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The Art of Letterpress, exhibit proposal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078909/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Art of Letterpress, exhibit proposal
Physical Description: Archival
Creator: Santamaria-Wheeler, Lourdes
Bourque, Jason
Mullersman, Sarah
Publication Date: 2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Exhibitions
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
System ID: UF00078909:00001

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Table of Contents
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    Main
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        Page 11
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Full Text


THE ART OF
ETTERPRESS



































Aerial view of layout


















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Frontal view of layout




















Corner layout view


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THM A CT 0 r IL-U1RaFpIRSS

In the modem age of computer-driven ;ec.,L.olIy and hig'".-iesolution laser ;ri:!r!er, the
printing :echniioue knoxiw as letterpress is rapil.d becoming a lost art. Letterpress is a
labor-intensive medium that requ.ires tune investment and a
keen _-' k.ledge of materials. The end result is a **niqi'e iw',.
of art.

Sn7-i, e.l:ib;loCn embodies the ..-J. of a dedicated group of
letterpress artists who make up the PAal'.il~g: ed Printers'
Association (APA). The APA is an art-collective with a
maxnium i 50 members at any given time. Tihe group's
unified ambition since :195 has been to keep the flick;:ri;:g
tfla::l ofle::e-, s-s alive and well, and to preserve an art fonu
-. that has been I l ig:.o .r;-ed by the art commnumnity.

D-, id L Kent
donated this
collection of poi-.ers, business cards, and
book, to J;e George A. Smathers Library.
Special and Area Si.tCies Collection at the
UL:i';esil'. of Florida in 2005. Much of die
work shown in this exhibit focuses on the
closely-knit Kent I ln-l aIId 'i:eiJ mail i 0%
ef:rts, alongside 6.e work of .:eu' friends
and :cllegcue-. from the APA. Read,
examine, and enjoy :.e;e colorful works ol
art.


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Introductory Case


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Miniature Book Panel, above Miniature Book Case. Panel features enlarged reproductions of 2 books within case.





































Miniature Book Case





David L. Kent Ephemera



Ephemera (plural for ephemeron) are "a range of collectable items that were
originally designed to be short-lived" (Encarta World English Dictionary).
The following is a collection of short stories, typeset proofs, poems, one-
liners, quotations, and cards created by the APA's one-time archivist, David
Kent. Collectively, the pieces act like entries from the artist's personal
journal, giving you insight into his personality and creative thought
processes.

One noteworthy piece, Mexican Red Leg, is collaboration between David
and his daughter Susannah. This booklet is a tribute to the Kent Family's
deceased pet (female) Mexican red leg tarantula, John J. Trotter (1980-
1999).



















illustration from On the Way to Pompeii: Riddles for the Road by David L. Kent


KetEhmr
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Kent Ephemera Case


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Corner layout view


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APA Ephemera


This selection of ephemera by various APA members
includes items that date from the beginning of the
organization up to the late 1990's. You can see how this
group of closely-knit artists has shared ideas and inspired
one another over time through a commonality in medium,
sense of humor, and artistic styling.


Based on style,
can you pick out
which pieces were
done by a
particular artist?


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Never Insult An Alligat


Until You'ov Crossed


The River,


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NeverInsult an Alligatorby Herbert G. UXagjI 1985-1989, Ink on Paper


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APA Ephemera Case











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T he Word


As described by Iloxon in 683, a 'way-goose' is an entertainment given by a mnaser printer In 1655 Chrisopher Bennet issued an enlarged edition of Healths Improvement: or, Rule
to his workmen about Bartholomewtide (24th August), marking the beginning of the season comprising and discovering Ite nature, method, and manner ofpreparing all orts of fodsedin
of working by candlelight. It later came to mean an annual feglivity held in summer by the this nation. .. Written by that ewr famous Thomas Mufett. And little Mr Muffett ( 553-
employees of a printing establishment, considing of a dinner and usually an excursion into 1604) there recorded the opinion,'A young tuble goose feeding itself fat in wheaten fields,
the country, is the bet of all.' That the printer of this work, one T. Newcomb, seized the image and the
occasion to name what is known yet today as the Wayzgoose we have to conjecture.
But why the word 'way-goose'? Nathaniel Bailey's Dilionary (5th edition, 1731) defines
'wayz' as a bundle of Araw, and 'wayzgoose' as a fubble-goose, an entertainment given to To those who strenuously residf such homely etymology, we shall have to say that yes, it is
journeymen at the beginning of winter. Bailey is not mistaken, for the word waste appears possible chat the word 'Wayzgoose' derives from the Latin 'res cuius', translated roughly
as early as 1375 with the meaning of a wisp or bundle of traw or reeds. So a Wayzgoose is a 'their thing'. But, to each as he may prefer.
Stubble-Goose; and why a Stubble-Goose?


A keepsake for guests at the Colonial Wayzgoose in Concord, Massachusetts
Written and printed at the Vernal Equinox 1985 by DL & Carol Kent
ERESPIN PRESS 929 East 5oth Austin, Texas 78751



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Kent Panel Text, above Kent Case


The Kents

What began as an amateur interest in printing
books inexpensively eventually changed the lives
of Carol and David Kent. Originally, their goal was
to print the books David wrote about genealogy.
They bought a Kelsey press and fell in love with
the black art.

By taking up printing as a hobby and then as a
business, David and Carol were able to merge their
love of books with their growing interest in
letterpress printing. Soon they were collecting
antique and vintage type, buying presses, and
participating in the Amalgamated Printer's
Association. Carol served as the APA president
from 1985 to 1988, and David has served as their
archivist for the last fifteen years. Their children
learned to print by watching their parents work, and
learned to read backwards because of the way the
type was set! Letterpress has had a lasting influence
on all members of the Kent family.


Kent Case





Large Books Panel Text, above Large Books Case


Large Books

This collection of large hand-printed books
brings together two aspects of letterpress,
the art of designing the book and the actual
content within it. Although these books are
large enough to read from, the printer pays
most attention to the layout of the pages, the
types used, and the color selection.

It is difficult to imagine that, historically,
books were printed by hand. Their primary
value was in their content- this was the first
time that books became available to the
masses. Knowing this, we can appreciate
the time and effort it took to make this small
selection of books. The majority of these
books were printed in limited editions of
one hundred books or less. Because
letterpress is a dying art, the value of these
books lies not only in their content but in
their unique art form.


Large Books Case











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Proprietor Cards Group Label, affixed to outside of case


Proprietor Cards

Proprietor cards, or prop cards,
are like business or calling cards
for printers. They can be printed
in a variety of sizes and styles,
but the most common is
approximately 3 x 5 inches. Often
times they include more than
contact information, such as the
history of the particular press or
printing specialty. They can also
include the type of press and
typeface used to print the card.
Many printers also include their
membership number for the
exclusive Amalgamated Printers'
Association (APA).


Proprietor Cards Case





Detail of Proprietor Card layout


Proprietor Card
Robert L. Kent
The Robot Press
c. 1985
Ink on Paper


A.P.A. 542


Robert L. Kent, Prop.


Robert L. Kent printed this card when he was a young boy.
The green circuit design was reproduced from an issue of
Radio Electronics magazine. The card was then printed
again, with the text overlaid.

The number in the upper left identifies Robert Kent as a
member of the Amalgamated Printers' Association. At age
11, he was the youngest member of this exclusive
organization.


THIE RCI1oCT eCoISS



1705 Raven Drive o Austin, Texas o 78752












































HIGHLIGHTS IN AMERICAN HISTORY NUMBER 1


.t'?~?-ri
























Jason Bourque
Sarah Mullersman
* Lourdes Santamaria




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