• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Alice's alphabet
 The magic pear
 What o'clock jingles
 Outline pictures, with "color"...
 Nursery tiles with timely rhymes...
 Slate pictures for little folks...
 Child-life on the farm - The children...
 Rainy-day plays, and how to play...
 Doll Rosy's days and all her...
 "Just for fun" - Laughs for little...
 Back Cover






Title: Pastime for little artists
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078899/00001
 Material Information
Title: Pastime for little artists an art encyclopaedia for the little ones at home : includes, Alice's illustrated alphabet, What o'clock jingles, The magic pear, and all the charming drawing lessons and pictures which appeared in Little folks art book
Alternate Title: Alice's illustrated alphabet
What o'clock jingles
Magic pear
Little folks art book
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged), 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1890
 Subjects
Subject: Drawing -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on end papers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078899
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224437
notis - ALG4701
oclc - 181341531

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Alice's alphabet
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The magic pear
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    What o'clock jingles
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Outline pictures, with "color" stories
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Nursery tiles with timely rhymes and silhouettes
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Slate pictures for little folks with pencils
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Child-life on the farm - The children and the children's pets
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Rainy-day plays, and how to play them
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Doll Rosy's days and all her doings
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    "Just for fun" - Laughs for little folks
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text








Books by Margaret Sidney.

"There is so strong a love of humanity impelling the pen of Margaret Sidney that in whatever she
writes she makes interesting the homeliest and most ordinary aspects of life and imparts to duty the glory of
doing, and to virtue its own reward." Chicago Inter-Ocean.


Our Town.
A story for the home. i2mo, $1.25.
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The Pettibone Name.
1lmo, 51.25.
Samariha Sc jmit, the dressmaker, and her molfler,the widow,
are as lite-like as the :rs bei:t of Mrs Sitoe' or Mrs WhAtne''s
pitur ol Nc.v England lie The ChurAiiuirn, N. Y
Tom and Dorothy.
How They Made and Kept a Christian Home.
12mo, 75 cents.
One longs to give a copy of it to every yong bride that she
mai lIrfn the art io mikmag ard keeping ;uch a homc.' -Home
Gazrdun.
How They went to Europe.
i2mo, illustrated, 75 cents.
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in prci.ible and tumuliatng mental culture Presj'terizn
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Also. Kensington, Jr. t2mo, illustrated, $1.oo.
EicvUert porraia. c-f bright, honest and sturdy lads." BE-.
tazn -A der:fler
Who Told it to Me.
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Neighbor boYs and girls growing up ticgether in the old New
ELgland
The Golden VWest.
As seen by the Ridgway Club. 8vo. illustrated,
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And other Stories. I :mo, illustrated,boards, jl.oo.
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PPolly and the Children.
Square 8vo, boards, 12 full-page pictures by Mar-
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The story of a fiuny pa rrt and two charming children.
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It upens up a nef held ijr women.
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"' Both a pracicrible gu.de-book to this historic locality and an
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At the Bookstores, or sent postpaid, by the PAe'!.ishers,
D. LOTHROP COMPANY, BOSTON.
Ai


The Baldwn Library I
m Ucnrsy


'~~~' S t~~~~~Evtaat~~~~iaW111 ;. c.~ s rsa et L as..~ld ~ 5 .-thi .


NOW" L I_-. _--, _: -, -_ I .- -1 -- ",%]




















































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MPJ _


Babyland is a little magazine that mothers and
babies like in different ways. The baby likes it. of
course, because it makes him happy. That is reason
enough. The mother likes it because with such
pictures and tales and talk-stuff she has no end of
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Send live cents to D. Lothrop Company, Boston foL
a cJpy of it


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PASTIME FOR LITTLE



ARTISTS



AN ART ENCYCLOPAEDIA

FOR THE LITTLE ONES AT HOME



INCLUDES
ALICE'S ILLUSTRATED ALPHABET,
WHAT O'CLOCK JINGLES, THE MAGIC PEAR,

AND ALL THE CHARMING DRAWING LESSONS AND PICTURES WHICH APPEARED IN
LITTLE FOLKS' ART BOOK










BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY
WASHINGTON STREET OPPOSITE BROMFIELD






















































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THE MAGIC PEAR





THE MAGIC PEAR. I. THE ELEPHANT.


THE MAGIC PEAR. I.--THE ELEPHANT.


My little dears, this pear
is a Magic Pear. There is
an elephant in it. Get a
slate and draw it six times,
and the elephant will come
out. If he does not, let
mamma or papa try. Draw
it once-there is the pear!


Twice a pear with a big
flap-ear! Three times ah !
the elephant's trunk! Four
times it is an elephant,
tusk, tail, and two feet.
Five times eye, four feet,
and howdah-cloth! Six times
--elephant ready for a ride!


_ ___




THE MAGIC PEAR. II.--THE- MOUSE.


THE MAGIC PEAR. II.-A MOUSE.


This is the Magic Pear
that has a mouse in it.
Where is a slate ? We will
have him out in a wink!
First the pear! Twice-
here it is again, with curly-
cues for ears, a quirk for
nose and mouth! Three


times two circles with tails
to finish the ears, two odd
round eyes mousie harks
for the cat! Four times -
whiskers grow! Five times
- mouse has paws! Six
times -here is the big mouse,
long tail and all!





THE MAGIC PEAR. III. --THE DOG.


THE MAGIC PEAR. -III.-THE DOG.


There is a nice hunting-dog
curled up fast asleep in this
Magic Pear. Now come out,
sir! We will call you just six
times and no more. Draw the
Pear, rub out the blossom-end
and stem. Once! draw the start-
ing-line for forehead. Twice !


then draw the long hanging ears.
Tkree times! finish the ears,
draw eye-circles and mouth-
line. Four times! in come eye-
balls and nostrils. Five times !
(he is waking up!) lip-lines,
nose-shading and eyebrows.
Six times! hello, doggie!





THE MAGIC PEAR. IV.--THE CHICKEN.


THE MAGIC PEAR. IV.-THE CHICKEN.


Ah, funny Magic Pear, any
child can guess what you hold
this time! You look, outside,
like a fat bird fast asleep. Is
there not a downy little chicken
inside? Let us see. Come out,
chicken Yes, here is the head,
here a sign of a wing, here a lit-


tie leg! Here is a hungry bill!
Here is the comb, the eyes, here
are wing-feathers, two legs!
Eye opens! now wing-feathers!
all the toes Yes, here he is,
tail-feathers, down, and all-a
darling, cunning little chicken,
so wide awake, and so hungry!





THE MAGIC PEAR. V. --THE OWL.


THE MAGIC PEAF

Inside -this Magic Pear
sits a big wise bird, straight
and stiff. You can almost see
his form as soon as you rub
the stem off the pear. Let
us make some eye-shapes,
round and wide open, and
some claws. Now, some eye-


. V.-THE OWL.

ball shapes and some wings.
Next, a beak and a tail.
Now for the eyeballs; a few \
feathers too. Then finish his
eyes, his crest, his feathers,
and make him a perch.
There! tu-whit, tu-who! tu-
whit! tu-who !





THE MAGIC PEAR. VI. THE CAT.


THE MAGIC PEAI

A sleepy little animal sits
in this Magic Pear. Rub the
stem off, draw the face-line and
you see a ball of fur, as a cat
looks when asleep. Now draw
a criss-cross for nose and mouth,
then the breast-bone curve.
Now carry the face-line up into-


R. VI.-THE CAT.

ears, the nose-line up into eye-
brows, and make paw-lines.
Now for whiskers, eyes and
claws! A curly-cue and -
whisk! comes kitty's tail. Yes,
it is kitty, and as cross as
can be because she has been
roused from her nap.





THE MAGIC PEAR. VII. --THE DUCK.


THE MAGIC


PEAR.


VII.-THE DUCK.


This time the Magic Pear
holds a duck. We will let
him out and see him swim
away. Draw the Pear laid
on its side. Rub out the
stem. Draw two circles (round
a button, if you like) and a
straight line, and you will


see a head, bill, and a wing-
place. It looks like a duck
now. Now finish the bill,
draw the eye, the leg, the
tail. A few more marks on
wing, bill, eye, claws and
feathers and splash goes
your duck into the water!





THE MAGIC PEAR. VIII. -THE FISH.


THE MAGIC PEAR. VIII.-THE FISH.


A water-creature is shut
up in this Magic Pear.
Draw the Pear lying on its
side on your slate. Then
rub out the stem. Draw
a large curve with a tail
for the head, and an oval
for an eye. The second set


of curves, ovals and lines,
will make the creature look
very much alive. The third
set will make it look fierce.
The fourth set will make it
look fiercer. The fifth draw-
ing will show you a big,
hungry, ugly fish.





THE MAGIC PEAR. IX. THE FROG.


THE MAGIC PEAR.

Is it not strange that so many
animals have a body which is
the shape of a pear? Draw
the Magic Pear on your slates
once more, and see what will
grow out of it this time? Rub
off the stem and the blossom-
end. Then draw in the lines


IX.-THE FROG.

of the five pear-shapes, one by
one. The very first mouth-
lines cry out Frog! Frog!"
If you draw with brown, green
and yellow crayons, you will
think that the last one is a real,
live frog. Can you not hear him
say, Ker-chunk! ker-chunk!"




THE MAGIC PEAR. X.--THE ROBIN.


THE MAGIC PEAR. X.- THE ROBIN.


There is a plump song-
bird in this Magic Pear.
When you first try to call
him out on your slate with
your pencil, you will see
only signs of a hungry bird.
The next time he will look
as if he were crying for


a worm. The next time he
has got out of the nest, still
hungry; the next time he is
on his feet, still very hungry;
but the last time he stands
on a twig, happy and strong,
and you can see that he sings
with all his might.





THE MAGIC PEAR. XI. --THE RABBIT.


THE MAGIC PEAR.

What is shut up in the
Magic Pear this time? The
first drawing looks like a
sleepy dog. The second looks
like a sleepy cat. But the
third tries to tell the secret
- it is, perkaqs, a rabbit.
The fourth makes us sure


XI.- THE RABBIT.

that he is a rabbit. Ah, there
he comes Master Bunny
himself but so doleful, so
dismal! Is he going to cry
because we have brought him
out of the Pear and waked
him up ? I think he is. Such
a cry-baby rabbit!


I


_ ~C~ ___





THE MAGIC PEAR. XII. THE MAN.


THE MAGIC PEAR. XII.-THE MAN.


Who is in the Magic
Pear this last time? Even
when you have drawn it
twice, it will still be hard to
guess what is to come out.
But the third time you will
see that it is-a man! At
first he smiles. Next time


he looks sad. Then he
grows grave. The last time
you draw him he is an old,
old man.
Now, after this, you must
all see for yourselves what
creatures you can call out
of the Magic Pear.


__


























































LESSON-TIME.



















WHAT O'CLOCK JINGLES











One wee little woman,
Only one year old;
Blue eyes bright and merry,
Curly locks of gold.

Everybody's princess,
Everybody's pet;
For a throne so cosey
On a pillow set.


Sister brings her playthings,
Brother brings her books;
Mother saves to please her
All her sweetest looks.

Love and hugs and kisses
More than can be told
Has this little woman
Only one year old.


Two tiny tubs
With suds a-brim;
Two washerwomen
Neat and trim.

One dips and rinses,
Rubs and wrings,
And as she washes
Gayly sings.


But what has lazy
Dinah done?
Her morning work
Is not begun!

Two 'tubs a-brim
With foam and froth;
One little maid
To use them both.


=.N W WC.

OnI 'I











Three thirsty thistles
Beside the stone wall,
So tired of waiting
For showers to fall.

Dear little Dicky
Was passing the spot,
And brought, in a hurry,
His watering-pot.


Though it was heavy,
Little cared he;
"I am a shower!"
He shouted in glee.

Three thirsty thistles,
They feel the cool rain;
"Thanks to you, Dicky,
We are happy again!"


Four funny fans
Had Maud and May
To cool the air
One summer day:

A palm-leaf broad,
A feather fan,
And one that came
From far Japan;


And for the fourth
May took her hat
And made a fine
Big fan of that.


And
A
They
A


then so strong
breeze had they,
played it was
winter day!


I


__
_ __











Five fairy fingers,
All dimpled and white,
Busily plying
The needle so bright.

One wears a thimble,
A cap for his head,
While gayly the others
Pull out the long thread.


Five fairy fingers
Work very fast,
And hold up the treasure
Finished at last.

No matter how crooked
The small stitches are,
She knows the pincushion
Will please dear papa!


Six silver spoons
All bright and nice;
Six saucers full
Of orange ice.

Six little napkins
White as snow,
Six merry maids
All in a row.


The silver spoons
Make many trips
From heaping plates
To rosy lips.

And when they're empty
As before,
Six maids are ready
For some more!


V7 KG-- j S^ ax'!
4 1
4v










Seven shining shells
We gathered on the shore,
And if we could have staid
We might have got some more.

We'd played and played all day
As happy as could be,
And when the sun went down
They called us in to tea.


Eight eager elves
Flew high and far
To catch the sparkle
Of a star.

On butterflies
They rode, or bees,
Or floated softly
On the breeze.


We made a mound of sand
And put the shells inside;
" Don't touch our pretty things,
You little waves!" we cried.

O naughty, naughty waves!
We hurried back next day,
And mound and shells and all
Had vanished quite away!


But long before
They reached the sky,
A thunder-cloud
Came sailing by.

And blown with wind,
And wet with rain,
Eight eager elves
Flew down again.


''* -
~ (KAl











Nine nodding nosegays,
Fresh and fine;
"Which shall I choose,"
Said Tom, "for mine?"'

He looked at roses,
Red and white;
At lilies fair;
At pansies bright.


There were ten tin trumpets,
There were ten small boys,
And the ten still houses
Then were full of noise.

How they roused the mothers -
Grandmas, too, perhaps -
From their books and sewing,
From their peaceful naps!


At last he chose
A fine bouquet,
And proudly bore
His flowers away.

But I have heard -
I guess it's true -
He gave them all
To little Prue!


How they waked the babies!
How they scared the cats!
How they shrieked and whistled
Tunes in sharps and flats!

But at last the racket
Stopped at set of sun;
For the trumpets ten were
Broken, every one!










Eleven elastic eels,
This fisher-boy has caught;
A splendid basketful
To carry home, he thought.

His sister, standing by,
Thinks Johnny very wise,
And watches all he does
With round, admiring eyes.


Twelve twirling tops
As light as air;
Two children gay
With streaming hair.

So many times
The tops they've spun,
To spin themselves
They have begun.


But when he starts for home
He finds, too late, alas!
That not a single eel
Lies in the long wet grass.

The naughty, squirming things
-The truth is very plain -
Have wriggled to the edge,
And tumbled in again!


Round go the tops,
A dizzy whirl!
Round go the flying
Boy and girl!

Till who can see
Boy, girl or top ?
I wonder if
They'll ever stop!


.,. i-: -, -: :'s'-i ^ '-" ^'I"- =
- = i ,," -. .. : f I .. / ...s t '-- ..-




































.1~ ?-'~-;
'-," Lt


PLAY -THI.






















OUTLINE PICTURES
WITH "COLOR" STORIES
































MISS SUNSHINE'S WINDOW.

Outside the sun shines, the sky is blue; but the garden and lawn are
white with snow.
The only green things growing are the flowers in Miss Sunshine's
window. Miss Sunshine calls the south window her bit of summer. Get
your brushes and paints and color the picture and see if she is not right.
The walls are light olive, the curtain creamy gray; the flower pots
greenish red; the box is stone color, with touches of dull red and blue;
and the flowers-you surely know how to color them-one with a
crimson bloom, one with a blossom yellow as a solid bit of sunshine.
Miss Sunshine herself, with pink cheeks and gold-brown hair, wear
a dull blue gown, with golden hair ribbons, sash, and collar.






























A LITTLE SCHOOL-BOY.

Trudge! trudge! through the white snow-drifts goes Frank to school.
The snow is piled against the gray stone walls and green fir-trees. But
the cold weather only makes Frank's black eyes snap, and his cheeks
grow redder. His gray overcoat is warm with brown fur; and his fur
cap, and his scarlet leggings, mittens and muffler, are thick and warm.
So off he goes with his red-framed slate under his arm.
But oh, how our boy enjoys the dancing red fire in the gray soapstone
stove when he comes home at night. Off goes the gray overcoat, scarlet
muffler, mittens and leggings! Out steps Frank in black velvet, with blue
stockings and azure necktie! Down sits mamma's home-boy in the old
oak chair, to toast his toes, and think that fire is better than snow after all!































A FINE LADY.

One day last week, a fine lady was seen walking up and down the
brown floor of our attic. She came out of a russet leather trunk--at
least her clothes did. She wore a large bonnet lined with old gold, tied
with a big red bow, and trimmed with a red plume. On her hands were
long buff gloves, and she carried a red fan with silver spangles and feather
fringe. On her feet were buff stockings and bronze slippers with red
rosettes. Her gown was a blue brocade, dotted with silver; and her
cloak of black velvet lined with scarlet was carried by a little page clothed
in green, with a tall buff beaver hat. It was a fine sight, I tell you; and
the great lady's name was Sister Rosybud, and the name of the tiny
page was Brother Tommy.
































SUE'S KITE.

Black-eyed, black-haired, red-cheeked Sue said girls were just as smart
as boys. Her brother made kites; and Sue said she could make a kite, and
fly it too. She put on her blue hat with the gold feather and went out to the
barn where Ned kept his old kite-frames and papers, and there she cut
and pasted, cut and pasted, just as fast as she could.
By noon Sue had a red kite with a long gilt tail.
She took the kite and went out of doors. There was a high wind. It
flapped her blue dress and gold sash until she feared she might turn
into a kite herself and sail off. She tossed up the kite, clapping her hands
to see it go, and forgetting to hold on to the string. In five minutes that
kite was out of sight, and Sue never saw it again.

































DICK GOES A-FISHING.

It was a dark stormy day. The wind blew and the rain beat against the
window panes.
But as Dick had made up his merry mind the night before to go
fishing he put on his old gray suit and felt hat and started off. He
walked along under the gay green landscape picture in the gold frame, with
the peacock feather over it, until he came to Lounge Brook. The soft brown
banks of Lounge Brook were speckled with pink flowers and green leaves
which grew in rows. In this quiet spot Dick sat down to fish. He had a
very good fish-hook, and he soon filled his little yellow basket. He caught
three spools of thread, a doll, and a little white cotton rabbit. Was not that
good luck for one day?































HOPE AT THE SEA-SHORE.

How Hope clapped her hands when she first saw the blue, blue seat
How she laughed at the little brown donkey with his big ears! Mamma
laid the gold and purple afghan on his back, and Hope rode up and down
the soft gray sand. The sun was hot, but Hope's blue-trimmed hat
shaded her, and she raised her Japanese parasol. Soon, too, the sea-
breeze blew, and fluttered her golden locks, and her rose-colored skirts;
and Hope was so jolly that the donkey stuck out his red tongue as if
he were laughing too.
Next morning there was better 'fun still. Hope and her baby sister, in
their blue dresses, went down to the beach and sat under a big brown
umbrella, and built sand houses; and they found a star-fish, too!
































THE LITTLE BAKER.

Little flaxen-haired Peter's mother dressed him up clean in green jacket
and trousers, and red stockings, and sent him out to play while she went to
make a call.
Little flaxen-haired Peter played till he was hungry. Then he went
in. No one was there, and he could not open the cupboard door. A
pan of flour stood on the table, and a bowl of berries. I can make a pud-
ding," said little Peter. So he poured water into the bowl of berries, and
stirred in flour until it was thick. Therahe set it in the old red brick oven,
and ran out to play. He ran in again just as his mother came home. She
found him with a little raw berry pudding in his hand. The little baker had
forgotten to build a fire 1

































THE BABY'S DOLL.

The black-haired baby was fast asleep. He lay on the great crimson sofa.
His black eye-lashes rested on his moist pink cheeks. He did not once stir
among the white pillows. He was covered close with the pink and gold
blanket. Joe, his doll, was sure that he was asleep.
Joe's little green suit was very tight-fUtliir,. but he threw up his arm111:,
opened his mouth, and spoke aloud:
"Of all bad things," said he, the worst is to be a baby's doll! You
have no rest He takes you to pound with i He takes you to strike his
mother and sister with You never go to bed! You are left lying about!
You are held by a string while he sleeps! Pity, oh, pity the sorrows of
a baby's doll!" Just then the baby stirred, and Joe spoke no more.


~-s~--~-- I --.L-----~~pD---
































CARL'S BUTTEEFL1ES.

Carl had no brothers and sisters; yet he was a very smiling boy so long as
the sun shone. His blue eyes sparkled, his red cheeks dimpled.
But ah, you should have seen Carl when the stormy days came--
then Master Carl looked sober. He looked out often to see if there was
any blue sky: then he played with the cat and the dog. He made
tops and kites, and whittled out wooden Jacks. One snowy day he
had a happy thought. He made some gilt paper butterflies, and flew then'
about from his mother's scarlet fan. That was fun Carl actually laughed
in the face of the flying snow-flakes. Hurrah he cried, as he fanned the
glittering creatures about. "Hurrah! a fine summer day -see what a
swarm of butterflies "































JOHNNY'S LITTLE SISTER.


I'l take care of Sissy," said brother Johnny.
Baby was so sweet and rosy! Mamma had just dressed her, all white
and fair. Johnny held out his arms to her.
Johnny was very proud to be trusted with his little sister. He sat down
with her in the great green easy-chair, and put both arms round her.
Now Sissy shall hear a nice story," he said, all about Christmas.
"Sissy shall have beautiful things Christmas.
"A big ivory rattle with long red ribbons, and a picture book, and a
dolly with black hair, and a soft ball all blue and yellow and brother
will buy them for her all himself."
Baby said, ( Goo-goo," and smiled a honey-smile.





































DICKY DILVER.


When the first snow-flake fell, black-eyed Dicky Dilver began to get ready
for a good time. First, he brought "Flash," his blue sled, down from the
attic.
He was so glad to see "Flash" again that he caught hold of the yel-
low leather lines, ran out-doors bare-headed, and galloped off down the walk
as fast.as he could go. Then he came in and hunted up his speckled red mit-
tens, leggings and scarf. "Hurrah he cried, "come on with your snows
and blows, old Mr. Winter, I'm ready!" But the sun shone next day, and
next day, and next day, for two whole weeks. Then, one night, a big snow-
storm came and such a snow-ball as Dicky Dilver rolled up to the front
door next day !


I- '-

ii, ~


__































JACK'S RIDE.

Jack's hair was the color of gold. His cheeks were the color of wild
roses. He had a little brown velvet coat and brown velvet trousers,
and he wore cardinal red stockings and bronze slippers. But he was
not happy. Christmas was a stormy day, and he could not go to
grandpa's. He cried and cried. But finally he said, "I will go to
grandpa's." So he made a carriage and got into it, and rode to grand-
pa's all the forenoon. The oak camp-chair with scarlet cushion and
gold fringe, and the brown-and-blue camp-stool, with the dark green um-
brella, made a capital carriage.
Now put these colors on the picture, with a gray back-ground, and see
if you do not wish you were Jack with his red whip in his hand.






















NURSERY

WITH TIMELY RHYMES


TILES

AND SILHOUETTES

























FRESH GRASS.


Hear him rumble and grumbe,
Bibbety, babbety, bumble -
The great black king of all the bees,
Who wades in honey to his knees.


Hark, how, over and over,
He growls at the red-top clover,
With a bag of sweetmeats on his thigh,
And a wicked twinkle in his eye.

Whene'er I hear his humming,
I sigh, The king is coming -
The great black king with bands of gold,
Who nothing does but scold and scold."


Bibbety, babbety, bumble!
Hear him grumble and mumble:
" If I find a boy of any size,
I'll bite his finger till he cries "























APRIL SHOWERS AND APRIL SUNSHINE.


The little gray duck's daughter
Lives in a pool of water,
And wears the pretty three-toed shoes
Her careful mother bought her.



--..--..




And in the showery weather
The goslings dapce together,
And cry, If it should pour a week "
We'd never turn a feather."


Yet I know a lazy fellow -
But who I'll never tell a
Single soul who when it rains
Calls out for an umbrella.


(,(I Ii 1i t i 1('i'


A bandbox would be handy,
In which to put this dandy;
I'm sure he must be made of salt,
Or else of sugar candy.


























"THE MARCH WINDS DO BLOW."


An old-fashioned roundelay
The wind begins to play;
He opens up the jubilee
With do, re, mi!

Cries the leader of the choir,
" Pitch the measure higher !
You're all too low and all too slow,
Fa, si, la, si, do!"


Whining treble, hollow bass,
Join in the noisy race;
All disagree upon the key
For do, re, mi !

Yet all the more they roar and roar,
Louder than before!
Low they go, and high they blow,
Fa, si, la, si, do !

























POP CORN.


In this little cage of wire,
Hung above the glowing fire,
See the kernels skip and hop !
Corn begins to pop !

Every funny little fellow
Wore at first a coat of yellow;
Now lie blossoms out in white -
Such a pretty sight !

What if in this fine commotion
Each should take a sudden notion,
As he bobs and leaps about,
To come jumping out?


r i/^l *^^^> "


Why, there'd nothing be to hinder
Them from being burnt to cinder.
And the coals, to say the least,
Would have all the feast.





























A CHRISTMAS DINNER.


Little old woman up in the sky,
See how she makes the feathers fly !
She sits in the twilight overhead
And picks her geese for a feather-bed.


A
0 b
if
I
4k rc"


/4.


The gray geese flap their heavy wings;
The little old woman sings and sings:
" How strange that the people down below
Should call my bits of feather, snow !


S


" Here is a handful soft and white -
That is to cover the crocus tight.
Here is another, whiter still,
And that is to hide the daffodil.

"Here is one for the great fir tree,
And another here for the chickadee "
Little old woman overhead,
What will become of your feather-bed ?














''I I ~ IP








WIS H YOU "~MERRY CHRIST1MAS! "


Old Santa Claus, when he comes to-night
Down the open fire-place,
And sees what I see in the fire-light,
Will laugh all over his face.

And will say with finger upon his nose,
And a wag of his wise old head :
"I wonder whose are the little blue toes,
And whose the cardinal red "

.P-." ,.


fg ---



And when he lowers his monstrous pack,
I'll take a peep at the show -
'Tis the greatest wonder his dear old back
Wasn't broken long ago!-

And I'll whisper to him before he goes:
The little ones are in bed;
It is Gold Locks' stockings that have blue toes,
And Ted's are cardinal red."

.,' f-z ....























TH AN K GIVING.


Turkey, turkey, gobble-ty gee,
I'll roast you brown as brown can be;
I'll mince your liver, bit by bit,
And a nice sweet gravy make of it!







And roast and serve with apple-sauce!.
S .. "" *\ "




Duck in the water, quack-e-ty quack,
When every feather is off your back,
I'll tie your little fat wings across
And roast and serve with apple-sauce !


-- --- -

Pigeon, pigeon, coo, coo, co-o,
Such a dainty dish I'll make of you -
The flakiest crusts that ever were seen
In a pie, and you stewed in between !

Turkey, and duck, and pigeon, and then
One thing more the little black hen !
Cackle-ty cackle, with comb so red,
I'll broil her over the coals for Ted.


f,























SOUTHWARD HO!


Something in grandpa's garden !
Call Tony from the house!
I'm sure I saw a robber move
High up in the apple boughs !

Come, Tony a tramp! You know, sir,
What we expect of you !-
To growl and bark your very best -
And I hope you'll bite him too !

Will you and can you believe it ?
There, perched upon a limb,
Is Ted with an apple in each hand,
And Gold Locks close to him !


'^^'^^(<^^!


These, then, are the tramps that Tony
Was called upon to bite -
Hark, quails in the covert of the hedge,
Call out, "All right All right "



























FALLING LEAVES AND DROPPING NUTS.


, / "" .


Out in the grass are the crickets
'Tuning up ready to begin;
Squeak, squeak, squeak goes the fiddle,
And s-c-r-a-p-e, the second violin.

An old darkey in the corner,
Tall and shiny and lean,
Stands six feet in his stockings,
And plays on the tambourine.


One little fellow has a bugle,
And one beats the big bass drum,
Another picks away at the banjo -
Hi 1 how he makes it hum!

So all night long in the moonlight,
And even to the break of day,
'Tis twang-twang, pipe and twitter,
From the cricket orchestra.








- -- ---


ON A Mi SUMMER DAY.


Have a fan, Ted, have a fan !
A very warm day for a gentleman !
If you like it, here is a split bamboo,
Or perhaps a plain palmleaf will do.

And here is an odder fancy yet -
Some kitten tracks for an alphabet
And plenty of almond-eyed Ah-Sins,
With hair all skewered up in pins.


Have a fan, Ted, have a fan!
Take this little one from Japan,
Silk, with feathers a-top 'twill blow
A wind as cool as mountain snow.

Here is a blue, and there a gold;
They flutter and whisper as they unfold:
" We'll make you fresh as ever we can "-
So take a fan, Ted, take a fan !


,~~i


':jj
~


























UNDER THE OLD APPLE TREE.


Now, then, the orchard is our forest,
Silent and thick and green;
Here I swing my birch-bark cradle
Leafy trunks between.




>, -' 7





Tie it fast with a thong of deer-skin -
This is my babies' bed.
(Were ever the locks of papoose golden ?
Was ever one named Ted ?)


Put them in it, the dusky children,
Safe as birds in a nest
What, little Indians, are you laughing ?
Hush !- lie still and rest!


I .wing, 0, swing, my white papooses,
Si Birch-bark cradle and all!-
V/, *, old Locks, what is the matter with you ?
', Ted, look out, you'll fall!


























THE SHEPHERD BOY.


Said white sheep to black sheep,
Nibbling at the grass,
S ) Little Nan, mny woolly one,
) ?'.'"-' Has run a\vav--alas!"


-t Said black sheep to white sheep,
-S, -.' Pray, what shall we do,
? .s '4-'."' I'or naughty Blat, the lazy one,
h' -- as run away ton

S' -' <
VI
A- \:. "
Y~

15h


(Gct a lantern from the barn.
]-a-a, b-a-a !
Tell the boys to blow the horn,.
M-a-a, m-a-a !


Home comes hobbling lazy Blat,,
Tired enough to drop !
While in skips the nimble Nan,
Hippity, hippity, hop !





















SLATE PICTURES

FOR LITTLE FOLKS WITH PENCILS
















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SLATE PIC'-URE.- CHRIST-MAS EVE IN THE WOODS.























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2ji4 i2A











~f ~-~RI ,S


SLATE PICT-URE.- WHAT CAN THEY DO ABOUT IT ?































SLATE PICT-URE THE NIGHL BE-FORE THANKS-GIV-ING.


A


SLATE PICT-URE.-TItrLERS OF THE SOIL.


- 7,"EM;_-_, 5_
































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SLATE PICT-liRE.- A H-OME KINI)ER-GAR-TEN.


::7:777


SLATE PICT-URE -THE LIT-TLE PLAY-MATES.


~i-~,,,
























































SLATE PICT-URE.--THE MORN-ING WALK.


-- -~ .
-*
____________ ~~ ~ ~ ,-- -,r---;-~~-


SLATE PICT-URE.--THE HOUSE IN THE AT-TIC.































SLATE PICT-UTRE.-TAK-ING KIT-TY'S PICT-URE.


ii9~~p~


SLATE PICT-URE.- IN THE KITCH-EN.







































SLATE PICT-URE.-TWO FRIENDS.


"MA-RY HAI) A LTT-TLE LAMB." -SLATE PICT-URE.






















CHILD-LIFE ON THE' FARM

THE CHILDREN AND THE CHILDREN'S PETS












































"SHE'S A-SLEEP!"--OUT-LINE PICT-URE TO COL.OR.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.--THE ES-CAPE.










































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.- HELP-ING BROTH-ER


CHILD-LiFE ON THE FARAL-" DON'T EAT UP MY CHRIST-MAS WREATH !"






































CHILD-LIFE ON THE. FARM.-- "THIS IS FOR YOU COLT-IE "


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-THE LIT-TLE CLIMB-ER.









































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM. -A NO-VEM-BER RAIN.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-A RIDE A-ROUND THE BARN-YARD.








































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.--PIG-GY'S FRIENDS.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.--THE SCHOOL IN TIE MEAD.OW.






































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-THE IN-TRO-DUC-TION.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.- THE FIRST LES-SON.






















RAINY-DAY PLAYS

AND HOW TO PLAY THEM





































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

It rained. Five pairs of eyes looked sadly out of the windows. Five little
noses were pressed against the glass. Five voices said, 0 dear, how it does rain!"
Then a sixth little voice shouted, Have a carriage, sir ? Carriage ? Have a hack ?"
The five sad faces turned away from the windows and broke into five smiles. You
see instead of crying because it rained so hard he couldn't play outdoors, Bobby had
found something to do in the house. He had hitched his rocking-horse to a big chair
and to his own little chair, and was ready to take anybody to ride who wanted to go.
"I'll take a carriage," said Bessie, glad of the fun. "I shall get quite wet through
soon in this rain." So she seated herself in the carriage, and Bobby, the coachman,

got up in front, and off they went as fast as the rocking-horse could take them.
"Bobby is my sunbeam," said mamma. "Now, children, we shall have many rainy
days this summer, and just try to think of some new play every rainy day."




































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

The fifth rainy day it did rain. The wind blew, the rain beat against the windows
with a great racket. Mamma peeped into the play-room. A span of horses were
pulling a plough up and down the room. The span looked just alike. Their hair
was the same color, their eyes were the same color, their noses tipped just alike,
they were exactly of the same size, they were dressed just alike, and, as I said,
they looked exactly alike. They were Aunt Sue's twins, Edward and Richard. "Who
thought of this game ? asked mamma. "We did !" cried both the horses. As they
opened their mouths to say it, down dropped the bits, of course. 0, g'long there!
mind what yer about! shouted the driver. And the horses took their bits in their
mouths and began to plough again. "And when it's all ploughed." said Bessie, "we
are going to plant the corn six kernels in a hill. 'One for the blackbird, one for
the crow, one for the cutworm, and two to let grow!' I'm going to drop it." "And
I'm going to cover it," added Sam. And what a crop we'll have!" said mamma.





































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

These children live in Boston in the winter. So they know all about the police.
They thought, one rainy day, it would be a fine thing to play police. Only each one
wanted to be a policeman. "You can take turns," said Aunt Sue. "That's so,"
said Tom. So they took turns. You can see how they made their jail. They locked
it with a big padlock, which Perkins gave them. Perkins is the man who does the farm
work. Perkins made the clubs for the policemen. Bessie made the police badges
because she knows how to print nicely. They took turns at being jailer, too. Perkins
lent them his keys; the big keys that he uses to lock the stable, and carriage-house,
and tool-house, and granary with, every night. The police brought in a great many
prisoners to put into the jail. "What's this fellow been doing ?" asked the jailer, as
the police brought in Master Ned. "Threw a ball and broke a sidelight," said
the police. In with him, into jail! said the jailer. I do not believe a real police-
man would shut up a boy for throwing a ball and breaking a sidelight. Do you?




































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

"R-rags r-rags r-rags wanted !. old rags old rags !" that was the noise Mamie
heard. It came from the halls. A wagon was heard rattling by. There was a
tramp-tramp, like the feet of horses. "0, it's the rag-man," she cried, and she hur-
ried to open the play-room door. Yes, it was Sam, the rag-man. "Any old r-rags,
marm ?" asked the rag-man. "0, piles and piles," said Mistress Mamie. "I've just
finished my spring cleaning, and here's a big bundle of white rags. How much do
you pay for rags, Mr. Rag-man?" she asked. "One quarter of a cent a pound for
colored rags, and one half a cent a pound for white ones," replied the rag-man. The
rag-man weighed the rags. "Are there any stones in 'em?" he asked. "Folks
sometimes put stones in to make 'em weigh high." "What awful mean creatures!"
said Mamie. The rag-man looked like a big rag himself ; his big coat was ragged
and his hat was ragged. How Toddlekin did stare at him. She did not know it
was Sam. She thought he was a real rag-man.




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