largest cases, which made a very
serviceable table.
"Necessity is truly the mother of invention,"
said Mrs. Redford laughing. "I never thought
a table could be produced so easily."
Ah! Mrs. Redford," replied Mr. Harkom,
"we get to do without the polish in the colonies;
and, as the old saying has it, we take what we
have, and so never want."
The piano was now ready to be opened, and a
box being set up on end as a stool, Maud was
conducted over to it, with some show of ceremony,
to play the first tune.







THE REDFORDS:


"What shall I play?" said Maud. "One can't
help feeling quite nervous at the very idea of
touching the keys again, after so much work and
so many changes. What if it should be out of
tune?"
The boys called some for one tune, some for
another, and Mr. Harkom, who stood near her,
suggested one also, which Maud at once began to
play. It was about the Maid of Llangollen-all
about sweet "Jenny Jones," and While Maud
played the air sweetly and feelingly, Mr. Harkom,
at their request, sang a verse or two. Tune after
tune followed, till Maud, at her papa's request,
began to sing one of his old favourites. Unfor-
tunately she had chosen the too trying one of
" Home, sweet Home," which proved far too much
for Mrs. Redford, as her eyes suddenly filled
with tears, and a sob burst from her-irrepressibly;
Maud's voice, too, gave way, and Lily began to
cry outright, and everybody else was on the
point of being carried away by the same emotion,
except the younger boys, who were indignant.
"This will never do," said Mr. Redford, con-
trolling himself after an effort. "Let us have
something cheerful."







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


Miss Maud," cried Mr. Harkom, "if you can
play 'Sally in our Alley,' I'll sing it, though it's
twenty years since I've heard the air."
Thus the occasion was turned into cheerfulness
-once more; the rest of the evening passed very
pleasantly, while they talked of their plans and
occupations till a late hour, as Mr. Harkom was
going off next morning too early for good-byes.
When he was fairly gone, every one could not
help.feeling very dull: even Tim looked melan-
choly, and, as if to get rid of the feeling, he flung
off his jacket, picked up his hatchet, and ran off
to the bush.
Little Madge shed tears quite openly, and,
though Maud reminded her that the pair of
chickens he was to send her could not come
unless he went away to look after them, she said
she would rather not have them, if Mr. Harkom
would but stay with them always.
"I shall see him at church," said Lily. "Papa
has promised to take me on Sunday-that is to say,
if it does not rain like these two last Sundays."
"I wish the road was not so far round by
land," said Mrs. Redford; "and so rough; I
dislike the boat."







THE REDFORDS:


"Oh, mama," replied Lily, "it is such a short
way across, and our boat is such a nice, great
strong one!"
All very true," was the answer; "but I never
did like boats all my life, and prefer to travel
by land. Still more does it make me anxious
when left behind."
"Well, my dear," said Mr. Redford, "we shall
know more about the road by and by. Perhaps
the distance has been exaggerated. I must go
to town soon about some cows Mr. Harkom was
speaking of that are for sale; and some of us
may have to return by the road."
The children were delighted at the thought of
having a cow; and the younger boys amused
themselves with teasing Maud about taking her
dairy produce to market.
"I'll tell you what it is," said Maud, "I shan't
have a thing to sell if you boys don't be active
and turn that little broken-down shed at the back
of the warrie into a dairy. Papa bought a nice
churn, you know, with a wheel for making the
butter; but I must have a cool shelf to place my
milk-dishes on."
"Oh, yes, I know," said Bernard; "we can







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


get the few bricks left over from the chimney,
and we are going to make you a new dairy.
Tim is busy cutting down the trees to build the
place. But he has got such a grand idea in his
head besides; only it's a secret a present."
"Let's tell the 'old mother,'" said Charley.
"You won't repeat it, mind. Tim wants to have
a house of his own, and he is going to make a
small hut to hold himself. It won't. be larger
than a pig-house; but quite large enough for
him. I suppose it will make him feel as if he
were a 'hemigrant' in real earnest."
"And does he mean to cook his own food, and
eat it by himself," said Maud laughing.
"Well, I can't exactly say," replied Charley;
"but I rather think he does; only I don't suppose
mama will allow him, as it might affront William
to be left by himself."
Having got over the chief work of sowing and
planting, though much was still to do, Mr. Red-
ford went over to Dunedin to procurethe necessary
live-stock. He took Bernard and Maori William
with him, while the others returned with the
boat, after landing them at the town jetty.
There was already a rough wagon-track round
(348) F






THE REDFORDS:


the head of the bay from town, and by this Mr.
Redford brought back his present purchases,
including a serviceable riding-horse, which was
of use on the way. There were two good cows,
one of them giving plenty of milk; also a pair
of goats. There were two coops full of poultry,
and some young pigs. Mr. Redford had also
succeeded in obtaining a number of sheep to be
added to the small flock he had bought with the
property, and which were out on the run under
the charge of their shepherd; but these were to be
brought round from another direction. Bernard
had so much to tell when he came home of the
strange life in town that he made them quite
lively. The English mail had just come in that
forenoon, and he gave a humorous description of
the people swarming like bees round the post-
office, waiting to get their letters. As illustrative
of the life in Dunedin at the time, he repeated a
story he had heard; how some runaway sailors
had been confined in the jail, or, as it was called,
"in chokey." The old jailer treated them so
kindly, it seemed, that they looked upon him as
a father; and one day when there happened to
be some races in town, he gave his prisoners







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


permission to go out and enjoy the sight, trusting
simply to their word of honour. They found
themselves so comfortable with him that when
their term of imprisonment had expired they
continued as boarders
"But, stranger than all," said Bernard, "I saw
an old chief in town called Tyro, who has eaten
white people long ago; and he says he won't die
happy till he eats another white man. He had
come to town to get his own and his wife's
portrait taken."
"How I should like to see him!" said Charley.
"Well, perhaps you may, because he knows
William."
"Oh, dreadful!" exclaimed Mrs. Redford.
"William must be told not to encourage him to
come here, or any of the wild natives."
"They- are quite harmless," Mr. Redford said;
"but, by the way, you will be glad to hear that
before long we shall have a tolerable road, so
that you can go into Dunedin independently of
the boat, as then it will be possible to drive."
"Indeed, that is good news," replied Mrs.
Redford; "for the boat is the worst evil of the
place. I always dread some disaster from it."







THE REDFORDS.


"I have another piece of news to relate," said
Mr. Redford, "that will please you all, I am
sure. I met Mr. Harkom, and he told me he had
just sold his section and purchased another on
our side of the bay, with only a hill or two
between us.
They were all so delighted at the thought of
having Mr. Harkom for a neighbour, that it
almost drove out of mind the interesting subject
of the animals; though Madge was not quite
satisfied when she heard that the actual distance
between the two stations was fifteen miles, so
that she could not walk to his house, as she did
to the Mortimers' at home. She became recon-
ciled, however, 'when her papa explained that
Mr. Harkom would think it no distance at all,
and would doubtless ride over very often during
the summer.













CHAPTER V.

W E must ask our readers to suppose some
months to have passed over our friends
the Redfords, so that when next we visit them
they are beginning to look upon themselves as
established colonists, and to get over the first
difficulties which settlers feel in a country like
New Zealand. Not the least of these difficulties
had been the great expense of living, as long as
everything required to be got from the town;
the high cost of provisions, and the extravagant
charges for every article of consumption. The
colony of Otago, after being considered the most
backward of the settlements, about this time
rose in general estimation, and made rapid
strides. Every month large vessels arrived from
"home," crowded with emigrants, and loaded
with goods; while at the same time, as if afltici-
pating the fresh attractions that were soon to
distinguish the region, the throng was swelled by







THE REDFORDS:


a constant influx of more experienced settlers
from other parts. Prices rose daily, and for a
time every item of housekeeping was a matter
of careful consideration at Poatipa Hook. But
they were now beginning to find the tables turned
as their first harvest came to be gathered in, and
their own produce could be brought into use,
not only for themselves, but for the market of
Dunedin. The butter made by Maud and Lily
was in great demand even at the high. price of
two-and-sixpence a pound, and the eggs were
bought up above the usual market price.
One or two families came to settle-beside
the Redfords, who were very neighbourly and
agreeable. After the daily labours were over,
they would occasionally indulge in a little social
intercourse, when the younger members danced
and sang, and the elder folks talked over past
days in the "old country." Sometimes, too, they
would have a whole holiday, and would join
together to have a picnic up the river, or to the
top of Mount Flagstaff, a distance of about six
miles from Dunedin. There, when they had
overcome the difficulty of climbing the steep
mountain, which was not accomplished without







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


much merriment and laughter at the various
slips and falls some of the party made, they
considered themselves amply repaid by the
glorious view from the summit. Not only did
they see the city of Dunedin, now growing large
and populous, but the various streams, rivers,
and lakes, with the great Taieri plain spread out
like a panorama before them. There, too, was
the blue Pacific Ocean, and the remarkable-look-
ing hills called the Pig Ranges, undulating into
all sorts of strange shapes and hollows, while
beyond them is nothing but mountain and moun-
tain again.
At these times Mr. Harkom was certain to be
present; indeed, he came so often to the Hook
that he used to declare he had better build him-
self a warrie, like Tim Napper's, and settle aown
altogether.
The house at Poatipa Hook was still rough in
its outward appearance, with all the features of
an off-hand colonial dwelling, in the shanty or
log-hut style; but it had been rendered more
commodious by several additions as the necessity
arose, and was found to suit all the present re-
quirements. The situation was pleasant, though







THE REDFORDS:


Mr. Redford talked decidedly of erecting a
new house, at their first leisure, on the higher
ground, which commanded a fine view of the
bay. Meanwhile it was not likely that the said
leisure time would soon arrive; and here they
were conveniently placed, if not with an eye to
the picturesque, which was a consideration that
had given the original settler but little care.
Bush was behind them and on either hand,
and it stretched along to the adjoining creek,
which was thus hidden; the fields of the clearing
opened out on both sides, to which it was their
future business to add more ground, as the rough
soil could be brought into cultivation. Out-
houses of logs and wattle were put up about the
back, forming a snug, homely inclosure, being
more thoroughly supplied from time to time
with the suitable live stock for turning the farm
to account, and taking advantage of the profit-
able market in town. There were already two
or three excellent cows, and consequently a
regular dairy was fitted up, over which Maud
took charge, assisted by a rather rough, but
willing Irish maid-servant, who had been engaged
from the last ship. The younger girls had care







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


of the poultry, to which no little attention was
given, as fowls of all kinds sold high in Dunedin,
and eggs were at famine prices. Even little
Madge, in partnership with Charley, had their
stock- to take care of, in the shape of rabbits and
pigeons, and a goat with two kids, which multi-
plied fast from the few they had got as pets at
the beginning. A better idea cannot be given
of their life at this time than by describing a
day's occupation at the Hook.
First, Maud was up soon after dawn, and,
most invariably to commence with, she had to
rouse Biddy, the maid, among whose merits
early rising could not be included. Biddy slept
deeply, but at all events, there was no difficulty
in knowing her exact whereabouts, for she snored
outrageously. After she had been shaken up,
the smouldering log in the hearth was stirred, the
fire made, and preparation set going for break-
fast. They then went out, milked the cows, and
sent them by Tim to their pasture; next they
arranged the dairy for the day, and returned
indoors, bringing with them a supply of the
delightful new milk. Biddy now made cakes,
while Maud turned up her sleeves and mixed a







THE REDFORDS:


sufficient quantity of flour for slap-jacks, as well
as for the day's loaves in the oven, at both of
which she had become quite skilful. By this
time her younger sisters were up. Mrs. Red-
ford soon followed; and when the hungry party
of workers came in from their hour's occupation
before breakfast, all were ready for a hearty
meal. This over, they separated to their respec-
tive labours in thorough earnest.
"Come, now," said Maud, "we must hurry
with the clearing away, ard get out immediately
to hunt for those duck-nests. I am sure they
must be down in the long grass by the creek."
"Yes," said Lily; "and then we must set the
turkey. Wasn't it nice that Tim managed to
get the eggs for her so cleverly?"
"I do hope they will all come out," said
Madge. "What a nice lot of turkeys we will
then have, and what a lot of money we will
make by our eggs!"
"How strange that the best season for eggs is
Christmas!" said Helen; "and how surprised
the people at home would be to see us having
strawberries, and new potatoes, and green peas
on Christmas Day!"







AN EMIGRANT STORY,


"But we have our plum-pudding too," said
Lily. "I was so glad mama decided to have it
all the same, though it doesn't look so nice
coming in by daylight, and without the blue
flame too."
"Come, now, no more talking," said Maud;
"we must hurry, and leave the tidying-up of
the rooms to Biddy. Are you forgetting we are
to go out to the run this afternoon to see the
sheep folded for the shearing to-morrow?"
"Poor sheep," said Madge, "I am very sorry
for them. Only think how strange they must
feel without their fleeces."
"I think they must be very glad to get rid of
them," said Helen, "especially in hot weather;
and, besides, if the wool turns out well, and papa
makes money by them, we shall soon be able to
go home again."
"Oh, Helen!" said Lily, "you are always think-
ing about going home. I like this place ever so
much better. It's such a dear, jolly place. Far
better than the stiff old country; and I am sure
we are all happy here. And p'apa never looks
worn-out and tired as he did in Liverpool."
The dishes having been put away, and Biddy







THE REDFORDS:


and the dinner set going, the four girls now
proceeded to go in search of the missing nests,
and after a hot hour's work Helen was fortunate
in finding one; and Maud, a few minutes after,
another, so that they returned home with a
prize, as there was a larger quantity of eggs
than they expected. Making the cream ready
for Biddy to churn, and seeing to the contents of
the cheese-press, which Maud was very anxious
should turn out a success, took up the rest of the
time till dinner was ready. The boys were not
to return till night, but Mr. Redford came back
to escort them to the hill-pasture; and Mrs.
Redford being persuaded to go also, the bullock-
dray was got out; and, when she and the three
girls were comfortably seated, the little party
set out, with Tim for driver, while Maud rode
behind on her pony, along with her papa. The
weather was really delightful, so pure was the
atmosphere, though the heat was great, while the
smell of the tree-ferns and gums filled the air,
and the grass was full of wild flowers quite dif-
ferent from those in England, not to speak of the
sounds from various birds, the plumage of which
was far gayer than anything seen in the old







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


country-from the green paroquets to the blue-
mountain parrots, the bronze-winged pigeons,
and, occasionally, a white cockatoo.
When they had got into the thicker part of
the bush, they were startled by hearing a strange
cry, as if from some one in distress; but Mr.
Redford explained that it came from the more-
pork" bird; and on listening again they heard
it quite distinctly crying, "More pork!"-" More
pork!"
"How odd!" said Maud laughing. "What
does it put you in mind of, Lily?"
Oh! Helen and Aunt Julia, to be sure," replied
Lily, laughing also. "Don't you remember,
mama, when Helen was very little, how she horri-
fied aunt by the quantity of pork she ate; and
when she coaxingly tried to get her to wait for
the nice rice pudding, Helen kept saying, 'No,
mo' pork! mo' pork, please!'"
There were equally curious cries to be heard,
however, in the bush, which helped to save Helen's
blushes, the most remarkable of which was the
laughing jackass, a bird that seemed to imitate
people's mirth so wonderfully. But the ground
now opened out into bare hillsides, with gray






THE REDFORDS:


hollows winding through them up to the slopes
of pasture, where sheep were to be seen in the
distance. Maud and her papa rode on before to
look for the boys, and found them beside the fold
in the bottom of the valley, waiting for the shep-
herd and his dog to gather the flock downwards.
A lively scene it was till this had been done, af-
fording the party no little amusement, in addition
to the pleasure of the excursion among the hills.
It was evening by the time they returned. This
ended the day's labours, making everybody
heartily ready for supper-the most social and
leisurely meal of all.
The season passed rapidly in the various cares
of the sheep-shearing, the hay-making, the cut-
ting of the corn, and the gathering in of every
crop. Then roots had to be secured, and fire-wood
stacked, before the cold rainy weather, which
went by the name of winter. This was the more
social time, even beyond the outskirts of Dunedin;
and the neighbourhood of the Hook was becom-
ing, happily for them, a favourite township,
where several substantial settlers, both old and
new, had taken out sections, as the phrase was.
Within a space of three or four miles, several of







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


these were to be found living in rough, but hearty
comfort. Towards one point, two or three in-
habitants were within easy reach of each other;
and the establishment of a saw-mill there, added
to the discovery of various useful minerals on
the ground, promised before long to increase the
population. At no part could it be entitled to
the rank of a village, but the whole place went
by the name of Poatipa; and it was pretty cer-
tain that before many years a flourishing little
town would be seen in the locality. The bullock
tracks were already improved into tolerably
decent roads, so long as the weather remained
good. Mr. Redford's property was likely to
rise in value, and in the meanwhile they derived
great benefit in a neighbourly point of view.
One or two of the neighbours were on very in-
timate terms, among these being the Campbells,
who had come out in the same ship-the good
old Jura. The Campbells' place was, unfortun-
ately, about five miles distant; but when the
longer nights came, the intercourse between the
two houses was frequent, sometimes even in
spite of miry roads, late moonlight, and the
danger from water-holes by the way.







THE REDFORDS:


They were returning from this place one even-
ing after having spent some very pleasant and
merry hours along with young Campbell, who
was to stay at the Hook all night, when George
suddenly bade them be silent, for he fancied he
heard a strange noise. They stood still for a few
minutes, and then it became obvious that there
was not only a peculiar crackling noise in the
distance, but also a strong smell of burning.
"There's something on fire," said George. "I
hope it isn't the Dicksons' place, for it comes
from that direction, I feel sure."
"We had better hasten home with the girls,
and rouse papa and the others," said George,
" and then we can go back to see if any help is
required."
"Oh! do let me go with you, George," said
Maud, clinging to his arm. "I may be of some
use to dear Jane, and the rest of them;" but
George would not listen to her, and they hastened
on as fast as they could. By the time they
reached the Hook, dense clouds of smoke were
plainly seen curling slowly up from the west,
while now and then a long tongue of flame
writhed and twisted upwards through the smoke.







AN EMIGRANT STORY.


Mr. Redford now joined the party outside the
house, and with William and Tim set out at once
to see where the fire really was. In a very short
time they returned, trying to appear as composed
as possible, but by their manner Mrs.- Redford
described in a minute that something dreadful had
taken place.
"Oh! what is the matter, papa dear?" she
cried; "George, Dick, what has happened?"
"It is the bush some miles beyond the Dick-
sons that has caught fire," replied Mr. Redford,'
" but it is a great distance off as yet; only it will
be necessary to collect as many valuable things
as possible, and convey them with you and the
children across the bay to a place of safety."
Mrs. Redford begged to be allowed to remain
to the last; but seeing her husband was deter-
mined, she got into the boat with Lily and
the two children, and was rowed over the water
to a friend's house, who kindly gave them shelter.
Maud remained behind, with her mama's permis-
sion, for she feared the boys would be doing
something rash, and that Maud's presence would
be a check to them.
"Ochone! ochone!" said Biddy, "sure it's a
(846)







THE REDFORDS:


terrible country this. We can't get leave to live
in peace and quiet at all, at all. If them cows,
now, are hurt, Miss Maud, or anything happens
to the two calves I've taken such pains with,
shure my heart will break."
"I hope the fire will burn itself out before
long," said Maud, who could scarcely speak, she
was so excited. "We must ask God to help us,
you know, Biddy; and He will, if it is his plea-
sure, or if it is right."
"I've lost my beads," said Biddy sobbing; "and
the paters get all one a-top of the other. Ochone!
What would the old father say to it "
On it came faster and faster, till the whole
bush for miles round seemed to be one vast mass
of flame and smoke. The settlers were driven
back and back; forced to leave their dwellings a
prey to the devouring element; and, in some in-
stances, barely having time to save their cattle.
The Hook was the last house for some miles, and
it had been so well cleared that 'hopes were en-
tertained that at anyrate it might be saved; and
all night they laboured, putting wet blankets
over the buildings, for the heat was so -intense
that it was feared some stray sparks might lodge




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