Daisies

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Material Information

Title:
Daisies
Physical Description:
64 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Belford, Clarke & Co ( Publisher )
Chicago Engraving Company ( Engraver )
Publisher:
Belford, Clarke & Co.
Place of Publication:
Chicago
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1887

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre:
Children's stories
Children's poetry
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- California -- San Francisco

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
profusely illustrated.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Chicago-Eng-Co.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223324
notis - ALG3573
oclc - 06547430
System ID:
UF00078895:00001


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DAISIES...


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1890
CHICAGO-NEW YORK-SAN FRANCISCO
BELFORD, CLARKE & CO.


















































COPYRIGHT,

ISS7,

BY BELFORID, CLARKE & CO.


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" jGEE YeU I"


**DAISIES -









THE THREE GRACES.


THE THREE GRACES.
Oh! boys! boys! boys! There's mischief in
every line of your merry faces. You tear your
clothes to tatters, you try your father's patience,
you almost break your mother's heart; but you are
just what the world wants to make true, brave
honest men out of. God bless you, and make
you as good as you're bonny.

OUR LIFE.
FRANCES QUARLES.
Our life is nothing but a winter's day;
Some only break their fast and go away;
Others stay dinner, and depart full fed;
The longest age but sups and goes to bed;
He's most in debt that lingers out the day;
Who dies betimes has less, and less to pay.

THE TWO BAGS.
Every man, according to an ancient legend, is
born into the world with two bags suspended from
his neck-a small bag in front full of his neighbors'
faults, and a large bag behind filled with his own
faults. Hence it is that men are quick to see the
faults of others, and yet are often blind to their own
failings.


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THE THREE GRACES.


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8 LITTLE TELL-TALE MAGGIE.


LITTLE TELL-TALE MAGGIE.

Maggie is telling Grandma how that wicked,
mischievous kitten has been drinking the milk,
and has tried to steal the bird from the cage,
and now is unwinding her ball of wool. And
Grandma tells her, kittens are a good deal like
little girls, full of mischief, but they'll grow wiser
by and by.

THE DAISY.
Before the stars are in the sky,
The daisy goes to rest,
And folds its little shining leaves
Upon its golden breast.
And so it sleeps in dewy night
Until the morning breaks,
Then with the song of early birds,
So joyously awakes.


HOW TO MAKE A HERO.

A light supper, a good night's sleep and a fine
morning have often made a hero of the same man
who, by indigestion, a restless night and a rainy
morning would have proved a coward.











































































LITTLE TELL-TALE MAGGIE.








10 THE FISHERMAN'S WELCOME HOME.


THE FISHERMAN'S WELCOME HOME.

The fisherman's life is not a very enviable one.
When most people are sleeping quietly on their
pillows, he is out on the dark waters, gaining a
precarious living from lake or sea, and oftentimes
his night's rough work is all in vain, and weary
and disappointed he comes back to shore. But
there is one thing he is always sure of, and that is
a hearty welcome when he lands. Long before he
reaches port he sees his merry little children.
Fish or no fish, it matters not, they bid him wel-
come home. As he waves his hand they start a
race to see who shall get the first kiss from his
weather-beaten lips.


THE STARS ARE EVERYWHERE.
HENRY BURTON.
There is no end to the sky:
And the stars are everywhere,
And time is eternity,
And here is over there;
For the common deeds of the common day
Are ringing bells in the far-away.










































































THE FISHERMAN'S WELCOME HOME.









THE GREELY ARCTIC EXPEDITION.


THE GREELY ARCTIC EXPEDITION.

Amongst the bravest of all that valiant
crew who last went in search of the North
Pole was Edward Israel, the Michigan boy,
who had charge of the pendulum work in the
astronomical observations. He died on the 27th
of May, only twenty-six days before the rescue.
He was beloved by all, and his last request was
that if any of the crew survived, some one of
them should send his dying love to his mother.


THE LARK AND THE NIGHTINGALE.
JAMES MONTGOMERY.
The bird that soars on highest wing
Builds on the ground her lowly nest;
And she that doth most sweetly sing
Sings in the shade when all things rest.
In lark and nightingale we see
What honor hath humility.


THE ARCHITECTS OF THE FUTURE.

The children of to-day will be the architects of
our country's destiny in 1900.
























































































THE GREELEY ARCTIC EXPEDITION.


C~-u~t~








THE CHRISTMAS SNOWBALL.


THE CHRISTMAS SNOWBALL.
Archie and Duncan and Meg have been
rolling the great Christmas snow-ball. Meg has
dug out the place for the eyes and put pieces of
coal in for the eyes. Archie is sticking the flag
in the snow-ball's head, and Duncan, to make
all complete, puts a piece of holly in his mouth,
and all in great delight the little trio sing:
God bless you, merry gentlemen,
May nothing you dismay;
For Jesus Christ, our Saviour,
Was born on Christmas day.

FRIENDSHIP.
SIR WALTER RALEIGH.
There is nothing more becoming any wise
man than to make choice of friends, for by
them thou shalt be judged what thou art; let
them therefore be wise and virtuous, and none
of those that follow thee for gain; but make elec-
tion rather by thy betters than thy inferiors,
shunning always such as are needy; for if thou
givest twenty gifts, and refuse to do the like but
once, all that thou hast done will be lost, and
such men will become thy mortal enemies.





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THE CHRISTMAS SNOWBALL.


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GUSTAVE DORE.


GUSTAVE DORE, THE GREAT FRENCH ARTIST.

Paul Gustave Dore, the greatest French artist
of the nineteenth century, was born at Strasburg,
on the 16th of January, 1832; he died in Paris, on
the 23d of January, 1883. In the half century of
his active life, he contributed to art some of the
grandest pictures the world has ever seen. He
was a most laborious worker. His illustrations of
Don Quixote, Dante, Bible Scenes, the Orlando
Furioso" of Aristo, were enough to fill all the
years of a long life with active work. Perhaps his
most magnificent work was "Christ. Descending
from the Pratorium." During the siege of Paris
this remarkable picture was buried in a cylinder
for safety. It has been exhibited for the last fifteen
years in London. Dore's habits were of the
simplest kind, and his death at such an early age
was universally lamented.


THREE WISE WORDS.

The time is great-all times are great.
Reverie is the nurse of melancholy.
Action is a fountain of joy.


I







































































































GUSTAVE DORI, THE GREAT FRENCH ARTIST.


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A CHILD OF SEVEN.


A CHILD OF SEVEN.

All the bells of heaven may ring,
All the birds of heaven may sing,
All the winds on earth may bring
All sweet sounds together;
Sweeter far than all things heard,
Hand of harper, tone of bird,
Sound of woods at sundown stirred,
Welling waters winsome word,
Wind in wan, warm weather.
Golden bells of welcome rolled
Never forth such notes, nor told
Hours so blithe in tones so bold,
And the radiant mouth of gold,
Here that rings forth heaven.
If the golden-crested wren
Were a nightingale-why, then,
Something seen and heard of me,
Might be half as sweet as when
Laughs a child of seven.


TIME.

Time is the most subtle, yet the most insatiable,
of depredators, and by appearing to take noth-
ing is permitted to take all, nor can it be satisfied
until it has stolen the world from us and us from
the world.


_ __




































































A CHILD OF SEVEN.








A MOTHER'S BLESSING.


A MOTHER'S BLESSING.

Ralph Clinton is going to sea, and as his wid-
owed mother looks into his frank young face and
beaming, hopeful eyes, her heart is too full for
utterance; she can only sob between her tears and
say, "Good-bye; may God be with you."

Good-bye, good-bye, it is the sweetest blessing
That falls from mortal lips on mortal ear,
The weakness of our human love confessing.
The promise that a love more strong is near-
May God be with you!

Oh, may He guide and bless and keep you ever,
He who is so strong to battle with your foes;
Whoever fails, His love can fail you never,
And all your needs He in His wisdom knows-
May God be with you.


IDLENESS.

Idleness is the bane of body and mind, the
nurse of naughtiness, the step-mother of disci-
pline, the chief author of all mischief, one of the
seven deadly sins, the cushion upon which the
Devil chiefly reposes, and a great cause not
only of melancholy, but of many other diseases.





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A MOTHER'S BLESSING.










MAMMA'S FLOWER.


MAMMA'S FLOWER.
M. M. CASS.
Some day the daisies will all be dead,
And all the birdies will fly away;
And the clover blossoms so bright and red,
Will fall in the grasses and fade, some day;
Oh, how will the meadows be then, mamma,
And where will you take me then to play?

My child, they sleep beneath the snow,
Warm and safe in their mossy bed;
As snugly as you when cold winds blow,
Hide in the pillows your curly head;
For God takes care of the flowers each year,
As mamma takes' care of you, my dear.

For you are my own sweet flower, my child,
Mamma's flower with the violet eyes;
The snows may come and the winds grow wild,
And storms may blacken the soft blue skies;
But mamma will come with the morning light,
To kiss you again, my dear. Good night.


FOUR WISE MAXIMS.

Children are the poor man's wealth.
The stars shine only in the darkness.
Children and chickens will be picking.
In quietness and confidence is strength.


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MAMMA'S FLOWER.


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THERE SHALL BE NO MORE SEA.


THERE SHALL BE NO MORE SEA.
THOMAS W. HANDFORD.
"There shall be no more sea!" said one
Who dwelt in Patmos-prisoner of the Lord-
What time the waters surged around his lonely Isle.
"There shall be no more sea!" A radiant land
Lies summering in the light of God; where seas
No more shall foam in tempest, or awake in storm,
No wrecks shall mar the beauty of that strand.

No waves shall murmur dirges sad and drear,
No storm! No wreck! No lone, sad, wandering grave!
But love made perfect! The clasp of vanished hands!
And Heaven's eternal benedictions Rest and Peace !
"There shall be no more sea!"



THE DOG AND THE SHEEP.

The Dog sued the Sheep for debt, of which the
Kite and the Wolf were to be judges. They, with-
out debating long upon the matter, or making any
scruple for want of evidence, gave sentence for the
plaintiff, who immediately tore the poor Sheep in
pieces, and divided the spoil with the unjust judges.
Justice can only be obtained by an appeal to
righteous judges.












25


"THERE SHALL BE NO MORE SEA!"









DOT ON TIPTOES.


DOT ON TIPTOES.

We call her Dot, because she is so very little.
She can't even see the things on the table without
standing on tiptoes. The wedding breakfast is
spread for Belle's wedding; and while all the
people are at church, Dot creeps in and looks
with perfect wonder at the grapes and pears and
oranges, and sighs and wonders when her wed-
ding-day will be. All in good time, Dot; all in
good time. You have much to grow, and much
to know, before your wedding-day comes!


ON GRANDPAPA'S KNEE.
THOMAS W. HANDFORD.
The cosiest place and the snuggest spot,
In the summer time
When the days are hot,
And Jessie is tired as tired can be,
Is just to climb up on grandpapa's knee.


THE CHILDREN.
"They are idols of hearts and of households,
They are angels of God in disguise;
His sunlight still sleeps in their tresses,
His glory still beams from their eyes."


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DOT ON TIPTOES.
A


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SUNSHINE.


SUNSHINE.

Hattie's face is as radiant as a summer morn-
ing. It is her birthday, and Papa has given
her a fan and a kiss for her birthday, and Mamma
has made her the sweetest, neatest, cutest lit-
tle Turkish cap; and Uncle Tom has sent her
a beautiful bouquet of flowers. Happy Hattiel
Her face may well be wreathed with smiles!



BEAUTIFUL THINGS.

O, many things are beautiful!
The bird that sings and flies;
The setting sun
When day is done;
The rainbow in the skies.

The gentle lamb, so innocent,
The dove so tender, true,
The violet,
With dew-drop wet,
So sweet and fair to view.
But there is one more beautiful,
More tender, sweet and mild:-
The girl or boy.
A parent's joy,-
The loved and loving child.


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29


SUNSHINE.


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CLOUDS.


CLOUDS.

Alas! poor Fritz! The beautiful little ship
Captain Cooper made for him is broken, and
he don't know how to mend it. His face is
full of clouds and the tears come down like
rain. Cheer up, Fritz! there are worse things
to mend than broken ships, and there's lots of
sunshine behind the clouds.



FAULTS OF OTHERS.
D. C. COLESWORTHY.
What are another's faults to me ?
I've not a vulture's bill
To pick at every flaw I see,
And make it wider still.
It is enough for me to know
I've follies of my own,
And on my heart the care bestow,
And let my friends alone.


NEAREST TO GOD.

The smallest child is nearest to God, as the
smallest planets are nearest the sun.


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31


CLOUDS.


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THE GALLANT SAILOR BOY.


THE GALLANT SAILOR BOY.

Your poets may sing of the pleasures of home,
Of the land and a bright sunny sky;
Give me the rough ocean with bosom of foam,
And a bark, when in chase, that will fly;
Though aloft to the clouds on the billow we soar,
And then sink to the valley below,
We danger defy, 'mid the hurricane's roar,
And reck not how hard it may blow!
Then, hurrah for the sea, boys hurrah for the sea !
The mariner's life, is the life for me.

The dear ones we love, when our pockets are lined,
Help to spend all'our rhino on shore,
And when empty Up anchor!" we're sure soon to find
A prize that will furnish them more.
All friends we avoid as we roam on the wave;
The sail that we welcome's a foe;
And should death heave us to, there's a ready-made grave
And down to the bottom we go !
Then, hurrah for the sea, boys! hurrah for the sea!
A mariner's life is the life for me.


THE EAGLE AND THE FOX.


An Eagle and a Fox formed an intimate
friendship, and decided to live near each other.
The Eagle built her nest in the branches of a tall
tree, while the Fox crept into the underbrush.


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* : .


THE GALLANT SAILOR BOY.



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34 WHAT ARE THESE LITTLE ONES THINKING ABOUT.


WHAT ARE THESE LITTLE ONES THINKING
ABOUT.
What are these little ones thinking about?
Very wonderful things, no doubt--
Unwritten history!
Unfathomed mystery!
They laugh, and cry, and eat, and drink,
And chuckle, and crow, and nod and wink,
As if their heads were as full of kinks
And curious riddles,
As any Sphinx.


THE SWAN AND THE GOOSE.

A certain rich man bought in the market a
Goose and a Swan. He fed the one for his ta-
ble, and kept the other for the sake of its song.
When the time came for killing the Goose, the
cook went to take him at night, when it was
dark, and he was not able to distinguish one bird
from the other, and he caught the Swan instead
of the Goose. The Swan, threatened with death,
burst forth into song, and thus made himself
known by his voice and preserved his life by
his melody.
A word in season is most precious.

L_____ __


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"WHAT ARE THESE LITTLE ONES THINKING ABOUT?"


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ROGER AND KITTIE.


ROGER AND KITTIE.

Roger was the family horse, aud Kittie was
the family cat. Roger was a beautiful horse and
Kitty was a beautiful cat. They were great fa-
vorites in the family, and they were very much
attached to one another. Kitty almost lived in
Roger's manger, and if you looked in when Roger
was feeding, you would be almost sure to find
Kitty purring against Roger's cheek, and if by
any chance Kitty kept away a whole day, Roger
would be restless; and every time the stable door
was opened, would look round as much as to say,
"Whatever has become of Kittie?" Even dumb
animals teach us lessons of mutual kindness.



BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES.
Buttercups and daisies,
Oh the pretty flowers!
Coming, ere the spring-time,
To tell of sunny hours.
While the trees are leafless,
While the fields are bare,
Buttercups and daisies
Spring up everywhere.




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ROGER AND KITTIE,


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A TROUBLESOME VISITOR.


A TROUBLESOME VISITOR.
That good old dog Floss, has a happy lit-
tle family--Gyp, and Fan, and Pug, and Ro-
ver-but she cannot make them understand
that they are safe and happy in their kennel,
and that if they wander they will be sure to
get into trouble. One day a hedgehog came
along, and out bounced Gyp and Pug to bark
defiance at the stranger. Gyp, not satisfied
with barking, made straight for the hedge-
hog; but one taste of his prickles was enough.
Back went Gyp, barking and yelling. Pug
was more cautious, and was satisfied with bark-
ing. Good old Floss takes little heed, she is
old enough to know that some puppies and
most men can only be taught by experience.

THE MAN IN THE MOON.
The man in the moon who sails through the- sky,
Is the most courageous skipper;
But he made a mistake when he tried to take
A drink of milk from the "dipper."
He dipped it into the "milky way,"
And slowly cautiously filled it;
But the ",Great Bear" growled and the "Little Bear" howled,
And scared him so that he spilled it.


















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A TROUBLESOME VISITOR.









SUNNYPATE.


SUNNYPATE.
Dear little Sunnypate
Waits for a kiss;
Oh, what a plague
And a treasure he is;
Clean little hands,
And white little brow,
Spotless his frock
And his pinafore now;
Cheeks like the roses,
And curls fair and bright;
Just for one moment
A beautiful sight.


THE FOX AND THE LION.

A Fox saw a Lion confined in a cage, and,
standing near him, bitterly reviled him. The Lion
said to the Fox, "It is not thou who revilest me,
but this mischance which has befallen me."


OUR BRAINS A CLOCK.
0. W. HOLMES.
Our brains are seventy-year clocks. The Angel
of Life winds them up once for all, then closes the
case, and gives the key into the hand of the Angel
of the Resurrection.


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SUNNYPATE.


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THE COTTAGE HOMES OF ENGLAND.


THE COTTAGE HOMES OF ENGLAND.
FELICIA HEMANS.
The Cottage Homes of England!
By thousands on her plains,
They are smiling o'er the silvery brooks
And round the hamlet fanes-
Through glowing orchards forth they peep,
Each from its nook of leaves,
And fearless there the lowly sleep,
As the birds beneath their eaves.

The free, fair homes of England!
Long, long in hut and hall
May hearts of native proof be reared
To guard each hallowed wall:
And green forever be the grass,
And bright the flowery sod
Where first the child's glad spirit loves
It's country and it's God!


WORRY.


Worrying is one of the greatest
happiness. Most of it can be
only determine not to let trifles
the largest amount of worrying
the smallest trifles.


drawbacks
avoided if
annoy us;
is caused


to
we
for
by


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THE COTTAGE HOMES OF ENGLAND.


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FROM CABIN BOY TO ADMIRAL.


FROM CABIN BOY TO ADMIRAL.
T. DIBDEN.

The Cabin-boy's over the sea;
For his sister and mother weeps he;
Till good conduct prevails, and homeward he sails,
To land his full pocket, with glee.

Next a Middy away o'er the wave,
'Tis his fortune in action to save
His officer's life in the heat of the strife,
And he lands at home happy and brave.

Now an Officer over the main,
Fresh laurels on ocean to gain,
Till, commanding a prize, his friends see him rise,
And a Captain's commission obtain.

The Captain adventures once more,
Returning a bold Commodore;
And, his wishes to crown, he comes up to town,
With an Admiral's flag at the fore.



THE FLOWERY PATH.
MARGARET LONSDALE.

Flowers bloom along the way that Duty treads;
And as thou goest on thy stern high path,
Glimpses will come to thee of heavenly joys
Transcending all the base world reckons of.



/.


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FROM CABIN-BOY TO ADMIRAL.


45










ROSE GAVE THE GIRL A BOUQUET OF FLOWERS.


ROSE GAVE THE GIRL A BOUQUET OF FLOWERS.
HORACE SMITH.
Your voiceless lips, O flowers, are living preachers;
Each cup a pulpit, and each leaf a book,
Supplying to my fancy numerous teachers
In lowliest nook.
Floral apostles, that with dewy splendor,
Blush without sin, and weep without a crime;
Oh may I deeply learn and ne'er surrender
Your love divine.
Not useless are ye, flowers, though made for pleasure,
Blooming o'er hill and dale, by day and night:
On every side your sanction bids me treasure
Harmless delight.


THE WOLF, THE FOX AND THE APE.

A wolf accused a fox of theft, but he entirely
denied the charge. An ape undertook to adjudge
the matter between them. When each had fully
stated his case, the ape pronounced this sentence:
"I do not think you, Wolf, ever lost what you
claim; and I do believe you, Fox, to have stolen
what you so stoutly deny."
The dishonest, if they act honestly, get no
credit.















, -- .-


ROSE GAVE THE POOR GIRL A BOUQUET OF FLOWERS.








THE LITTLE INVALID.


THE LITTLE INVALID.
Poor little Charlie Summers is sick, and, as
you see, his mother is pouring out for him the
medicine that is soon to make him well. He is
a quiet, patient little sufferer, and many who loved
Charley when he was well, seem more tender than
ever because he is ill. Apples and oranges, grapes
and flowers are sent to him daily with the kindest
words of love.

"JIMMY AND I."
K. P. OSGOOD.
Jimmy and I are fellows for play !
Never tired of it, rain or shine.
Jimmy was six the last birthday,
While I was only -sixty-nine!
*
And sadly the question bothers me,
As I stop in my play to look at him -
What will the twentieth century be,
If the nineteenth's youngsters are all like Jim?


CASTLES IN THE AIR.
If you have built castles in the air, your work
need not be lost; that is where they should be; now
put foundations under them.













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THE LITTLE INVALID.


__









WHAT THE FROG SAID TO PHIL GARDNER.


WHAT THE FROG SAID TO PHIL GARDNER.

"Now look here, Master Phil, it's all very
well for you to call me a miserable croaking old
frog. Perhaps I'm not very handsome, but I've
seen some of you boys who have no more beauty
than you can carry. Beside, you are mistaken
about me being miserable. I'm very happy, as a
rule, and that's why I sing so much, or croak, as
you call it. Some people like to hear frogs sing,
they know our singing is a sign of spring. But
now, Master Phil, if I were a handsome boy, like
you, I wouldn't be mean and throw stones at a
poor harmless frog; there now!" And with that
the frog flo,ped down into his pond.



TREASURE FOR TRYING.

Away with thy fear,
Hope on and hope ever !
Though winter be here,
Away with thy fear !
Soon the spring shall appear
With new life and endeavor.
Away with thy fear,
Hope on and hope ever!


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51






























































WHAT THE FROG SAID TO PHIL GARDNER.


tlP-._---~L---L--L~-)-ll__-~---Y- ~---








SYDNEY'S MORNING SALUTATION.


SYDNEY'S MORNING SALUTATION.
Sydney's mother is an invalid, and every
morning Sydney carries up a cup of coffee to
his mother's room; but which the poor, sick
lady enjoys most, the aroma of the coffee or the
smile of her bonny boy, it is hard to tell.

PROVERBS.
The thinkers must guide the toilers.
God's order is through love to light.
Goodness is better than genius.
We live to die, and die to live.
Better do a thing than wish it done.
Good servants should have good wages.
Patches are honorable, rags a disgrace.
Contentment is a pearl of great price.
Be slow to promise, quick to fulfill.
Liberty knows nothing but victories.
Idlers are always busy.
Think of ease, but work on.
It needs brains to deal with blockheads.
Every pea helps to fill the peck.
All are not saints that go to church.
Despise school and remain a fool.


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LYDNEY'S MORNING SALUTATION.


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THE DOWNFALL OF HAROLD.


THE DOWNFALL OF HAROLD.

Whew! But that was a tumble! Elsie had
just been swinging and gave up the swing to
Harold. He was just going to show her how
high he could go, when down he came to the
ground. Poor Elsie was afraid Harold was
hurt, but Harold learned this lesson, that it's
best to see that the rope is all right before you
swing very high.


WORTH REMEMBERING.

All is fine that is fitting.
Be not high minded.
The world knows nothing of its greatest men.
Despair of the future is disloyalty to God.
Second thoughts are often best.
Happy Sabbaths make happy weeks.
Playful youth makes tranquil age.
Avoid the man who never smiles.
Buy the truth at any price.
They who never think always talk.
Oil and truth get uppermost at last.
Industry is fortune's right hand.











































































THE DOWNFALL OF HAROLD.









A FATHER'S COUNSEL.


A FATHER'S COUNSEL.
Learn to live and live to learn,
Ignorance like a fire doth burn;
Little tasks make large return. 4

Toil when willing growth less,
"Always play" may serve to bless,
Yet the end is weariness.


THE DOVE AND THE CROW.

A Dove shut up in a cage was boasting of
the large number of young ones which she had
hatched. A Crow hearing her, said: "My good
friend, cease from this unreasonable boasting. The
larger the number of your family, the greater your
cause of sorrow, in seeing them shut up in this
prison-house."

A BEAUTIFUL MAXIM.
I live for those who love me,
For those who know me true,
For the Heaven that shines above me,
And waits my coming too:

For the'cause that needs assistance,
For the wrongs that lack resistance,
For the future in the distance,
And the good that I can do,


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A FATHER'S COUNSEL.


' v''


57'








THE AFFLICTED DOLL.


THE AFFLICTED DOLL.

Elsie Johnson had a beautiful doll, with blue
eyes that opened and shut, and the loveliest polka-
dot dress you ever saw. Well, dolls will get sick
the same as people will, and something was the
matter with Dolly's eyes--they wouldn't open.
Elsie was in great distress, and sent for her cousin
Bertie, whose Pa was a doctor. He put 6n his Pa's
coat and hat, and came with physic, and pow-
ders, and pills. He felt Dolly's pulse, and told
Elsie she must keep her very quiet, and put her
in a dark room.



HANDS AND LIPS.
Oh, what can little hands do
To please the King of Heaven ?
The little hands some work may try,.
To help the poor in misery,
Such grate to mine be given!

Oh, what can little lips do
To praise the King of Heaven?
The little lips can.-praise and pray,
And gentle words of kindness say,
Such grace to mine be given!





































































































THE AFFLICTED DOLL.


I _









THE SNOW BATTLE.


THE SNOW BATTLE.

Dr. Linton was always kind to his boys,
and after school one day he told them they
might have a snow battle if they would promise
to play fair and not lose their temper. There
were eighteen of them, nine on a side, and a
glorious time they had. They played for nearly
two hours, and when they returned for supper
their cheeks shone like roses in June.


GOLD.
THOMAS HOOD.
Gold! gold! gold! gold!
Bright and yellow, hard and cold,
Molten, graven, hammered and rolled,
Heavy to get and light to hold,
Hoarded, bartered, bought and sold,
Stolen, borrowed, squandered, doled,
Spurned by the young, but hugged by the old
To the very verge of the churchyard mold;
Price of many .a crime untold!
Good or bad a thousand-fold!
How widely its agencies vary-
To save, to ruin, to curse, to bless,
Now stamped with the image of good Queen Bess,
And now of a bloody Mary!


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61












































































THE SNOW BATTLE.




____________________________________________________________________________1










WHAT DO PUSSIES THINK ABOUT?


WHAT DO PUSSIES THINK ABOUT.

What do pussies think about,
All the day and all the night?
Well, they dream sometimes, no doubt,
When the mice are out of sight;
What do pussies think about
All the day and all the night?

Do they think of milk and mice,
Or. of mischievous young rats,
That to worry would be nice
For the jaws of little cats?
Pussy, dear, take my advice,-
Milk is sweeter far than rats.





GOOD ADVICE.

Help the weak if you are strong,
Love the old if you are young,
Own a fault if you are wrong,
If you're angry hold your tongue;
In each duty
Lies a beauty,
If your eyes you do not shut,
Just as surely
And securely
As a kernel in a nut.


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