At the fireside

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Material Information

Title:
At the fireside one hundred original stories for young poeple
Physical Description:
153 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Brine, Mary D
Brine, Mary D ( Mary Dow ) ( Author )
Douglas, Marian, 1842-1913 ( Author )
France, L. A ( Author )
Bell, Annie Douglas ( Author )
Hatheway, M. E. N ( Author )
Hall, G ( Author )
Sanford, D. P. ( Author )
Johnson, Margaret ( Author )
Dayre, Sydney ( Author )
Crampton, T ( Author )
Bates, Clara Doty, 1838-1895 ( Author )
Carey ( Author )
Prescott, Mary N ( Mary Newmarch ), 1839?-1888 ( Author )
Lowrie, R. W ( Author )
Church, Frederick S ( Frederick Stuart ), 1842-1924 ( Illustrator )
Carey, William de la Montagne ( Illustrator )
Shelton, W. H ( William Henry ), 1840-1932? ( Illustrator )
Barnes, Culmer ( Illustrator )
Mozart, W. J ( Illustrator )
Sheppard, William Ludwell, 1833-1912 ( Illustrator )
Tucker, Elizabeth S ( Illustrator )
Taylor, William Ladd, 1854-1926 ( Illustrator )
Hopkins, Livingston, 1846-1927 ( Illustrator )
Merrill, Frank T ( Frank Thayer ), b. 1848 ( Illustrator )
Hassam, Childe, 1859-1935 ( Illustrator )
Miller, Francis ( Illustrator )
Hayden, Parker ( Illustrator )
Share, H. Pruett ( Illustrator )
Humphrey, Lizbeth Bullock, b. 1841 ( Illustrator )
Dale, Daphne ( Editor )
Elliott & Beezley ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Elliott & Beezley
Place of Publication:
Chicago ;
Philadelphia
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Mary D. Brine, Marian Douglas, L.A. France, Annie D. Bell, M.E.N. Hatheway, Mrs. G. Hall, Mrs. D.P. Sanford, Margaret Johnson, Sydney Dayre, T. Crampton, Clara Doty Bates, Mother Carey, Mary N. Prescott, R.W. Lowrie, and others ; with original illustrations by F.S. Church, W.M. Carey, W.H. Shelton, Culmer Barnes, W.J. Mozart, W.L. Sheppard, Miss E.S. Tucker, W.L. Taylor, L. Hopkins, F.T. Merrill, F. Childe Hassam, Francis Miller, Parker Hayden, H. Pruett Share, Miss L.B. Humphrey, and others; edited by Daphne Dale.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223321
notis - ALG3570
oclc - 181343828
System ID:
UF00079876:00001


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AT THE FIRESIDE:


One Hundred Original


Stories


for Young People.


BY
MARY D. BRINE, MARIAN DOUGLAS, L. A. FRANCE, ANNIE
D. BELL, M. E. N. HATHEWAY, MRS. G. HALL, MRS. D. P.
SANFORD, MARGARET JOHNSON, SYDNEY DAYRE,
T. CRAMPTON, CLARA DOTY BATES, MOTHER
CAREY, MARY N. PRESCOTT, R. W. LOWRIE,
AND OTHERS.

WITH ORIGINAL ILLUSTRA TIONS.
BY
F. S. CHURCH, W. M. CARY, W. H. SHELTON, CULMER BARNES,
W. J. MOZART, W. L. SHEPPARD, MISS E. S. TUCKER, W. L.
TAYLOR, L. HOPKINS, F. T. MERRILL, F. CHILD
HASSAM, FRANCIS MILLER, PARKER HAYDEN,
H. PRUETT SHARE, MISS L. B. HUMPHREY,
AND OTHERS.


EDITED BY
DAPHNE DALE.



CHICAGO AND PHILADELPHIA:
ElLLIO'TT & B RcZLR.Y.
1890.







































COPYRIGHT 1890,

ELLIOTT & BEEZLEY.












TABLE OF CONTENT,..


Title.
AT THE FIRESIDE,
BEAR STORY, A,
vBoWSER, -
V/BABY BEAR, THE,
/BUG WITH A MASK, THE,
BERTIE'S BATH,
BECALMED AT SEA,
BASKETFUL OF SWEETNESS,
VBEPPO,
CHANGEFUL HETTY,
CATCHING THE COLT,
,DUKE AND THE KITTEN,
FIRST BIRTHDAY, THE, -
VFREDDIE'S PUZZLE,
FLY AWAY, LITTLE BIRDS,


GOING TO THE GOLDEN WEDDING, -
GOING AFTER THE COWS, -
VGRANDPA LYNN'S PICTURE,
vGOAT IN TROUBLE, A.
,/How BIRDS USE THEIR BILLS,
How Two BIRDIES KEPT HOUSE IN A SHOE,
vHOw THE BEARS HELPED ONE ANOTHER,
HOUSES EOR RENT, -
vHURDLE RACE, THE, -
" HEAR US SING, SEE US SWING,"
IF,
INSECTS' WINGS, -
IN THE LANE, -
JEALOUS LITTLE DOG, THE, -
KITTIE'S PIE,
,LILY's GARDEN, -
VLOST AND FOUND, -
L-'IZZIE, THE ELEPHANT,
LITTLE MISS JOSIE, -
LETTER TO MOTHER NATURE.
v MOVING DAY, -


Author.
John D. Long. .
Clara Doty Bates.
C. Bell.
Grace C. Fisk.
Mrs. G. Hall.
A. M.J.
Alice Spicer.
Mary D. Brine.
Jennie S. Hudson.


S i,,.:,,in Douglas. _
L. A. France.
_If,, W,. i ,' r Johnson.
Annie D. Bell.
SM. E. N. Hatheway.
A. S.
Mary D. Brine.
R. JW. L.
L. B. P.
Mrs. G. Hall.
"Aunt Dewsy,"
T. Crampton.
L. A. France.
Mrs. D. P. Sanford.
L.A.B.C.
Sydney Dayre.
Mrs. G. Hall.
L. A. France.
C. M.

Mary N. Prescott.
I M.L/,t r Carey.
T. Crampton.
M. T.H.
Sydney Dayre.
. Mrs. D. P. Sanford.


I


Page.
_ 9
20
33
46
83
89
96
123
125
51
111
16
45
82
98
38
113
124
133
26
30
60
64
S129
S130
11
S 44
115
S 28
69
42
90
102
S104
116
13







TABLE OF CONTENTS.


Titie.
,/MRS. HUMMING-BIRD, -
MOON-CLOTH, THE, -
MORNING-GLORIES, -
NEW YEAR, THE, -
vNEw BABY, THE,
ONLY A CHICKEN,
VON THE BEACH,
vOn! THOSE WASPS,
OUR MAY-DAY AT THE SOUTH,
VPUMPKIN-STALK FLUTE, THE,
PATH BY THE RIVER, THE,
PLAYING GYPSIES, -
PONTO AND THE MOON,
vQUEER PIN-BOX, A, -
, QUEER CONVEYANCES, -
RAGGED JOE'S THANKSGIVING,
REASON WHY, THE, -
V SAVED FROM FREEZING TO DEATH,
v SNOWBALL AND THE LOBSTER,
SAD, -
SNOWING,
STORMY DAY, A, -
SNOW-BIRDS, -
SUMMER, -
VSANTA CLAUS'S LETTER, .
,/SELFISH GIRL, THE, -
/ TABBY AND JOSEY, -
VITILLIE TEXAS, .
.THINKING OF ANIMALS, THE,
* TWO WAYS OF READING,
, TWENTY LITTLE POULTICES, -
v Two RUNAWAYS, -
VALENTINE, A, -
WHAT MABEL DID, -
WILL-O'-THE-WISP,
WHERE? -
./WHY TOMMY WAS IN BED,
WHAT PUSS HEARD, -
,-WHAT THE CHILDREN SENT TO CHINA,
/WHERE THE PRETTY PATH LED,
YOUNG PREACHER, THE,


J. l,',, Bloom.
C. Emma Clr,. ,.
S IIH. L. Charles.
Mrs. G. I. Hopkins.
S Faith Wynne.
_ Mrs. G. Hall.
-Aunt Nell. -
E. S. Tucker.
Emily H. Miller, .
. Clara G. Dolliver.


_b..',,/, r Carey. _
It,,'.- N. Prescott.
Florence B. Hallowell.
Mary N. Prescott.
Kate Tannatt Woods.
Mrs. F T. J r,/ I
R. W. Lowrie.


Author.
A. D. Bell. .
Clara Doty Bates.
E'i:,i',. i, A. Davis.

Sophie May.
Eugene J. HaCl.
Uncle Forrester.
Edward A. Rand.
L. A. B.C..
J. A.M.
Chenry.
R. W. Lowrie.

Florence B. Hallowrell.
Lavinia S. Goodwin.
Kham.
-r,,i- D. Brine.
Mrs. F. Greenough.
Effie Rodgers.
Sydney Dayre.
Elizabeth A. Davis.
Mary E. Gellie.


Page.
S22
S85
92
S93
139
S146
81
S136
S152
24
27
S94
S120
S56
S118
15
134
-40
S48
S58
- 71
78
-87
-105
S109
127
32
54
66
67
72
- 141
- 106
S35
S37
S53
- 62
- 75
- 76
- 107
S103




















COLORED PLATES.


Subject.
THE FLEET, -

LILLIE AND THE CAT,

WHAT MABEL DID, -

CHANGEFUL HETTY, -

"SHE CAUGHT HER APRON FULL OF SNow,"

ON THE BEACH, -

THE SNOW-BIRDS,

FLY AWAY, LITTLE BIRDS,

IN THE SWING,

Two RUNAWAYS, -

LITTLE BLOSSOMS, -


Artist. Page.
S Frontispiece.

C. Barton Barber. 17

L. I, 38

S- 51

S69

SC. Lobrichon. 79

L. B. 87

M. E. E. 99

TV. S. Coleman. 131
S143


- 149













LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


Subject.
"AND HEARTH AND HEART FLASH ALL AGLOW,"
"AH, You NAUGHTY DOG, YOU 'RE JEALOUS!"
"A PAx oF BREAD AND MILK BEFORE HIM,"
"A CROSS OLD LOBSTER," -
"A TAIL-PIECE,"
"ALL WENT TO TERRIBLE SMASH,"
"A WALK OUT IN THE WOODS,"
A STORMY DAY: AT THE HOVEL,
ON THE RIVER,
L" ON THE OCEAN,
"A BIG WAITER FOR HERSELF,"
"A VALENTINE," -
"AND LEMONADE SHOULD BUBBLE UP,"
" AD BARKS AT THE MOON,"
"ALL NESTLED DOWN 'MID BLANKETS THERE,"
' BUT THEY LIVED IN THE PARK,"
" BIRDS Do NOT HAVE HANDS,"
BOWSERR HAD A SET OF NEW SHOES,"
" BEFORE THEY MADE ANY MORE,"
" BEPPO WAS A DONKEY,"
" CLOSE UPON HIM WAS THE OLD RAM,"
" COVERED HER UP IN A TINY BED,"
" COVERED WITH GREAT WHITE LILIES,"
"EDITH EMPTIED IT OVER HER HEAD,"
" EMBARKED UPON HIS BREAD-TRAY BRIG,"
"FOR RENT: APPLY WITHIN,"
" FLUTTER THE FLAKES OF SNOW,"
"FLY AWAY, LITTLE BIRDS,"


Artist.
E. H. G.
F. S. Church.
W. M. Cary.
W. H. Shelton.


Culner Barnes.
W. J. Mozart.


W. L. Sheppard. _
Miss E. S. Tucker.
L. Hopk ins.
Parker Hayden.
Jessie McDermott.
W. M. Cary.
Culmer Barnes.
H. Scharstein.
W. L. Taylor.
W. H. Shelton.

L. Hopkins.
F. T. Merrill.
Miss E. S. Tuck r.
F1. T. 1. ,,.,ii.
W. L. Taylor.
E. H. Garrett.
F. Childe Hassa:n.


"FOUR ROSY-CHEEKED LITTLE GIRLS ON HIS BACK," W. H. Shelton.
"' How DARE You?' HE SHOUTED," Francis Miller.
"HE SEIZED THE NEWFOUNDLAND," H. P. Share.
"HE FELT STRANGELY TIRED AND COLD," W. H. Shelton.


Page.
S 9
. 29
47
- 49
S50
S59
60
78
S78
S78
S104
- 106
116
S121
123
S20
S26
S34
- 86
125
41
54
-107
63
96
64
71
98
126
15
38
40







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


Subject. Artist.
"HE JUST CAUGHT HOLD OF THE TAIL," W. H. Sheltou.
"HE FELL INTO A PIT," Culmer Barnes.
" HOLD ON TIGHT AT THE TOP," -
" HAVE YOU SEEN THE BEAUTIFUL DRAGON-FLIES ?" W. L. Taylor.


" HE SAT ON THE EDGE OF THE TUB,"
"HE SLOWLY SHOOK HIS EMPTY HAT," -
" HEAR Us SING, -SEE US SWING,"
" IF I WERE ONLY A KITTEN,"
"I'VE GOT ONE,"
"I AM WRITING YOU A LETTER,"
"IDA FOUND HERS SWEET AND JUICY,"
"Is YOUR DOLL PRETTY WELL? "
" JOHNNIE GAVE HER A SAUCER OF MILK,"
"LET Us GRIND OUR FINGER-NAILS,"
" LITTLE CHILDREN, DON'T YOU HEAR? "
"LOADED, IN THE WOODS,"
" M LITTLE MARGARET SITS ME NEAR,"
"MY KITTY Ia A QUADRUPED," -
"MABEL LAY ON THE FLOOR WITH HER BOOK,"
"MORNING-GLORIES,"
" MAMMA WAS GRIEVED,"
MOUNTED ON THE HEN'S BACK," -
' MISTRESS CACKLE LAUGHING," -
"MARY LOVES HER BROTHER NOW,"
" ONLY THE CHICKADEE CHIRRUPS HIS SONG,"
" ON A STOOL, AND THAT WAS HIS PULPIT,"
" 0 TED, HERE'S A LETTER,"
"PLEASE, WILL-O'-THE-WISP," -
"RAN HER FINGERS OVER THE PAGE,"
"SHE FLEW BACK TO HER NEST,"
" SHE RAN TO THE PLACE,"
"SHE FOUND A DANDELION," -
" SOMETIMES HE SHOWED HIS SAVAGE NATURE,"


F. T. Merrill.
(1


Miss E. S. Tucker.
Miss C. A. Northam.
Culmer Barnes. -
L. Hopkins.
Miss E. S. Tucker.
Miss L. B. Comins.
W. L. Taylor. _
Miss E. S. Tucker.
Miss L. B. Humphrey. -

E. H.G.
W. L. Taylor.
Miss L. B. Humphrey. _
Parker Hayden. -
William St. J. Harper.
F. S. Church.
Jessie McDermott.
Miss L. B. Comins.
E. H. Garrett. -
Francis Miller. -
William St. J. Harper.
W. L. Taylor.
Miss L. B. Humphrey. -
Culmer Barnes.
A. Buhler. -
Chas. Copeland.
W. M. Cary.


"STANDING ERECT, HE WOULD WALK AROUND US," "
"SHE BEGAN TO POKE IT WITH ONE PAW," Culmer Barnes. -
"SOMETHING FOR THE POOR CHINA CHILDREN," Francis Miller.
" SHE AND DORY TALKED IT OVER," F Childe Hassam.
"SHE HAD CAUGHT HER CHAIN ON A RAIL," W. M. Cary.


47
66
76
S 81
133


Page.
40
60
61
83
89
112
130
12
45
116
128
139
33
74
93
117
9
33
67
92
109
118
134
140
53
103
110
37
67
23
24
43
46







LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


Subject. Artist.
SCREAMINGN, RUNNING, TOSSING UP THEIR ARMS," H. P. Share.


"THE MAN LIFTED HIM UP THERE," W. 1
"THE KITTEN WOULD PUT ITS PAW UP .
THROUGH A HOLE,"
"THE DAINTIEST LITTLE HUMMING-BIRD," Culn
" THEIR BILLS ARE USEFUL TO THEM," "
" THE DUCK THRUSTS HIS BILL DOWN," "
"THAT WALK BY THE RIVER'S SIDE," E. P
"'T WILL MAKE YOU A NICE NEST," F. C
"THE BEAR CURLED UP CLOSE TO HER," T. J
" THE Two KITTENS HAD BEEN ENJOYING A NAP," W.
"TILLIE ENJOYED JUMPING INTO A TUB OF L. i
WATER," _
" THE HEAD WAS FULL OF PINS," Elle
" THE POOR LITTLE HEAD HAD TO BE SHAVED," Miss
" TWENTY LITTLE POULTICES," -
" THEY WERE SITTING BY THE OPEN FIRE," Miss
"THEY PUSHED THE BOAT AWAY FROM THE Frar
SHORE,'" I
"TEDDY WAS CALLED FROM THE COASTING W. f
HILL," -
"THROUGH COUNTRY LANES," F. C
" Two DREADFUL GYPSIES CAME IN," F. T
" THE DOCTOR TOOK HOLD OF THE TRUNK," W.
"THE SHEEP THEIR COMPANIONS AT PLAY," E. P
" To THE END OF THE LANE," TV.
" THE COMING OF THE CRANES," F- S
" TOOK HIS PICTURE ON THE SLY," I. G.
" THE RACE COURSE WAS A DITCH," F. T
" Two LITTLE GIRLIES," Jessi
" THREE LITTLE GIRLIES, ALL SO SOUND ASLEEP," "
" THE WAY FOR CHILDREN TO TREAT WASPS," II. I
"UP SPOKE SWEET EDITH, SITTING THERE," W
"WENT TO SEE WHAT THE BIRDIES HAD DONE," F. (
" WHERE IS THE HONEY-BEE?" E. L
" WITH THEIR HANDS BEHIND THEIR BACKS," Miss
" WE WILL HAVE A DRUMMING MATCH," -F. C
" WITHOUT HIM JOHNNIE COULD NEVER GO," W. j
" YET TOMMY WAS IN BED," Miss


. Sheppard. .
M. Cary.
zer Barnes.
C'


arker Hayden.
hilde Hassam.
If. Cary.
H. Shelton. -

ropkins.
n Oakford.
E. S. Tucker.

C. A. Northam.
cis Miller.

L. Taylor.
hilde Hassam.
SMIerrill.
H. Shelton.
H.fl-, ,,l. .
L. Sheppard. -
. Church.
McCutcheon.
*. 11, r,. i.
e McDermott.

). Share.
L. Taylor.
'h"./,/ .Hassam.
i. Garrett.
E. S. Tucker.
hilde IHassam.
L. Taylor. _
SE. S. Tucker.


.


Page.
- 136
14
S19
S22
S26
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S27
S30
S46
S58
55
S57
63
- 74
- 75
- 77

85
91
S95
102
105
115
119
124
129
S134
135
S138
S86
S31
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114
62
















T E T FIRESIDEO


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AT THE FIRESIDE.





IF.
IF I were only a kitten,
How jolly and nice 't would be
To play about in the sunshine
And run up the tallest tree!
I never should hem the towels
Nor sew any buttons on;
I never should have to stay in school
Till the brightest hours were gone.
Sometimes, though, I should be busy
Making a marble roll,
Or sitting, if I were hungry,
To watch by a mouse's hole.

But if I were feeling lazy,
I'd curl myself in a ball,
And lie all day by the fire,
With nothing to do at all.










But, dear! I had 'most forgotten, -
If I were only a cat,
I could n't be mamma's girlie.
Now, what do you think of that!


I '11 work and I'11 study bravely
Always, to hear her say:
"My own little darling daughter,
You have been good to-day."


SYDNEY DAYRE.






MOVING DAY.


MOVING-DAY.

JAMIE BRIGHT was four years old when his father and mother moved
to a new home. The old home, where Jamie was born, was just in
the edge of the woods. Jamie had played in and out among the
trees ever since he could walk alone.
Now Jamie's father was going to keep the store, up by the Green,
and a small house near the store was to be their home. Jamie's
mother was sorry to leave the old home; she and sister Katy wiped
their eyes often on the moving-day. But Jamie thought it was
great fun to move, and he was full of glee.
Father went up to the new house on that day, to get it ready.
Then a man came with an ox-cart to take the beds and chairs and
all the other things.
When the load was piled on, mother a nd Katy set out to walk
through the woods, by a short path, to the new house. They had a
corn-basket between them; the cups and glass things were in the
basket. Mother called, Come, Jamie, you can go with us "
Oh, no," said Jamie, "I must go after the cart, and take care of
the things "
His mother laughed. She said, "It is a long way round by the
road; you will be tired !"
"Best let him go," said the man who drove the team; we need
him to look after the load "
So the oxen started off at a slow pace, and Jamie followed the
cart. His mother's brass kettle hung out at the back of the load,






MO VING-DA Y.


from the end of the mop-stick. The kettle kept swinging as the cart
jogged on. Jamie watched it all the time lest it should fall off.
He stubbed his toe and fell down t\\ i-, because he was looking
up at the cart; but he did not cry; he was a man, that day At
last the man who drove saw that the small man was tired. So he
said, "See here, youngster; can't you sit up on this feather-bed,
and see that the oxen keep the road ? "
There was a soft nest, just big enough for Jamie, between two


chairs. The man lifted him up there; it was a nice place. In five
mi iiutL' J mie i was sound asleep..
When they came to the new house the man lifted him down, and
said," Here's the young man who took care of the load "
Jamie had had such a good nap that he was all ready to help put
the new house in order.
MRS. D. P. SANFORD.






RAGGED JOE'S THANKSGIVING


'I c;~~0 W-1,
0 .;. 0


-9-AR4D'
rs;_ '


I x


11A( ED JOE'S THANKS I ING.

TIANKSGIVING was FY1,-.l, Ray's thil..: Fri-. within li ttle
sister, Eunice, had just gone out to try hi-. new. sled, when his
father called him to do an errand. Leave Eimic i to pl-y with
Rob Roy," he 2aid (Rob Roy was the sled's i:ner. "'and r.i:fii u ai
soon as you can.
It is not pleasant to be sent away when about to try a new sled.
But Fred did not allow such things to vex lii-, He ran iff l.,01 liij,.
and in about ten minutes he came ro-ind tlih corner a..iiln. panting
in his race. Then he saw something that made his heart thump.
There stood little Eunice, white with snow, and with th.-- tears
streaming down her rosy cheeks. By her side, b.Mldini: thed sled,
was a boy; and such a ragged boy! He seemed to 'wear more
holes than clothes. His bare toes peeped out of hi.s ;-h.:;1s. H.: was
pale and thin. You would say he did not know wl. at ti0.1key. was.
Fred ran up to him. How dare you," he sll:i.ited. p:.ish my
sister into the snow, and take my new sled! The 1,:y jbeaUn to
cry. Then Fred noticed his pinched face. He drew :back l he had
learned to govern his temper.






DUKE AND THE KITTEN.


Oh, you didn't mean it, I think," .he said.
"No, I didn't," cried the boy; "but I did want a coast so much.
I never had a sled. And the little girl held on so that I pulled her
over. Don't strike me, please! I didn't mean any harm, and I
will drag her on the sled if you will let me."
This was too much for Fred. He pitied the poor, eager boy.
" So you may drag her, and have a coast too if you like! he cried.
And he ran into the house to report to his father.
Now Mrs. Ray had watched the whole scene. I will not tell what
she thought, or how she found out about i i --'1 Joe, for that was
the poor boy's name.
All is, at dinner Fred broke the wish-bone with his father. I
wish Joe had a sled, too," he cried.
"And I wish," said his father, "that my Freddy may always act
like a little man, as he did to-day."
And I must tell you that, after dinner, Fred found i -.-,1 Joe in
the kitchen. He had a great basket of goodies, and Fred's old sled
to draw them home with. It was a happy day for Joe when he first
saw the Rob Roy. So it was for Fred too, for he became more of a
little man than ever.
KHAM.










DUKE AND THE KITTEN.

DUKE was a large black and white dog. He had long ilky ears
and large bright eyes. When he was a pup, he was so full of mis-
chief that his mistress used to say, We really shall have to send
Duke away ; we cannot have any peace of our lives while he stays
here." Somehow Duke was never sent off. Every one thought too






DUKE AND THE KITTEN.


much of him. Even his mistress, for all she scolded him, would
have been sorry to have him go.
Duke was very fond of a little yellow kitten, and the kitten was
fond of him. Although Duke teased the kitten, he was very careful
not to hurt it, and they had some lively times together.
They used to play hide-and-seek together. The kitten would
run under an ottoman; it came so close to the floor that there was


just room for the kitten to get under. Duke would lie down and
put his head close to the floor. The kitten would stick out its yellow
paw, and Duke would try to catch it; after a while the kitten would
run out, and they would play up and down the walks.
Sometimes the kitten -would run under the porch and put its paw
up through a hole in the floor. Duke would come and put his paw
on it; then the kitten would put its head up. Duke would take
its head in his big mouth, pull it up through thihole, and carry it
around the garden. They both seemed to think it fun.
L. A. FRANCE.







A BEAR-STORY.


"I KxOW a new bear-story,"
I said to the little folks,
Who surely as the twilight falls,
Begin to tease and coax.


"And did they live in the forest,
In a den all deep and dark ?
And were there three ? "-" Yes, three," I said,
But they lived in the park.


" Let's see Old Jack, the grizzly,
With great white claws, was there;
And a mother bear with thick brown coat,
And Betty, the little bear!






A BEAR-STORY.


"And Silver-Locks went strolling
One day, in that pretty wood,
With Ninny, the nurse, and all at once
They came where the bears' house stood.

"And without so much as knocking
To see who was at home,
She cried out in a happy voice,
'Old Grizzly, here I come!'

"And thereupon old Grizzly
Began to gaze about;
And the mother bear sniffed at the bars,
And the baby bear peeped out.

And they thought she must be a fairy,
Though, instead of a golden wand,
She carried a five-cent paper bag
Of peanuts in her hand.

" Old Grizzly his red mouth opened
As though they tasted good;
And the brown bear opened her red mouth
To catch one when she could;

"And Betty, the greedy baby,
Followed the big bears' style,
And held her little fire-red mouth,
Wide open all the while.

"And Silver-Locks laughed delighted,
And thought it wondrous fun,
And fed them peanuts from the bag
Till she had n't another one.

"And is that all ? sighed Gold-Locks.
"Pshaw, is that all ?" cried Ted.
"No one thing more 'T is quite, quite time
That little folks were in bed !"
CLARA DOTY BATES.






u~----1 -





I i '








MRS. HUMMING-BIRD.
ONE day grandpa said to Harry and Ida, Children, if you will
come out while I am picking peas to-morrow morning, you will see
something very pretty." That was all he would tell them.
They kept wondering about it every little while through the day,
and made mamma promise to wake them early. I was a little curi-
ous, myself, to know what could be there at six o'clock in the morn-
ing, and at no other time.
The children were very wide awake at the appointed hour,
and full of fun. Grandpa said they must be quiet, or they would
frighten away his little pet.
Won't you tell us what it is, grandpa? cried Harry.
"Do tell us, grandpa!" chimed in Ida.
Grandpa smiled, with a teasing look in his eyes, and said, Oh,
you will soon find out for yourselves, if her royal highness favors us."
He had been at work only a few minutes, and was whistling softly
to himself, when out flew the daintiest little humming-bird! Her
nest was in a quince-tree just beyond the fence.
At first she was very shy, and did not alight; but her wings
quivered in the sunshine, and showed the lovely colors. She flashed
around like a bit of a rainbow, and the children were wild with
delight.







MRS. HUMMING-BIRD.


Grandpa pretended not to see her, and soon she gained more
courage. Then she flew back to her nest, and called her two young
ones. They had just begun to use their wings, and the mother-bird
coaxed them along to the pea-vines.
The children had a good look at them then. They were about as
large as a bumble-bee, only slimmer in the body. Their feathers
had begun to grow, and they seemed like a mixture of red and
green and gold.
The mother-bird flew away, and left her little ones near grandpa,
as if she knew he would keep them from harm. In a few minutes
she was back again, her bill laden with sweets, which she fed to the
birdies.
She did this several times. Then she gave a little call, and flew
towards the nest. The birdies soon followed her.
Grandpa said she helped the little birds along with her bill the
first morning she came.
The children were delighted with grandpa's pet. They had
never seen a humming-bird before, and to have one so near was an
inducement for them to wake up early.
Mrs. Humming-bird came every morning until the little ones were
able to fly away, and grandpa's peas were all picked.
A. D. BELL.







































THE PUMPKIN-STALK FLUTE.

FREDDIE BROWN had a present on his last birthday. When he
went out into the barn he found a little calf only a few hours old.
Mr. Brown thought it must be meant for his little boy, as it came
on his birthday. Freddie was glad to have a calf for his own.
Every day he thought of some new thing he should buy with the
money, when she had grown to be a cow and he could sell her






THE PUMPKIN-STALK FLUTE.


milk. He made such a pet of the calf that she soon knew him, and
learned to follow him about.
It was hard work to find a good name for the pet. A great many
had been thought of, but none of them seemed to be just right.
One day Bossy followed Freddie into the kitchen. Mrs. Brown was
making cookies. The calf stood looking at her, as though she were
trying to find out just how much sugar, butter, and flour were used.
Mrs. Brown laughed, and said Fred ought to call the calf Yankee,"
she was' so inquisitive and independent. That just suited Freddie,
and so Bossy got a name.
Some i 'i Yankee stayed in the pasture with her mother. Then
she seemed to miss her little playfellow. Her mother was too old
and grave to frolic much. One day, when she was feeling lonesome,
Yankee thought she heard another calf not far away. She was glad
to have company, and ran to the place where the sound came from.
There she found, not another calf, but her little master with a neigh-
bor friend. She stood looking at them a long time.
Freddie had cut a pumpkin-leaf, and trimmed it down close to the
stem, until it looked like this : _--_---_
He made a slit about an inch long in the stem near the top.
Then he put it into his mouth so far that the slit was covered, and
blew. This made the noise Yankee had mistaken for another calf.
When Freddie was tired of that sound, he cut a little round hole
near the other end of the stem, and blew again. This time he made
a different noise. When he put his finger on the hole and blew, he
made the same noise that he did at first. Then he cut more holes,
and found that he could make so many different sounds that he had
quite a good pumpkin-stalk flute.
J. A, M.







HOW BIRDS USE THEIR BILLS.


TrijHE l. ii'r1 do nt 1e han

', l .iI I M sW\-Irs j1. t .il w.,411. T l 'ir i. lls are
l"l ll!, o 1 I rto I L< o l ; v i.' 1' ii' l a 're



N.1 0 ll-- --- l J, I 11-. It 1 3 illa k
hi ; -, v 'rY 'i,. -,r 1.ill. It is nia eh
s,, 1., 'au ,t thi- .,il I. has t., til,.l its
;^*,,,l u illir wat,-r. It calli; lt sI1 e
whIt it ,~t-+ ;'1 i luil't t;e], instead.
S. tliS-, I 1ill i l tilled itl, n0r\Vt-s
", t:,r ti ,_ ti' ui"", It I..s ai rIow of

,Il..-. -,mujthir ,.' like t:-.:t h. But
ll,-w Ji:,,. .1~ ,l ,k iui it LL.-t us

W, 1I .- hi n11 tor 1'...l, it
Ii ru t. thi. bill d,.,wn, and 1.lrings
it up t'll ,I f X ,iud. N.:N- in tlihe nmud
'I r,. tF ie vl-iv tlIin.s the bird lives-

The e little iniervi tell it just




i .. ..,. i -
: -:---': --- ^ '---- :- ^ ----


-^^i, )






THE PATH BY THE BIVE~.


what is good to eat. What is not good is sent out through these
queer points, just as if it was a sifter. The nerves in this funny
sieve take very good care that nothing shall be lost that is worth the
eating.
You know all about the little birds that build nests with their
bills, and what wonderful things they are. Some can sew very well
with their beaks ; of course they use their feet too.
MRS. G. HALL.


THE PATH BY THE RIVER.

BELLE loves that walk by the river's side,
In summer or in winter time;
Great vessels float on the gentle tide,
And the hill is pleasant to climb.


HENRY.


























THE JEALOUS LITTLE DOG.

MY name is Curly. I am a cunning little cream-colored dog. I
have a long bushy tail that curls up over my back when I am happy,
and drags in the dust when I am sad.
I am usually pretty happy, for I have a sweet little golden-haired
girl for my mistress. She loves me very dearly; at least, I suppose
she does, from the way she squeezes me, and lets me lick her hands.
Her name is Ivy, and she is so kind to me, that I should never get
cross or sad if it were not for Tom.
I just wish Tom was dead. If I were big enough,I would tie him
up in a bag and throw him into the river. Tom is a big white cat
with sharp claws, and an awful appetite for beefsteak. He eats all
the meat that Ivy gives him, and then growls and spits at me till I
give him mine too. Half the time I am so hungry that I could eat
Tom, hair and all, if he would only lie still and let me; but he
won't. He is just the meanest cat I ever saw.
The worst of it all is, Ivy seems to love him nearly as well as she
does me. She actually hugs him, and calls him her Dear kitty, and
I can't stand it. I always growl at Tom, and try to squeeze myself in


i
I






THE JEALOUS LITTLE DOG


between him and Ivy; but she says, Ah, you naughty dog, you're
jealous!"
Jealous! The idea of a handsome, dashing dog, like me, being








u ... -, -. l'.




f ""-M















jealous of an ugly old cat! I declare, such injustice almost breaks
my heart! I am going off to lie down under the currant-bush now,
and try to die if the fleas will only let me lie still long enough.
C. M_.
-' < {I-
.. ._ ,,,;

.;', ..
.. ,. ,
.. ---, '. ...,








jelu o nugyod a!I elr, uhinutce mstbek
my he rt mgic f oledw ne h urn-uhnw
and~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~A:c' tr ode- ftefeswl nl e elesilln nuh
F''Zie. '"'






30 HOW TWO BIRDIES KEPT HOUSE IN A SHOE.


Z-


AL -

I -I


HOW TWO BIRDIES KEPT HOUSE IN A O3HOR

THE morning was sunshiny, lovely, and clear,
And two little wrens were both hovering near;
Chirping and warbling with wonderful zest,
Looking for some place to build them a nest.

They searched the veranda, examined the trees,
But never a place could they find that would please;
Till Mabel, whose eyes were as blue as the sky,
And very observing, their trouble did spy.






HOW TWO BIRDIES KEPT HOUSE IN A SHOE. 31

Then, quick as the thought darted through her wee head,
"I'11 help you, dear birdies," she lispingly said;
" You just wait a minute, I'll give you my shoe;
'Twill make you a nice nest, as good as if new."

With much toil and trouble she undid the knot,
Took off the small shoe, and picked out a spot
Behind a large pillar; there tucked it away;
And soon she forgot it in innocent play.


__ PI -



II I







But the wrens chirped, "Why, here is a nest ready-made,
In the very best place, too, and quite in the shade 1"
They went to work quickly, without more ado,
To keep house like the woman that lived in a shoe."

When evening shades came, at the close of the day,
And dear little Mabel was tired of play,
She thought of the birdies, and went off alone,
To see, if she could, what the birdies had done.

With heads under their wings, the wrens were asleep;
Side by side, in the shoe, they were cuddled down deep;
Then, clapping her hands, Mabel said, "Keep my shoe;
My new ones I '11 wear, and this one 's for you."
"AUNT DEWSY."








TABBY AND JOSEY.


PAPA was on the back porch smoking a cigar Little John was
playing near by with a pretty wind-wheel papa'had made for him.
Across the way two children were holding a yellow-and-white kitten
by the tail. Kitty struggled to get away. By and by she did get
away, and ran to Johnnie's papa, who stroked her gently, saying,
" Poor kitty poor kitty !" Johnnie gave her a saucer of milk, and
she ran up and down the piazza for a bit of beef tied to a string.
She lay down to rest after she had swallowed the meat and part of
the string, which mamma had to pull out of her throat.
She is such a homely cat, I don't want her here," said mamma.
She is a beauty," replied papa. Let her stay."
"She is Tabby Wilson," said John. Nobody could tell why our
six-year-old called the new cat Tabby Wilson," but she goes by
that name. Tabby Wilson said John's house was good enough for
her to live in, so she thought she would stay.
When Tabby Wilson had been with John a few days, in walked
a dirty little black-and-white kitten. She was very thin and sick-
looking, and Tabby Wilson flew at her, growling and spitting, with
her paw raised to strike her.
Let Josey Brooks alone, Tabby Wilson! screamed John, taking
up the poor little kitten and stroking her.
"I shall not," mewed Tabby Wilson, and she flew at her. But
John took the new kitten into the kitchen and gave her some milk.
So Josey Brooks and Tabby Wilson became our cats.
After a while Tab and Jo became quite good friends and played
together. John harnessed them to a pasteboard box. Get up," he
cried. I shall not," spit Tabby. Nor I, either," growled Josey.
They ran under a chair and crouched close together.
"They won't drive, mamma," whined little John, coming close to
mamma.
They are ungrateful quadrupeds, then," said mamma.
Quadrupeds, mamma. What are they? asked John, stopping
his whining at once.
How many feet has Tabby Wilson? asked mamma.






BO WSER.


John seized Tabby -
and counted, One, two,
three, four."
"Very well," said ----
mamma; "if she has
four feet she is a quad-
ruped."
"And is Josey Brooks i
a quadruped too?" i/
"Count her feet and
see."
"Yes, she has four; so ,
she is a quadruped. But -
what am I, mamma I X
have but two feet." I ",
"You are a biped,
dear; so is papa." -
John threw himself on
the floor and kicked his: :-"
heels into the air, holding
Tabby Wilson and sing-
ing, My kitty is a quad-
ruped, quadruped, quad- r.
ruped; but I am a biped, /
biped, biped, biped." .,. -- __---
MRS. G. I. HOPKINS.


BOWSER.

BOWSER is only a horse; but he knows how to behave when he
wears his Sunday suit. That is more than some children know.
There are little ones who make mud-pies when they have on their
best clothes. Bowser never does.
Bowser drags a cart on week-days; on Sunday he goes to church
with a buggy. When John puts the heavy harness upon Bowser,






BO WSER.


the horse goes to the cart and backs in. When he is dressed in the
nice buggy-harness, he steps off proudly and gets into the shafts of
the buggy. He does this all alone. He never makes a mistake.
One day Bowser had a set of new shoes. When the blacksmith
put them on, he drove a nail into one of Bowser's feet. John did
not notice it till they were almost home. When he saw that Bowser
limped a little, he said, "I must lead the poor fellow back, when
I get him out of the cart."
They reached home, and John took off Bowser's harness. As soon
as he was free, the horse turned about and trotted off. When John
called him, he did not mind. He went straight back to the black-
smith.
"Hello, Bowser cried the blacksmith.
The poor horse said nothing, but lio walked up to the man and
held out his aching foot.
Then the blacksmith put the shoe on all right; and he patted
Bowser kindly, and said, "You know a great deal, for a horse."
C. BELL.


A. N
























-G W "4








',0
me







What are those things on the
stream "
Said the cat-tails, quite un-
able
To make out, until they saw
By the brook-side, little Mabel.

"Ah, we have it!" then they
said,-
"'Tis a funny girl we know,
Broke a scarlet poppy up,
Just to see the pieces go.

When she gets a little older,
Mamma then will say to
Mabel,
"Put the scarlet poppies, dear,.
In a vase, upon the table."


WHAT MABEL DID.

Mabel broke a poppy up,
And threw the pieces on the
water;
But she did it all for fun,
Mamma's darling daughter.

Then she played that they were
boats.
- Going off. where toys are
plenty;
Coming back with what she
wanted,
Pretty things, enough for
twenty.

Cats and donkeys, balls and
books.
And a jumping-jack so jolly;
And a pretty, gold-rimmed tea-
set.
And a little coach for dolly.


x






WILL-O'-THE- WISP.


WILL-O'-THE-WISP.


" PLEASE, Will-o'-the-Wisp,
Don't hurry away!
The rays from your lamp
Must light my lone way!"


"Ah, poor, little child!
Return, I entreat!
My path is too wild
For your tender feet.


"I dance all night long,-
Through blackest morass,
And where my lamp leads
Your feet cannot pass."
MOTHER CAREY.









GOING TO THE GOLDEN WEDDING.

PAUL was going to a golden wedding. Grandpa and grandma
had been married fifty years, and the children and grandchildren
were to meet at the old home. What a good time Paul expected!
Would the day never come ? At last it dawned. So impatient was


Paul, that his papa allowed him to start first. As he approached
the station, Paul saw a small dog pursued by a Newfoundland.
Seize him Shake him roared some idle boys.
For shame It is wicked to make dogs fight "
"Hear the goodie boy Hear mother's baby "
Encouraged by the shouts of the boys, the Newfoundland sprang
upon the small dog.


j BA;~
r"
~L

.--~
,-n
-r
c'--






GOING TO THE GOLDEN WEDDING.


Oh, call him off He '11 kill him Stop him cried Paul.
"Shake him Shake him was their reply.
Paul's temper rose. "I'll part them myself!" he said. Spring-
ing into the street, he seized the Newfoundland and held him firmly,
until his frightened victim had time to slink away.
Bravo called a policeman; and the muttering boys fled.
"Why, why, what is this ?" "Our Paul! cried papa and
mamma. Here Paul's strength gave way; he let go the Newfound-
land, and began to cry. But the officer told the story, and praised
him so highly for his courageous act that Paul felt like a man.
Following papa and -mamma to the cars, lie was quickly forgetting
his adventure, when a noise under his seat caused him to look
down. What do you think was there ? The Newfoundland He
looked at Paul pleadingly, as if to say, Oh, be my master Speak
kindly to me; I've had blows and kicks all my life. I knew no
better than to fight! "
0 papa, -may I keep him "
If no one claims him. But you must never get angry and strike
him; treat your dog as you like to be treated yourself, my boy."
Paul promised; and could Rover speak, he would say that he had
kept his word: Paul was quite a hero to grandma and his cousins,
and grandpa was so pleased with his namesake that he bought
Rover the handsomest collar lie could find. And both Paul and
Rover had great fun at the golden wedding
H. A. S.






SAVED FROM FREEZING TO DEATH.


SAVED FROM FREEZING TO DEATH.
WHEN Bobby Smart was six years old, he was left to the care of
his Uncle James, who lived in the country. His aunt took him to his
future home, and at the depot he saw his uncle for the first time.
Bobby was lonely and sad; his uncle often treated him with
harshness and even cruelty. The cold winter had come on early.
Bobby was the only boy about the farm, and he had to work
very hard. His clothing was unfit for the winter weather, and he
often suffered from the cold.
Among the duties which this poor boy had to perform was that
of tending a flock of sheep. One afternoon, when there were signs
of a snow-storm, he was sent to drive the flock to the barn. He
started for the field, but his clothes were so thin that he was be-
numbed by the intense cold. He sat down on a large rock to rest
himself. He felt strangely tired and cold. In a little while he
began to feel drowsy. Then he thought it was so nice and com-
fortable that he would stay there awhile. In a very few moments
he was asleep, and perhaps dreaming.
Suddenly he was aroused by a tremendous blow which sent him
spinning from his perch on the rock to the ground. Looking about
him, he saw an old ram near by. The creature looked as though he
had been doing mischief, and Bobby was no longer at a loss to







SAVED FROM FREEZING TO DEATH.


know where the blow came from; but he thought the attack was an
accident, and in a short time he was again in the land of Nod.
Again the ram very rudely tumbled him over into the snow.
He was now wide awake, and provoked at the attack of the beast.
He began to search for a stick to chastise his enemy. The ram
understood his intention, for he turned upon Bobby as if to finish
the poor boy. Bobby was forced to take to his heels, and ran
towards home.
The ram chased him, while the rest of the flock followed after
their leader. The inmates of the farm-house were surprised to see
Bobby rushing towards the house as fast as his little legs would
allow him. His hair was streaming in the wind, and he was very
much terrified. Close upon him was the old ram, kicking up his






/__... .. ....- ,












heels in his anger. Behind him could oe seen a -- --. --',, .ng line of
.K -
4 -



turn the flock into the barn. It was a long time before Bobby
L -: -: .. .. ....








hel in his anger. Behind him could e seen a .line of
sheep doing their best to keep up.
Bobby won the race, however. His uncle catime out in led hime to
turn the 'flock into the barn. It was a long time before Bobby
would venture near the ram again.
Bobby knows now that but for the efforts of that old rai in
knocking him from his seat on that bitterly cold day he would have
been among the angels in a very short time. The sleepy feeling
which overcame him would have ended in death.
Bobby declares that the ram knew all the time what ailed him,
and that he butted him from the rock on purpose. I cannot explain
it, but do know that "God moves in a mysterious way his wonders
to perform."
MRS. F. hREENOUGH.























I. ..- THERE was only a little piece of garden
belonging to Lily's home in the city. In
:the bright spring days she went out there,
.
--,;: and watched to see if any flowers came up.
--- She felt happy when she found the first
blades of grass.
The poet sings that his heart dances with the daffodils." Lily's
heart danced, one morning, when she found a dandelion among the
grasses in her yard, a real yellow dandelion, with all its golden
petals spread out.
Just then, one of her playmates looked over the fence, and put
out her hand.
Do give it to me," she said. I sha' n't like you a bit, if you
don't: I shall think you are just as stingy -"
"But it's all I have," said Lily; "I can't give it away. I can't.
Wait till to-morrow, and there '11 be some more out. They 're grow-
ing. There 'll be some all round to-morrow or next week."
To-morrow I want it now, to-day," said her friend, to-day 's
better than to-morrow."
Lily looked at the child and then at the dandelion. "I suppose






LILY'S GARDEN. 43

it would be mean to keep it," she said, "but it is so lovely- can't
you wait ? "
"Oh, well, keep it, you stingy girl!"


l,' ..... '",* .' ; ": ,,';,,,r.., y,,. .-: ^* .. -. .- '
4p '"II
..I. .







.. ..... y i ^ "...... :., :., .........
;
gill, -0 -,4



r- -Z-_-= ,- ..


















Come and pick it yourself, then," said Lily, with tears in her
eyes.
The next day, when Lily went into the yard, there were a dozen
golden dandelions, like stars in the grass, and a little blue violet
was blooming all alone by itself.
S. MARY N. PRESCOTT.
....n .ad los .i~ .t r in th.; g :#s .... .. .-- tl b u _.... ...,
wa ,lom n .l ,ln by .. ., .+.+ .,
.~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ 1Z~ ".:- '. .' .- .-= _':COa'










- 4'
- '.1 I'


form and sometimes
just as well without


4


INSECTS' WINGS.

THERE is nothing
more delicate than the
-*"..; wings of insects. They
-- are like gauze, but they
.., have a framework that
~~^' makes them quite firm,
L just as the leaves on the
.trees are firm from the lit-
tle ribs that are in them.
SThese wings are all
t' covered with hair. You
L could see it under the
magnifying glass, but
not without.
In some small gnats
the hairs spring from
each side of the veins,
',,, like butterflies' feathers,
or like blossoms on the
twigs in springtime.
SEven the wing of a
'iJ-^i.:. common fly is very
,;,' ;, *' ( beautiful. Did you ever
notice that if you take
4. .*,_ a butterfly by the wings,
Sa colored dust is all over
your fingers ? Then the
wings are lefttransparent
where they have been
touched. If you should
put some of this dust on
S va slip of glass and ex-
'.. / amine it, you would find
that each particle is a
--little scale of regular
most beautifully shaped. But the insect flies
the dust.






THE FIRST BIRTHDAY.


Besides his regular wings, the fly has others for sails. They are
all lifted by a great number of little tough muscles in his sides.
Thus he moves in the air and darts away. Before he goes he
"plumes" his wings, just like a bird. MRS. G. HALL.



Sj ^ I



THE FIRST BIRTHDAY.

ONE little year with its changeful hours,
Blossoming meadows and wintry showers,
Shadow and sun.
Shadow and sin, and rain and snow;
Morning splendor and evening glow;
The flying minutes, how fast they go! -
And the little year is done.

What has it brought to the baby, pray, -
The princess who holds our hearts in sway?
A queenlier air,
A merrier laugh for lips and eyes,
A deeper frown of grave surprise,
A hundred ways that prove her wise,
And sweet as she is fair.

Kiss her once for the year that is done,
And once for the year that is just begun,
And softly sing, -
"The years that are coming so fast so fast -
Each brighter and happier be than the last;
And every hour that goes hurrying past,
New gifts to our baby bring!"
MARGARET JOHNSON.







THE BABY BEAR.

ONE day we stopped at the Hot Springs, about five miles from
Helena, in Montana. When I went into the reception-room, I was
surprised to find a little cinnamon bear, six
Sv weeks old, lying on the ~onf. I put my lit-
_c; fe -ist"r, lh: ~1. 1.b:u tl,.- saiIe age,
"'i' '. lesihe it-. 0nd t1 L. :,-ar i.t-led up
', .. .- 1 .., 1. l,:,.'-, t< hI:.r ; .l \\ iX t,:1 -lf t ep .
B t .. B tr i i- f, w- were in-
-v --ite-d t, _'l., ...ut and
." i ",'. e M aster
.r n eat
;' sup-


l/ .a:+:': .... r ..
:g 0 -' ""' "'-




I '* "' -- '



-_ A", ,' ',,I i 'i- ''
I= ) -- '" '. .; '. -


large pan of bread and milk was placed before him. He pui his
forepaws into the pan, drew out the pieces of bread and ate them.
Then he lapped the milk.
For a while he was allowed to run all over the house and grounds.






THE BABY BEAR.


He soon found where the sugar and molasses were kept, and helped
himself so freely that he had to be secured with a chain.
Not long ago Bruin slipped his chain from the pole to which it
was fastened, and climbed
a ti'e,-.
Tl1e chain caught on a
.:,r.-lii, and he found him-
S.- it lung up in mid-air.
T 1. Il'roprietor of the
li, heard his cries;
; .. ,.-i,.i. ,iiig out, he found
Lh' iji kicking violently,
i,$'l thriving to reach the
Body of the tree.
After a great deal
Sof trouble the
Sbear was taken
e to down, and was
glad to find him-
Sself once more
Son solid ground.
During the
Summer we often
called to inter-
view "his Bear-
~ ship." After we
knew of his lik-
ing for sweets, we made it a point to take some candy with us. He
seemed to know us, and to watch for our coming. Standing erect,
he would walk around us, hugging us with his forepaws. Then he
snuffed at each pocket, to find where the sweets were hidden.
Sometimes he showed his savage nature, for he would snap and
snarl if the promised treat was withheld.
When the cold weather came, Bruin hid away in a large hole for
his winter sleep. He did not show himself again until the warm
days of spring.
GRACE C. FISK.






SNOWBALL AND THE LOBSTER.


ToM had just brought in something in a covered basket. He put
it down on the kitchen floor for a moment. Then he went into the
pantry to see the cook, and taste the fresh crisp doughnuts.
The two kittens had been enjoying a nap in the sunshine on the
wide window-sill. When Tom came into the kitchen, the noise he
made woke them.
Snowball lazily stretched himself and gave a great yawn. Then
he mewed to Kitty that he would like his dinner. He began to
hunt for some mice. Kitty purred that she would go with him
anywhere.
Snowball was a large white kitten, and wore a blue ribbon around
his neck. Kitty was younger and smaller than Snowball, and
always allowed him to take the lead in their adventures.
Kitty's coat was gray, and her four legs were pure white. Mary
said she wore white stockings and white gloves.






SNOWBALL AND THE LOBSTER.


Snowball and his little sister were walking across the kitchen
floor, to the door. Snowball saw Tom's basket, and went up to see
what was in it. With his nose he pushed up the lid of the basket.
He found something alive under it. He turned around to call


Kitty to come. In doing so, his tail fell across the now open
basket.
There was a cross old lobster inside the basket. He did not like
to have Snowball's tail in his face; the hairs on it tickled his nose.
So he just caught hold of the tail with his pincers. He gave it a
strong nip, and would not let it go.






SNOWBALL AND THE LOBSTER.


Poor Snowball mewed piteously, and ran round and round the
kitchen, the lobster and the basket spinning around behind
him.
Seeing the trouble Snowball was in, Kitty gave one frantic
"mew" and ran out the door. She perched in safety upon the
fence.
The luckless Snowball pulled so hard that he drew the lobster
out of the basket. He ran out into the yard and around the
house, where he was seen by the dog. Watch ran after the flying
lobster.
Tom heard Watch barking loudly, and went out to see what all
the fuss was about. He rescued Snowball from the lobster, and the
lobster from Snowball and Watch, and carried the shell-fish back
into the house.
As soon as Snowball was free, he ran under the house. He
could not be coaxed out all the rest of that day. He lay there,
sadly looking at his poor tail, and licking it from time to time.
Since then he has not seemed at all curious about baskets and
their contents.
EFFIE RODGERS.











CHANGEFUL LIT-
TLE HETTY,
SEE WHAT SHE
IS AT;
NEVER STAYS AT
OYNE THING
LONG,
TURNS FROM
THIS TO THAT.


CHANGEFUL HETTY.









1
-s-sS. -


JUST SO WITH HER
DRESSES,
TURNS FROM
BUFF TO
GREEN;
THEN AC-AIN TO
CRIMNiN,
\V'H.T DOES
HE-TV MEAN?

s..AJL


1 HEN -HE \WVhITE
.A WORD uR,\
TWO
OF HER C(O F
FAIR;
THEN SHE BLOT-.
AND GIVES IT
UP
THEN S H LE
COMBS HER
HAIR.

NOW SHE TRIES TO
SEW A BIT, .i'4
THREADS
HER NEEDLE,
THEN
S r i.DIES FOR A
LITTLE WHILE
THEN IS OFF
AGAIN.


TAKES HER SLATE TO CIPHER,
DOES NOT MAKE IT OUT,
SAYS THAT EVERY THING GOES
WRONG;
THEN BEGINS TO POUT.


HETT\, WITH LOU'R FOLDED
HANDS,
]MTAMM TA SA 'S TO YOU,-
"TAKE LESS WORK AND DO IT
WELL,
THAT'S THE WAY TO DO."


~


- -







WHERE? 53






f i.

.. '..,\ -4-



~~~~F -;-~ r .






''1

FkE t11:1 1 1 ?VJ1 'Z.IF
c- -










ii
.--- Vi~~ ;~'

:, idB~~
-A /i~i-

WHEUE


IA


W !ilt ._r t l,-\' th,- little e i,.-,
S1 i 1n i -w.-.ii t.r -t .Vi e-?
W l.-,,i- ,, tl.- pi,, Aty tlNi. P S;
TN h t bl. -..,n,-, il, --V ,.n i iles ?

MARY N. PRESCOTT.










TILLIE TEXAS.

WE have had some funny boarders at our house. Tillie Texas
was about the funniest. She came one hot summer day, dressed in
a heavy black coat.
She was an entire stranger to all of us. She did not look or act
like any one who had ever before been among us. We were very
shy of her at first, and didn't give her a warm welcome. By and
by we grew to like her and enjoy her society.


r.
;;/


I i

-~ *1


What do you suppose she was? A lady? No. A little girl?
No. I'll tell you. She was-a little bear! She was only six
weeks old when caught in Texas, and was sent to. our landlady's
daughter by express. She wore her name, Tillie Texas," on a
silver necklace.
Poor little thing! She was too young to leave her mother, and
at first she cried like a baby if she was left alone. The landlady






TILLIE TEXAS.


took her to her own room at night, and covered her up in a tiny bed.
At midnight she would get up and warm a bowl of milk. Tillie would
sit up and clasp her paws around the bowl to hold it steady. Then
she drank all she wanted. After this she would. lie down again and
suck her paw till she fell asleep. She made a humming noise all
the while, that sounded like the buzzing of hundreds of bees.
When she grew older she took great delight in standing in the


wood-shed door and attracting a crowd of boys to the fence. When
she was tired of walking on her hind feet and holding a stick in her
paws, she would go behind the door and close it in the laughing faces
of the children.
Tillie enjoyed jumping into a tub of water on a warm summer
day and splashing it a! over herself. The little girls were careful
to draw their dresses close about them if they passed her in the
water; for she was very affectionate, and always wanted to give
them a hug with her wet paws.
FA-ITH WYNNE.






A QUEER PIN-BOX.


's "-J" i" "




A QUEER PIN-BOX.

TROTTY kept house in the closet of her papa's library. She had
all her dolls in there, and a little tin tea-set her uncle had given her.
The dolls were all of rubber, except one; this was of wood. It had
been sent to Trotty by an aunt who lived in Michigan, very near
a settlement of Chippewa Indians. The doll had been dressed by
an Indian woman, and its clothes were covered with beads. Trotty
called it her little Indian boy. She loved him very dearly, in spite
of the fact that she was obliged to whip him a dozen times a day.
But she loved Fanny, her big rubber doll, best of all. Fanny had
lost an arm, and there was a hole where her nose ought to have
been; but Trotty thought her beautiful, and always gave her the
best seat and the best bed in the baby-house.
One evening Trotty was watching her mother dress for a party.
"I can't find a pin anywhere," said Mrs. Ray. "It is strange
what becomes of them. I've bought paper after paper of them;
but can never find any when I dress."






A QUEER PIN-BOX


Perhaps Fanny takes them," said Trotty. She may have them
in her pin-box."
Mrs. Ray laughed. I think not," she said. "Fanny is too good
a child to take my pins."
But that night, when Mrs. Ray took Fanny out of Trotty's arms,


after the little girl was sound asleep, she thought the doll seemed
very heavy about the head. She looked, and found that the head
was full of pins. Trotty had dropped them in through the hole
where the nose ought to have been.
Was n't that a queer pin-box ?
FLORENCE B. HALLOWELL.








SAD!


THE horses came prancing around to the gate,
And Mabel and Myrtle and May
Went out in the carriage to take the fresh air,
All dressed very dainty and gay.

With ruffles and ribbons and pleatings and puffs,
With gloves and with handkerchiefs too, -
They sat very quietly folding their hands,
As proper young ladies will do.

The horses were jogging quite soberly on,
Behaving remarkably well,
When all on a sudden a mishap occurred,
Most shocking and mournful to tell.

For, watching them slyly from under the hedge,
A threatening enemy sat,
With glowering eyes and with wide-spreading tail, -
A dreadful and fierce-looking cat.

And Rover he bristled, and Carlo he growled,
And then down the gravelly road
They tore and they dashed and they scampered along,
Forgetting their dear little load.

They flew over ruts and they bumped over stones,
Then over a wall with a crash,
With carriage and Mabel and Myrtle and May,-
And all went to terrible smash.






SAD!


The mothers in tears and in grief and dismay
Came weeping and wailing around,
And wringing their hands as they wofully viewed
The ruin and wreck on the ground.


~LA


They tenderly gathered the poor little pets,
All battered and tattered and torn,
And dusty and draggled,- did ever you hear
A story so sad and forlorn!

But the wise little mothers were quickly at work,
And with needle and thread and some glue
Soon each little dolly was looking as sweet
And lovely as when she was new.
SYDNEY DAYRE.








HOW THE BEARS HELPED ONE ANOTHER.


BoB BRUIN was a g..iil y1 m iii- r,
bear, that minded what his father
and mother said to him. *
"When you take a walk out of the
forest," said Mr. and Mrs. Bruin to
Bob, "don't go near those houses.
Men live in them, and they treat '
bears very badly."
"What do they do?" asked .Bob. .
Oh," said Mr. Bruin, some-
times they kill us and eat our flesh.
Sometimes they tie a.great log to our legs so that we cannot run."
"Ah," said Bob, "but I would bite them."
"To prevent that, they will tie a great muzzle on your mouth; so
keep away from them, Bob."
Bob promised to obey. But one day, while walking outside the
wood, he fell into a pit. He roared so loud that Mr. and Mrs. Bruin
came running to see what was the matter. When they came to the
pit, they saw some nuts, and fruit, and buns, lying on the grass.
So they made a step forward to get these nice things, when down
they went into the pit where Bob was, with the buns and nuts.
They then found that the food had been laid on twigs and leaves
across the pit, which was dug as. a trap for them to fall into. But
how to get out was the puzzle.






HOW THE BEARS HELPED ONE ANOTHER.


After a little while Mrs. Bruin got on top of Mr. Bruin's shoulders,
and so scrambled out of the pit.
Now, Bob, you do the same, and I'll tell you how you may then
help me out."
So Bob got out of the pit as his mother had done.
Now," said Mr. Bruin, go to the woods and bring back a stout


branch of a tree." They did so, and placed the end':It tllt 1,-'ttom
of the pit.
Now hold the end tight on the top," said Mr. Biii ., "" lil I'll
try and climb up."
So Bob and Mrs. Bruin held the branch at the top of the pit, andl
Mr. Bruin, who could climb very well, managed to scramble out ut
the pit.
They all went home again to the forest in safety, and had a long
talk about men, and their tricks to catch poor bears in pits.
T. CRAAMPTON.








WIHY TOMMY WAS IN BED.

THE sun was shining brightly. It was only two o'clock in the
afternoon, and yet Tommy was in bed, The fact is, he had been
in bed since ten o'clock. Do you want to know why You
may be sure it was not from choice, for Tommy was very fond of
playing out doors, and was always the first to get up in the morning.


T~"T:
li
~''I~'' '' s
'' 1 i
i. I;.




1


But he was a very mischievous little boy, and liked to tease his
little playmates.
"Oh, dear!" said his little sister Edith one day, "I wish my
hair was curly. I like curly hair so much! "
"I will tell you how to make it curly," said Tommy. "Put
mucilage on it to-night, and in the morning it will be curled tight
to your head.






WHY TOMMY WAS IN BED.


Edith was only three years old, and did not know that Tommy
was teasing her. So that night, after her nurse had put her to bed
and had gone down-stairs, she jumped up and went into the library.
The mucilage was on a desk, and Edith emptied it over her head
and rubbed it in well.
Then she went back
to bed again, sure that '
her hair would now be "
curly.
Oh, what a little fright
she was when morning
came IHer pretty
brown hair was stuck
tight to her head in a
thick mass. Her mam-
ma tried to wash the
mucilage out; but it
could not be done.
The poor little '
head had to be -
shaved at last.
"Tom must be punished," said mamma.
Tom was fouAnd hiding behind the wood-
pile.. You may be sure he cried when he
found that he was to be punished.
And that was the reason Tommy was in bed when the sun was
shining. Don't you think he deserved to be there .
FLORENCE B. HALLOWELL.








HOUSES FOR RENT.





-" I.
11 ----, ,,,1M,-. 10A,,.


itu. ti, In. .n 1h in, -t
-'T"t It I r :..,_, i .,,.' .,i fly 1../ fi ,,. i:,
a .,, i:.' -. en l l .tti .-


Full .-ix t t. f l th, l .it



















N e. 1n th i 1s, is .m i l:,f -, -

To b out in t-' .


%i<17 A:
'4.-


Anil it, t,. h.i the r, -
rme n,:l..,tion
That it i, out of th, r,;n-ah
Of ':Att.






HOUSES FOR RENT.


Possession given in April;
The rents, for all summer long,
Are a very trifing consideration, -
In fact, they are merely a song.

These bargains in country homes
Are to the best markets near,
And the price of seasonable dainties
Is very far from dear:

A strawberry or two blackberries
For eating four fat bugs,
And cherries without number
For keeping off the slugs.

Other things are in proportion,
And everything in reason,
From tender lettuce to peaches,
Will appear in its season.

From four in the morning till evening
These houses are open to view;
And I wish I had a dozen to rent,
Instead of only two.
L. A. FRANCE.







THE THINKING OF ANIMALS.


OD gives to every animal just such
S machinery as its mind can use. If it
,I knows a good deal, he gives it a good
S' deal of machinery; and if little, he
gives it but little.
Some animals do a great deal of
;'..-. k- tlhii kii.', bout what they see, hear, and feel;' very
S'i- ii'iuch i, ou do, only that you know more. Your
\ i'III ', I :. r ; -t knows a great deal more than an oyster;
tl.-iFtire your pets are given paws and claws and
teeth, for their minds to use.
I once knew a cat that was born in the spring-time after the
snow was all gone. When the first storm came the next winter,






-- -










f -.. Ii--


snow fell in the night and was more than a foot deep. Of course
" Smutty Nose" had never seen it before. When she came out in






TWO WAYS OF READING.


the morning, she looked at it with very curious eyes, just as you
would look at anything new; very likely she thought how clean
and white and pretty it was.
After looking at it awhile, she began to poke at it with first one
paw and then the other, several times, to see how it felt. Then she
gathered some up between her paws, as much as she could hold, and
threw it up in the air over her head; then ran swiftly all round the
yard, making the snow fly like feathers wherever she went. Now
do you not believe pussy was thinking and feeling just as you boys
and girls feel when you see the first snow, to know anything about
it I do. Her mind was very busy in her little brain in these
sports, just as your mind is in your sports; and she enjoyed it, in
her way, just as much.
MRS. G. HALL.











7 \


\.- .. .. -_,.. ., .".. ..




MABEL was a good little girl, but she did not like to study. She
told her mother she could walk and talk, and she didn't want to
read.
Her mother was sorry to hear her little girl talk in that way.







TWO TVAYS OF hEADING.


She told Mabel how foolish she would feel to grow up and know
nothing.
Mabel said she would like to learn if it was not such hard work.
One morning Mabel lay on the floor with her book in her hand.
She said, Mamma, I don't think other little girls have such hard
times studying."
"I know my little girl is not very stupid," said her mother. "If
you would study your lesson instead of thinking how hard it is, you
would soon get through, Mabel. Put your book away now, and I
will give you a lesson without any book."
Mabel was delighted to put her book down. She did not know
what her mother could mean. They put on their hats and walked a
great distance. At last they came to a shady yard with a large
stone building in it. Mabel's mother asked to go to the school-
room. They were taken into a large roomp. Many little girls were
seated in a row, with books in their hands.
"Now, Mabel," said her mother, see how nicely those little girls
study."
Mabel looked at their books and said, Mamma, they are not
studying, for their books have no letters in them."
Mabel's mother then asked for one of the books, and showed it to
her. There were no black letters in the book. Mabel felt the page,
and found that it was rough. Her mother told her it was covered
with raised letters.
The teacher told one of the little girls to read for Mabel. The
pupil ran her fingers over the page, and read nicely. Mabel then
learned that the poor little girls were blind, and could only read by
feeling the letters.
Mabel told her mother that she had enjoyed her lesson without
any book very much, but she was so sorry for the little blind
girls. Her lessons would not seem hard again, when she thought
of them.
AUNT NELL.










KITTIE'S PIE. M

She caught her apron full of ';

snow, .,
This little girl so spry; .

And went and packed it on a

plate,

To make a frosted pie. ,


She put it in the oven then,

And when she thought 'twas -

done

She lifted out an empty plate, '

And that's what made the fun.
..r ..,
... ..:- -.. .
-2~-



To go and do that silly thing,
SShe was too old by half.
SShe said, "I wont tell brother

Fred,

'Twould only make him laugh."






SNO WING.


M ,i.
-... ..~~~~~. "',-?."" .::...,


SL .,',.I V l'..\,,, l tl ...!i, l til;, -,'.'. ,l l ., 1 -
Flitt, t t ih.,_ 1- .. -I
It .. t l.- I ,. iin I-- .l ,.i'. I:!' t I. : t,, =, ii.


.\.'I 1 i. i lii | ,ti. .t I,-,i 11 1 t 1j I.I ',.
-litr l-. i i 1 *i 11 \ i '. -







Till ever tiny, separate flake
xrA.' itll l c t nI X:A..b-~ ii t f i l 1.1
f >.. t ill t t l :l i ,- v t p .--s

1 1 1 1 1 1 .





Till every tiny, separate flake
Has found its resting-place.
ELIZABETH A. DAVIS.






TWENTY LITTLE POULTICES.


TWENTY LITTLE POULTICES.


IT never would have happened if mother had not gone away, and
the twins had not been left by themselves because Hannah was
"preserving," and if that grindstone had not been left out in the
yard.






TWENTY LITTLE POULTICES.


But mother had gone, Hannah was busy, the grindstone was
there, and it did happen, -this naughty thing !
The twins were sitting on the doorstep, eating bread and "'serves"
that Hannah had given them. It was very warm and quiet, and
there was not a
thing to do. The
bees were busy
enough out there
in the clover ;
but then they
were bees, and
did not know
any better fun
than to work all
day.
It was Dell who
began it. She
always did begin
things, and Bell
had to follow.
She finished her
bread first, and
sat trying to
think of some-
thing to play.
Then she saw
that grindstone,
and said, "0 Bell,
let's grind !"
Bell swallowed
her last bite
quickly, and fol-
lowed Dell to the
grindstone.
Now they did not- seem to remember that some one, mamma per-
haps, had said, "Never touch the grindstone, little girls." Bell did
5






TWENTY LITTLE POULTICES.


begin to remember, when, suddenly, there was Dell turning that
lovely stone with both hands. Of course Bell had to get a knife
and hold it to grind.
They ground two knives, which they got from the kitchen when
Hannah's back was turned. Then they ground the hoe till it was
" awful sharp," and some of the points off the handsaw. Then Bell
said, Let's grind our fingernails!" They turned the stone, and
held their fingers on it; and at first it felt funny and ticklish."
When they stopped, oh dear! the tips of every one of those poor
little fingers were sore indeed, for they had ground the skin right
off, and the blood came.
They ran crying to Hannah; and what do you think she did ?
Why, she put a little poultice of bread and milk on every one of
those fingers and thumbs on each naughty hand.
The twins were so ashamed to have mamma see those hands,
when they had promised to be so good! When she came home at
night, two sorry little girls met her, with their hands behind their
backs; and when she asked what was the matter with her birdies,"
they sorrowfully held up those ten no -- twenty little poultices.


E. S. TUCKER.

































WHAT PUSS HEARD.


THEY were sitting before the open fire, in the twilight, telling fairy-
stories. Frank had just brought in an armful of locust-wood and laid
it upon the hearth. Suddenly puss, who had been sleeping upon the
rug, waked, and climbed on the locust-wood and listened.
She hears a mouse in the wainscot," they said. Hush! All
were silent. Presently puss returned to the rug, and made believe
'go to sleep. But she could have had only a cat-nap before she was
,scampering over the wood-pile again. A beautiful blue-and-black
butterfly flew up into the warm firelight, as if he had mistaken it
for summer weather.
I call that a fairy-story," said the children.
Puss had heard the butterfly break the chrysalis.
MARY N. PRESCOTT.







WHAT THE CHILDREN SENT TO CHINA.

Buzz and Bess were at the sea-shore for the summer. All day
long they played and played until the sun went down. Buzz liked
to play with the little girls; Bess was his sister.
One day they found a boat on the beach. They thought it would
be nice to send it to China. They had heard something about China
being across the sea. Their Sun-
day-school teacher told them of
poor little children, also, who
lived over the sea. :
"Of course they all live in I ,
China," said Bess. ...
"Yes, there isn't any more *....
over the sea but China," said _2
Flossie.
"Let us borrow this boat and
send them something nice."
So we will," said Buzz;
"something good to eat."
"Something to keep for ever
and ever," added Flossie.
The children all went home to
get something for the poor China
children. Flossie brought a doll and some peaches. Bess had her
little arms full of blocks and books. Buzz brought two old tops, a
Chinese puzzle, and some doughnuts.
"Won't they be pleased said Flossie, clapping her hands.
We must send them a letter," said Bess.
And write our names," added Buzz.
Bess ran for some paper.
"You must write it, Flossie, for you make the best letters." So
Flossie wrote:-
DEER CHINA CHILDERN, We ar sorry for u and send
u sum of our things. We live in Boston.
FLOSSIE MAY,
BESSIE PARKER,
Buzz PARKER.






WHAT THE CHILDREN SENT TO CHINA.


The children put the letter where it would keep dry. They
pinned it in tbh doll's dress. Then they pushed the boat away from
the shore, and saw it float off.
It's most to China now," said Bess, so let's go and play church."


"It's only out to Egg Rock," said Flossie. But they played
church, and soon forgot the China children.
The next morning, while the little friends slept, an old fisherman
found the boat. It was drifting out to sea. He laughed when he
saw the toys. He carried them-home to his children.
His little girl found the letter. When the fisherman's wife read
it she said, "Bless their dear little hearts! They have made my
children just as happy as any China children could be."











N -1L
,,"'


A STORMY DAY.


HARK, how the rain is pouring !
Hark, how the north winds
blow!
Think of the poor, poor children
Who have nowhere to go,
But crouch in sheltered corners
To keep from wind and rain.


Do you thank God, dear little
ones,
That you know not such pain ?
Then think of them with pity,
And try what you can do
To make the poor, poor children
Both warm and happy too.
MARY D. GELLIE.




































ON THE BEACH.


DonP and Dolly spent a whole day at the beach. Dory used his
shovel, and Dolly carted the sand he dug up in her little wagon. It
was a pleasant day, and there were plenty of people on the shore.
Among them was a very old man. His clothes were all in rags.
He said he had to take care of his sick daughter and his little
grandson. He had been sick himself, and not able to work. He
had come to the beach to dig clams, for they had nothing in the
house to eat.
Dory helped him with his shovel. While he was at work, Dolly
ran down to him with a silver dollar in her hand. She had found it
in the sand she had in her wagon. She and Dory talked it over.
Dory told her about the poor old man, and they agreed to give the
dollar to him.
They walked down to the water, where he was turning up the
clams. He looked very sad; but when the dollar was put into his
hand he smiled, and looked happy. Dory and Dolly were as happy
as he was, for it is more blessed to give than to receive."
UNCLE- FORRESTER.


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FREDDIE'S PUZZLE.


I WONDER why little boys like to make a noise, and why it is so
hard to keep still sometimes, and easy enough other times.
I wasn't sent up into the
attic because I was so i.i. -
but mamma said I c.i.iil.
make all the noise I want-i i- '
to up here, and I would i *' -
to be quiet in the sitting- .,'.,. .' -
And now I'm here, .-,i. I -'
don't feel like making I ii i ii
at all. But I do not I... 'h-
it is as much fun when AM
are all alone. I like to Il ., :. .
the whistle on my locormi- "'
tive, and drum, and plev i, .' .',
wild Indian; and then :
mamma says, Be moi. .i ,j
quiet, Freddie; you I.
are such a noisy boy --_ ----: *,' ,'I1
I try real hard to -
be still sometimes; but Ip .:_.
minute I forget, I jump. '. --
shout, and act like a v
boy, Aunt Jane I-, i I. -
believe mamma would nii. it. .: iii --
if Aunt Jane didn't always say, Well, -
I never saw such a noisy boy in my life "
Perhaps when I grow older I shan't feel so much like shouting
and hammering. I think I'll go downstairs now, and try to be still
five minutes. Oh, there goes Willie Brown with his drum I'll
get mine, and we will have a drumming match in the garden.
ANNfE 1). BELL.













THE BUG WITH A MASK.

THERE is a funny little creature that wears a covering all over
his face just like a mask. And what do you think it is for ? Let
us see.


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Perhaps you have seen the beautiful dragon-flies
that look so much like humming-birds and butter-
flies too. They have broad wings, as thin as a fly's,
1.-It tiitt-'-r like -- .i i,. n the sunshine. Their backs
.,- ~l-t like blue steel.
You will always find
them in.the hot summer
months flying through
S the fields, or over ponds
Low- and rivers. In the
country they are called
: --"devil's darning-nee-
dles," because they are

S --.French people call them
demoiselles," which
~means ladies.
-=-" Now this handsome,
swift creature grows
--_ from an ugly bug, that
-1. -\l.- .;-.,i the mud at the bottom of
thii- :. iii. And this is the way it comes


Little white _-.--, are laid on the water, the rip-
ples carry them far away, and then they sink into the mud.
The warm sun hatches them, and from each egg creeps a tiny
grub of a greenish color. They are hungry creatures, with very bad






THE B UG WITH A MASK.


hearts. They eat up every little insect that comes in their way.
They are very sly, too. They creep towards their prey as a cat
does when she is in search of a rat.
They lift their small hairy legs, as if they were to do the work. It
is not the legs, but the head that does it. Suddenly it seems to open,
and down drops a kind of visor with joints and hinges.
This strange thing is stretched out until it swings from the chin.
Quick as a flash some insect is caught in the trap and eaten.
This queer trap, or mask, is the under lip of the grub. Instead of
being flesh like ours, it is hard and horny, and large enough to cover
the whole face.
It has teeth and muscles, and the grub uses it as a weapon
too.
It is nearly a year before this ugly-looking grub gets its wings.
A little while after it is hatched, four tiny buds sprout from its
shoulders, just as you see them on the branch of a tree. These are
really only watery sacs at first. Inside of them the wings grow
slowly until you can see the bright colors shining through.
Some morning this hairy-legged little bug creeps up a branch.
Then he shakes out his wings and flies away into the air, a slender,
beautiful dragon-fly.
I have told you of the only creature in the world that wears this
curious mask.
MRS. G. HALL.







THE MOON-CLOTH.


THE winter night fell all too soon;
There was no moon,
SSave just a crescent that seemed to be
A silver C,
Written against the frosty sky,
So far and high.

Teddy was called, against his will,
From the coasting-hill.
The track was icy along the drift,
And his sled was swift;
So he the summons to hear or heed
Was loath indeed.

-- Even when the fire-lit house was gained
His frown remained;
And he murmured 'twas hard for him
to see
Why the moon should be
Sometimes so round, like a great white
ball,
SSometimes so small.

Up spoke sweet Edith, sitting there
All Saxon fair :
" They hadn't enough of the moon-cloth spun
For a larger one,
And they wanted to use this up before
They made any more."

This satisfied dear little Ted,
And he went to bed;
But he thought of his precious penny hoard
So snugly stored,
And he wondered how much of a supply
His dollar would buy.








THE MOON-CLOTH.


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he asked of Edith afterward,

much the moon-cloth cost a yard.

MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES.


And

How
















-THE SNOW BIRDS.
When skies looked cold and winter boughs
Gave out a crackling sound,
Two little snow-birds chilled, with frost,
Had fallen to the ground.
When Nelly came along that way,
And saw them sitting there;
She thought them dead, "But no," she
said,
"They need a little care."
She warmed them with her hand, and
gave
Them dainty crumbs to eat,
And then they oped their pretty eyes,
And stood upon their feet.
And looked up sweetly in her face,
And chirped, as if to say,,
" We thank you for your tenderness,"
And then they flew away.
Where they had gone so suddenly,
She looked above to see,
And there they sat, a row of them,
Upon the maple tree.
They chirped and twittered as they
looked,
As much as they could do,
As if to say "Sweet little girl,
We will remember you."
And to a friendship very sweet,
Her acts of kindness led,
For often would they follow her,
And fly above her head.
But how they could remember her,
She never understood,
But papa said, "I think 'tis by
That little scarlet hood.'


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BERTIE'S BATH.


BERTIE'S papa was master of a large ship that sailed on the great
ocean. When .Bertie was about four years old he and his mamma
went to sea
in the ship
with papa. Bertie saw many
curious things; but now I
want to tell you of a funny
bath he took.
One day he said, "I want to
bathe in the ocean water, mam- '
ma." The next morning his papa
had a man fill the bath-tub with
salt water from the ocean. Bertie
stepped into the tub, gave a little -
scream, and climbed up and sat
on the edge of the tub. ,-
"Ha!" he said, "the-ocean .
water here is colder than the
ocean water at the beach. I .
think I'll get out." But he still
sat on the edge of the tub and .
looked solemnly into the water.
Now it seemed as if Old Ocean ----
meant that Bertie should get in,
for just then a big wave rolled under the "
ship, and tossed her bow high in the air.
Bertie was thinking of the beach at
home, where he had played in the sand.
He had forgotten he was at sea. So when --
the ship was tossed upon the big wave,
down fell Bertie, souse, into the bath-tub. r
Such a splashing and dashing and spluttering
you never heard When he opened his mouth to scream, the
water rushed into it. At last he scrambled up and stood in the tub,
and mamma wiped his face. Just as he was going to cry, he saw






LOST AND FOUND.


that she was laughing, and he could not help laughing himself. In
a minute he said, "The water doesn't feel so cold now; guess I'll get
in again."
In he plunged, and had a nice play. He had many baths after
that, and never minded the cold water. I think Old Ocean taught
him that when he had a thing to do, it was best to do it at once.
What do you think?
A. M. J.



LOST AND FOUND.

COMPANY was expected at Vine Cottage. Jennie's mamma had
been busy all the morning. She found small time to look after her
little girl.
Noontime came, and with it Jennie's papa from his store. The
store was not far from Vine Cottage, and on the same street. It
was in a small country town, where grass and tall, rank weeds
were allowed to grow on each side of the streets.
Mamma's eyes opened wide with surprise when she saw papa
enter without Jennie. Where's Jennie ?" were the first words that
greeted his entrance to the kitchen.
She has not been near me to-day, the darling," said papa.
"You surely cannot mean this! exclaimed mamma. She is
always with you at the store, when not at my heels."
"When did you last see her?" asked papa, anxiously.
She came to me about ten o'clock, and asked for her little pink
gingham sun-bonnet. I tied it over her bonny brown head, and
she scampered away, throwing back kisses to me," said mamma.
Three hours ago! Bless her little feet, where may they not
have carried her in that time ?"
Papa's eyes grew misty as he ordered a search to be made for the
little lost one. Every nook in the old house was searched. Millie,
the cook, even looked into the great stone churn, though it was one-
third full of rich sour cream.
Mamma's eyes were red and swollen. No chip had been left






LOST AND FOUND.


unturned, under which Jennie might be concealed. Once Sue thought
they had found her swate gossoon; but jist ye wait a bit!"
Pinned between a pair of fine sheets, in Jennie's little bed, was the
old house-cat, Tom. He had on Jennie's night-gown and cap. It
was no wonder he
had been mistaken
for his little mistress. ..
Papa says, "I won-
der where Rover is -
Sure enough, where .
was Rover ? Papa
found him locked in'
the store. He remem- "
bered his coming and
his strange behavior.
How his small, yellow ;
legs did fly when the r:1
door was opened, -
up the path which led jA.
through the tall, rank N
May-weeds to the
house Papa followed ':
as fast as he could. ':i ,
Rover stopped half- 1A I"
way up the path, and i ,
looking towards papa, I'''
whined. I' '
Coming up, papa i ,; '
saw something that -v ,
made him glad.
There, cradled deep
among the white blossoms, lay Jennie, fast asleep. Kisses awoke
the wee maiden, and she rubbed her sleepy eyes.
And now, whenever'I walk through country lanes, I recall with a
smile the noonday nap I took There, little people, I've let the old
cat out of the bag; but- never mind.
MOTHER CAREY.









MORNING-GLORIES.


HURRY hurry hurry !
Don't you see the sun,
Pretty Morning-Glories, -
Work not yet begun ?


Open quick your petals
Swift to greet the day.
Higher! higher! higher !
Catch the first bright ray.


I


Don't you know the morning
Is your little hour,
And how soon you're drooping
If a cloud should lower ?


So be up and doing,
Children of the sun;
For your chief adorning
All his beams are spun.
ELIZABETH A. DAVIS.

















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PLAYING GYPSIES.


Ours to choose the thorns or flowers.
If 'we but mind our duty,
Spend aright the priceless hours,
And life will glow with beauty.

Let us, then, the portals fling,
Heaping high the liberal cheer;
Let us laugh, and shout, and sing, -
Welcome! Welcome, glad new year !
ELIZABETH A. DAVIS.


PLAYING GYPSIES.


MABEL and Fay thought it would be nice to play gypsies and
steal their baby brother away from mamma. Then they would
make her pay piles of money for bringing him back. So they
dressed up, and were dreadful-looking gypsies, in slouched hats and
long coats. They hid little Georgie carefully on the front porch
behind some chairs and an open umbrella.






PLAYING GYPSIES.


Mamma was listening, and soon she said: "Where is Georgie ? I
saw some gypsies near here to-day; I am afraid they have stolen
him." So she looked in all the wrong places she could think of,
Then she sent Dinah, the cook, and told her to offer ten dollars for
the lost baby.


if I o. i. h i t., h- 11-.I,
Pa 1e t.


round pieces of gilt paper to the chief of the robbers, which was
Fay, and got her dear stolen baby back. Then she "made be-
lieve" she had been very much frightened about Georgie. The
gypsies broke down, and one of them wept, because she thought
mamma really had been troubled. Then Mrs. Godwin kissed the ter-
rible gypsies and told papa all about it when he came from the office.
R. W. LOWRIE.


~":
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BECALMED AT SEA, OR THE UNPROSPEROUS VOYAGE.

On, bold and bumbly boomed the bees
All in and out the elder-trees,
When Vibe, in his bathing-rig,
Embarked upon his bread-tray brig,
His towel for a sail.



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The lake stretched out before him vast;
He used a fish-pole for a mast;
For ballast, in his boots he cast;
And paddling out, the shallows past;
He waited for a gale.


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