• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 January, 1890
 November, 1885
 December, 1888
 November, 1888
 Back Cover














Title: Babyland
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078900/00001
 Material Information
Title: Babyland
Alternate Title: Stories from Babyland
Wide awake
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1890
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: edited by the editors of Wide awake.
General Note: Volume 14, no. 1 (January 1890) and v. 9, no. 11 (November 1885), v. 12, no. 12 (December 1888) and v.12, no. 11 (November 1888) of Babyland bound as book.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078900
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002471054
notis - AMH6571
oclc - 181341527

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Title Page
        Page 7
        Page 8
    January, 1890
        Page 9
        December days - A shipwreck
            Page 10
        A shipwreck
            Page 10
        "See my Christmas present!" - Mamma's arithmetic
            Page 11
        The wonderful story of Baa-Baa
            Page 12
            Page 13
        Three boys
            Page 14
            Page 15
        Polly Pry and Toddlekins
            Page 16
    November, 1885
        Page 89
        Not satisfied - The little swans' lesson
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
        My lady's work-table - A weather prophet
            Page 93
        In the park - Little people in black
            Page 94
        A yea of fun
            Page 95
        The Chrissy cherryblows
            Page 96
        Faith's letter - A Christmas snow-storm
            Page 98
        A Christmas snow-storm
            Page 99
    December, 1888
        Page 97
        Baby and the crickets
            Page 100
            Page 101
        The sick dolls
            Page 102
        The cure
            Page 103
        Me and Toddlekins
            Page 104
        Play
            Page 90
            Page 91
    November, 1888
        Page 89
        Baby and the crickets
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
        The striped kitten's lesson
            Page 95
        Me and Toddlekins
            Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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BABYLAND






EDITED BY

THE EDITORS OF WIDE AWAKE


BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY
WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD


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COPYRIGHT, 1890,
BY
D. LOTHROP COMPANY.
























Edited by the Editors of WIDE AWAKE.

Jinjar',, 1890. D. LOTHROP COMPANY, Publishers, Boston, Mass. 50 cts. a year,
V... I Vl. No. I. Copyright, 1889, by D. LOTHROP COMPANY. 5 Cts. a number,


CHRISTMAS MORNING.


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10 DECEMBER DAYS. -A SHIPWRECK.

DECEMBER DAYS.

Merry little Days are we,
Making music, making glee:
SHo! ho! the Christmas.
Little Days to clear the way
For the mighty Christmas Day:
Ho ho! the Christmas.
Children smile as we go by,
Wishing we would faster fly:
SH Ho! ho! the Christmas.
Little Days, we wing and sing,
SIn the Christmas Day we bring:
DECEMBER DAYS. Ho ho! the Christmas.


A SHIPWRECK.

A dash- and a splash -
A rinse-and a rub-
You sailors! ahoy!
Don't rock the bath-tub!
You sailors ahoy!
There-tip-goes the boat-
And the nursery floor
Is all afloat! YOU SAILORS! AHOY!




10 DECEMBER DAYS. -A SHIPWRECK.

DECEMBER DAYS.

Merry little Days are we,
Making music, making glee:
SHo! ho! the Christmas.
Little Days to clear the way
For the mighty Christmas Day:
Ho ho! the Christmas.
Children smile as we go by,
Wishing we would faster fly:
SH Ho! ho! the Christmas.
Little Days, we wing and sing,
SIn the Christmas Day we bring:
DECEMBER DAYS. Ho ho! the Christmas.


A SHIPWRECK.

A dash- and a splash -
A rinse-and a rub-
You sailors! ahoy!
Don't rock the bath-tub!
You sailors ahoy!
There-tip-goes the boat-
And the nursery floor
Is all afloat! YOU SAILORS! AHOY!




' SEE MY CHRISTMAS PRESENT! -- MAMMA S ARITHMETIC. II


"SEE MY CHRISTMAS PRESENT!"


MAMMA'S ARITHMETIC.

2 big eyes, soft and blue,
I sweet mouth with kiss for you,
2 small feet that trot all day, -4
I queer tongue with much to say,
2 white hands, plump and fair,
i bright head of golden hair,
i small nose, a wee bit pug-
Make one dear girl just right to hug.




THE WONDERFUL STORY OF BAA-BA'A.


THE WONDERFUL


One day in
/, ,, i 'i" spring Baby
Bun's mam-
Sma said, "I'm
bABY BUN. take
BUN. going to take
you to the farm to-day."
Baby liked that; and when
he was ready to go, what do
you think he had in his hatd ?
"A dolly?" Oh! no. His
dear little woolly lamb.
"Why don't you take your
new horse, Baby? asked mam-
ma. Doesn't he want to go ?"
Oh! yes," said Baby; "but
Baa-Baa is sick, so I must take
him to-day,"
Poor Baa-Baa did look


STORY OF BAA-BAA.

badly. One ear was gone, one
leg was broken, and his head
hung down in a forlorn way.
He was wrapped in an old
doll-blanket, and Baby carried
him very carefully.
When they got to the farm
Baby trotted about, looking till
he found the very greenest,
freshest grass anywhere near
the farmhouse.
There, Baa-Baa, eat all
you want," said Baby.
While Baa-Baa stood look-
ing at the grass,
but before he
had begun to '.
eat, Farmer ,.
Robbins came -
that way. FARMER ROBBINS.
"How do you do, Baby
Bun? said he. "Come and
see the Bossy in the barn."
Baby looked at Baa-Baa,


12





THE WONDERFUL STORY OF BAA-BAA. 13


Farmer Robbins said, "Oh!
you need not worry about him;
animals sometimes like best to
be alone when they eat."
So Baby went with the
farmer to see the Bossy, and
left Baa-Baa
S-' to eat the
THE BOSSY. fresh tender
grass as he liked.
After Baby Bun had seen
the Bossy, Farmer Robbins
showed him the pigs and the
horses and the ducks, until it
was dinner-time.
Then, after dinner, Baby
took a drive with mamma.
He did not forget Baa-Baa, but
thought, "He will have plenty


": i + .


of time to eat all he wants."
When mamma said, Now,
we must go home," Baby ran
to get his pet. There stood
Baa-Baa just where he had
left him but oh! oh! oh! -
he had two ears, his broken foot
seemed to have grown on again,
and his head was up just as it
should be !
Baa-Baa is all well!"
shouted Baby, Baa-Baa is
all well!"
Baby always thought it was
the fresh grass that had cured
his pet, but mamma knew that
kind Farmer Robbins had
minded Baa-Baa while Baby
was at dinner.


BAA-BAA IS ALL WELL NOW!




14 THREE BOYS.


7Te \/ee
little
3o


THREE

Once there were three boys.
One was a Great Big Boy, and
one was a Middle-sized Boy,
and one was a Little Wee Boy.


BOYS.

The Great Big Boy went to
school and said his lessons out
of a great big book; and the
Middle-sized Boy stayed at




THREE BOYS., 15


home and said his lessons to
mamma out of a middle-sized
book; and the Little Wee Boy
sat in Grandma's lap and saw
pictures in a little wee book.
And the Great Big Boy
wore great big black stockings,
and the Middle-sized Boy wore
middle-sized blue stockings,
and the Little Wee Boy wore
little wee red stockings.
The night before Christmas
the Great Big Boy hung up his
great big black stocking, and
the Middle-sized Boy hung up
his middle-sized blue stocking,
and the Little Wee Boy hung
up his little wee red' stocking.
In the morning, before the
sun was up, they jumped out of
bed and ran to seewhat Santa
Claus had brought. And the
Great Big Boy found his great
big black stocking full of
oranges and candy, and under
it there was a great big rocking-
horse. And the Middle-sized


Boy found his middle-sized
blue stocking full of oranges
and candy, and under it there
was a middle-sized drum.
And the Little Wee Boy
found his little wee red stock-
ing full of oranges and candy,
and under it there was a little
wee carriage made of tin.
And the Great Big Boy
shouted, "0, jolly!" and got on
the horse and rocked away as
hard as he could. And the
Middle-sized Boy shouted, "0,
jolly!" and took the drum and
beat on it as hard as he could.
And the Little Wee Boy
shouted, 0, jolly!" and drew
the tin carriage round the room
as fast as he could. And in
less than two minutes the house
was full of Merry Christmas!

: dt




POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.--I.


0- "ODDLEKINS
was asleep in
her little white
y ~ bed. The sun
tried to peep
-into her closed
eyes, the clock
struck six very
loud, a big fly buzzed in her
ear, and mamma came and
called, but still Toddlekins
did not wake up. Then a
queer, cracked voice began to
speak to Toddlekins.
"Hullo!" it said. Toddle-
kins opened one eye.
"Hullo! How de do, dear?
Good-morning! morning !"
Both Toddlekins' eyes flew
wide open, and she sat up and
looked around. That was not
mamma's voice!
"Pretty Polly!" said the
voice softly. Polly Pry!


Pret-ty Poll! O-look-at-Poll!"'
Then Toddlekins saw what
it was. Perched on the foot
of her bed, sat a parrot with
green and red feathers.
"This is Polly Pry!" said
mamma. "Polly, this is your
little mistress, Toddlekins!"


I r


POLLY PRY SAYS


'


"GOOD-MORNING "


"Ha, ha!" laughed Polly,
winking at her, "ha! ha! ha!"






















November, 1885.
Vol. IX. No. II.


Edited by the Editors of WIDE AWAKE.

D. LOTHROP & Co., Publishers, Boston, Mass. o5 cts. a year.
Copyright, 1885, by D. LoaTnor & Co., sad entered at the P. O. at Boston as tsecod-cla e matter. 5 cts. a number.


GOING TO MILK WITH MAMMA.




NOT SATISFIED. THE LITTLE SWANS LESSON.


NOT SATISFIED.


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WHAT HE

And I'll



He's so


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I was very fond indeed
Of my red velocipede,
Till the big boys got their
bicycles, you see-
Just two wheels, and how
they fly,
Up so very light and high,
Just two wheels, while my
velocipede has three!


Well, as soon as ever I can,
INTENDS '10 BUY. I shall try to be a man,
buy a new one then that's what I'll do !
And this birthday red one- maybe
I will give it to the baby!
little he won't know three wheels from two.


THE LITTLE SWANS' LESSON.

Once there was a fair swan their own bugs, nor cut their
with a coal-black neck. She own grass-salads, nor to swim.
had three ,pretty baby swans, They wished to take their bugs
but they were lazy little things. and grass from their mother's;
They did not wish to pick bill, and to go up stream and'


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THE LITTLE SWANS LESSON. 91
down on her back. It was a swans fall off. Then up she
pleasure to their mother to came and swam off as fast
feed them and to give them
rides. But she knew they must -: -
be taught to seek their own
food, and to swim up and
down.
SWhen she spoke to them: '
about it, they said, Next week -
we will." Next week one of .
them did keep her word and
swim, and seek her own bugs, 4Z--^
and nip grass for herself. But
the others.still sat on their -
mother's back. So one day ---
when she was out in the stream, -
and they were catching butter- GOOD TIMES.
flies from her back, the mother as she could, in among the
swan-with a funny smile at reeds, where she stayed all
her good child -dived, heels night. By morning her little
over head, and let the lazy swans had learned their lesson,


A GAME OF NINEPINS.










































4I




--










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I .. O I





"TALK TO ME, TOO, MIIAMMA."





MY LADY S WORK-TABLE.--A WEATHER PROPHET.


93


MY LADY'S WORK-TABLE.


A WEATHER PROPHET.

----- Little Madam Modest,
i." 'Happy in her nest,
^ \ Thinks her little grassy
Home the very best;

Just one little duty
She herself has set--
When the days are rainy
She must cry More wet! "




;:94 IN THE PARK.-- LITTLE PEOPLE IN BLACK.

IN THE PARK.

:.; ::- : .... I'm a rich little kitten:
I. live at my ease,
I keep my own carriage,
S.::I go where I please;
My turn-out is stylish,
I nothing neglect,
And often I notice
,That all recollect
_T:hat a rich little kitten
Deserves much respect.



LITTLE PEOPLE IN BLACK.-XI.

"The kind of child that I
most like," said Santa, "is the
child that has no playmate,
and contrives to amuse her-
self from morning until night
with her own songs, her own
thoughts, and her own plays.
For such a child-I see one r-'
now --I will save the best toys *,-_^_l... ,
in my next Christmas pack." NO PLAYMATES.





A YEAR OF FUN.


A YEAR


FOR THANKSGIVING.
"Thanksgiving Day is coming
The children cry in glee.
The kitchen's full of goodies
As tempting as can be.

The pantry shelves are loaded
With dainty cake and pies,
And Ben and Bessie view the
With wide and longing eye

"O deary me !" says mamma
"What had I better do?
Some one's been in the pantr
And in the kitchen too;


,


d

m
s.

Y,

'y,


THE MICE.


OF FUN.-XI

"And nibbled round the edges
Of everything that's nice.
I'll set a trap to-morrow--
Of course it must be mice.

"I certainly must teach them
To let my things alone,
And never, never meddle
With what is riot their own."

Up came two little figures,
Each with a drooping head;
!" I guess you needn't set the trap,
We were the mice!" they said.




THE CHRISSY CHERRYBLOWS.


THE CHRISSY CHERRYBLOWS.-XI.


It was Chris's turn to go to
town. He had been a good
boy. He had helped dig the
potatoes and pick the apples.
His father said he would give
him "a treat" when they went
to town. They drove to a
funny little shop. A queer
old woman kept it; the store
was in the front room, and
she lived in the back room.
" Now, shut your eyes till I


say 'Open! said his father.
Then he led him in. Open !
said he. And what did Chris
see? He saw one hundred
frisky squirrels, all tame. These--
squirrels knew this was a pet-'
lover. They were all over him
in ten minutes. Of course
Mr. Cherryblow bought a pair
for Chris,; with a little hous.el
and wheel. Fun" andI
" Frolic" Chrissy named them.,





98


DEAR BABIES:-
My name is Faith Butler.
I live in Chicago and am just
:six months old. Once every
week I am put in a basket
and weighed. When I was
sixteen weeks old I weighed


sixteen pounds. The last time
papa put me in I heard him
say, "Mamma dear, Baby is
getting too large for this bas-
ket. Before she outgrows it we
must have her picture taken."
The first pleasant day after
that mamma took me to the
photographer's, and here I am
just as the man took me.
Auntie says, "Why, what a
basket full of Faith that is "
Folks say a great many strange
things about me.
The next time you see me
the basket will be too small
and I shall be in my carriage.
Good-by. FAITH BUTLER.


A CHRISTMAS SNOW-STORM.


Ho, ho !
A Santa Claus snow! "
Cries the Baby in glee;


"Santa Claus in his sleigh
Is now on the way
With presents for me!"


FAITHS LETTER.--A CHRISTMAS SNOW-STORM.

FAITH'S LETTER.




A CHRISTMAS SNOW-STORM.


99


"Ah, ah!"
And out looks mamma ,,; ;. ,.l.
On the snow fresh and i '&-
white;
And with Baby she feels
That Santa on wheels
Were a pitiful sight -


No snow,
And driving so slow i-;
On a hard frozen road,
WVTith a rumble and roll vv
Over hubble and hole,
And a jolt of his load!


But O,
See the Christmas snow-
How it stretches away!
And the children declare ..
They can hear in the air
The bells of his sleigh,


So clear,
As the team of reindeer As the fleeter they fly
All a-galloping go, Through the Christmas-tide
Tossing antlers on high snow!


















Edited by the Editors of WIDE AWAKE.

I ,,..ember, 1888. D. LOTHutROP COMPANY, Publishers, Boston, Mass.
' ... XII. No. 12. Copyright, 1888, by D. LOTHnRO COMPANY.


50 cts. a year.
5 cts. a number.


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THE TWO FRIENDS AT THE BARN.


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THE CHRISTMAS-TREE.

When the candles were lighted, the Christmas-tree,
I-lung full of trinkets as tree could be,
Was a wonderful, wonderful thing to see.

And out of the darkest fire-place chink,
With little old face as black as ink,
Dame Cricket peered with wink and blink,











And she sighed: I wish those chicks of mine
Were awake to see how bright, how fine!"

There were flocks of children, girls and boys,
That chattered and laughed with happy noise,
So the Cricket lifted her tiny voice,

And their play was hushed for a minute, when
" Cree-crick for Christmas!" she cried, and then,
" Cree-crick for Christmas !" over again.
s"h




BABY AND THE CRICKETS.


That meant


And
Old


"three cheers," the children knew,


they answered back, Three cheers for you,
Cricket, and Merry Christmas, too!"


..;...* = ) -" (! '.'; I ,L I.' j: I

With a backward scrape of her small toes
She curtesied and dipped and rose,


the glasses dropped from


~&t I r


her funny


And they
About the


laughed, and crowded eagerly
corner, and cried, See, see!


She's better than even our Christmas-tree!"


-^^^S^^^^^^&^^^^^^T


Till


nose.


IOI





102 THE SICK DOLLS.


THE CATS AT THE PLAY; THEY SEE A COMEDY.


THE SICK DOLLS.

The little doll Nell,
I "A 11The little doll Bell,
) And delicate little doll Emma,
They left their gloves off,
-;,. ., And caught a bad cough,
S---- And their mammas were in a
"THEY LEFT THEIR GLOVES OFF!"
dilemma.


THE SICK. DOLLS.


102


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THE CURE.


THE CATS AT THE PLAY; THEY SEE A TRAGEDY.


THE CURE.

Pink caramels three,
( '- And peppermint tea,
I' They sipped in a cinnamon
V chowder,
l1 ^&r-__ But were cured at last,
When the danger was past,
"THE PEANUT POWDER CURED THEM! By a beautiful peanut powder.


IO3




ME AND TODDLEKINS.


ME AND TODDLEKINS.-XII.


SCOST, from this house, a
= p pretty striped kitten, wzitl
a blue ribbon and a bell
round his neck."
Cd That was Me.
k Toddlekins' Papa
put that sign on the
fence, and people brought white
cats and black cats and thin
cats and fat cats, but nobody
brought the Boofer Kitten.
This was the way it hap-
pened. Toddlekins went out
to a Little Girls' Lunch, and I
was lonesome, and the Cook
was cross, and so I thought I
would run away. It was fun
at first to play by myself in the
Park, but when it grew dark
I wanted to go home. Then
I found out that I was lost.
Two whole days I stayed
out in the rain without any-
thing to eat, and could not see
Toddlekins' house anywhere.


Then the sun shone and Tod-
dlekins came out to walk in
the Park, and I saw Toddle-
kins and Toddlekins saw me.
Boofer Kitten!" cried Tod-
dlekins. Miaow!" said I,
and I jumped straight into her
little loving arms, and Me and

7:


FOUND.
Toddlekins will never run away
from each other again never!


o104




PLAY.


PLAY.

Play I was a lady,
Come to make a call;
I can do like big folks,
'Cept the being tall.


How is Johnny's measles ?
Dolly has the mumps,
And she looks so funny
With her throat all lumps.

Play I was a fairy
And you told a
That you had an c
On a silver dish.

Now I'll bring it to you;
But you mus'n't look,
'Cause you wouldn't want to
Know which one I took.


O, what lovely weather!
Guess I'll have to go;
Come and see me sometime,
Pretty soon, you know.


wish /
)range


Isn't it a beauty?
'Most too big for one;
S'posing we divide it,
Wouldn't that be fun?


Play I was a kitty,
And you were a mouse,
So that I could' chase you
All around the house.
x-a





PLAY. 91

Listen, I am hungry- Just a little milk, please,
Me-ow, me-ow, me-ow; For the pussy's sake;
Don't you think you'd better But I'd full as rather
Get me something now? Have a sugar cake.


Play I was your sister,
And we two were twins;
I'll be Lulu Lacy,
You be Minnie Binns.

No, we couldn't do .that; 6
'Cause, you know, the name,
'Specially the last one,
Has to be the same.

Play I was a baby
That you loved to kiss;
Put your arms around me,
Such a way as this.


Would you like to hold me? 0, how nice and easy
Why, what makes you smile! Up here in your lap-
I am just a baby I am pretty sleepy--
For a little while. Guess I'll take a nap.



















Edited by t/e Editor-s of WIDE AWAKE.


November, 1888.
Vol. XII. No. II.


D. LOTHROP COMPANY, Publishers, Boston, Mass.
Copyright, I888, by D. LOTHROP COMPANY.


50 cts. a year.
5 cts. a number.


A PARTNERSHIP SNOWBALL.









HOW TIM AND BOB RAN AWAY.

"Oh, little Bob Cricket, are you sick ?"
The Baby asked him, when, click, click,
He limped along on his dried-grass stick.

Bob Cricket hung his shiny head;
" I'm not exactly sick," he said,
Then stammered and blushed a burning red.


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And showed the baby his bandaged knee:
"The way it happened was this you see,
We didn't mind mother, Tim and me!

"She said to us all the other day,
'Don't go out of our weeds to play!'
Yet Tim and me -we ran away.

"Ran far as the door-step where there sat
A great big green-eyed tiger cat,
Nodding and drowsing on the mat.






BABY AND THE CRICKETS. 93

" She heard us creep, creep, past her nose,
And thought 'twas a mouse-step, I suppose,
For, to our horror, up she rose;



--_ ._------- __-_--








" Her green eyes glared, her mouth was grim,
One blow of her paw, and down went Tim!
Another, and I fell over him !
._ -- --




-'I"- --; ,..""- i ', -' .-: -
--1 --




"Now the others, who didn't disobey,
Laugh at us when we limp, and say,
'It served you right for running away.'"

---.--
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A VENTURESOME FOOT.




THE STRIPED KITTEN S LESSON. 95


THE STRIPED KITTEN'S LESSON.


.-~__- -
SHE PEEPS IN.
The Striped Kitten always
had had all she could eat, and
her small furry body was as
round as a little barrel she
was so fat with new milk she
could hardly purr. When the
milk was brought in she had
some at once, warm, sweet and
frothy, but after that she would
go to Ann, the dairy-maid, and
mew as if she had not been


fed, and she would go into the
dining-room too, and mew in
the most pitiful manner.
But one day she went out to
the barn just when the calves
were at breakfast. She ran
up to their tub at once, mew-
ing, and the calves stepped
back. Some poor starved
thing," said Buttercup. Per-
haps so," said Daisy, but I
think it is the kitten at the
house." She did not say
" Please," but stretched over
for the milk when in she
went, splash / and oh how
wet she got! Cats do not like
to get wet, but
the Striped
Kitten got
very wet in- -
deed-so very -..
wet that she SHE FALLS IN.
was afraid of pails and tubs of
milk always after that.




ME AND TODDLEKINS.


ME AND TObDLEKINS. XI.

ODDLEKINS Yellow Bird in a gold cage.
has had a birth- But they hung that up so high
day. She was the Boofer Kitten couldn't
S^four years old reach it with the tip end of
and there was a his paw.
big frosted cake When Toddlekins cut the
with four pink candles in it, cake, she gave Me a big piece.
and four Live Things for The Boofer Kitten would like
presents besides.
First there was a round
Thing with a white face, __ '' .
that talked all the time. -
" Tick! tick tick! tick! it
said, loud and quick. Then ,
there was a Top that spun
round and round so fast the
Boofer Kitten couldn't catch
it. Then there was a square .
box, and when Toddlekins 'X
opened the cover out popped t vE
a Man with big eyes. The ,i
Boofer Kitten was a little bit
afraid of that Live Thing! to have a Birthday all his own,
And then there was a beautiful with Live Things and a Cake.




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