• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Lucy Grey
 The thievish cats
 The cats' consultation
 The rainbow
 Johnny Wilson
 Robbie's red apple
 The town pigeon
 Her father's darling
 The ermine
 Two rogues
 The little toy-girl
 Lucy Green
 Strike the knot
 Our father, who art in heaven
 The kind driver
 Baby brother
 Story of a bird's nest
 The happy family
 Hattie's birthday
 The school-master
 Who is she?
 Grandma's darlings
 The daughter of a king
 The sea-side
 Reading the Bible
 Counting a day's sport
 Harry's friend
 The sparrow's morning visit
 Philip the idiot
 Spoiling a quarrel
 Lament of a little mother...
 "Scatter seeds of kindness"
 The sheep with a cart
 Dan and dimple, and how they...
 Our father made them all
 John Grimly
 The two gifts
 My little treasure
 The moon
 The fly and the bee
 A blessing for baby
 The coming shower
 Out in the cold
 The sorrows of poor Bose
 Take care
 Freddy and his mamma
 Grandpa and Lotta
 The good ship "Never-fail"
 The dog and the ice
 Baby, the king
 Cousin Lou
 The stray sheep
 The treat
 The faithful dog
 The raccoon
 My kittens
 The burnet moth
 Good-humor
 Keeping shop
 A Japanese orchestra
 The two sprites
 Little Eunice
 Dogs
 Watering his garden with rain
 A pleasant family
 What is the matter with Robby?
 Christmas bells
 Mother's letter
 Sheep
 Winter
 The bird that walks on the...
 Children among the flowers
 Pussy cat
 The new scholar
 The prisoner
 The frigate-bird
 Minnie to Dolly
 The doll's washing
 The gardener's grandchild
 The escape
 The lost penknife
 Lily and her dolly
 The kitten and falling leaves
 Night-watchmen
 Ida's chickens
 Try, try, try again
 The greedy mice
 Good advice for little ones
 Shaving Jack
 The pursuit of the butterfly
 A happy New Year
 Roman children
 Birds and birds' nests
 The oak
 Kittie
 Do something for each other
 The sisters
 Home for the holidays
 Disobedient Harry
 Our Father in heaven
 A merry heart is better than...
 Fan and her puppies
 The little exile's song
 The lion
 Snow
 Dolly's bedtime
 The little harebell
 My dog tray
 The bear
 The little soldier
 Good counsel
 The boy's wish
 Eva's fairy story
 Frost pictures
 The first snow storm
 The cat that saved the baby
 The old country house
 Willie's happy day
 Susie's Robin
 My little brother
 The lucky-bag
 The rain
 The canary bird
 The skipping rope
 Put your paw up!
 Our Lily
 The chetah
 Back Cover














Title: Budget of stories for boys and girls
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078897/00001
 Material Information
Title: Budget of stories for boys and girls
Series Title: Red line series
Physical Description: 247, 1 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Brothers
Place of Publication: N.Y
Publication Date: [1890?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Text is within a red and black double ruled line.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078897
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223070
notis - ALG3318
oclc - 181341537

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Lucy Grey
        Page 7
    The thievish cats
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The cats' consultation
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The rainbow
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Johnny Wilson
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Robbie's red apple
        Page 17
    The town pigeon
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Her father's darling
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The ermine
        Page 22
    Two rogues
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The little toy-girl
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Lucy Green
        Page 27
    Strike the knot
        Page 28
    Our father, who art in heaven
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The kind driver
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Baby brother
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Story of a bird's nest
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The happy family
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Hattie's birthday
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The school-master
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Who is she?
        Page 43
    Grandma's darlings
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The daughter of a king
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The sea-side
        Page 49
    Reading the Bible
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Counting a day's sport
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Harry's friend
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The sparrow's morning visit
        Page 56
    Philip the idiot
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Spoiling a quarrel
        Page 58
    Lament of a little mother robin
        Page 58
        Page 59
    "Scatter seeds of kindness"
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The sheep with a cart
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Dan and dimple, and how they quarrelled
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Our father made them all
        Page 66
    John Grimly
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The two gifts
        Page 68
        Page 69
    My little treasure
        Page 70
    The moon
        Page 71
    The fly and the bee
        Page 72
    A blessing for baby
        Page 73
    The coming shower
        Page 74
    Out in the cold
        Page 75
    The sorrows of poor Bose
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Take care
        Page 79
    Freddy and his mamma
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Grandpa and Lotta
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The good ship "Never-fail"
        Page 84
        Page 85
    The dog and the ice
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Baby, the king
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Cousin Lou
        Page 90
        Page 91
    The stray sheep
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    The treat
        Page 95
    The faithful dog
        Page 96
        Page 97
    The raccoon
        Page 98
        Page 99
    My kittens
        Page 100
        Page 101
    The burnet moth
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Good-humor
        Page 104
    Keeping shop
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    A Japanese orchestra
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The two sprites
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Little Eunice
        Page 113
    Dogs
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Watering his garden with rain
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
    A pleasant family
        Page 119
    What is the matter with Robby?
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Christmas bells
        Page 123
    Mother's letter
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Sheep
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Winter
        Page 129
    The bird that walks on the water
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Children among the flowers
        Page 132
        Page 133
    Pussy cat
        Page 134
        Page 135
    The new scholar
        Page 136
        Page 137
    The prisoner
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
    The frigate-bird
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Minnie to Dolly
        Page 145
    The doll's washing
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
    The gardener's grandchild
        Page 150
        Page 151
    The escape
        Page 152
        Page 153
    The lost penknife
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Lily and her dolly
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
    The kitten and falling leaves
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Night-watchmen
        Page 162
        Page 163
    Ida's chickens
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
    Try, try, try again
        Page 168
        Page 169
    The greedy mice
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Good advice for little ones
        Page 170
    Shaving Jack
        Page 172
        Page 173
    The pursuit of the butterfly
        Page 174
        Page 175
    A happy New Year
        Page 176
        Page 177
    Roman children
        Page 178
        Page 179
    Birds and birds' nests
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
    The oak
        Page 183
    Kittie
        Page 184
        Page 185
    Do something for each other
        Page 186
    The sisters
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Home for the holidays
        Page 189
        Page 188
    Disobedient Harry
        Page 190
        Page 191
    Our Father in heaven
        Page 192
    A merry heart is better than money
        Page 193
        Page 194
    Fan and her puppies
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
    The little exile's song
        Page 198
        Page 199
    The lion
        Page 200
        Page 201
    Snow
        Page 202
        Page 203
    Dolly's bedtime
        Page 204
        Page 205
    The little harebell
        Page 206
    My dog tray
        Page 207
    The bear
        Page 208
        Page 209
    The little soldier
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
    Good counsel
        Page 213
    The boy's wish
        Page 214
        Page 215
    Eva's fairy story
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
    Frost pictures
        Page 219
    The first snow storm
        Page 220
        Page 221
    The cat that saved the baby
        Page 222
        Page 223
    The old country house
        Page 224
        Page 225
    Willie's happy day
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
    Susie's Robin
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
    My little brother
        Page 232
        Page 233
    The lucky-bag
        Page 234
        Page 235
    The rain
        Page 236
        Page 237
    The canary bird
        Page 238
        Page 239
    The skipping rope
        Page 240
        Page 241
    Put your paw up!
        Page 242
        Page 243
    Our Lily
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
    The chetah
        Page 247
        Page 248
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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CONTENTS.


PAGE
LUCY GREY.................. 7
THE THIEVISH CATS ......... 8
THE CATS' CONSULTATION..... 10
THE RAINBOW .............. 12
JOHNNY WILSON .............. 14
ROBBIE'S RED APPLE ........ 17
THE TOWN PIGEON ........... 18
HER FATHER'S DARLING ..... 20
THE ERMINE ............... 22
Two ROGUES ................ 22
THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL ....... 24
LUCY GREEN ................ 27
STRIKE THE KNOT .......... 28
OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN
HEAVEN ................ 28
THE KIND DRIVER .......... 30
BABY BROTHER............... 32
STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST..... 34
THE HAPPY FAMILY ......... 36
HATTIE'S BIRTHDAY .......... 38
THE SCHOOL-MASTER......... 40.
WHO IS SHE? .............. 43
GRANDMA'S DARLINGS......... 44
THE DAUGHTER OF A KING... 46
THE SEA-SIDE .............. 49
READING THE BIBLE ......... 50
COUNTING A DAY'S SPORT. .... 52
HARRY'S FRIEND ............ 54
THE SPARROW'S MORNING VISIT. 56
PHILIP THE IDIOT ........... 56
SPOILING A QUARREL.......... 58
LAMENT OF A LITTLE MOTHER
ROBIN ................. 58


SCATTER SEEDS OF KINDNESS..
THE SHEEP WITH A CART ....
DAN AND DIMPLE, AND HOW
THEY QUARRELLED .......
OUR FATHER MADE THEM ALL.
JOHN GRIMLY. ................
THE TWO GIFTS ............
MY LITTLE TREASURE ........
THE MOON .................
THE FLY AND THE BEE ......
A BLESSING FOR BABY .......
THE COMING SHOWER........
OUT IN THE COLD ...........
THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE..
TAKE CARE ................
FREDDY AND HIS MAMMA ....
GRANDPA AND LOTTA ........
THE GOOD SHIP "'NEVER-FAIL'
THE DOG AND THE ICE ......
BABY, THE KING.............
COUSIN LOU ...............
THE STRAY SHEEP...........
THE TREAT. .................
THE FAITHFUL DOG.........
THE RACCOON ...............
MY KITTENS ................
THE BURNET MOTH .........
GOOD HUMOR ..............
KEEPING SHOP .............
A JAPANESE ORCHESTRA......
THE Two SPRITES ...........
LITTLE EUNICE .............
DOGS ....... ................


,I.1~


ml'-







-'I I-


CONTENTS.


PAGE
WATERING HIS GARDEN WITH
RAIN................... 116
A PLEASANT FAMILY ......... I19
WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH
ROBBY? ................ 120
CHRISTMAS BELLS ............. 123
MOTHER'S LETTER .......... 124
SHEEP ... ...... ......... 127
W INTER.................... 129
THE BIRD THAT WALKS ON THE
WATER.................. 130
CHILDREN AMONG THE FLOWERS. 132
PUSSY CAT.................. 134
THE NEW SCHOLAR........... 136
THE PRISONER ............... 138
THE FRIGATE-BIRD........... 141
MINNIE TO DOLLY ............ 145
THE DOLL'S WASHING........ 146
THE GARDENER'S GRANDCHILD. 150
THE ESCAPE................. 152
THE LOST PENKNIFE.......... 154
LILY AND HER DOLLY ......... 157
THE KITTEN AND FALLING
LEAVES.................. 16
NIGHT-WATCHMEN. .......... 162
IDA'S CHICKENS................ 164
TRY, TRY, TRY AGAIN ...... 168
THE GREEDY MICE .......... 170
GOOD ADVICE FOR LITTLE ONES 170
SHAVING JACK .............. 172
THE PURSUIT OF THE BUTTER-
FLY. ..................... 174
A HAPPY NEW YEAR......... 176
ROMAN CHILDREN .... ...... 178
BIRDS AND BIRDS' NESTS..... 180
THE OAK................... 183
K ITTIE...................... 184
Do SOMETHING FOR EACH OTHER 186


PAGE
THE SISTERS................ 1 86
HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.... 188
DISOBEDIENT HARRY ......... 190
OUR FATHER IN HEAVEN ..... 192
A MERRY HEART IS BETTER
THAN MONEY ........... 193
FAN AND HER PUPPIES ....... 195
THE LITTLE EXILE'S SONG. ... 198
THE LION.. ............... 200
SNOW .................. ... 202
DOLLY'S BEDTIME............. 204
THE LITTLE HAREBELL...... 206
MY DOG TRAY............... 207
THE BEAR. ................ 208
THE LITTLE SOLDIER ........ 210
GOOD COUNSEL ............. 213
THE BOY'S WISH ............ 214
EVA'S FAIRY STORY ........... 216
FROST PICTURES ..... ....... 219
THE FIRST SNOW STORM...... 220
THE CAT THAT SAVED TIE BABY 222
THE OLD COUNTRY HOUSE.... 224
WILLIE'S HAPPY DAY........ 226
SUSIE'S ROBIN ............... 229
MY LITTLE BROTHER ........ 232
THE LUCKY-BAG .............. 234
THE RAIN ......... ...... 236
THE CANARY BIRD........... 238
THE SKIPPING ROPE ......... 240
PUT YOUR PAW UP ........... 242
OUR LILY. .................. 244
THE CHETAH................ 247


~.1~






m1. I


THE BUDGET.



LUCY GREY.

IUCY GREY was sent by her mother to carry her father's
dinner to him, as he was making hay in a meadow
nearly a mile off, and would not have time to come home
for it. "And be quick, Lucy," she added, "for I have
put a hot steak and potatoes in a basin inside the bundle for a
treat for him, and if it gets cold he won't enjoy it."
It was very hot, and the roads looked white and dusty; but
the wild-flowers looked lovely in the bright sunshine, and the
birds sang their sweetest songs from the tree-tops.
In the first field she saw little Will Jones, trying to see-saw
by himself.
Oh, come, Lucy !" said he, "just for a little while, and see
what fun we will have."
Lucy forgot everything her mother had said, and was soon
having a grand play on the see-saw.
Time flew on, and Lucy heeded it not; at last she heard a
loud laugh, and looking up saw a boy, commonly known as
" Bad Ben," running off with the bundle and tin can. Lucy
called and ran after him, but it was of no use; and at last, tired
and hot, she sat down on the grass and burst into a flood of tears.
If she had done as her mother had told her it would not


I......









THE THIE VISiH CATS.


have happened, and now her father would lose his nice dinner
through her thoughtlessness and disobedience. She must go
and tell him, and then go home for some bread and cheese for.
him. She walked on, still crying, anj .soon saw her father
coming towards her, pitchfork in hand.
Heyday, Lucy what's the matter ?" said he; and where's
my dinner? for I'm very hungry, I can tell you."
And then poor Lucy told him all, and ended by sobbing out
that she was very sorry, and would never be so naughty again.
Her father could never bear to see his little girl cry, so kissing
her kindly, he told her not to mind, but to run home and see
what she could get for dinner, and they would have it together.
Lucy's mother was vexed, but she sent some cold bacon and
bread, which they ate in the pleasant hay-field. Her father
told her she was old enough to be a comfort to those around her,
and she must be more careful. Lucy promised, and she did try
from that time.


THE THIEVISH CATS.
SHE family in which these kittens live must be very fond
of cats; only think, to have four good-sized kittens in
one family, and maybe one or two under the table! I
think that until we can teach kittens to speak and to
reason it will be better to keep them out of the dining-room, or
the crockery will get broken and the cream-jug upset.
I am afraid that the plate is done for; and as to that fish that
Spotty is busy with, I don't think I should care for it. Maybe
Whitey didn't upset the cream-jug, but he is certainly having
the benefit of it. Blackey is cultivating a taste for coffee that
seems to be a sign of early depravity for a cat.
"Better run along, kittens; I think I hear some one coming !"


-I,' ,










THE CATS' CONSULTATION.
FOUR VOICES AND CHORUS.
CL LL the cats consulted:
A What was it about?
C How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.
The cat with the black nose
Made this remark:
"I will eat the mouse up,
Because my nose is dark."
Chorus.-All the cats consulted:
What was it about?
How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.
The cat with the white tail
Said, "Stop a bit,
I have got a white tail,
Only look at it;"
Then softly murmured,
Under her breath,
"I with my white tail
Will switch him to death."
Chorus.-All the cats consulted:
What was it about?
How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the double teeth
Laughed loud at this:
"I'll kill the mousykin
With a kind kiss;


~~I *1.


I









THE CATS' CONSULTATION.


I'll say whisky-whisk,
Mew, mew, mew,'
Nibble up the mousykin
Before you count two."
Chorus.-All the cats consulted:
What was it about?
How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The cat with the long claws
Turned up her lip:
11


7 ._II-


I -m






rn-u Y -


THE RAINBOW.


"You can only snip-snap,
It's I can grip;
Stick in my long claws,
Hold him rather tight,
Then with my little jaws
Whisk him out of sight."
Chorus.-All the cats consulted:
What was it about?
How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.

The mouse, who kept listening
To all that was said,
Felt extremely frightened,
And thought he'd soon be dead;
But time may be wasted
If cats have much to say,
And while the cats consulted,
The mouse-ran away !
Chorus.-All the cats consulted:
What was it about?
How to catch a little mouse
Running in and out.




THE RAINBOW.

SOME, see how fast the weather clears,
The sun is shining now;
And on the last dark cloud appears
A beauteous-colored bow.


- m --








THE RAINBOW.


'Tis God who make the storm to cease,
And sun to shine again;
The rainbow is the sign of peace
Between Himself and men.

This lovely bow He stretches forth,
And bends from shore to shore-
His own fair token to the earth
He'll bring a flood no more.


-I


-II







1. 1~


JOHNNY WILSON


Just such a bow shines brightly round
The throne of God in heaven,
Which shows His mercy has no bound,
And speaks of sins forgiven.




JOHNNY WILSON.
OHNNY WILSON was a good little boy in the main,
but he had one fault that gave him a deal of trouble, and
that was driving nails. Now, I hear some of you little
folks say, "Driving nails is not a fault."
Well, if a little boy should ask papa to give him a block of
wood, a paper of nails, and a hammer, he could have a nice
time and not trouble anybody. But Johnny Wilson was not
content with a block of wood; he drove nails into everything;
into the walls, carpets, chairs, and tables. In short, whatever
was large enough to hold a nail, was sure to come under Johnny's
hammer. I really think mamma was afraid he would drive
nails into the baby. He was punished and forbidden to touch
a*hammer, but it seemed, indeed, as if he could not help it, for
whenever any one made Johnny a present, it was sure to be a
hammer.
One bright summer morning, mamma took the baby and
went out to spend the day; she left Johnny at home alone with
the servants, feeling sure, as he had no hammer, that all would
go right.
As I said before, he was a good boy when hammers were out
of the question; but no sooner had mamma gotten fairly off,
than the carpenter came to hang a gate at the top of the stairs, to
keep baby, who was just beginning to toddle, from falling down.
14


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JOHNNY DRIVING NAILS IN HIS FATHER'S HAT.


.4 L.


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~I. .1~


JOHNNY WILSON.


Johnny was much interested in watching the man measure,
and saw, and hammer, but did not offer to touch any of his
tools. At twelve o'clock, however, the carpenter was obliged
to go home to his dinner, and as the gate was not quite finished,
he left his tools until he should return. It was too much for
Johnny. to be left alone with such a beautiful hammer, and
nails of every size and shape.
In the room close to the stairs stood mamma's cedar chest,
and this was what first caught Johnny's eyes. "That would
be a splendid place to drive nails," thought he. "I will just
try one."
So he first put a little one in; but that went so nicely he
tried another, and another, until there were ever so many.
Then he screwed the gimlet in the chest, he hammered in the
chisel, and what do you think he did after that? Why, he
found papa's high hat that was put away for the summer, and
filled that full of nails. Oh, Johnny, Johnny! what will
mamma say?
When the carpenter returned he felt very cross, but after he
had seen all the damage that was done, he felt very sorry for
Johnny, as he knew a punishment was sure to follow. So he
tried his best to mend'the matter; he drew the chisel and all
the nails out of the chest, and unscrewed the gimlet; but the
marks were still there, and the hat was ruined forever. When
mamma came home, how do you think she punished Johnny?
Not by whipping and scolding. No; but she made him wear
the hat, nails and all, every day to school for a week. Poor
little boy! She felt very" sorry sometimes, when the boys
laughed and made fun of him, but he was at last cured of his
bad fault of driving nails, and so effectual was mamma's remedy
for the trouble, that Johnny was ever afterwards ready almost
to run away out of sight of a hammer.


'I I














ROBB/E'S RED APPLE.
NE day Robbie was visiting his cousin. They went to a
neighboring farmhouse, and the kind people gave them
permission to go into the orchard and get some ripe apples
to eat. The trees were bending with fruit, and under-
neath their laden boughs were many mellow apples fallen to
the ground. Some were yellow, some rosy-cheeked, and some
were red all over. A few were very large, and others quite
small.
Robbie looked around, trying to find a very nice one. He
wasn't satisfied with those that seemed fair to middling," but
wanted a very good one indeed. Presently he chose one. It
was one of the largest and reddest-a fine apple to look at.
But apples were made to eat. Robbie took a bite of his beau-
tiful one, and found its looks were a great deal better than its
taste. It was not sweet or thoroughly ripened, and it was hard
and coarse-grained besides. Many apples, lying close at hand,
though but half as large and not half so pretty as this one, were
ten times better, for they were mellow, sweet, and juicy.
Robbie showed a little of the unwise and selfish side of the
heart, which is too common in the world. He was fond of size
and show; he judged from outward appearance, and so made a
very poor choice.
The great and showy things of life, and the bright and glit-
tering things of the world, are not always what they seem.
Fine clothes and big purses do not make good, wise people.
Such things are like the rind of Robbie's red apple, merely out-
side show that deceives the thoughtless. Real merit does not
love to deck itself in showy garb.


I L.


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THE TOWN PIGEON.
- HE beautiful picture on the opposite page reminds me of
the following poem, which I think you will agree with
me is very pretty.

Stoop to my window, thou beautiful dove!
Thy daily visits have touched my love.
I watch thy coming, and list the note
That stirs so low in the mellow throat,
And my joy is high
To catch the glance of thy gentle eye.

Why dost thou sit on the heated eaves,
And forsake the wood with its freshened leaves ?
Why dost thou haunt the sultry street,
When the paths of the forest are cool and sweet?
How canst thou bear
This noise of people-this sultry air?

Thou alone of the feathered race
Dost look unscared on the human face,
Thou alone, with a wing to flee,
Dost love with man in his haunts to be;
And the gentle dove"
Has become a name for trust and love.

A holy gift is thine, sweet bird!
Thou'rt named with childhood's earliest word!
Thou'rt linked with all that is fresh and wild
In the prisoned thoughts of the city child;
And thy glossy wings
Are its brightest image of moving things.
18


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THE LADY AND THE DOVES.







~1 Ii-,


HER FATHER'S DARLING.


It is no light chance. Thou art set apart,
Wisely by Him who has tamed thy heart,
To stir the love for the bright and fair
That else were sealed in this crowded air;
I sometimes dream
Angelic rays from thy pinions stream.
Come then, ever, when daylight leaves
The page I read, to my humble eaves,
And wash thy breast in the hollow spout,
And murmur thy low sweet music out!
I hear and see
Lessons of heaven, sweet bird, in thee !


HER FATHER'S DARLING.
TINY happy face,
Six sunny tumbled curls,
C Two rosebud lips apart
Disclosing milk-white pearls.
Two wondering wide blue eyes,
Now bright with baby glances;
Beaming on some small prize,
Now wet with some small sadness.
Plump shoulders, soft and white,
For kissing surely meant;
Rumpled and crumpled muslins,
With here and there a rent.
Dimpled little fingers,
Everywhere they fumble;
Restless, little active legs,
Now and then a tumble.


- I









HER FATHER'S DARLING.


Saucy little stampings,
Pretty little rebel!
Saucy small expressions
In a silvery treble.


Ringing shouts of laughter,
Sobs of deepest woe;
Going to see wee piggies,
Hurt a tiny toe.

Now naughty wilful ways,
And most indignant glances;
Anon her stick a racer,
She caracoles and prances.

A little sunbeam ever,
With very soft'ning power,
Oh how her father loves her,
His sweet unopened flower!
21


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-4


THE ERMINE.
CN WAY up in northern latitudes, where there is nearly
always snow and ice, and where the summers are very
C' short indeed, lives a little creature which wears such a
beautiful dress that we are all envious and desire to rob
him of it. His dress is soft as any velvet, and creamy white,
and so warm that it is a protection against the coldest weather.
Ladies want it to border their garments with, judges think that
it adds to their dignity to wear it, and even kings and nobles
desire to have it to help to make their crowns and coronets. So
this beautiful, shy little creature, scarcely as large as a cat, is
hunted by the trapper, and when caught deprived not only of
its garment, but of life itself, that lords and ladies, kings and
judges, may have their whims gratified.
This little animal is called an ermine. Its food consists of
rats, young rabbits, birds, small animals of every description,
and birds' eggs. It is long, slender, and graceful in form, and
can climb trees as easily as a cat.
During the summer the ermine is called a stoat, and then its
back is of a reddish brown, which allows it to pass along the
ground among the fallen leaves and rubbish without being
perceived. But when the cold weather comes, the fur gradually
turns white, all but the tip of its tail, which remains black.


TWO ROGUES.
S(IVING all alone in a silent house I stay,
SNo one speaking to me through the weary day;
Reading, sewing, knitting, doing this and that,
No companions have I but my dog and cat.
None to say good-morning, spring with willing feet,
None good-evening bid me with their kisses sweet.


_I *1-






-4


THE ERMINE.
CN WAY up in northern latitudes, where there is nearly
always snow and ice, and where the summers are very
C' short indeed, lives a little creature which wears such a
beautiful dress that we are all envious and desire to rob
him of it. His dress is soft as any velvet, and creamy white,
and so warm that it is a protection against the coldest weather.
Ladies want it to border their garments with, judges think that
it adds to their dignity to wear it, and even kings and nobles
desire to have it to help to make their crowns and coronets. So
this beautiful, shy little creature, scarcely as large as a cat, is
hunted by the trapper, and when caught deprived not only of
its garment, but of life itself, that lords and ladies, kings and
judges, may have their whims gratified.
This little animal is called an ermine. Its food consists of
rats, young rabbits, birds, small animals of every description,
and birds' eggs. It is long, slender, and graceful in form, and
can climb trees as easily as a cat.
During the summer the ermine is called a stoat, and then its
back is of a reddish brown, which allows it to pass along the
ground among the fallen leaves and rubbish without being
perceived. But when the cold weather comes, the fur gradually
turns white, all but the tip of its tail, which remains black.


TWO ROGUES.
S(IVING all alone in a silent house I stay,
SNo one speaking to me through the weary day;
Reading, sewing, knitting, doing this and that,
No companions have I but my dog and cat.
None to say good-morning, spring with willing feet,
None good-evening bid me with their kisses sweet.


_I *1-






-II irn


TWO ROGUES.


I've a next-door neighbor more fortunate than I;
Thinking of her blessings, I sometimes pause and sigh.
Little children scamper in and out all day,
Making dreadful racket at their merry play;


I.~









THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.


Losing playthings here, and dropping playthings there;
Letting song and laughter echo everywhere.

Little rogues, I see you, peeping down at me,
With your laughing eyes, and faces full of glee.
How your presence brings the gladness to my heart!
Would you come to me and nevermore depart?
Darlings, you are welcome, come whene'er you will;
Blessed is the home you with your sunshine fill!


THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.
SNE pleasant summer afternoon, Bertha and wee two-year-
old Hermann were playing merrily up and down the
garden walks, while their good mother sat on a bench by
the cottage door, busily knitting. In the flower-beds, gold
and purple pansies, fair white lilies, and nodding blue-bells
were in full blossom, filling the air with their sweet perfume.
Among the cherry-trees the little birds sang, and the gay butter-
flies flitted from flower to flower.
"Dear little ones," said the mother to herself, as she watched
her children in their play, "how happy they are and how good
the sunshine is for them They need it-my little home-blos-
soms-as much as do the flowers in the garden."
And then she thought of the many little children shut up in
cities, with never a sight at the fresh green fields and sweet
flowers; to whom bird-songs were unknown music, and whose
only play-ground was the paved and dusty street. "Thank
God," said she, wiping a tear from her eye, "that my darlings
are not shut up like caged birds, within city walls !"
Presently little Bertha, who was peeping through the palings
of the garden gate, exclaimed, Oh, mother, here comes a little


I IF


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-I


THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.


girl with a basket! Shall I open the gate and ask her to
come in ?"
Yes, darling," said her mother. So Bertha held the gate
wide open and the little girl entered. She was very fair, with
sweet blue eyes, and golden hair that rippled in bright waves to
her shoulders. Her simple dress and apron were clean and
tidy, and the napkin that was thrown over her basket was
snowy white. She dropped a courtesy and said, Will the
lady please buy some toys for her little children ?"
Bertha and Hermann came near and, with their mother,
looked into the basket.
My brother carved these from wood," said the little girl,
showing many curious and beautiful toys; and he painted all


~_ II







-I'


THE LITTLE TOY-GIRL.


the pictures in these books. He is lame, and he sits in his chair
all day long, making toys and painting pictures for me to sell."
Where does your father live ?" asked the mother.
The blue eyes of the little girl filled with tears as she softly
answered, In heaven. It is many a long day since he went,
and though, as mother says, it is happy for him to be there, it
is sad enough for us without him."
"And your brother," asked the mother, "was he always lame?"
Not always," answered the child, "though PIcan remember
him only as he is now. He reads to me every day, from his
little Testament, of the fair land where our dear father has gone,
and says that it will not be long before he will be there too.
He does not say so before mother, for it would make her cry
too much.
But I must not stay too long," continued the little girl, for
I want to sell all that I have brought before night, for we
have many things to buy with the money that I shall get for
them."
So the mother selected a book with beautifully colored en-
gravings for Bertha, who had just begun to learn to read, and a
little horse-and cart, with a little whip, for Herinann.
As she put a bright silver coin in the little girl's hand she
said, "I will go and see your mother and lame brother soon, if
you will tell me where you live."
Will you ?" said the child, her cheek flushing with pleasure;
"that will please us all so much, for we are strangers here."
So she told where she lived, and after another courtesy she
took her leave with a glad heart.
Flowers, birds, and butterflies were now, for the time, forgot-
ten, as Bertha, leaning upon her mother's knee, looked at the
beautiful pictures in her new book, and little Hermann, sitting
upon the grass at her feet, gave himself up to the full enjoy-
ment of his new treasure.


1 ._ m









LUCY GREEN.


LUCY GREEN.

w UCY GREEN was a dear little girl, and took great
delight in flowers, of which she had a great many. She
was quite a favorite with old William, the market
gardener, for she very seldom missed a week without
going to him for a new pot, and the old man would choose her
the prettiest flowers he had, and often add one as a gift from
himself to those she paid him for. It was quite a pretty sight
to seethe two friends; they were both so very fond of their
flowers, and would stay chatting about the roses that had budded
since they last met, or the new flowers they had discovered.


.1 Imim


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-I CI-


STRIKE THE KNOT.
2 HEN we were little boys-little fellows-our father
began to teach us how to work, and we were anxious to
perform the allotted tasks. We were splitting wood.
A tough stick with a most obstinate knot tried all
the skill and strength of a weak arm, and we were about to
relinquish the task when our father came along. He saw the
piece of wood had been chipped down and the knot hacked
around, and took the axe, saying,-
"Always strike the knot."
The words have always remained safe in my memory. They
are precious words, boys. Never try to shun a difficulty, but
look it right in the face; catch its eye, and you subdue it as a
man can a lion.


OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN
wHY Father, little one, and mine,
Is He who reigns above;
Thy prayers and mine He deigns to hear,
In mercy and in love-
Thy prayers and mine, dear little child,
He deigns in love to hear;
Oh, to His blessed mercy-seat
Let us in faith draw near.
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
All hallowed be His name;
Oh, pray thou that His will be done,
In earth and heaven the same.
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
Pray thou for daily bread,
For by His power alone we live,
And by His bounty fed.
28


I_ urn






-I CI-


STRIKE THE KNOT.
2 HEN we were little boys-little fellows-our father
began to teach us how to work, and we were anxious to
perform the allotted tasks. We were splitting wood.
A tough stick with a most obstinate knot tried all
the skill and strength of a weak arm, and we were about to
relinquish the task when our father came along. He saw the
piece of wood had been chipped down and the knot hacked
around, and took the axe, saying,-
"Always strike the knot."
The words have always remained safe in my memory. They
are precious words, boys. Never try to shun a difficulty, but
look it right in the face; catch its eye, and you subdue it as a
man can a lion.


OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN
wHY Father, little one, and mine,
Is He who reigns above;
Thy prayers and mine He deigns to hear,
In mercy and in love-
Thy prayers and mine, dear little child,
He deigns in love to hear;
Oh, to His blessed mercy-seat
Let us in faith draw near.
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
All hallowed be His name;
Oh, pray thou that His will be done,
In earth and heaven the same.
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
Pray thou for daily bread,
For by His power alone we live,
And by His bounty fed.
28


I_ urn









OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN.


Thy Father, little one, and mine-
From evil keep us, Lord;
Oh, turn our feet in those blest paths
That lead us to our God !
Thy Father, little one, and mine,
To Him the glory De;
To Him the kingdom, Him the power,
To all eternity.


m~i~thi..


-I 1-


35











THE KIND DRIVER.

LADY, sitting at a window in the country with some
friends, saw a wagon and pair of horses coming down
the road, driven by a stout old man.
"Here comes a kind driver," she said. I've noticed
the way he treats his horses, and their obedience and attach-
ment. Wait until he gets near and I'll speak to him."
So when the man came opposite to the house, the lady called
out,-
"Good-morning, Benjamin. Won't you show my friends
what a bright pair of horses you have? Make them shake
hands."
The man called, "Whoa !" to the horses, and as soon as they
had stopped, he said, speaking to one of them, "Tom, shake
hands!" when instantly the horse lifted his foot in a pleased,
gentle way, and gave it into the man's hand, who, after shaking
it and letting it fall, said,-
"Now, Tom, the other;" and up went that also. Then he
went around to the other horse, and he did the same thing in
the same gentle and pleased way.
"Now turn round and come on," called out the man; and
instantly, without the crack of a whip or a loud command, the
docile animals turned carefully the wagon to which they were
harnessed, and followed their kind driver as a dog would have
followed his master.
"Thank you, Benjamin," said the lady. "I wanted my
friends to see how much more obedient animals can be made
by kind than by harsh treatment."
As the man drove on with his horses, pleased with the notice
that had been taken of him, one of the ladies said,-
"This reminds me of a little pony that is managed entirely
without a whip, his driver only carrying a bit of straw in his


~1.


ml






-II 1m


THE KIND DRIVER.


hand. The pony obeys his master with all the docility of a
dog. He has but' to say, 'Tom, come here a little;' or,' Tom, a
little farther,' and pony, just as if he could do everything but
say 'Yes' in reply, instantly does what he is told. On being
asked one day if he never used the whip, the driver answered,
'Oh, sir, if I were to use a whip, he would feel it,' meaning
that if he were to strike the pony, the animal's feelings would
be hurt as much as his body."


. -I~h~







-I i-a


BABY BROTHER.
BABY brother Louis!
You are fairest of the fair;
There's nothing half so beautiful
In earth, or sea, or air.

O baby brother Louis!
You are sweetest of the sweet;
With breath as fragrant as the breeze
When spring and summer meet.

0 baby brother Louis!
You are fair, and sweet, and wise;
The angels, mamma says, look out
Upon us from your eyes-

The angels, pure and innocent,
Who're near unto the Lord;
I read about them yesterday,
While reading in his Word.

And I am sure it must be so,
For every one can see,
While gazing in your heavenly eyes,
A heavenly mystery-

A mystery of love and peace.
What better can I say ?
There is no power in human words
Their meaning to convey.

Oh, darling baby brother!
If angels are so near,
That, while his face beholding,
They're dwelling with you here,
32


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-I I _-~


BABY BROTHER LOUIS!









STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST.
How gentle and how loving
Should all our actions be!
How tender and how truthful
Ev'ry spoken word to thee!


STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST
ID you ever, dear children, watch the birds in spring-time
Building their pretty nests; and did you think how won-
derful it was that they should know how to make so nice
a little home from such things as they pick up here and
there? How smooth and beautiful they make the inside of
their nests, so as to form a soft bed for their eggs and little
birdies!
Do you suppose that your fingers, which are so skilful about
many things, could form as nice a nest as the little birds can,
with their slender beaks ? If you think that perhaps they
might, just try it some day, and see if you can weave together
twigs and hair, with perhaps some bits of wool or cotton, into a
little rounded nest as beautiful as that which a pair of robins
would make! Even if you should succeed in making some-
thing to look like a nest, you would be obliged to try a number
of times first, and you would probably make many mistakes,
and have to take your work into pieces and begin anew again
and again before it would suit you.
Not so with the birds. They never make mistakes, and they
are not even obliged to think how to make their pretty homes,
because God has given them what is called instinct. In other
words, He teaches every little bird how to build just the kind of
nest best fitted for its use.
I will tell you a true story of a pair of golden orioles that
many years ago built a nest in an elm-tree so near a farm-house
that the children who lived there could watch them every day


-9 -


1. -






17 II-


STORY OF A BIRD'S NEST.


about their work and could hear the chirp of the little birds
after the wee things were hatched. You all know, perhaps,
what kind of nests the orioles build, like slender baskets hung
from the branches of the trees.
If they could speak, the mother orioles might well sing to
their babies,-
35


I -I









THE HAPPY FAMILY


"Rock-a-bye, baby, on the tree-top;
When the wind blows the cradle will rock !"
For several years the same pair of orioles came back to their
home in the elm-tree, made what repairs were needed, laid their
eggs, and reared their little ones.
One spring, just after the little birds were hatched, there came
a long, cold rain, which lasted several days. The children and
others who lived in the house saw the golden orioles flying about
as if in great distress, and heard the pitiful chirping of the little
ones. At last, after the storm was over, some one took a ladder
and went up the tree to see what the trouble was, and found
that the pretty hanging nest was filled with water, and the
young birds were drowned. Now comes the strange part of the
story. After a few days of flying and fluttering about, as if
they had some new idea in their little heads, the parent birds
began to build another nest in the same tree, but instead of
forming it like the old one, they built a round nest like that of
the common robin upon a branch, and soon they had another
family of little birds nestled therein.



THE HAPPY FAMILY.

E are not going out to-day,
So shall we have a game of play ?
Let us be ladies, and we'll see
What happy ladies we can be.

We must have other names, of course-
I will be Mrs. Wilberforce.
Will you be Mrs. Wiggins, Flo ?
Because you like that name, you know.


I


r









THE HAPPY FAMILY.


"Yes, I'll be'Mrs. Wiggins, dear,
But here is our dear brother here;
We really must have him to play:
I'm sure he won't be in the way."
'Tis very pleasing thus to see
Brothers and sisters all agree;
So all good little girls and boys
Should share their pretty books and toys.
Dear little boys and girls, will you
Do as these little children do;
And never, never try to tease,
But always do your best to please?
87


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HATTIE'S BIRTHDAY.

H, this is a happy, beautiful world!
My heart is light and gay;
The birds in the tree sing blithely to me,
And I'm six years old to-day.

Yes, six, and father has bought me a book,
And mother, the sweetest doll,
All dressed in white, with blue eyes bright,
And the nicest hat and shawl.

My Kitty sat quietly near the fire
As Dolly and I came by;
Miss Dolly bowed, and pussy meowed,
And opened her yellow eye.

Ah, me! if Kit could only talk,
And Dolly could but chat,
We'd social be as any three-
Talk, sing, and all of that.

I dressed all up in grandma's cap,
And put on her glasses, too;
"Why, Grandma!" I said, as I looked at myself,
"I'm almost as old as you."

My mother softly kissed my cheek,
And then she blessed me, too,
Praying that I, as years went by,
Might be as good and true.

My birthnight song is a merry one,
And my heart is warm and light;
Kind father, mother, and dear grandma,
Sweet dolly and pussy, good-night.
38


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HATTIE DRESSED UP IN GRANDMA'S CAP.


F


'1-










THE SCHOOL-MASTER.
N days gone by, young people found it no easy thing to
pick up a little learning. They had not then the easy,
pleasant books which they now have. Schools were often
very dismal places, and school-masters were very severe. If
a boy were a dunce, or behaved amiss, he was struck on his
hand with a ruler, or beaten with a cane, or poised on another
boy's back and flogged with a birch-rod. But we need not
dwell on these things, as most young people have heard of them.
A change has taken place, and kindness is found to be a better
teacher than severity.
We know a school-master in a country town who is as cheer-
ful as May-day, and he brings on his scholars nicely. It was
on a holiday afternoon that he was seated in a sheltered seat at
the end of the playground, reading a book. Taking off his
spectacles he called out to his scholars, who had been enjoying
themselves at trap and ball, "Boys, stop a moment or two in
your play, and I will tell you a tale."
In a moment the trap and ball were left on the ground, and
the boys gathered around him. After a little scuffling for the
nearest place to their kind master, silence prevailed. You
might almost have heard the tick-tack of a watch, and every
eye was fixed on the school-master. After a short pause, he
related to them the following tale:
Many years ago, a certain vizier, for some cause or other,
was condemned to perpetual imprisonment in a lofty tower. At
night his wife came to weep below his window.
"' Cease your grief,' said the sage, putting out his head with
a turban on it. 'Go home for the present, and return hither
when you have procured a live beetle, together with a little ghee
(that is, butter made from the milk of buffaloes), three balls,
one of the-finest silk, another of packthread, another of stout
whipcord, and finally a bundle of strong rope.'
40


4 L


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-I Im -


THE SCHOOL-MASTER.



1, ,


"Away went the vizier's wife to do his bidding, and when
she again came to the foot of the tower, provided according to
her husband's commands, he directed her to touch the head of
the insect with a little ghee, or butter, to tie one end of the silk
thread around him, and to place the beetle on the wall of the
tower.
Deceived by the smell of the butter, which he considered to
be in store somewhere above him, the beetle continued to ascend
till he reached the top, and thus put the vizier in possession of
the end of the silk thread. He then drew up the packthread
by. means of the silk, the small cord by means of the packthread,


I I






-I .1I


THE SCHOOL-MASTER.


and, by means of the cord, a stout rope capable of sustaining
his own weight. Thus was he enabled at last to escape from
his place of confinement. We see, then, from this story, what
great endings may be brought about by small beginnings."
The boys were all highly amused with the tale which had
been told them; but the cheerful school-master had not yet done
with his story, for, without losing any time, in a lively and
encouraging manner he made the following remarks:
"It appears to me that our tale is well suited to all of us.
Every boy in my school, though he does not wear a turban, may
be called a vizier, and may be said to be shut up in a high
tower-the tower of ignorance-from which he ought to do his
best to deliver himself.
"The vizier's wife may be set forth by the printing-press,
which has provided what is necessary to free the vizier school-
boy from captivity. What we should do without the printing-
press I cannot tell.
"But where shall we find a black beetle? for somehow or
other we must have one. In my opinion your school-master
will be the very thing. If I am not blind, I wear a black coat,
and am very persevering; yes, I see I must play the part of a
black beetle.
"The ghee, or buffalo butter, is my desire for your good;
and this, I hope, will be quite enough to lead me on to serve
you so long as you are in the tower, and I have the means of
rendering you assistance.
"The silken line that I bring you is the alphabet; a very
small beginning, which may produce a very large and profitable
ending. Had we no alphabet, you might almost as well stop
away as come to school. If the alphabet be our silk line, well
may we regard words as our packthread. Single letters pro-
duce words, and thus, as we proceed, we gradually increase in
knowledge.


-. I-









WHO IS SHE?


"After words come sentences; these must be whipcord; and
then follow books, which are strong rope, so necessary to set you
free from the tower of ignorance.
"And now, boys, as the beetle has brought you the silk line,
the packthread, the whipcord, the strong rope, after you have
finished your game of trap-ball set to work at your books as
fast as you can, that you may enjoy liberty, and turn your
backs on the tower of ignorance for ever."


WHO IS SHE?
SHERE is a little maiden-
Who is she? Do you know ?-
Who always has a welcome,
Wherever she may go.
Her face is like the May-time,
Her voice is like a bird's;
The sweetest of all music
Is in her lightsome words.
Each spot she makes the brighter,
As if she were the sun;
And she is sought and cherished
And loved by every one;
By old folks and by children,
By lofty and by low:
Who is this little maiden ?
Does anybody know ?
You surely must have met her;
You certainly can guess;-
What! I must introduce her?
Her name is-Cheerfulness.


I, 17


I I....









GRANDMA'S DARLINGS.

S HICH is grandmother's darling
Of the children three at play?
Which does she love the dearest,
Hattie, Fannie, or Jay?
Which are the brightest eyes for her,
Soft black, or blue, or gray?
Which would she miss the soonest,
If away from her loving care:
Hattie, the dark-haired maiden,
Blue-eyed Fanny, the fair,
Or Jay, with the honest, truthful face,
And sober, manly air?
Keep still, for grandma is thinking;
She'll tell you by and by.
She is gazing upon them fondly,
With a far-off look in her eye,
With a sad, sweet smile upon her face,
And on her lips a sigh.
She thinks of three other darlings
In the far-off, long ago:
Of the baby, who long has slumbered
Under the daisies and snow,
And beside it, a noble, manly form
'; In-his early strength laid low.
And the other ? Oh, that's the papa,
Who is coming now through the lane,
And back from the past so distant
Comes grandma's heart again;
As she kisses the little ones o'er and o'er
They are darlings all, 'tis plain.
44


-I -


_IJI~















































































































- i Urn


--1







-I .1-


THE DAUGHTER OF A KING.

SWISH I were a princess !"
Emma stood with a dust-brush in her hand, pausing on
her way up-stairs to her own pretty room, which was re-
quired to be put in order every day.
"Why, my child ?" asked her mother.
"Because then I would never have to sweep and dust and
make beds, but would have plenty of servants to do these things
for me."
"That is a very foolish wish," her mother replied;" and
even if you were a princess, I think you would find it best to
learn how to do all these things, so that you could do them in
case of necessity."
But it never is necessary for princesses to work."
There my little girl proves her ignorance. If she will come
to me after her work is done, I will show her a picture."
The little bedroom was at length put to rights, and Emma
came to her mother, reminding her of her promise about th6
picture.
"What do you see, my child ?" her mother asked as she laid
the picture before her daughter.
I see a young girl with her dress fastened up, an apron on,
and a broom in her hand."
"" Can you tell me what kind of a place she is in ?"
"I do not know. There are walls and arches of stone, and
a bare stone floor. I do not think it can be a pleasant place."
"No, it is not. It is a prison, and the girl is a king's
daughter."
"A king's daughter ?"
Yes; and her story is a very sad one."
"Please tell me about her."
More than eighty years ago the king of France was Louis
46






-I II


QUEEN MARIA ANTOINETTE IN PRISON.


-I,-






-I I -


THE DAUGHTER OF A KING.


XVI.; his wife was Marie Antoinette. They were not a wicked
king and queen, but they were thoughtless and fond of pleasure.
They forgot that it was their duty to look after the good of their
people, so they spent money extravagantly in their own pleas-
ures while the whole nation was suffering. The people became
dissatisfied, and when finally Louis and Marie Antoinette saw
the mistake they had been making and tried to change their
conduct, it was too late. The people, urged on by bad leaders,
learned to hate their king and queen. They were taken with
their two children and the sister of the king, and shut up in a
prison called the Temple.
"There were dreadful times in France then, and every one
who was suspected of being friendly to the royal family was
sent to prison and to the guillotine. The prisoners in the
temple passed the time as best they could. The king gave
lessons to his son and daughter every day, or read aloud to tlem
all, while Marie Antoinette, Madame Elizabeth, and the young
Maria Theresa sewed.
"After a time the angry people took away the king and be-
headed him. And shortly after the little son was separated
from his mother, sister, and aunt, and shut up by himself in
the charge of a cruel jailer. Next it was Marie Antoinette's
turn to ascend the scaffold, which she did October 16, 1793.
Her daughter Maria Theresa was then left alone with her aunt,
the Madame Elizabeth."


WHEREVER in this world we are,
iIn whatsoever estate,
We have a fellowship of hearts
To keep and cultivate;
And a work of lowly love to do
For the Lord on whom we wait.


~I. Im







-I It-


THE SEA-SIDE.


THE SEA-SIDE.
C NNIE an'd little Fred are spending happy days by the
sea-side, where their mamma has taken them to pass the
Summer months. Mamma is tired, and she and aunty
are resting while the little folks play in the sand. They
have made friends with a boy who has brought out his father's
glass for them to look through. And he tells them all about
the boats, and how the poor fishermen are out on the sea day
and night, to catch fish. He tells Annie how he sometimes is
permitted to go with his father in the boat, and what fine times
they have when the weather is clear: how they throw over the
net; and after carefully drawing it along for some distance, they
land it at last full of slimy, slippery fishes.
49


-1' 1-







-f. 1I


READING THE BIBLE.

SOME, darling, bring the Bible,
And place it on my knee;
And you climb up beside it,
And sit close up to me.

Now slowly turn the sacred page,
Not rough-as though it were
A mere unworthy common book,
That you might soil or tear.

But ever, ever bear in mind
That 'tis a holy Book,
And on its every page, my child,
With humble reverence look.

It is God's holy Word, my dear,
To sinful mortals given;
A lamp unto our feet below,
To light us on to heaven.

Oh, learn to prize it as you ought;
Seek wisdom from on high
To teach you how to read aright,
To read it prayerfully.

The child who loves God's holy Word,
And takes delight therein,
That child will not be led astray
In wickedness and sin.


L








-3 1


I ,9-









COUNTING A DAY'S SPORT.

0 IOM GILES is Farmer Giles's son, and they live at an old
farm-house at the end of a shady lane.
Tom is a thoughtful boy, and Blackboard, the old
school-master of our village, says he is a first-rate fellow
at school; and I know the old housekeeper at the farm finds
him very useful indeed.
Everybody likes Tom Giles, from the ploughman that follows
his father's team, to the magpie who calls out Tom! Tom! from
the top of the barn door.
At Mr. Blackboard's school the boys have a holiday every
Wednesday afternoon, and away they all scamper to the village
green, kick up their heels as though the whole school had gone
mad, and I'll warrant you that Tom Giles is as merry as any
boy among them.
One day they proposed to go fishing in the large pond at the
end of the village green, and then there was such a lot of cut-
ting fishing-rods, and making nets, and borrowing pickle-jars
to put the fish in, that at last Farmer Giles declared that his
best hedge was almost cut to pieces, and the old housekeeper
said she had scarcely a jar left. But, after all, the day's sport
was soon over, and when Tom got home again he put his jar
upon the kitchen table to count what he had caught.
One, two, three, four little sticklebacks, bobbing about as
though they were playing at hide-and-seek. One, two, three
little efts were also there, looking very gloomy indeed; perhaps
they wanted to play at puss-in-the-corner, but as there are no
corners in a round pickle-jar of course they could not do that.
But you know I told you that Tom was a thoughtful boy, and
as he looked at the little fish swimming about in the jar, he
wondered whether they were happy, and whether there were
any little baby fish left in the pond who were calling out for
their papas and mammas that he had caught, or whether there


-I ,


Fr










COUNTING A DAY'S SPORT.


'
-- ~
_I~-I--
=:- F~-
a- --..


were any fathers and mothers in the pond who were wonder-
ing wherever their little sticklebacks had gone to.
And Tom was a kind as well as a thoughtful boy, and so he
crept silently out of the back door, and ran all the way to the
pond, and let the little prisoners free just at thp very spot at
which he had previously caught them.
And they all swam home to supper, and Tom Giles was hap-
pier in letting his little prisoners go than he would have been
if he had caught a great big whale and kept it all to himself.


II .1i


I 111mm






-I U-


HARRY'S FRIEND.

C IARRY! that was wrong. How could you strike old
Rover !"
"Because he stepped on my kite with his great, heavy
foot, and liked to have made a hole in it," replied the boy,
a lad of ten years old, who had been reproved by his mother
for striking a faithful old house-dog.
"But Rover did not do it on purpose; he didn't mean to
break your kite."
"I don't suppose he did; but he had no business to tread on
my kite. He's big enough to know better, I should think-
and old enough too."
"He's old enough to be a wise dog, Harry; and so I think
he is-much wiser as a dog than you are as a boy. If he had
been as foolish and passionate a dog as you are a boy, he would
have turned round and bitten you, instead of walking off as he
did with a look of grief at your bad treatment. I am sorry
that you would treat Rover unkindly-you of all others."
"Why me of all others, mother ?"
"Have I never told you how Rover saved your life?"
"No! How was it, mother? When did he save my life?
Tell me about it."
I was looking from the window, and all at once I saw Rover
start up, and come running into the house. He acted as if some
one had called him. After running through all the rooms
below, I heard his big feet on the stairs. He came up with
two or three heavy bounds. Entering my room, he looked all
about and then up into my face. 'Where's Harry, Rover?' I
said, for the thought of you came instantly into my mind, 'Go
find him, sir.'
"The dog understood me. He turned short away, sprang


- I I-






-I I -


HARRY'S FRIEND.


down-stairs, and out into the garden. I followed him, for I felt
strangely concerned about you. As I approached the lower end
of the garden, I heard Rover growling, and soon saw him
shaking something in his mouth, with great violence, while the
hair on his body stood out straight and stiff like bristles. Close
beside him, you lay sleeping calmly on a bank.
"You may suppose I was almost horror-stricken when I
came near enough to see a venomous snake in Rover's mouth.
"The faithful dog had, doubtless, saved your life. And you
-ah, Harry! think of it-and you have been so thoughtless
as to strike Rover."
The boy, at this, burst into tears, and hid his face in his
mother's lap. He continued so for some time; then he went
after the faithful animal, and when he had found him, caressed
him, and talked to him in such a kind way, that Rover, who
never held resentment, forgot in an instant the blow he had
received, and was as happy again as an old dog could be,


-L







I1 I


THE SPARROW'S MORNING VISIT.
SLAD to see you, little bird;
'Twas your pretty chirp I heard;
What did you intend to say-
Give us something this cold day ?"
That I will, and plenty too;
All these crumbs I saved for you;
Don't be frightened-here's a treat;
I will wait and see you eat.
Thomas says you steal his wheat;
John complains his plums you eat;
Choose the ripest for your share,
Never asking whose they are.
Yet you seem an.honest bird;
And I may say I've also heard
That insects, grubs, and worms you eat,
And other things that spoil the wheat.
So I will not try to know
What you did so long ago;
There's your breakfast, eat away,
Come and see me every day.


PHILIP THE IDIOT.
|T is a very sad sight to see a poor boy who is not quite
right in his mind, even though he be not altogether
insane. Some of these poor half-witted creatures are able
to move about the streets, doing simple errands for their
friends. We should' always be very kind to such, and never
run after them, or shout and make fun of them, as some bad
boys and girls will do. Philip Turner was one of these poor
creatures, and lived with his sister Sophia, who was very good


- u a-







I1 I


THE SPARROW'S MORNING VISIT.
SLAD to see you, little bird;
'Twas your pretty chirp I heard;
What did you intend to say-
Give us something this cold day ?"
That I will, and plenty too;
All these crumbs I saved for you;
Don't be frightened-here's a treat;
I will wait and see you eat.
Thomas says you steal his wheat;
John complains his plums you eat;
Choose the ripest for your share,
Never asking whose they are.
Yet you seem an.honest bird;
And I may say I've also heard
That insects, grubs, and worms you eat,
And other things that spoil the wheat.
So I will not try to know
What you did so long ago;
There's your breakfast, eat away,
Come and see me every day.


PHILIP THE IDIOT.
|T is a very sad sight to see a poor boy who is not quite
right in his mind, even though he be not altogether
insane. Some of these poor half-witted creatures are able
to move about the streets, doing simple errands for their
friends. We should' always be very kind to such, and never
run after them, or shout and make fun of them, as some bad
boys and girls will do. Philip Turner was one of these poor
creatures, and lived with his sister Sophia, who was very good


- u a-







-I F


PHILIP THE IDIOT.


to him, and took great care of him. Philip was very quiet and
harmless, and had such funny ways. He would walk up and
down the street with a sword, and think he was a soldier. And
as is pleased him, his kindl sister would humor him and let him
do as he pleased.


m1 I, -






- V


SPOILING A QUARREL.
J OHNNY stood a little while at the gate, nibbling the
scallops from the edge of his cookey; possibly he was
nursing his courage to say a kind word. He was waiting
for Jerry White to turn around and look.
"Hallo, cry-baby!" shouted Jerry, as he discovered him;
"what you got there ?"
"Halloo, pretty-face!" retorted Johnny, good-humoredly;
" come and see.
"' Open your mouth and shut your eyes,
And I'll give you something to make you wise.'"
"Open your eyes and shut your mouth," responded Jerry,
" and I'll-" and here a snowball that was meant for Johnny's
face fell harmlessly over his shoulder. The next minute the
extra cake was struck from Johnny's hand into a snow-drift.


LAMENT OF A LITTLE MOTHER ROBIN.
H, where is the boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who climbed up a tree in the orchard to-day,
And carried my three little birdies away ?
They hardly were dressed
When he took from the nest
My three little robins, and left me bereft

Oh, humming-birds, have you seen to-day
A very small boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little robins away?
He had light-colored hair,
And his feet were both bare.
Ah me! he was cruel and mean, I declare.
58


-. I






- V


SPOILING A QUARREL.
J OHNNY stood a little while at the gate, nibbling the
scallops from the edge of his cookey; possibly he was
nursing his courage to say a kind word. He was waiting
for Jerry White to turn around and look.
"Hallo, cry-baby!" shouted Jerry, as he discovered him;
"what you got there ?"
"Halloo, pretty-face!" retorted Johnny, good-humoredly;
" come and see.
"' Open your mouth and shut your eyes,
And I'll give you something to make you wise.'"
"Open your eyes and shut your mouth," responded Jerry,
" and I'll-" and here a snowball that was meant for Johnny's
face fell harmlessly over his shoulder. The next minute the
extra cake was struck from Johnny's hand into a snow-drift.


LAMENT OF A LITTLE MOTHER ROBIN.
H, where is the boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who climbed up a tree in the orchard to-day,
And carried my three little birdies away ?
They hardly were dressed
When he took from the nest
My three little robins, and left me bereft

Oh, humming-birds, have you seen to-day
A very small boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little robins away?
He had light-colored hair,
And his feet were both bare.
Ah me! he was cruel and mean, I declare.
58


-. I







-r .1~


LAMENT OF A LITTLE. MOTHER ROBIN.


Oh, butterfly stop just one moment, I pray;
Have you seen a boy, dressed in jacket of gray,
Who carried my three little birdies away?
He had pretty blue eyes,
And was small of his size.
Ah, he must be wicked, and not very wise!
Oh, boy with blue eyes, dressed in jacket of gray,
If you will bring back my three robins to-day,
With sweetest of music the gift I'll repay!
I'll sing all day long
My merriest song,
And I will forgive you this terrible wrong.


WHENEVER you know a thing is right,
Go and do it with main and might,
Nor let one murmur fall,
For duty makes as strong a claim
As if an angel called your name,
And all men heard the call.
Keep all the day, and every day,
Within the straight and narrow way,
And all your life, in fine,
Be temperate in your moods and meats,
And in your sours, and in your sweets,
And, lastly, don't drink wine!

A LADY teacher inquired of the members of a class of juve-
niles if any of them could name the four seasons. Instantly
the chubby hand of a five-year-old was raised, and promptly
came the answer,-
"Pepper, salt, vinegar, and mustard."
59


-, -IL-






-I I-


"80A TTER SEEDS OF KINDNESS"
f<0ET us gather up the sunbeams,
Lying all around our path;
Let us keep the wheat and roses,
Casting out the thorns and chaff;
Let us find our sweetest comfort
In the blessings of to-day,
With a patient hand removing
All the briers from the way.
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness,
Then scatter seeds of kindness
For our reaping by and by.

Strange we never prize the music
Till the sweet-voiced bird has flown!
Strange that we should slight the violets
Till the lovely flowers are gone!
Strange that summer skies and sunshine
Never seem one-half so fair,
As when winter's snowy pinions
Shake the white down in the air.
Tken scatter, etc.

If we knew but half the sorrow
That the poor have oft to bear,
How our hearts would yearn to help them,
Though their griefs we could not share ,
And the broken-hearted mourners,
Who in silence pass us by,
Would be lightened of their burden
If they knew a friend was nigh.
Then scatter, etc;


Immn










" SCATTER SEEDS OF KINDNESS."


Oh, there's many a wayworn wanderer,
Whom the cold world treats with scorn,
Who has often wept in secret,
Wishing he had ne'er been born;
Let us those remember daily
In our prayers to God on high,
While we scatter seeds of kindness
For our reaping by and by.
Then scatter, etc.


I i3-


m







-t ~II


THE SHEEP WITH A CART.
SNEVER saw a sheep harnessed up before," said Harry,
as he turned over the leaves of a big book on natural his-
tory, and found a picture of a sheep drawing a two-wheeled
cart.
Do you know what natural history means? It means a
history or description of animals, birds, and fishes.
Let me see," said his mother. So Harry brought the great
book and laid it in her lap. "Ah, yes," she continued, "it is a
sheep that lives in Syria and Egypt, and other parts of Asia
and Africa, and has a long heavy tail which sometimes trails on
the ground. This tail usually weighs fifteen or twenty pounds;
but when the sheep is fattened, it sometimes gets to weigh
seventy or eighty, or even one hundred and fifty pounds. The
sheep cannot carry it then, so a little cart is made to lay it on,
and the sheep draws it about."
"What is the use of such big, fat tails ?"
"The people, when they kill the sheep, use the fat of the tail,
which is not at all like tallow, for butter."
Harry shut up his book and put it away, and went out to
play; and his mother kept on sewing, and forgot all about the
sheep with the cart. After a while she heard a great racket
outside the window, and looking out, she saw Harry and Nep.
He had fastened his cart to the dog, and as Nep would not let
his tail lie in the cart he had tied his white tippet to the end of
the tail. Nep did not understand these proceedings, and was
frisking about and wagging his tail, with every wag setting the
tippet flying in the air, and every few steps overturning the
cart.
"Never mind, Nep, I'll teach you yet. If you don't be a
good dog and let your tail lie down in the cart, I'll have to tie
it down."


-E -







-II TI


THE SHEEP WITH A CART.


B~LJ~g~-1~


But the next jump brought Nep quite out of the harness,
and away he capered, looking back roguishly, as much as to say,
"No you don't, old fellow."
Harry was about to follow him, but just then a lady passed
by, her long, trailing skirt sweeping the walk and gathering
dirt and dust. Harry stood looking at her until she was out of
sight, and then turning to his mother, he said,-
"Mother, don't you think it would be a good plan for ladies
who wear tails to their dresses to have a little cart to keep them
up out of the dirt?"


A NOBLE ANSWER.-" Why did you not take one of those
pears ?" said one boy to another. "There was nobody to see
you."
"Yes, there was. I was there to see myself, and I do not
wish to see myself doing so mean a thing as stealing."
63


-1~


B
i
-G
~;;~i~--S~-L~-~_=5=~~ 3
zZ-,







I. F


OAN AND DIMPLE, AND HOW THEY QUARHELLED.

vO begin in things quite simple
Quarrels scarcely ever fail-
And they fell out, Dan and Dimple,
All about a horse's tail!

So that by and by the quarrel
Quite broke up and spoiled their play-
Danny said the tail was sorrel,
Dimple said that it was gray!

"Gray !" said Danny, "you are simple!
Just as gray as mother's shawl,
And that's red!" Said saucy Dimple,
"You're a fool, and that is all !"

Then the sister and the brother-
As indeed they scarce could fail,
In such anger, struck each other-
All about the horse's tail!

"Red !" cried Dimple, speaking loudly,
How you play at fast and loose!"
"Yes," said Danny, still more proudly,
"When I'm playing with a goose !"

In between them came the mother-
What is all this fuss about ?"
Then the 'sister and the brother
Told the story, out and out.


I-









DAN AND DIMPLE, AND HOW THEY QUARRELLED.


And she answered, "I must label
Each of you a little dunce,
Since to look into the stable
Would have settled it at once !"

Forth ran Dan with Dimple after,
And full soon came hurrying back
65


I -


-LI







- Tr1


JOHN GRIMLY.
Shouting, all aglee with laughter,
That the horse's tail was black !

So they both agreed to profit
By the lesson they had learned,
And to tell each other of it
Often as the fit returned.


OUR FATHER MADE THEM ALL.
i WOULD not hurt a living thing,
However weak or small;
The beasts that graze, the birds that sing,
Our Father made them all;
Without his notice, I have read,
A sparrow cannot fall.


JOHN GRIMLY.
J OHN GRIMLY lived in a worn-out house-
A house unpainted, old, and gray-
That let in the wind in winter time,
And the drenching shower of the April day.
The windows were little, and rough, and square,
And a man must stoop to go in at the door;
And the winter sleet and the sunshine fair
Came in through the chinks on the rotten floor.

John Grimly's years were sixty and two,
His form was bent and his hair was gray,
Yet he trudged, be the skies or gray or blue,
To his lonely workshop every day.
66


I I







- Tr1


JOHN GRIMLY.
Shouting, all aglee with laughter,
That the horse's tail was black !

So they both agreed to profit
By the lesson they had learned,
And to tell each other of it
Often as the fit returned.


OUR FATHER MADE THEM ALL.
i WOULD not hurt a living thing,
However weak or small;
The beasts that graze, the birds that sing,
Our Father made them all;
Without his notice, I have read,
A sparrow cannot fall.


JOHN GRIMLY.
J OHN GRIMLY lived in a worn-out house-
A house unpainted, old, and gray-
That let in the wind in winter time,
And the drenching shower of the April day.
The windows were little, and rough, and square,
And a man must stoop to go in at the door;
And the winter sleet and the sunshine fair
Came in through the chinks on the rotten floor.

John Grimly's years were sixty and two,
His form was bent and his hair was gray,
Yet he trudged, be the skies or gray or blue,
To his lonely workshop every day.
66


I I









JOHN GRIMLY.


The children who passed by the workshop door
Hushed shout and laughter till they were by,
And shunned the sound of his old, cracked voice.
And the passing glance of his stern gray eye.


I I-


.mm.I Im






-I 1~


THE TWO GIFTS.
T was Christmas Eve and snow was falling silently, but the
storm was not severe enough to keep the children from the
church. Their happy voices mingled with the deep, rich
tones of the organ in Christmas hymns, the soft light poured
through the stained windows on the snow-covered paths, and
the beautiful tree shed its varied and abundant fruit. Homes
looked doubly cheerful to-night; there was many a glad
reunion, married sons and daughters coming with their little
ones from their own firesides to the old hearthstone.
But in two chambers in the quiet village the lamp burned
dimly; footsteps were silent, voices hushed to low, tender tones,
and in one, a mother's heart aching in secret for a little child
lying on a bed of pain and weariness. In another home an
orphan boy had received all of care and kindness he had known
since his mother went to live with angels. Love would gladly
have given these little ones as fair a tree as the rest, and did
bring to their bedsides all they could enjoy, hot-house flowers,
golden oranges, and rich, juicy grapes. Ethel took these from
her mother's hand, and while that hand gently bathed her
aching temples and the low, sweet voice sang the lullaby she
loved best, her white eyelids drooped and a refreshing sleep
held her free from pain.
Who can tell how Jamie longed for his mother ? Well did
he remember her smile and voice and touch. His friends were
kind and took good care of him, only not a mother's care. His
Sunday-school teacher was most like her; she came to him
to-night as soon as she could leave the church, after seeing her
little class safely on their way home. She brought his flowers
and fruit; she bathed his brow with a hand so gentle that it
seemed like his mother's; she sang to him and soothed him, too,
to sleep. As she still sat beside him a beautiful smile played


I1 L.^-----------







-I- .1 -


THE TWO GIFTS.


over his thin face. He opened his eyes with a new, glad light
shining from their depths, and said, twining his wasted arms
around her neck, "Oh, Miss Wells, I've had such a good
dream!"
"What was it, dear ?"
"I sat at the window watching the snow falling so quietly,
just as it does to-night, and I did not feel cold, though the
window was open. It was light, too. By and by the tiny flakes
seemed to hold together, and then to spread like wings, and a
beautiful angel floated down, all in white, with long golden
curls and clear gentle eyes. She came closer and closer to me,
and I felt so glad to see her; she seemed like my mother. She
took me in her arms and laid my head on her breast. Then
she kissed me, and all the pain went away and I felt rested and
well. And then I saw that it was mother. Oh, how happy I
was too happy to say anything only, Mother Mother She
seemed to move upward a little, and I thought she was going to
carry me with her home to heaven, but just then I woke. I
feel well, though, and it is a beautiful Christmas, for I've seen
mother."
Christmas morning dawned clear and beautiful. The sun
shone on the new-fallen snow as white as an angel's wing, and
on trees and fences studded with brilliant. The village children
were early astir, and merry with their Christmas gifts. In
Ethel's sunny chamber were rejoicing hearts, for she was better.
A good night's rest, such as she had not had for weeks, calmed
her pulse and gave her new strength; she would soon be well.
Jamie's little form lay white and still, with snowy blossoms
on his breast and twined in his dark hair. He had found his
mother.
There shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying;
neither shall there be any more pain, for the former things are
passed away, and God shall wipe away all tears from his eyes."
69


urn.









MY LITTLE TREASURE.

To each little one the angel had brought the gift that was
best. To Ethel-the joy of her mother's heart and cherished
by loving friends-healing and strength for life's work yet
before her. To Jamie, the poor orphan, his mother, rest, and
heaven.





MY LITTLE TREASURE.

SOULD you know my little treasure,
Rarest, priceless beyond measure ?
Come with me;
Look and see-
Ripe lips brimming o'er with pleasure-
Laughter-loving Marjorie!

.Little darling, bright eyes gleaming,
Full of thought and tender dreaming-
Thought for me!
Look and see
All the love that there is beaming-
Sweetest, dearest Marjorie!

Little daughter, full of laughter,
Whom the sunbeams ripple after,
Dear to me;
Look and see
All the love that I would waft her-
Best of treasures, Marjorie!


- I 1







ii I


THE MOON.


THE MOON.
N and out, in and out,
Through the clouds heaped about,
Wanders the bright moon.
What she seeks, I do not know;
Where it is, I cannot show.
I am but a little child,
And the night is strange and wild.
71


-I. I-









THE FLY AND TIE BEE.


In and out, in and out,
Wanders the bright moon;
In and out, in and out,
She will find it soon.
There she comes as clear as day,
Now the clouds are going away.
She is smiling, I can see,
And she's looking straight at me.




THE FLY AND THE BEE.

C FLY once said to a bee, "Tell me, my friend, how is it
that no one pursues or torments you, as they do me? I
have to protect my life from every one, but you fly about
in the air gathering honey unforbidden from the flowers.
If I venture to put out my trunk to reach a crust of bread, or
perchance to dip into some more dainty dish, death threatens
me on the spot. I think if I could sting, and take vengeance
on my foes as thou canst, that I should be left in peace."
You are mistaken," replied the bee. A much surer pro-
tection to me is that by diligence I serve mankind."

4= "

ToMMY's mamma had given him a beautiful watch. "What
time is it ?" asked the proud young mother.
"Quarter-past six."
"You are mistaken; it is half-past six."
"How glad I am !" said the boy.
"Why so?"
"I have loved you a quarter of an hour longer."


I-rn


-1 7~
I







I1-


A BLESSING FOR BABY.
C LESS thee, my baby, may life for thee ever
Be bright as a long summer's day;
SMay all that is sweetest and all that is dearest
Like sunshine descend on thy way.
May thoughts that are holy like angels attend thee,
May sorrows like shadows depart;
May love like a blossom unfold in its beauty,
And peace find a home in thy heart.


r- ImE






-I .1


THE COMING SHOWER.

S OW close and how warm the air is !
Oh, never a breath is stirring;
And loud in the pathway there is
A sound of locusts whirring.

All drooping and hot the grass is;
The leaves have no life nor motion;
The stream like a river of glass is
As it glides away to the ocean.

Ah, it is too warm for eating,
So the sheep leave the scorching meadow;
And here on the hill-side meeting,
They lie in the trees' cool shadow.

But see, while I yet am speaking,
The clouds are the sunlight dimming,
While the swallows, the water seeking,
Are lowly and swiftly skimming.

Take courage, O panting creatures,
Take courage, O drooping grasses!
Oh, flowers, lift your delicate features
To be bathed in the rain as it passes!

Afar o'er the distant hill-tops,
See the welcome shower advancing;
And now a thousand raindrops
On the river's breast are dancing.

It is here, the blessed shower !
Give thanks, a myriad voices!
While bird and beast and flower
Each in its way rejoices.
74


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~I. A-


AL.

OUT IN THE COLD.
C ACK FROST is a sharp one,
And nips, as he goes,
Poor mittenless fingers
And stockingless toes,
And bites without mercy
Your ears and your nose.
Why, dear little maiden !
Out here in the cold,
The snow and the north wind
That whistles so bold,
Like a shivering pet lamb
Astray from its fold?
Hurry on Hurry on !
Little maiden, I say,
For the wind bloweth keen
On this cold winter day,
And the frost has no pity
For any astray.
75


ILI I-










THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.
HE sat in the deep kitchen window, blinking her eyes in
the sun. She had snow-white feet, of which she seemed
C proud, for she took great care of them, and had a habit
of curling her tail about them when she sat down, in a
very genteel manner : perhaps she thought the effect was stylish,
for her tail was white at the end; and her name was Tabby.
Bose lay on the floor trying to get a troubled nap. He had
some few accomplishments: could sit on his hind feet and beg
for his dinner, shake hands, and roll over. But his temper was
unpleasant, for he would bark at strangers, however quiet and
well-behaved they might be. Perhaps it was a remorseful
conscience that disturbed his rest,-the ghost of a murdered
gosling that he wantonly shook to death, or a stolen depredation
upon the sheep pasture. He first stretched himself out with
his head on his paws, but sleep refused to visit his eyelids, then
he crawled round three times and curled himself up in a semi-
circle, but in vain; so he sat up gloomily and sleepily, and
looked at Tabby, who sat in the kitchen window blinking in
the sun.
At length he broke out in a fretful tone; it sounded like a
short bark,-
"Tabby, you are purring again!"
Tabby unwound her tail from her fore-paws and waved it
slowly once or twice, and said,-
"Am I? Well, it is so pleasant here in the sun, and I had
such a nice breakfast. I really don't know half the time when
I do purr. It is a comfort, too, to purr. If you should try it,
I dare say you could sleep better. I often purr myself to
sleep."
"Who said I couldn't sleep? You seem to take a great
many things for granted."


-It----------


-I






-9-1


THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.


"I thought you seemed restless. Perhaps you ate too much
breakfast."
"I suppose you mean to insinuate that I ate more than my
share? You are the most disagreeable cat I ever saw in my life!"
Another sharp bark, and Bose stretched himself on his side
to his utmost dimensions, and resolutely shut his eyes. Presently
he raised his head, and said, a little more mildly,-
"Tabby, you are purring again."
Now, really, Bose, you must excuse me, for I didn't know
it. I was thinking what a sweet girl my mistress Mary is.
When she pats me on the head, and smooths my fur, my
happiness is complete."
Now, Tabby," Bose jumped up into a chair by the window,
and Tabby curled her tail more tightly, as if she thought he
would bite, I want to talk with you."
With pleasure, Bose."
"And try and keep from purring; you have no idea how it
disturbs me."


I A





- --


THE SORROWS OF POOR BOSE.


"I will try; but if you would only purr yourself."
Don't mention it! I wouldn't for the world I want to
know, Tabby, if you are really so satisfied with your lot as you
pretend to be. Don't you ever have anything to annoy you ?"
"I don't remember anything. Oh, yes; Susan shut my tail
in the door the other day, and yesterday I caught a mouse and
it got away from me. Yes, I was excessively annoyed; but one
was an accident, and for the other no one was to blame but
myself."
Poor Bose made no answer, but he was so discontented with
his home that he took the first opportunity of running away,
which was the following morning. The butcher-boy that
brought the meat called him, and he gladly followed.
When Bose reached the butcher's headquarters, and saw the
array of beef, mutton, pork, sausage, and liver hanging upon
the wall, he thought he had come to a sort of dog's Paradise.
He willingly obeyed the command of his new master to lie
under the bench, and gratefully gnawed the bone he threw to
him. The boy took great pleasure in making him roll over,
and run after a stick which he threw across the street. But he
got out of patience when the dog would not walk on his hind
feet, and ordered him to lie down under the bench, where he
was forced to remain for two or three hours.
But he was afterwards fed bountifully with bits of liver and
kidneys, and began to feel that it was very much better for him
than at home with Mary and Tabby.
At last when the snow was on the ground, and Bose was
nearly frozen under the door-step, and had suffered the insult
of having his head whitewashed by the butcher-boy, he put his
tail between his legs, and, looking behind him as he ran, disap-
peared in the direction of the old farm-house.
Cold, and hunger, and insult had broken his spirit and
conquered his pride, and he longed for the old box in the shed,
78


- I II









TAKE CARE.


and thought the music of Tabby's purring would' be the
sweetest sound he could hear. Good, gentle Tabby, how glad
she would be to see him once more! He would never chide her,
or be impatient toward her again.
It was late when he reached his old home. The house and
shed were fastened for the night, and he lay down quietly to die.
His heart was quite broken; and when Willie found him
stiff and frozen in the morning on the door-step, and saw a
well-known star on his breast, he said, "Poor Bose !"
So they buried him tenderly, while Tabby, unconscious of
his misfortunes and his unhappy fate, still sat in the window,
purring and blinking in the sun.





TAKE CARE.

C ITTLE children, you must seek
Rather to be good than wise,
For the thoughts you do not speak
Shine out in your cheeks and eyes.

If you think that you can be
Cross or cruel, and look fair,
Let me tell you how to see
You are quite mistaken there.

Go and stand before the glass,
And some ugly thought contrive,
And my word will come to pass
Just as sure as you're alive.
79


~1.


I- -- I









FREDDY AND HIIS MAMMA.
What you have, and what you lack,
All the same as what you wear,
You will see reflected back
So, my little folks, take care !

And not only in the glass
Will your secrets come to view;
All beholders, as they pass,
Will perceive and know them too.



FREDDY AND HIS MAMMA.

OME, my bonnie birdie,"
M;1i.nm. to Fred will say:
"Come, prepare for bye-bye.
Fred is tired to-day.

"Put his hands together,
Shut his weary eyes,
Pray God to bless him,
As in sleep he lies.

"Bless mamma and sister,
Both to me so dear;
Bring papa back safely
To his loved ones here."

Then mamma takes Freddy
To his little cot,
And, though no one sees them,
Angels guard the spot.
80


-I I -


-r:










FREDDY AND HIS MAMMA.


Angels watch dear Freddy,
As he slumbers there;
Mamma's treasure, papa's darling,
Little sister's care.


A LITTLE boy, seeing a man sauntering about a public-house
door, counting some money held in his hand, and evidently
about to go into the public-house, stepped up to him and said,
"Don't go in there." The man put his hand, with the money,
in his pocket, thanked the little boy for his advice, and did not
go in.


I-


I










GRANDPA AND LOTTA.
C ND now what does puss want?" said grandpa, as Lotta
Climbed into his lap. It was a warm afternoon, and
grandpa had been dozing in his chair ever since dinner.
Lotta, before telling what she wanted, put her two
hands on grandpa's cheeks and gave him a good kiss.
"Now, what is it ?"
"I want you to take me- Lotta did not finish the
sentence.
"Where ?" asked grandpa.
"Out to---" she stopped again.
"Well, go on."
"The park!"
She threw out the last word quick and strong. For you see
she was not sure of grandpa, and wanted to make him under-
stand how much she wanted to go.
"Oh, dear !" answered grandpa, who was feeling dull. "It's
too hot."
"But it's so cool in the park, and so nice out there. Do,
grandpa !" and Lotta put her arms about his neck and gave him
the biggest kind of a hug.
"I suppose I shall have to, after that," said grandpa, who
was beginning to get wider awake, and to feel the dulness passing
off. So get yourself ready."
Off scampered Lotta, and soon came dancing and singing
back, ready for a ride to the park. Grandpa and his little pet
took one of the cars, and in less than half an hour were in the
beautiful park, where hundreds of happy children were playing
on the cool green grass, and hundreds of carriages sweeping
along the level roads, making a scene of life and beauty
refreshing to look upon. It was almost as good for grandpa to
be there as Lotta. While she ran about on the green sward
and picked her hands full of buttercups, gay as a little bird, he
82


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-I 7









GRANDPA AND LOTTA.

N O -

PII,














sat in the pleasant shade and breathed in the sweet fragrance
of the mown grasses, feeling that it was good for him to be
there, and having a double enjoyment in seeing the delight
of Lotta.
The birds were so tame that they hopped about on the
ground close to where he was sitting and sang in the trees right
above his head. The cool air fanned his cheeks and lifted his
gray hair and filled his lungs with a new life.
"Isn't it nice out here, grandpa ?" asked Lotta, as she came
running up to him with her hands full of wild flowers.
"Yes, indeed," answered grandpa.
"Ain't you glad you came ?"
Yes, dear."
"I thought so;" and she gave him a kiss, and then ran off
again. They stayed there until the sun was low down in the
west, and then came home, both feeling better and happier for
their visit to the park. I think they will go again very soon.


-I I -










THE GOOD SHIP NEVER-FAIL."

I asked the other day,
As strolling idly on the beach
I saw my lads at play;
One blue-eyed rogue shook back his curls,
And held his ship to me,
"I'm giving her a name," he cried,
Before she goes to sea;
We rigged her out so smart and taut,
With flag and snow-white sail,
And now I'll trust her to the waves,
And call her 'Never-fail.'"

The little ship sailed proudly out,
Through mimic rock and shoal,
The child stood watching on the beach,
His vessel reached its goal;
The wind had risen soft at first,
But wilder soon it blew,
It strained and bent the slender mast,
That still rose straight and true:
"Yet," cried the boy, "my ship is safe,
In spite of wind and gale,
Her sails are strong, her sides are firm,
Her name is 'Never-fail.' "

And presently the wind was lulled,
The little bark came home,
No wreck, although her sails were wet,
Her deck all washed with foam;
And loudly laughed my true boy then,
As on the beach she lay.


.4 Im


II-









- I_ U-


-I I-






~tI 17


THE DOG AND THE ICE.


And wisely spoke my true boy then,
Although 'twas said in play-
"Grandpa, I thought if mast and sail
And tackle all were true,
With such a name as 'Never-fail,'
She'd sail the wide sea through."


THE DOG AND THE ICE.
41 HHAT ever is that dog a doing?" exclaimed our little
Patty, and her eyes grew bright with wonder.
Two words too much," said Aunt Ruth, in a grave
voice and with a graver face. "Why don't you learn
to talk right ?"
"Oh, dear! you're always a putting of a body out!" Patty
looked very much annoyed.
"Two words too much," said Aunt Ruth, in a dead-level
voice.
"You're always a doing of it, aunty. Why can't you tell
me about the dog ?"
Two words more. I'm really surprised, Patty. Where do
you hear that kind of talk ?"
"What kind ?" the child asked, looking puzzled as well as
annoyed. How should I talk ?"
"'What is that dog doing?' was all you need have said,"
replied Aunt Ruth.
Well, wasn't that just what I did say ?" returned Patty.
No; you put in two useless words that spoiled the sentence.
You said, 'What ever is that dog a doing ?' "
"Oh, well, that doesn't kill anybody. You knew what I
meant, aunty." And Patty tossed her little head in an injured
way.


*1-







-I I-.


THE DOG AND THE ICE.


"And then," continued Aunt Ruth, "you said, 'You're
always a putting of a body out,' instead of saying, 'You're
always putting a body out,' which sounds better and saves
breath. You must think about these little things, my dear,
and learn correct ways of speaking. And now let us see what
the dog is doing. Oh! breaking the ice with his foot, I do
declare !"
Wouldn't' I declare,' be just as well, aunty, and save breath
on the do ?" said Patty, turning upon Aunt Ruth with an arch,
saucy smile.
"Fairly caught !" was Aunt Ruth's good-humored reply.


I. -









BABY, THE KING.


"Yes, dear, that do was a word too much. Your old aunty
learned some bad habits when she was young like you, and
finds it hard even now to get over them, so she wants her little
niece to have as few faults as possible to overcome when she
grows old. She does not know yet that unlearning is a great
deal harder than learning. And now for the dog."
Aunt Ruth read for a minute in the book which Patty held
open in her hand. Then she said,-
Well, that is curious This dog you see was walking along
with his master one frosty morning. The night before had
been cold, and all the little pools of water were frozen over.
The ice was not very thick, and so looked nearly the color of
water. The dog put his head down to drink first at one frozen
pool and then at another, and each time looked surprised and
disappointed. Then his master broke the ice with his foot, and
the dog drank his fill. On they went, and soon the dog wanted
to drink again. But this time he did not wait for his master,
but struck his great foot on the surface of an ice-covered stream
and broke a hole for himself.
"Just look at him in the picture He's as pleased as any
boy."


BABY, THE KING.
H7 Y country's very small-
ji 'Tis just a room
Built by the forest edge,
Watched by the moon.
Only two persons in it!
I'm one, and sing;
Baby's the other one-
Baby, the king !
88


~I 3-


II II







1. .1r


BABY, THE KING.


His crown is golden hair,
Measuring an inch;
His sceptre chubby arms,
Tempting to pinch;
His robe's a snowy one;
And I will sing
Of all the gems that deck
Baby, the king!
89


I I-







-II .1


COUSIN LOU.


Two very drowsy eyes,
One funny nose,
Two little feet that kick,
Ten pinky toes;
His law's a cry, but he
Crows while I sing-
Now you know all about
Baby, the king!






COUSIN LOU.

[TTLE roguish Cousin Lou,
With her dancing eyes of blue;-
While the long and silken lashes
Can't conceal their mirthful flashes.
Careless waving, golden tresses,
Which each passing breeze caresses;
Dimpled cheeks-and sunny smiles,
Silvery laugh-and playful wiles,
All these charms your love will woo,
For my witching Cousin Lou.

These are sure enough to please,
But my Lou has more than these;-
From her eyes of heavenly blue
Beams a spirit kind and true;
Every warm and generous feeling
O'er her childish heart is stealing,-
90


I I









COUSIN LOU.


And her soul is high and truthful,
Though her form is slight and youthful,
Is it very strange, think you,
That I love my darling Lou ?
91


-. 6-


V






mm 9


THE STRAY SHEEP.
| HO is the good Shepherd ?" asked our teacher, as she
took her seat in front of her class of little boys and
girls one Sunday afternoon. It was many years ago,
and I was only a little child then, but I can remember
that pleasant afternoon and the sweet, earnest face and tender
voice of our teacher almost as well as if only a year had passed.
"The Lord," answered one of the children.
Yes, the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, who came to seek
and to save that which was lost." Then she showed us the
picture of a shepherd carrying a sheep in his arms, and said,
"Of what parable does this remind you ?"
Of the parable of the lost sheep," two or three eager voices
replied.
"Yes; and now can you find this parable ?"
There was a quick turning of leaves by the children. Mary
Foster-dear Mary she was taken to the heavenly fold many
years ago-found the parable first, and read it aloud:
How think ye ? If a man have an hundred sheep, and one
of them be gone astray, doth he not leave the ninety and nine,
and goeth into the mountains, and seeketh that which is gone
astray ?
"And if so be that he find it, verily I say unto you, he
rejoiceth more of that sheep, than of the ninety and nine which
went not' astray. Even so it is not the will of your Father
which is in heaven, that one of these little ones should perish."
"I want to talk to you about the good Shepherd to-day,"
said our teacher as Mary stopped reading, and it was that you
might the more surely remember what I am going to say that I
brought with me this sweet and beautiful picture. Its image in
your memories will help you to recall my words."
All the children in the class grew very still, and looked
earnestly into her face. We loved to hear her talk.


I I- -






- I I


THE STRAY SHEEP.


You remember," she went on, how often in the Bible God
is spoken of as a Shepherd, and His people as sheep. And
now, children, what I want particularly to impress upon your
minds is that the Lord, our Shepherd, really loves us. Think
of what He has said: 'I am the good Shepherd: the good
Shepherd giveth his life for the sheep.' And again, 'I lay
down my life for the sheep.'"
She paused for a little while that we might take this
assurance of God's tender care over us deep into our hearts.


SI. I --'




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