• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Note
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 The royal shepherd : or, Love for...
 Scattering seed : or, Evil among...
 Wonders of yeast : or, The power...
 Brave deeds of a shepherd boy :...
 Vines and fruit trees : or, Shall...
 Water heaped up : or, The wonderful...
 The mysterious message : or, Panic...
 The wonderful water-jars : or,...
 The mysterious panic : or, Abundance...
 Good and beautiful : or, A godly...
 The week of wonders : or, Making...
 A peep into paradise : or, Happy...
 Feasting on forbidden fruit : or,...
 A hundred years' job : or, A marvelous...
 Too wicked to live : or, The greatest...
 Choosing companions : or, How the...
 A den of thieves : or, The rascals...
 The children's friend : or, Jesus...
 Seeking in earnest : or, Determined...
 Leaving a happy home : or, From...
 Burning the first fruits : or,...
 The voice of blood : or, A strange...
 Alone, yet not alone : or, The...
 The bow of beauty : or, A token...
 A royal welcome : or, The wanderer...
 Generosity abused : or, Forgiveness...
 Work and wages : or, settling with...
 Lessons from the stars : or, A...
 Three wonderful guests : or, Entertaining...
 Everything destroyed : or, Fleeing...
 The wonderful ladder : or, A stairway...
 The fruits of envy : or, Bartering...
 From prison to power : or, Good...
 Hungry and helpless : or, Boyhood's...
 Hard times : or, Much work and...
 A waif on the water : or, Floating...
 Freed from prison : or, Doors opened...
 Lessons from nature : or, New views...
 Advertising
 Back Matter
 Back Cover














Title: Delightful stories, or, Home talks out of the wonderful book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078890/00001
 Material Information
Title: Delightful stories, or, Home talks out of the wonderful book a series of one hundred delightful fireside stories, in the chatty, conversational style, in which Grandpa Goodwin narrates the most wonderful occurences recorded in the sacred volume in a manner to charm the young folks by the real romance they contain, and at the same time sow the good wheat of divine truth in fertile soil
Alternate Title: Hometalks out of the wonderful book
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Peltz, George A ( George Alexander )
Elliott & Beezley ( Publisher )
Publisher: Elliott & Beezley
Place of Publication: Philadelphia ;
Chicago
Publication Date: 1890, c1888
Copyright Date: 1888
 Subjects
Subject: Dummies (Bookselling)   ( lcsh )
Samples (Commerce)   ( lcsh )
Bible stories, English   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Sample books -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Genre: Children's stories
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Sample books   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by George A. Peltz ; richly illustrated.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note: Baldwin library copy is a salesman's sample book containing random pages and sample spines; and p. 149-150 torn affecting text.
General Note: Title page printed in red and black ink.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078890
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224444
notis - ALG4708
oclc - 181343862

Table of Contents
    Note
        Unnumbered ( 1 )
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
        Page xv
        Page xvi
        Page xvii
        Page xviii
    List of Illustrations
        Page xix
        Page xx
        Page xxi
        Page xxii
        Page xxiii
        Page xxiv
        Page xxv
    The royal shepherd : or, Love for the lowly
        Page 369
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
    Scattering seed : or, Evil among the good
        Page 374
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
    Wonders of yeast : or, The power of influence
        Page 380
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
    Brave deeds of a shepherd boy : or, Fit to become a king
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
    Vines and fruit trees : or, Shall we cut it down?
        Page 384
        Page 385
    Water heaped up : or, The wonderful crossing
        Page 202
        Page 203
    The mysterious message : or, Panic at the feast
        Page 298
        Page 299
    The wonderful water-jars : or, Serving his friends
        Page 328
        Page 329
    The mysterious panic : or, Abundance for starvation
        Page 263
        Page 264
    Good and beautiful : or, A godly queen's noble act
        Page 270
        Page 271
    The week of wonders : or, Making great things out of nothing
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 34
        Page 35
    A peep into paradise : or, Happy people in a happy home
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Feasting on forbidden fruit : or, Trifling with a serpent
        Page 40
        Page 41
    A hundred years' job : or, A marvelous piece of joiner work
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Too wicked to live : or, The greatest storm on record
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Choosing companions : or, How the lord got his helpers
        Page 333
        Page 334
    A den of thieves : or, The rascals turned out
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
    The children's friend : or, Jesus among the little ones
        Page 357
        Page 358
    Seeking in earnest : or, Determined to win
        Page 389
        Page 390
        Page 392
        Page 393
        Page 394
        Page 395
    Leaving a happy home : or, From peace and plenty to toil and tears
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Burning the first fruits : or, A wicked brother's brutal deed
        Page 51
        Page 53
    The voice of blood : or, A strange cry from the ground
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Alone, yet not alone : or, The unseen companion of a singular man
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The bow of beauty : or, A token of good things to come
        Page 78
        Page 81
    A royal welcome : or, The wanderer home again
        Page 396
        Page 397
        Page 398
        Page 399
    Generosity abused : or, Forgiveness for the forgiving
        Page 405
        Page 406
    Work and wages : or, settling with the servants
        Page 409
        Page 410
        Page 411
    Lessons from the stars : or, A grand future foretold
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Three wonderful guests : or, Entertaining angels unawares
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Everything destroyed : or, Fleeing from the burning city
        Page 116
        Page 117
    The wonderful ladder : or, A stairway to the skies
        Page 135
        Page 137
    The fruits of envy : or, Bartering away a brother
        Page 148
        Page 149
    From prison to power : or, Good brought out of evil
        Page 152
        Page 154
    Hungry and helpless : or, Boyhood's dreams fulfilled
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Hard times : or, Much work and little pay
        Page 162
    A waif on the water : or, Floating into fortune
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Freed from prison : or, Doors opened in a strange way
        Page 478
        Page 479
    Lessons from nature : or, New views of old subjects
        Page 506
        Page 507
        Page 510
    Advertising
        Page 511
    Back Matter
        Page 512
        Page 513
        Page 514
        Page 515
        Page 516
        Page 517
        Page 518
        Page 519
        Page 520
        Page 521
        Page 522
        Page 523
        Page 524
        Page 525
        Page 526
        Page 527
        Page 528
        Page 529
        Page 530
        Page 531
        Page 532
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

This copy
is a
salesman's
sample book
containing
selected pages
and sample
spines.






























E.
ly:























11, Z tI1A U

..........L









































































I HOME TALKS OUT OF THE WONDERFUL BOOK.


I I













DELIGHTFUL STORIES

OR


HOME TALKSOF TE WONDERFUL BOOK



A SERIES OF ONE HUNDRED DELIGHTFUL FIRESIDE STORIES, IN THE CHATTY, CONVER-
SATIONAL STYLE, IN WHICH GRANDPA GOODWIN NARRATES THE MOST WON-
DERFUL OCCURRENCES RECORDED IN THE SACRED VOLUME IN A
MANNER TO CHARM THE YOUNG FOLKS BY THE REAL
ROMANCE THEY CONTAIN, AND AT THE SAME
TIME SOW THE GOOD WHEAT OF DIVINE
TRUTH IN FERTILE SOIL.



BY

REV. GEORGE A. PELTZ, D.D.


FORMERLY ASSOCIATE EDITOR SUNDAY SCHOOL TIMES, ETC., ETC.



RICHLY ILLUSTRATED.



ELLIOTT & BEEZLEY,
PHILADELPHIA AND CHICAGO.
1890.


-4.























































Copyright 1888, by HUBBARD BROTHEB.













PREFACE.



THIS book is unique in some important respects. Bible stories
have been told in the words of the Bible and in the sermonizing or
didactic style, but seldom have they appeared in the real language
of the household and in the sprightly, conversational manner of an
intelligent family group about the home fireside.
This home style is that which childhood craves, which childhood.
understands. Not to be read to nor preached at is childhood's de-
light; but to be talked with, to have questions answered and expla-
nations given, to give and take in the bright word battles of the
home circle. For the lack of this attractive, nineteenth-century style,
books of Bible stories and the Bible itself lie neglected and unread
by numbers of well-meaning people. To popularize the rich treas-
ures of the Book of Books is the aim of GRANDPA GOODWIN'S
STORIEs.
In developing the fireside conversations of the book representative
characters have been chosen. Grandpa himself, Mrs. Reed, Mary,
Carrie, and Charley are just such people as live everywhere. There
is not an unreal character in the entire group, and the stories are
looked at through the eyes of childhood. They are clothed in the
language of home; they are brightened with the queries and com-









vi PREFA CE.

ments of d company of wide-awake juveniles; and yet, in them all
there is a scrupulous regard for truth and a constant pursuit of the
profitable. To children these stories will prove a genuine delight;
to parents or teachers a valuable help.
The source whence these stories are drawn is at once the most
ancient, the most varied, and the most authentic in the world. It
commands a wider and more profound reverence than any other
volume extant. Its narratives diverge widely from the beaten paths
of nineteenth-century life, but they invariably lead to the higher
grounds of a nobler and happier career. To effectively present
these romances of sacred writ in the most attractive form, the reader
is introduced into Grandpa Goodwin's home. Sitting there and
chatting with him and his dear ones, many a happy hour will be
passed and many a precious lesson will be learned.
The power of illustration has also been brought to bear in this
volume. It is adorned with nearly two hundred elegant engravings,
about half of which are full-page size. The value of such a pictorial
presentation of truth will be incalculable to the children and their
maturer friends. Every one of these illustrations throws light upon
the text with which it is used, and the one result of the volume
must be entertainment and profit.


























CONTENTS.


PAGE
THE WEEK OF WONDERS; OR, MAKING GREAT THINGS OUT OF NOTHING, .. ... 27
Genesis i, I-3I; Hebrews xi, 3.


II.


A PEEP INTO PARADISE; OR, HAPPY PEOPLE IN A HAPPY HOME, .. ..
Genesis ii, I-25; Revelation ii, 7; xxii, I-5.


FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT; OR, TRIFLING WITH A SERPENT, .
Genesis iii, I-2I.


. .. 36


. . 40


. 46


LEAVING A HAPPY HOME; OR, FROM PEACE AND PLENTY TO TOIL AND TEARS,
Genesis iii, 22-24.


V.

BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS; OR, A WICKED BROTHER'S BRUTAL DEED, .. .. .51
Genesis iv, 1-8; Hebrews xi, 4.


VI.

THE VOICE OF BLOOD; OR, A STRANGE CRY FROM THE GROUND, . .. 56
Genesis iv, 9--6; Matthew xxiii, 35; Hebrews xii, 24.












viii CONTENTS.


VII.
PAGS
GREATER AND RICHER; OR, FROM FARM LIFE TO CITY SPLENDOR, ......... 60
Genesis iv, 16-24.


VIII.
ALONE, YET NOT ALONE; OR, THE UNSEEN COMPANION OF A SINGULAR MAN, ... .64
Genesis v, 21-24; Hebrews xi, 5, 5.


IX.
A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB; OR, A MARVELOUS PIECE OF JOINER WORK, . ... 69
Genesis vi, 1-22; Hebrews xi, 7; I Peter iii, 20; II Peter ii, 5.



X.


TOO WICKED TO LIVE; OR, THE GREATEST STORM ON RECORD, .
Genesis vii, 1-24; Matthew xxiv, 37-39.


THE BOW OF BEAUTY; OR, A TOKEN OF GOOD THINGS TO COME, . .
Genesis viii, 1-22; ix, 1-17.



XII.

MAKING FUN OF HIS FATHER; OR, WHEN WINE IS IN WIT IS OUT, . .
Genesis ix, 18-29.


XIII.


. . 74


. 78


TOO BIG A JOB; OR, A SUDDEN CHANGE OF PLAN . . ...
Genesis xi, --9.


XIV.
SURPRISED AND DELIGHTED; OR, THE FIRST SIGHT OF A SPLENDID INHERITANCE, 91
Genesis xi, 26-32; xii, -20o.


XV.

TRUE NOBILITY; OR, STOOPING TO CONQUER, . . . . ... 95
Genesis xiii, 1-18.


. . 87













CONTENTS.


XVI.

HOME FROM THE FIGHT; oR, ROYAL HONORS FOR VICTORS, .
Genesis xiv, 1-24.


XVII.
LESSONS FROM THE STARS; OR, A GRAND FUTURE FORETOLD,
Genesis xv, 1-6; Hebrews xi, II, 12.


XVIII.
FAMILY TROUBLES; OR, THE SERPENT IN THE HOME, . . .
Genesis xvi, 1-16; xxi, I-21; xxv, 9-18.


XIX.
THREE WONDERFUL GUESTS; OR, ENTERTAINING ANGELS UNAWARES,
Genesis xviii, 1-33.


XX.

EVERYTHING DESTROYED; ox, FLEEING FROM THE BURNING CITY, .
Genesis xix, 1-38; Deuteronomy xxix, 23.


XXI.


A TIMELY RESCUE; oR, THE CHILD OF PROMISE SAVED, .
Genesis xxii, 1-19; Hebrews xi, 17-19.


XXII.

A QUEER COURTSHIP; OR, WHY SUPPER WAS DELAYED, ....
Genesis xxiv, 1-67.


PAGE
. . . 101


. . . 104


. . I07


1 II2


. 116


. . . 120





. . . 124


XXIII.

SHARP PRACTICE; OR, DIAMOND CUT DIAMOND, .............. .130
Genesis xxvii, 1-45; Hebrews xi, 2o.


XXIV.
THE WONDERFUL LADDER; OR, A STAIRWAY TO THE SKIES .. . ... 35
Genesis xxviii, 1-22; John i, 51.












CONTENTS.


XXV.

WHICH HE LOVED BEST; OR, SEEKING ONE AND GETTING TWO, .
Genesis xxix, 1-3o; xxx, 25-43; xxxi, 1-55.


PAGE
. . 140


XXVI.

A FAMOUS WRESTLING MATCH; OR, THE VICTORIOUS CRIPPLE ........... 144
Genesis, chapters xxxii-xxxiii.


XXVII.


S148


THE FRUITS OF ENVY; OR, BARTERING AWAY A BROTHER . . .. .
Genesis xxxvii, 1-36.


XXVIII.

FROM PRISON TO POWER; OR, GOOD BROUGHT OUT OF EVIL, .
Genesis, chapters xxxix, xl, xli.


XXIX.

HUNGRY AND HELPLESS; OR, BOYHOOD'S DREAMS FULFILLED,
Genesis, chapters xlii-lxvii.


XXX.

HARD TIMES; OR, MUCH WORK AND LITTLE PAY, . .
Genesis, chapters xlviii-1; Exodus i, I-16,


XXXI.

A WAIF ON THE WATER; OR, FLOATING INTO FORTUNE, .. ..
Exodus, chapters ii, iii.


XXXII.
A STRANGE SNAKE STORY; OR, ONE SWALLOWING A MULTITUDE,
Exodus iv, 1-23; vii, 1-12.


XXXIII.
FLYING FOR FREEDOM; OR, A MARVELOUS DELIVERANCE, ....
Exodus vii, 12-25; chapters viii-xv.


. . . 52


. . . 156


. . . 162





. . .. 165


S. ... 170


. . . 173












CONTENTS. xi

XXXIV.
PAGE
HANDS UP; OR, How THEY WON THE BATTLE, . . .. .. . . IS
Exodus xvii, 8-16.


XXXV.
A POOR EXCUSE; OR, WHAT CAME OUT OF THE FIRE . . .
Exodus, chapters xix, xxxii.


XXXVI.
THE GORGEOUS TENT; OR, WORSHIP IN THE WILDERNESS, . .
Exodus, chapters xxv-xxxi, xxxv-xl; Numbers xvii.


. . 188


XXXVII.
LIFE FOR A LOOK; OR, THOUSANDS CURED THOUGH FATALLY BITTEN, ..... .193
Numbers xxi, 4-9; II Kings xviii, 4; John iii, 14, 15.


XXXVIII.
FORTY YEARS A GENERAL; OR, SURRENDERING A GREAT COMMISSION, ..... .. 197
Numbers xxvii, 15-23; Deuteronomy xxxiv; Joshua i, 1-18; v, 13-15.


XXXIX.
WATER HEAPED UP; OR, THE WONDERFUL CROSSING, . . . ... 202
Joshua, chapters iii, iv.


XL.
VICTORY AND DEFEAT; OR, WHY THEY CONQUERED AND HOW THEY FLED, . 206
Joshua, chapters vi-viii.


XLI.
DIVIDING THE INHERITANCE; OR, REALIZING A GREAT POSSESSION, . ... ..210
Joshua, chapters x-xix.


XLit.
STRENGTH TURNED TO WEAKNESS; OR, How THE MIGHTY FELL, ... ..... .. 214
Judges, chapters xiii-xvi.


. . I83












CONTENTS.


XLIII.
PAGE
UNDYING DEVOTION; OR, Two LOVING HEARTS,. .... . . .. 219
Ruth, chapters i-iv.


XLIV.
BRAVE DEEDS OF A SHEPHERD BOY; OR, FIT TO BECOME A KING, .. ... .224
I Samuel xvii.


XLV.
A RUGGED WAY TO THE THRONE; OR, PATIENCE AND FORBEARANCE REWARDED, .230
I Samuel, chapters xvi-xxxi; II Samuel i.


XLVI.
THE WAYWARD SON; OR, TROUBLES AND TRIALS ABOUT THE THRONE, .. . 236
II Samuel, chapters xiv-xviii.


XLVII.


GREATEST AMONG KINGS; OR, SPLENDOR DAZZLING A QUEEN, . .
I Kings i, 5-53; chapters ii-x; Matthew vi, 28-30.


XLVIII.
THE RIVAL KINGS; OR, ROUGH ROADS FOR ROYAL FEET . .
I Kings xi, 26-43; chapters xii-xiv.


. 240


. . 245


XLIX.
MIRACULOUS FEEDING; oR, STRANGE SUPPLIES IN DIRE DISTRESS, . ... 249
I Kings xvii, 1-24; Luke iv, 25, 26.


L.
THE PLOWMAN'S APPOINTMENT; OR, CALLED TO A GREAT OFFICE . ... 254
I Kings xix, 15-21; II Kings, chapters ii-iv.



LI.
THE LITTLE CAPTIVE; OR, WHAT A SERVING MAID MAY Do, . . ... .259
II Kings v, 1-27.













CONTENTS.

LII.

THE MYSTERIOUS PANIC; OR, ABUNDANCE FOR STARVATION, . . .
II Kings vi, 24-33; vii, I-20.


LIII.

THROWN FROM THE WINDOW; OR, A WICKED QUEEN'S FEARFUL END, . .
II Kings ix, 30-37.


LIV.

GOOD AND BEAUTIFUL; OR, A GODLY QUEEN'S NOBLE ACT, . . .
Esther, chapters i-x.


LV.


SATAN LET LOOSE; OR, SUFFERING WITHOUT SINNING . .
Job, chapters i, ii, xlii.


LVI.

UNCOMFORTABLE QUARTERS; OR, THE RUNAWAY BROUGHT BACK,
Jonah, chapters i, ii; Matthew xii, 40.


LVII.

THE DISAPPOINTED PREACHER; OR, PROPHECY NOT FULFILLED,
Jonah iii, iv; Matthew xii, 41.


LVIII.

FOUR NOBLE BOYS; OR, RIGHT BETTER THAN ROYALTY, . .
Daniel i, I-21.


. . ... 275


. . 280


. . 284


. . 288


LIX.

FAITHFUL AND FEARLESS; OR, BRAVING DEATH FOR DUTY'S SAKE, . ... 293
Daniel, chapters ii, iii, vi.


LX.


THE MYSTERIOUS MESSAGE; OR, PANIC AT THE FEAST . .. .
Daniel v, 1-31.


. . 295


PAGE
S263





. 267


. 270












CONTENTS.


LXI.

WONDERFUL BABES; OR, THE KING AND HIS HERALD . . .. ...
Luke i, 5-So; ii, 21-40.


LXII.
CHRISTMAS CAROLS; OR, HEAVEN AND EARTH REJOICING, . . .
Luke ii, 1-20.


LXIII.


LED BY A STAR; OR, A LONG WAY TO WORSHIP . .
Matthew ii, 1-23.


LXIV.
PUZZLING HIS TEACHERS; oR, YOUTH WISER THAN OLD AGE, .
Luke ii, 41-52.


. . 313


. . . 3 7


LXV.
A BACKWOODS PREACHER; OR, CRYING IN THE WILDERNESS . . .32,
Matthew iii; Luke iii, I-2o; John i, 18-37; Matthew xiv, 1-12.


LXVI.


THE WONDERFUL WATER-JARS; OR, SERVING HIS FRIENDS, .
John ii, I-II.


...... .. 329


LXVII.
CHOOSING COMPANIONS; oR, How THE LORD GOT His HELPERS, . ... 333
Matthew x; John iii, 1-21.


LXVIII.
A DEN OF THIEVES; OR, TURNING THE RASCALS OUT, ..
John ii, 13-17; Matthew xxi, 10-13.


LXIX.
WALKING ON THE WAVES; OR, LORD OF THE SEAS, ............. 342
Matthew viii, 23-26; xiv, 22-33; Mark vi, 45-51.


S* 338


. 3o8












CONTENTS.


LXX.
PAGE
THE GREAT OCULIST; oR, SIGHT FOR THE BLIND, .. . . . .. 347
Matthew ix, 27-31; xi, 4, 5; Mark viii, 22-25; x, 46-52; John ix, I-41.


LXXI.
GETTING AT THE DOCTOR; OR, ODD WAYS OF GAINING A CURE, ...... 352
Mark v, 24-34; Luke v, 18-26.


LXXII.
THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND; OR, JESUS AMONG THE LITTLE ONES, . ... 357
Mark v, 21-43; ix, 17-29.


LXXIII.
CALLED BACK FROM THE GRAVE; OR, VICTORIES OVER DEATH, . ... 363
Luke vii, II-15; John xi, I-54.


LXXIV.
THE ROYAL SHEPHERD; OR, LOVE FOR THE LOWLY, ...
John x, 1-18; Luke xv, 1-7.


LXXV.

SCATTERING SEED; OR, EVIL AMONG THE GOOD, . .
Matthew xiii, I-30, 36-43.


LXXVI.
WONDERS OF YEAST; OR, THE POWER OF INFLUENCE, .
Matthew xiii, 33.


LXXVII.

VINES AND FRUIT TREES; OR, SHALL WE CUT IT DOWN? .
John xv, 1-8; Luke xiii, 6-9.


. . . 369


. . . 374


. . . 30


. . . 384


LXXVIII.
SEEKING IN EARNEST; OR, BOUND TO WIN, . . ...... .. 389
Matthew xiii, 44-46; Luke xv, 8, 9.













X-vi CONTENTS.


LXXIX.


A ROYAL WELCOME; oR, THE WANDERER HOME AGAIN,...
Luke xv, 11-24.


LXXX.
TOO LATE; OR, REJECTED AT THE DOOR . ..
Matthew xxv, 1-13.


LXXXI.
GENEROSITY ABUSED; OR, FORGIVENESS FOR THE FORGIVING,
Matthew xviii, 23-35.


.. .. .. ... 396


. . o40C


.... ....... 405


LXXXII.
WORK AND WAGES; OR, SETTLING WITH THE SERVANTS, . ... .... 409
Matthew xx, 1-16.
f


LXXXIII.
ANOINTING JESUS; OR, THE GOOD WORK OF Two WOMEN, .
Luke vii, 36-50; John xii, 1-7.


LXXXIV.
THE TRIUMPHAL MARCH; OR, A WORTHY WELCOME TO THE KING,
John xii, 12-16.


LXXXV.
GATHERING DARKNESS; oR, LOVE AND SORROW STRANGELY BLENDED,
John, chapters xiii-xviii; Mark xiv, 26-52.


.. .. .. .. 414


. .... 419


....... 424


LXXXVI.
BETRAYED AND BOUND; OR, STILL DEEPER DARKNESS . . .. 430
Luke xxii, 39-54; Matthew xxvi, 30-56.


LXXXVII.


MIDNIGHT ADVENTURES; OR, DESERTED AND DENIED, .. .....
Mark xiv, 53-72; Luke xxii, 21-34, 54-62.


S* 435












CONTENTS.


LXXXVIII.

A MOCKERY OF JUSTICE; OR, OVERAWED BY A MOB, . . . .
Matthew xxvii, 1-32; Mark xv, 1-21; Luke xxiii, 1-32; John xviii, xix, 1-16.


LXXXIX.


PAGX
S440


IT IS FINISHED; OR, THE TRAGEDY COMPLETED, . . . ... 447.
Matthew xxvii, 34-66; Mark xv, 22-47; Luke xxiii, 33-56; John xix, 17-42.


XC.


THE OPENED TOMB; OR, FROM DEATH TO LIFE AGAIN . . .
Matthew xxviii; Mark xvi; Luke xxiv, I-49; John xx, xxi.


. 454


THE CONQUEROR'S RETURN; OR, A MARVELOUS ASCENSION, .
Luke xxiv, 50-53; Acts i, I-II.


XCII.
TALKING IN STRANGE TONGUES; OR, POWER FROM ON HIGH,
Acts i, 12-26; ii; iv. 32-37; v, I-II.


. . . 461


. . . 466


XCIII.

POWER IN A NAME; OR, A LAME MAN CAUSED TO LEAP, . . .. 473
Acts iii, 1-26.


XCIV.


FREED FROM PRISON; OR, DOORS OPENED WITHOUT HANDS, ; .
Acts xii, 1-23.


XCV.
PICKING UP A PASSENGER; OR, THE RIGHT MAN IN THE RIGHT PLACE,
Acts viii, 26-40.


. . 478


. . 483


XCVI.
A BONFIRE OF BOOKS; OR, STRANGE HONORS FOR TRUE MEN, . . 489
Acts xiv, 8-18; xix, 1-20.












xviii


CONTENTS.


XCVII.
PAGE
IN THE PATH OF DUTY; OR, TEARS AND TERRORS POWERLESS, . . ... .495
Acts, chapters xx-xxvi.


XCVIII.


THE IMPERIAL CITY; OR, THE END AT HAND, . . . . .
Acts, chapters xxvii, xxviii.


S500


XCIX.
LESSONS FROM NATURE; OR, NEW VIEWS OF OLD SUBJECTS ....
Isaiah xxxii, 2; Song of Solomon ii, I; Luke xii, 4.


. . 506


THE VENERABLE PRISONER; OR, BROAD VIEWS FROM A NARROW ISLAND,
Revelation, chapters i-xxii.
























LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.





Grandpa's Stories from the Wonderful Book, . . . . FRONTISPECE.


Philip Doddridge Taught by Pictures (full page), .
Emerging from Chaos, ............. .

Expelled from Paradise, . . ...
Toiling for Daily Bread, . . ....
Burning the First Fruits, ...........
Slaying His Brother, . .......
Fleeing from the Dead (full page) . .
Building a City . . .......
Walking Heavenward (full page) . .
The Boatbuilder Taught . . .
The Dove Sent Forth (full page) . ..
Coming Ashore . ........
The Bow of Beauty, . ......
Cursed be Canaan, . . ....
Scattering of the Nations, ..........
A Splendid Outlook, . ......
Abram's Magnanimous Offer (full page) . .
Blessing the Victors ... . .....
Seeing Stars, ......... .....
Banished from Home. . . .
Entertaining Angels, . . .


PAGE
26

31
47
49
52

53
57
* 62
. 65

. 71

. 77
. 79
. 81
* 85
* 89
* 92

. 97
. 102

. 105
. o9
- ITS


. .. . . . . . . .. 117


A City on Fire, .












xx LIST OF ILL, USTRA TIONS.

PAGS
A Narrow Escape, ..... ...... .... . .......... 122
Seeking a Bride ........................ ........... 125
Meeting a Husband, ................... ................. 127
An Oriental Well-scene (full page) . . . . . . ... 129
The Wrong Man Blessed ................... ........ .... 133
The Wonderful Ladder ..... .... ........................... 137
Fixing His W ages, . . .. . . . . . . 141
Off for Home, .......... ................... 143
A Strange Wrestling Match, .................. ... ...... ...... .146
Reconciliation, . . . . . . .... . .. 147
A Wicked Sale, .................. .. ............... 150
Before the King, . . . . . . . .... 154
In the Place of Honor, ...... ... ........... ...... 157
The Unknown Brother (full page) . . .. .. . . 59
A Glad Meeting .......... .. .... .... .......... 161
Hard Times ................... .... .............. .163
Rescuing a Waif, ... ..... . . . . ... 166
Slaying the Tyrant, ....... ..... .. .................. 167
Burning, yet not Consumed (full page), . . . . . 169
Sticks Turned to Snakes, ....................... .... 171
Death in every House . . . . ... ..... . . 174
Buried in the Sea (full page) . . . . . . . 177
Celebrating Victory (full page) . . . . . . ... : 179
Winning the Battle (full page) ............................. 181
Worshiping a Calf, ... ........... ... .............. 185
The Tent of Worship, ................... ............... 189
Carrie's Plan of the Tabernacle, ............ .... .. ......... 9o
Blossoms on a Rod, ... .............. .. .. .. ........ 191
The Healing Serpent (full page), ... ...... .. . . 195
The New Commander, ...... .. .. .. ........... ....... 198
The Commander-in-Chief, ... . . . . . 201
Waters Heaped Up (full page) ..................... .. ... .. ... 203











LIST OF ILL USTRA TONS. xxi

PAGE
Carry Out the Memorials (full page), . . . . ... . 205
The Falling Walls of Jericho, ............................. 207
Recovering the Stolen Treasures (full page) . . . .... ..... 209
Five Kings in a Cave, ............................... 211
Dividing the Land by Lot, ............. .............. 213
Samson Slaying his Foes, ........ ...................... 215
Fall of Dagon's Temple, ................... ........... 218
Ruth and Naomi,. ........................... ........ 221
Ancient Israelites at their Meal (full page), . . . . ... ..... 223
Bearding the Lion in his Den (full page), . . . . ... ..... 225
Gathering Ammunition from the Brook (full page) . . . . .. 227
The Giant Beheaded (full page) . . . .. . ... 229
God's Chosen King Anointed, . . . . ... . . 231
Sparing a Sleeping Foe, .............................. .233
Death of Israel's first King (full page) . . . . . ... .235
Curses on a King, .................................. 237
David's Charge to his Son (full page), . . . . ... ...... 241
Royal Courtesies Interchanged (full page) . . . . .. .. 243
Dividing the Kingdom, ............................... 246
Death of the Young Prince (full page) .. . . . . . 248
Supplied in the Wilderness (full page) . . . . ... .. .. .250
Supplied in the City (fullpage) . . . . . . 251
Life for the Dead Boy, .............................. .253
The Mocking Children (full page) . . .. . . . 255
A Marvelous Jar of Oil (il page) ........................... 257
View of the Jordan, .................................. 260
Gehazi's Terrible Penalty (full page), . . . . . .. 261
Lepers Viewing the Deserted Camp (full page), . . . ... . 265
Thrown from a Window, .............................. .. .268
Scribes at their Work (full page), ....................... ..... .271
Mordecai in Honor (full page), . . . .. ... ... .. 273
Job in Sorrow (full page), ... .... ....................... 276
Job ia Prosperity, .......... . ........ 279
2











xxii LIST OF ILL USIRA TIONS.

PAGE
Tossed into the Sea, ... .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 2t r
Preaching in Nineveh, ........................ ......... 285
Nineveh's Great Palace, ............ ... ........ ....... 287
The Young Teetotalers (full page) . . . . . . 289
The Youthful Counsellor (full page), . . . . . .. 291
In the Den of Lions, ................................ 296
The Proud King's Outlook (full page), .. . . . . ..... .. .297
The Mysterious Handwriting (full page), . . . . ... ...... 299
Destruction of Babylon (full page) . . . . ... . . 301
John's Birth Foretold, ........ ..... ... ........ ........ 304
Mary and Elizabeth Rejoicing, . . . . ... . ..... 305
The Babe in the Temple, ............................ .... 307
The First Christmas Carol, .................. .............. 309
Chapel of the Nativity (full page), .......... ... ............ 310
Telling the Good News, . . . .. ... . . ..... 3
Led by a Star (full page), ............................... 315
The Boy in the Temple, .. ......................... 319
The Backwoods Preacher, . . . . .. .. .. . 323
Reproving the Soldiers, . . . . .......... . 324
"Behold the Lamb of God!" ..................... ... ... 325
A Joyous Feast (full page) .. ................. ......... .. 329
View of Cana (full page), ................... .. .... 331
The Night Interview, .................. ....... . ......... 334
"Go ye and Preach," .................. ....... . 335
Driving Out the Peddlers, .............. .' ................ 339
View of the Sea of Galilee (full page), . . .... . . 343
Walking on the Sea (full page) .......... . . . 345
Two Persistent Blind Men, . . . .. . . 349
Condemned for Ingratitude (full page), . .. . .......... 35z
A Successful Seeker (full page), . . . ... . . . 353
Seeking the True Physician (full page), . . . . .... 356
A Helping Hand for a Boy (full page), . .. . . ..... 358
A Helping Hand for a Girl (full page), . . . . 36












LIST OF ILL USTRA TIONS.


Life for a Dead Young Man, . ..

View of Bethany (full page), . .
Life for One Dead Four Days . .
The Fond Sheep-owner (full page) . ..
Bringing Back the Lost One (full page), .
Scattering Good Seed (full page), .. ..
Doing Mischief (full page), . .
Wonders of Yeast (full page) . .
Lessons from the Vine (full page), . .
Shall We Cut it Down? (full page) . .
Seeking Hidden Treasures (full page), .
Buying the Splendid Pearl (full page), .
Search for the Coin (full page) . ..
Home Again (full page), . . .
Too Late; or, The Foolish Virgins (full page),.
The Forgiving King (full page) . .
Dissatisfied with their Wages (full page), .
Jesus Anointed by Mary Magdalene, ..
Anointed by the Sister of Lazarus, . .
The Triumphal March, . . .
View of Jerusalem (full page) . .
Garden of Gethsemane (full page) .
Agony in the Garden (full page), . .
Arrested and Bound, . . .
The Fearful Denial (full page) . .
Pilate's Mockery of Justice . .
On the Way to Calvary . . .

The Sorrowful Way (full page) . .
Church of the Holy Sepulchre (full page), .
Laid in the Tomb . . .
Mary at the Opened Tomb, . .
The Joyful Meeting, . . .
The Wayside Talk (full page), . .


PAGE
364
365
367
371
373

375
S379
S383

385
. 387

* 390
* 39'
* 395
* 398
* 403
* 407
* 413
* 415
* 417
* 421

* 423
- 426

* 429

* 433
* 437
* 442

* 444
S445
* 449
* 453
* 456

* 457
* 459


~


xxiii











LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE
The Meeting by the Sea, ................... ....... . 463
Return to the Father, .. .... ............... ........... 465
Descent of the Comforter, .... .. ........... . . 468
Bringing in the Money (full page), .................. .. ..... 47

The Discarded Crutches (full page), . . . . . . .. 475

An Unexpected Liberation (full page), . . . . . . 48i
A Helpful Companion, ..... ................... ....... 485
Philip's Fountain, ....... . . . *** *... 487
Mistaken for Gods, ......... . . . . 490
A Bonfire of Books (full page), . .. . . . 493
A Tearful Parting, ..... . . . . 496
Pursued by a Mob (full page), ......... ..... . ............... 499
Ancient Style of Ships, ... .. ... . . . . ... 501
The Appian Way (full page) ......... ..... .............. 503
Paul and his Son in the Gospel (full page) .. ... .. . . ..... 505
Shadow of a Great Rock, .................... .. ......... 507
Lily of the Valley, ............ ......... . . 508
Caring for the Birds (full page), .............. . .............. 511


571


The Outlook from Patmos (full page) . . . .


xxiv















GRANDPA GOODWIN'S STORIES
FROM

THE WONDERFUL BOOK.









THE ROYAL SHEPHERD. 369



THE ROYAL SHEPHERD:

OR, LOVE FOR THE LOWLY.



MARY was very anxious for the early assembling of the
family, for she had a question which evidently was import-
ant to her and she wanted to ask it.
When they were fairly ready for work, she said: "I don't know
why Jesus should have been so much.concerned for the lame and
blind and all other suffering people. It seems to me He would have
enjoyed well people and happy people a great deal more."
"I am not surprised that you think so," responded Grandpa; "for
His love to men and His kind work for the lowly are really amazing.
Why He felt and acted so we may not be able to explain. His love
is always spoken of as above any other love-even as beyond that
of a mother."
Nobody can tell how much a mother would do for a child-can
they?" asked Carrie.
No; and nobody can tell what God would do, or what His Son
Jesus would do. There was one way in which Jesus often spoke of
Himself and His work that helps very much to make it plain."
"Tell us about that, please. I want to understand it better," said
Mary.
"In Palestine," began Grandpa, the raising of sheep is very ex-
tensively followed. Almost every man keeps some sheep, and many
men have immense flocks, thousands of sheep sometimes belonging
to one person. Many men follow the care of sheep as a trade;
they are known as shepherds, and most of their time is spent with
their flocks."
















































































THE FOND SHEEP-KEEPER.










372 THE ROYAL SHEPHERD.

matter how long the journey, how rough the way, how steep the
mountains, or how deep the valleys, He pushes on until the sheep is
found; then He lays it on His shoulders, rejoicing, and carries it
home in safety."
I'm not sure I know what Jesus meant to teach by that," said
Carrie, thoughtfully.
"Why, darling, it shows how He has sought and labored and suf-
fered for poor, lost men-just as we have seen Him doing. Such is
His concern that He would do all this for even one wanderer. And
when even one such is found and is brought back to serve Him, He
is glad. He is willing to toil, to suffer, to endure any burden for the
sake of the lowly ones He calls His sheep."
SYou remember the hymn," said Mrs. Reed, "which tells of the
ninety and nine which were safe in the fold while one had gone
astray. For this lost sheep the Shepherd went so far and worked
so hard, you remember."
"Oh yes, mamma shouted the girls; "and won't you sing it
for us ?"
"With pleasure," responded Mrs. Reed, stepping to the organ,
where she sang those beautiful words:
"There were ninety and nine that safely lay
In the shelter of the fold;
But one was out on the hills away,
Far off from the gates of gold.
Away on the mountain they heard it cry-
Sick and helpless and ready to die."
When Mrs. Reed ceased singing, Grandpa repeated from Psalm
xx'ii these words:
"The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to
lie down in green pastures: He leadeth me beside the still waters;
He restoreth my soul; He leadeth me in the paths of righteousness
for His .name's sake. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the
shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for Thou art with me; Thy rod
and Thy staff they comfort me."






























































24 BRINGING BACK THE LOST ONE










SCA ITERING SEED.


SCATTERING SEED;

OR, EVIL AMONG THE GOOD,



'r- HOSE talks of Jesus about shepherds and sheep must have
Been very interesting to the people who knew so much
about them," said Mary.
"Yes," answered Grandpa, "interesting and useful too. Jesus
always tried to make His lessons useful as well as attractive. He
took hold on what was familiar to the people, and used that to make
truth plainer. Many who heard Him were farmers. They knew all
about sowing seed as it was then done. To teach them Jesus once
represented Himself as a farmer sowing seed. His words were the
seed; He Himself scattered, or sowed it, as He taught."
"That was His parable of the Sower, wasn't it?" asked Mary.
"That was our Sunday-school lesson one day."
"Yes," answered Grandpa. "In Matthew xiii Jesus tells of a sower
who went out to sow. As he sowed, some seed fell on the path, or
road, where the soil was trampled hard and the seed could not sink
into it, but lay exposed on its surface, to be trodden under foot, or
to be carried off by birds. This, He said, was like people who listen
to the truth, but are careless about it. Then Satan, like a bird which
follows the sower, catches away the seed, or some wicked thought or
act crushes out the good thought, and it is lost."
"That's like a boy who don't attend to his lessons in school-he
never gets up."
"That's it exactly, Charley," said Grandpa; "and one who does
not attend to the Lord's lessons will never get up either. The Lord
also said that some seed fell in stony places, where there was not










378 SCATTERING SEED.

growth of evil. Satan has been there, or some of his helpers. The
enemy of all good has done it."
"But can't Jesus stop this mean work?" asked Carrie. "He
surely is able to do so."
He commands us to watch against it, and to give Satan no chance
to do his mischief. He promises His help while we watch and fight
this enemy, and He has assured us that by and by Satan and his
helpers shall be overthrown and all their work shall be rooted out."
"But why don't Jesus root it out now and be done with it?" asked
Mary.
"The servants of the man whose field was sown with tares asked
the same question. They wanted to go right out and root up every
tare, but the master said, No, lest they should root up the wheat also.
So in this world the Lord sees some benefits from allowing evil and
good to remain for the time side by side. But the harvest time came.
The tares were gathered and burned and the wheat was saved. So
shall it be in the end of the world. The evil shall be destroyed, the
good shall be preserved."
Well, I don't want to be any tare," said Charley, in an emphatic
tone. "I'm for the wheat every time."
As Charley's words ended, his mother very gently began, to sing
the words:
"Scwing the seed by the daylight fair,
Sowing the seed by the noon-day glare,
Sowing the seed by the fading light,
Sowing the seed in the solemn night;
Oh what shall the harvest be?
Oh! what shall the harvest be?"
The children quietly gathered about her, joining in the chorus,
:nd so the entire hymn was sung.





















































































DOING MISCHIEF.








380 WONDERS OF YEAST.



WONDERS OF YEAST;

OR, THE POWER OF INFLUENCE.



^" RANDPA, there's an old saying, Give the devil his due,"
said Mary. "It's not very pretty to use, but I don't mean
it in any wicked way. But is it fair to charge the devil,
or Satan, with all the wrong done in the world ?"
By no means, my dear. If he were responsible for it all, why
should any of us be condemned for our misdeeds ? The fact is, we
are influenced by other persons, and we influence ourselves, too, for
good or for evil by the thoughts we allow and by the surroundings
we choose."
But how can we help having evil thoughts and feelings or meet-
ing with bad company sometimes?" asked Carrie. "If I could
always be at home I could do well enough, so far as company is
concerned; but at school, in the street, almost everywhere, there are
bad people and I cannot keep clear of them."
"An old writer says, We cannot prevent evil birds from flying
over our heads, but we can keep them from building nests in our
hair."
Oh! I see, Grandpa," laughed Carrie. Evil thoughts and com-
panions will come and I can't help that, but I can refuse to entertain
them. That's what I try to do, and I mean to all the more, since I
understand it better. They may fly over my head, but they shall not
make nests in my hair."
"Nor mine," said Charley, rubbing his own short crop. "They
wouldn't do much in my stubble-field. Carrie's curls would be a
heap better for them."








WONDERS OF YEAST. 381

"This same idea Jesus urged when He said to His disciples, Watch
ye and pray, lest ye enter into temptation. Temptation is abundant
and everybody will feel its power. Jesus Himself was tempted; it
is said He was tempted in all points like as we are. To be tempted
is not wrong. He was sinless, though He was tempted. To enter
into temptation is the wrong. We must watch and pray against that."
"Oh! I see," responded Carrie. "Entering in is letting the birds
build nests-isn't it ?"
Yes; and that is the sin which we must carefully avoid. Resist
temptation; do not yield."
That's clear to me now," said Mary. "I see just where I must
take my stand."
The Lord taught a lesson on this subject in a very pretty way,"
continued Grandpa. He took hold on a simple thing that every-
body understood-that is, the leavening or raising of bread, as it was
then done in every house."
"What! setting bread to get light? Did Jesus talk about such
every-day things as that?"
Yes, Mary. In the parable of the Leaven He said: The kingdom
of heaven is like unto leaven which a woman took and hid in three
measures of meal till the whole was leavened."
"Didn't He explain any more what He meant?-I don't just see
His meaning," asked Carrie.
No; and for that reason good men have had different ideas as
to just what He did mean. But see how the case stood. Women
then had little mills with which they ground the meal as they needed
it. They would spread a clean cloth on the floor; place their mill-
stones on it; put in the grain; turn the stones by hand; gather up
* the meal which worked out at the edges of the stones; put it into a
pot or dish to mix it; add their leaven or yeast; let it raise enough,
and then bake it."
"Why, that's the way we do, only we don't grind our dwn meal,"
said Mary.








282 WONDERS OF YEAST.

"They did it then as many people now grind their own coffee. ..
The mill-stones were two round, flat stones laid one upon the other.
The top stone had a hole at the middle into which-the grain was
poured; it also had an upright handle by which it was turned. The
grain was ground fine between the stones and the meal worked out
at the edges, ready for use after it had been put thtoagh a fine
sieve." '
"I'm glad we don't have such trouble nowadays,, id Mary.
"But when meal is mixed and yeast or leaven is put into it, the whole .
of the dough gets light. What did Jesus mean by saylT the king-
dom of heaven was like that ?" ..
He meant that good influences or bad influences were like yeast.'":. : : .
They would affect any boy or girl, man or woman, into.whom they:*'
entered. The whole lump-be it a .child, a man. 'or a nation-feels
the power of good or of evil as a hlmp of dug.ih f1el's he yeast."
"Oh! I see!" exclaimed Carrie. -*And tha.; another way that
evil comes into the world-isn't i .9. ne -bad man .influences an-
other."
"Yes; as Solomon says, One sinner troyeth much.good. n
the other hand, one righteous-person does much good. -We are. ll*
like yeast; we influence those a ~t.. forgood or for evil; ,Wl" raise '
them or sink them." -
"And they who are about us influ eife us also," added Mrs. 'eed.
"And our own thoughts influence us,tpo," added Mary.
"Dear me! we are all a set of yeast-cakes-aren't w sad
Charley, with his shrug of the shoulders and his thrust of his hand'
into the pockets of his trousers. ''::.
"I read," said Mary, "of a young lady whose father refused her -
permission to go to a public ball. She urged that it would not hurti '/.
her. He picked up a dead coal from the fire and told her to take
it, saying, It won't hurt you. No, said she, but it will soil my hanss.
So, said he, if not hurt by the ball you may still be soiled."
"A good illustration of the power of influence," said Grandpa. '





















































J BRINGING OUT THE MEMORIAL STONES


.r ,

,r .. ". "' *
.1C .
--N.




~u ~~ III
:-~,_~~_ ,-~~e;=~r~i~-,7.B 1 Oi



W-N-2-




BRNIGOT H EOIA TNS

V;









BRAVE DEEDS OF' A SHEPHERD BO Y


BRAVE DEEDS OF A SHEPHERD BOY;

OR, FIT TO BECOME A KING.



G RANDPA," began Charley, "you spoke last night of David.
Tell us about him to-night, please. He's just splendid."
He began splendidly," answered Grandpa. He was a
brave and noble boy, and such boys are fit to become kings."
"Tell us what he did when a boy, Grandpa," said Carrie. "I like
to hear about boys-that is, boys who have grown up to be good
men."
Or boys who may grow up to be good men," answered Grandpa,
pleasantly. Well, Carrie, dear, when David was a boy he watched
his father's sheep. One day he missed a lamb, and on looking for
traces of ithe discovered tracks of two great beasts. Examining
closely, he found that a lion and a bear had both been among the
sheep and had carried off this lamb. Instead of running away, as
most boys would have done, he caught up the sword and shield he
had to defend himself with in case of danger and off he started on
the trail of these wild beasts. Soon he came to a cave, into which
they had gone, and into which he plunged, sword in hand. A mo-
ment more, and both bear and liofi lay dead, and the lamb was
delivered out of their very mouths."
Hadn't they killed it ?" asked Charley, in surprise.
It seems not. They had caught it as a cat catches its kittens and
as lions and bears catch their cubs, and so had carried it by the loose
skin of its back without doing it serious harm."
Good boy !" shouted Charley.
But the boy was too good to claim for himself the credit of this




























LI


"" RAVE SOEpHEI3D Boy.


E~
---------~









BRAVE DEEDS OF A SHEPHERD BOY.


great deed. When he told of it to King Saul, he gave God all the
praise. It was God, not David, who did it. This success made him
feel sure of God's help, and because he was sure of it he was not
afraid to fight the great giant Goliath."
Oh! yes, Goliath Tell us about him," cried Charley.
"Well," said Grandpa, good-naturedly yielding, "the Philistines
and the Israelites were at war, and David's brothers were in the
army. One day David went to take them some food, and while there
he saw the great, boastful, swaggering, giant soldier of the Philistines.
He was about nine feet high, very stout and strong, and so skillful as a
fighter that no man dared to meet him in battle. So Goliath used to
walk along near to the soldiers of Israel and dare them to come out
and fight him. David heard these defiant,, insulting remarks of the
giant, and he was very indignant. He heard, too, that King Saul had
promised high honors to anyone who would kill the giant. So David,
mere boy that he was, offered to go himself and fight Goliath. His
brothers ridiculed him, but Saul heard what he had said and sent for
him."
Hey! that was good!" cried Charley. "The boy who kept sheep
sent for to see a King! I'd like to see a real King."
"And the King was pleased with the boy-so pleased, indeed, that
he allowed David to go and fight Goliath while both armies stood
and looked on. Saul wanted to give David armor such as the sol-
diers wore and a sword, but he was not used to these; so off he
scampered to a brook near by, where he selected a lot of smooth
stones such as he was accustomed to throw from his sling. With his
shepherd's staff and his sling, the stones being in his shepherd's bag
at his side, he went to meet the giant, who raged and swore at the.
idea of a boy with a stick and a bag of stones coming against him,
as though he were a dog."
"I'll bet he was mad. Go in, David !" shouted Charley.
"David did go in and kept cool, too. When near enough, he
shouted that he came in the name of the Lord of hosts, who would














































r-- -


THE WONDERS OF YEAST.








VINES:AND FRUIT TREES.


VINES AND FRUIT TREES;

OR, SHALL WE CUT IT DOWN?



S DON'T wonder everybody wanted to hear Jesus preach and
Teachh" said Carrie. "He made sermons from sheepfolds, from
the fields, and the seeds, and everybody could understand what
He meant."
SHe did make everything very clear," answered Grandpa, and
that is why it is said, The common people heard Him gladly. They
were not educated, and could not understand most of their teachers;
but Jesus they could understand, He made everything plain, so they
movedd to hear Him."
Tell us about some other talks of His," added Charley. "I feel
like the common people did-I'm glad to hear Him."
One day Jesus and His disciples were together, and He began
to talk about vines. Why He spoke of vines we do not know, but
probably over the door of the room where they sat there were vines.
As they entered they may have noticed the fruit or the branches,
and so had this subject in mind. He began by saying, I am the vine,
my Father is the husbandman or vine-dresser, ye are the branches.
So He caught every man's attention. All who were present and
heard Him began wondering why they were called branches, and
why He called Himself a vine."
"And why did He do .it, Grandpa? That was a queer way to
begin. I want to know what He meant," exclaimed Mary.
"So the disciples did, and they listened, as you will. His first les-
son from the vine was that His followers, if really true disciples,
would be 'o Him as branches are to a vine. He would support



















































































CARING FOR THE BIRDS.









202 WATER HEAPED UP.



WATER HEAPED UP;

OR, THE WONDERFUL CROSSING.


L AST night, Grandpa," began Carrie, "you said Joshua led
the children of Israel into Canaan. But they were on the
other side of the Jordan, and wasn't it a big river? How
did he get them across ?"
"Sure enough, my child. How did he? Jordan is a deep, rapid
river at the season when they crossed.. It then overfloweth all its
banks, as the Bible record says. There was no bridge, nor had they
any boats, but an immense number of men, women, and children,
with live. stock and goods, had to cross: How could it be done ?"
Swim 'em," answered Charley, with the promptness of an. old
commander; swim 'em. There's no better way to cross rivers."
How absurd !" exclaimed Carrie. "Even'if all the men could
swim, which I doubt, for they had not been much about the water;
but even if they could, imagine thousands of women and children and
babies swimming across with all their goods. They'd have a job of
it, and lots of them would be drowned."
"Jess so," answered the boy; with a laugh. "Jess so, and that's
where the fun would come in."
"What other way was possible?" asked Grandpa. "How else
could the crossing be made ?"
"As it was done at the Red Sea," said Mary. "I don't know how
else it could be done."
"That was the chosen way. God'gave orders that the priests
should take up the ark of the covenant and, with it on their shoul-
ders, that they should march directly into the water. They started,
but no sooner did their feet reach the brink of the river than the



















































































PREPARING THE DOCUMENTS.









THE MYSTERIOUS MESSAGE.


THE MYSTERIOUS MESSAGE;

OR, PANIC AT THE FEAST.



S O-MORROW I leave you for a few weeks. I will write to
you while I am away, but do you think you can read my
messages ?"
"Why, Grandpa, of course we can," declared Carrie, earnestly.
"I'd like to see a message from you that I couldn't read."
"Well, darlings, I suppose you will be able to do that, but before
I am off I will tell you about a message that nobody could read ex-
cept one man. It was not only a mysterious message, but it caused
a fearful panic at a splendid feast."
"Where did it happen ?" asked Charley.
"At Babylon, in the time of Daniel. Nebuchadnezzar, of whom
we have talked, was a great King, and he became very proud. It
is said thatihe walked upon the palace where he dwelt in Babylon,
looked out over all the splendors of that great city, and said, Is not
this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by
the might of my power and for the honor of my majesty? While he
tickled his own vanity by such talk, God decided to humble him. He
lost his reason and was turned out to live among the beasts of the
fields. At last God restored his reason, and as an old man he was
both humble and devout. Years passed by, and one of his descend-
ants, probably his grandson, Belshazzar by name, sat upon the throne.
He was proud, wicked, and rich. He cared little for good men, and
hardly knew that Daniel still lived."
"Where was Daniel then ?" inquired Carrie.
"He was in Babylon, probably in the palace itself, but not in honor





























































DESTRUCTION OF BABYLON









THE WONDERFUL WA TER-JARS.


THE WONDERFUL WATER-JARS;

OR, SERVING HIS FRIENDS.



" W did Jesus begin His work?" asked Mary, when all were
again ready for a new story.
His first public act was a miracle done in the village of
Cana, not far from Nazareth, where Jesus lived. There was a wed-
ding-feast at this place, probably among the kindred of Mary, the
mother of Jesus, and both He and she were present."
"So Jesus went to wedding-feasts?" said Carrie, seemingly a little
surprised at this festal side of His-life.
"0, yes! and to many other feasts, as you will see; but wherever
Jesus was, whether ata feast or a funeral, He was always full of love and
good works. At this feast His mother had charge of things. Many
guests were there, probably more than had been expected, and so it
happened that in the midst of their festivities the wine gave-out, and
there was no way to get more."
"Wine !" exclaimed Carrie, in surprise. "Did Jesus go to a feast
where they used wine ?"
"He did; and that is not all of it, either, as you will see. Mary was
not pleased that when she was managing affairs this awkward failure
of the wine should occur-so she hurried to Jesus, no doubt confident
that He would help her, and said, They have no wine. He did not
promise to do anything to relieve the difficulty, but somehow she was
sure He would, so she said to the servants, Whatsoever He saith
unto you, do it."
"That's a good text to remember," said Carrie. Whatsoever He
saith unto you, do it. I like that."



















' I


GATHERING AMMUNITION FROM THE BROOK.









THE MYSTERIOUS PANIC.


THE MYSTERIOUS PANIC;

OR, ABUNDANCE FOR STARVATION.



" r ELL us another story about Elisha," was the unanimous de-
mand of the children when they met Grandpa again; so he
began as-follows:
Near the close of Elisha's life he was in the city of Samaria. The
Syrian army had besieged it, and it was shut up so closely that no
one could go out or come in. Food soon became very scarce, so
that all kinds of animals were eaten for food, and even human flesh
was so used. When everything was at its worst, Elisha quietly told
the people that on the next day food would be abundant. Nothing
was less probable. The great army around the city meant to starve
the people into surrender. So unlikely was Elisha's prophecy that
the people ridiculed his statement, and one great man of the city de-
clared that this could not be even if the Lord should open windows
in heaven."
Pretty badly off if that could not relieve them," commented Mary.
"But that was exaggeration."
"They were badly off-so badly, indeed, that mothers killed,
cooked and ate their own babes to escape starvation."
Horrible !" exclaimed Carrie.
It was horrible indeed," answered Grandpa; and you can easily
imagine something of the sufferings that filled the city. All were
hungry and emaciated for want of food until strength was gone and
they looked like living skeletons. Fever and delirium seized many
of them. Such as were able to move prowled about like hungry
hyenas seeking a morsel to eat. Here and there mothers, half-















































































IN SIGHT OF THE DESERTED CAMP.








GOOD AND BEAUTIFUL.


GOOD AND BEAUTIFUL;

OR, A GODLY QUEEN'S NOBLE ACT.



" A FTER you went to bed last night," began Mrs. Reed, "I told
Grandpa I was afraid you would all have bad dreams, that
was so terrible a story about Jezebel! But to-night we are
to offset last night by the story of another Queen who was both good
and beautiful."
The children all declared they had -no bad dreams, though Carrie
said that two or three times she fancied herself thrown out of a win-
dow. But all agreed they were glad to have learned about the
fearful end of that bad woman, and were now ready to hear about
one who was better.
"And who is this better Queen, my dears?" was Grandpa's open-
ing question, to which Charley, for want of a better answer, responded.
Queen Victoria; but Mary came to the rescue, declaring her belief
that Esther was the one.
"Yes, Esther is the one of whom I want to tell you. She was
young, beautiful, and good. With many other Jews, she was a cap-
tive in Persia, but her beauty brought her to the notice of the King,
Ahasuerus, and he made her Queen. He was a selfish, brutal man,
killing people or honoring people as he pleased. Esther was an
orphan; her uncle, Mordecai, had brought her up. He was a proud,
stern old man, who always did what was right, and so displeased
many persons, among them Haman, the ruler next to the King.
This man began to plan, therefore, not only to kill Mordecai, but all
his kindred too. He soon persuaded the King to order the general
slaughter of the Jews, and-"




















































































" DEAR CHILD. ARISE."









THE WEEK OF WONDERS. 27


THE WEEK OF WONDERS:

OR, MAKING GREAT THINGS OUT OF NOTHING.


" THEN Grandpa comes I will ask him," said little Charley
Reed to his sister Carrie, who had been telling him how
the world was made. Her teacher had told her that God
made all things out of nothing. Carrie was but two years older than
Charley, yet she thought herself quite competent to be his teacher.
But Charley was full of questions, and it was not many minutes
before he had completely puzzled Carrie, and it was his unsatisfied
curiosity about this making of the world that prompted his resolution
to ask Grandpa about it.
Carrie and Charley, with their older sister Mary and their mother,
lived at Grandpa's house, their father being away from home much of
the time attending to business. Grandpa, or Grandpa Goodwin,"
as many persons called him, was Mrs. Reed's father, and he was
very fond of his little pets," the grandchildren. But his fondness
was not of a foolish sort. It did not show itself in candies and cakes
half so often as in kind and wise words and acts, which made the
children happier and better. They believed in Grandpa. They were
sure he knew everything, and that he could do everything that was
worth doing. Grandpa Goodwin did know a great many things, for
he had always loved to read good books and to listen to wise men,
and he had a wonderfully happy knack in telling what he knew.
Charley waited very impatiently for Grandpa's return. He had
never seen anything made out of nothing. His top, he argued,
was made out of wood and iron. His pocket-knife was made
of iron and steel and bone. His shoes were made of leather,









28 THE WEEK OF WONDERS.

and leather was made of skins, and the skins had grown on cows.
So Charley thought over very many things, but they all were made
out of something. Then he thought how big the world was and how
many things were made up in it. Where did all the dirt come from,
and the rocks that make the great mountains? Then he thought
about the ocean, which he had seen at Long Branch, and he wondered
where all the water came from. So his ideas grew bigger and
bigger, and there were so many things he wanted to ask about that
he wished and waited and looked and longed for the sight of Grandpa
hurrying home. At last Charley did see him coming, and ran to
meet him. Hardly waiting for the kiss Grandpa stooped to give him,
he broke out very eagerly with the question, "Where did God get
things to make the world of, Grandpa ?"
Grandpa Goodwin was too wise a man to answer such a big
question carelessly. He never gave the children a false or evasive
answer. He used to say, "When a child wants to learn, then is the
time to teach." So Grandpa did not answer Charley's question, but
roused his curiosity still further by asking, How many things did
God need to make a world ?"
"Oh! I don't know," said the boy, "but ever so many things, I'm
sure. There are stones and trees and dirt and water and horses
and--oh! I don't know, Grandpa; but tell me, where did God get
them ? Did He make them out of nothing? Carrie said He did,
but He didn't, did He? He couldn't do that, could He, Grandpa ?"
By this time they were fairly in the house, and Grandpa felt more
than ever that what he might say should be wisely said, so he told
Charley that after supper they would sit down for a good talk on
how God made the world.
When supper was over the family gathered in the sitting-room
about the centre-table, on which a bright light burned. Grandpa
was in his easy-chair, while Charley, restless and eager, was close
beside him. Carrie looked a little anxious, as though half afraid that
her well-meant lesson of the afternoon would prove incorrect. Mary









THE WEEK OF WONDERS.


had brought her Bible, which she opened at the first chapter of
Genesis, so that she might see what was there said about the
creation. Mrs. Reed sat in her sewing-chair doing some fancy work,
and anticipating a pleasant evening.
Now, Grandpa," began Charley, "do please tell us how God
made the world. I am almost crazy to hear all about it."
"To tell all about it," replied Grandpa, "is more than any man can
do. We have neither time nor knowledge for so great a task. But
I can tell you many things about it, and shall do so very willingly.
To give us a fair start, will Mary please read the first two verses of
Genesis ?"
Mary had her eye on the place in an instant, and read: "In the
beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth
was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of
the deep: and the Spirit of God moved.upon the face of the waters."
When was the beginning ?" asked Carrie, who had listened very
intently to these verses.
Nobody knows when it was," said Grandpa. "It was very, very
long ago when God began His work upon the heavens and the earth."
"But," interposed Mary, "my Bible says it was four thousand and
four years before Christ."
"Your Bible does not say so, Mary. The notes put in its margin
by the good men who edited it say so; but this is no part of what
God said. Those good men wanted to make the Bible plain for its
readers. They figured out that Adam was created four thousand
and four years before Christ came, but that time is probably far too
short. The beginning, however, was long before Adam was
created."
"Why," said Carrie, "did not God make all things in six days ?"
"Yes, Carrie, but not in six short days such as we have. A day may
be a very long period of time. God's seventh day of rest from crea-
ting has lasted six thousand years already. If the other days were as
long, thirty-six thousand years passed between the beginning and









30 THE WEEK OF WONDERS.

the time of Adam's creation. The fact is, that many more years
passed-how many, nobody knows. But that far-off beginning was
not God's beginning. He never had a beginning. He is eternal.
He always did live, and always will live. And in that beginning God
was able to create the heaven and the earth."
What does create mean, Grandpa ?" asked Charley.
"Mary may read you an answer from the dictionary. That, I
think, will give the clearest and best explanation."
"Create," said Mary, who quickly found the word, "means-to
bring into being; to form out of nothing; to cause to exist."
"Yes," said Grandpa, "and that is exactly what God did. He did
not take a quantity of material and make it into a sun, a moon, a
star, or a world, but He brought them into being; He formed them
out of nothing; He caused them to exist, as the dictionary explains
'create.' In Hebrews xi, 2, it is said, 'Things which are seen were
not made of things which do appear;' that is, nothing appears any-
where out of which the things we now see-the heavens and the
earth-were made."
This verse in Hebrews," said Mary, who had turned to the text
quoted by Grandpa, also says, The worlds were framed by the word
of God.' What does that mean ?"
It means that they were made, not by any work or effort of God,
but simply by His command. The third verse of Genesis tells us,
' God said, Let there be light; and there was light.' In one of the
Psalms we read, He spake, and it was done; He commanded, and
it stood fast.'"
"I told you so, Charley," shouted Carrie, who was delighted to
find her afternoon's teaching approved by Grandpa.
"Well," said Charley, "that's a new way to make things. 'He
spake, and it was done.' I wish I could make things I want so,
easily. I'd speak for a lot of 'em, I know."
But what is meant by this," asked Mary, as she again read from
Genesis-"'The earth was without form and void'?"









THE WEEK OF WONDERS. 31

"Simply that it had none of the regularity and beauty we now see.
But God was taking care of it. His Spirit was there bringing things
into proper shape. At first total darkness rested everywhere, but
God spoke, and light broke in, showing for the first time the difference
between day and night. Thus much was done in God's first day of
creating."
"His Monday," said Carrie, "for it was His first work-day."


"And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters."-Genesis i, 2.
"Yes, you may call it so," said Grandpa, "only remember it was
not a day of twenty-four hours, but-what ?"
"A very long day," they all answered, Mary adding the remark,
"Thousands of years long."
"What was God's Tuesday's work?" asked Charley, catching at
the new way of naming God's days.








34 THE WEEK OF WONDERS.

He made the sun, moon, and stars,' to give light upon the earth,' the
seventeenth verse says. Why were they needed to give light, when
light had already been given ? Or, rather, how could there be any
light at all before they were created."
"I don't wonder at your questions, Mary," said Grandpa. "Many
older heads have been puzzled at that point. Light had come to
the earth, but because of the dense vapors, the sources of light had
not appeared. We have light on cloudy days, though we do not
see the sun. But when the mists cleared away, and the open
firmament appeared, then the sources of light became visible, as if
at that moment they had been newly made."
Oh! I see," said Mary. "God made them appear on that day."
"Just so. If a person had been looking on to report what
occurred, he would have described this day's work just as the Bible
does. Indeed, when God showed Moses how the world was made,
so that Moses might write it in the book of Genesis, He probably
showed a series of visions, each giving a new view of the progress
of creation, and each forming a new day in this week of wonders."
The Friday of that week was a great day, wasn't it, Grandpa ?"
said Mary, looking up from her Bible, for then God made all the
birds and fishes."
Yes," said Grandpa. "Up to this time there was no living
creature in all the world-no beasts in the forests; no birds among
the trees; no fish in the waters ; no reptiles in the grass; no insects
in the air. But the earth was ready for animals to live upon it,
and so God spoke again. In an instant flocks of birds rose in the
air, flitted among the branches, or waded in the streams. And
fishes at once began to stir the brooks, the rivers, and the seas.
For the first time, a chorus of praise went up to God from the
throats of birds. Life abounded everywhere, and every creature
was full of praise."
Oh !" cried Charley, "that was splendid Mother took me to see
ever so many stuffed birds and fishes in the museum, and they were









THE WEEK OF WONDERS. 35

so pretty-all colors and shapes and sizes-and God made all of
them, and lots more, and did it all in one day. That's something
grand, I declare !"
Yes, Charley, and many other kinds of birds and fishes-far
more than are found in all the museums of the world. The
splendid colors of humming birds, peacocks, cockatoos, birds of
Paradise, and innumerable others, were all the work of God in that
one day"
"Well, I am sure God loves pretty colors, then," said Carrie,
"and pretty forms too, for what can be prettier than birds with
their gay plumage ?"
"And their sweet voices, too," said Charley, for what can be
sweeter than the singing of birds ?"
But we must hasten to the last day," said Grandpa, glancing at
the clock. On the sixth day God made all the land animals, birds
only excepted. Creatures with wings, and those with fins, were
already living, but now the great beasts of the forest were created.
Some of them were far larger than any known to us. The cattle,
too, were created on this day, and all creeping things. Over the
hills the flocks then scampered for the first time. In the meadows
the cattle grazed, and beasts of prey ranged through the forests.
None were old or lame or sick. It was a glorious world, but God
had one more glory to add. This was the creation of man. He
was formed to be ruler over all other created things, and to be the
companion and loving servant of the Creator Himself. But we must
stop for to-night. To-morrow, if you wish, we will take a peep into
Paradise, and see man in this happy home."
The "good nights were then said, and well pleased with their
chat on thq week of wonders, the little party scattered.









36 A PEEP INTO PARADISE.




A PEEP INTO PARADISE;

OR, HAPPY PEOPLE IN A HAPPY HOME.


ERE we are !" shouted Charley; all ready for our prom-
ised peep into Paradise."
--- "Glad to see you," answered Grandpa Goodwin, as he
seated himself in his easy chair. Let us see what Paradise means."
"I have it!" exclaimed Mary. "I found it in the dictionary. It
means (i) The Garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed;
(2) A place of bliss-a region of supreme delight; (3) Heaven."
"Very good, Mary. The word first meant a beautiful piece of
country, such as we see in the great parks of our cities. The Bible
does not give this name to Adam's home, yet it is so appropriate
that by everybody the Garden of Eden is called Paradise. The ac-
count given of this garden is very short. We are simply told that
God planted it eastward in Eden, that it was well watered every-
where, that every tree pleasant to the eye and good for food was
there, that it was, in short, what its Bible name means-a garden of
Eden-that is, a garden of delight."
"And don't we know anything more of how it looked?" asked
Carrie, with evident disappointment.
"We do not know, but we can fairly imagine a great deal of how
it looked. This is what the great English poet, John Milton, did in
his wonderful book called Paradise Lost. From the many splendid
gardens he had seen before he became blind he selected the most
beautiful things and put them all together in his imaginary garden
of Eden. Your mother may read us some of Milton's descriptions
of Adam's happy home in Paradise."










A PEEP INTO PARADISE. 37

Mrs. Reed, on Grandpa's suggestion, turned to her well-used copy
of Milton and read several selections. Among them these:

"In this pleasant soil
His far more pleasant garden God ordain'd;
Out of the fertile ground He caused to grow
All trees of noblest kind for sight, smell, taste-
And all amid them stood the tree of life."

"Concerning the stream which watered the garden," continued
Mrs. Reed, "Milton speaks thus:"

'Rolling on orient pearl and sands of gold,
With mazy error under pendant shades
Ran Nectar, visiting each plant, and fed
Flow'ers worthy of Paradise, which not nice art
In beds and curious knots, but nature boon
Pour'd forth profuse on hill and dale and plain.'

"Again, in describing the splendid groves of Paradise, Milton
speaks of them as-

"' Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm,
Others whose fruit burnish'd with golden rind
Hung amiable. .
Betwixt them lawns, or level downs, and flocks
Grazing the tender herb, were interposed,
Or palmy hillock, or the flow'ry lap
Of some well-watered valley spread her store,
Flow'rs of all hue, and without thorn the rose.' "

Mrs. Reed laid down her book. The children were all attention,
for she had read so clearly that they could catch the meaning of every
word. Then Grandpa resumed his talk.
"Into this beautiful home Adam and Eve were put, not to live in
idleness, nor yet to work hard, but, as the account says, to dress the
garden and to keep it-a pleasant and beautiful business, I am sure.
Nothing could be more delightful."
3









40 FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT.


FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT;

OR, TRIFLING WITH A SERPENT.


"/\ GRANDPA!" began Carrie, as the family came together
IJ after tea; "I have .thought so much to-day about Adam
and Eve. What a pity it was they did not stay in their
happy home! Why were they sent out of Eden, anyway? I don't
see what great harm there was in eating that fruit."
Probably no harm at all in merely eating that fruit. I do not
suppose it was poisonous, or unwholesome even. The harm was in
disobeying God. He forbade them to eat that fruit; they disobeyed
and did it deliberately. It was as clear a case of refusal to obey as
ever occurred."
"Yes, I know that," replied Carrie; but then it was so little a
thing-just to eat some fruit that looked so nice."
If it was so little a thing, the greater was the folly of not allowing
God to have His way about it. But it was not so little as it seems.
God had said, Do not eat. Adam and Eve each said, I will eat. It
was pure, simple, inexcusable disobedience of God. Wasn't it,
Carrie ?"
Well, yes, Grandpa. I know it was; I must admit that. But
why did God let them get into so much trouble about so little a
matter ?"
If we really love a person we show it, not by doing things which
are easy and pleasant to ourselves, but by doing things which are
hard, which require self-denial, but which please or help the person
we love. You show love to your mother, not by eating your food
and enjoying your play, but by leaving your play to serve her, or by









FEASTING ON FORBIDDEN FRUIT.


omitting some favorite article of food when she thinks it may do you
harm. So Adam and Eve showed their love to God, not by enjoy-
ing all that they were free to enjoy, but by doing without the one
thing which God forbade. Some test of their love was necessary,
and God made it just one little thing. The result showed that they
did not love and honor Him enough to yield that one little point.
They preferred their own way to God's way."
"Well, Grandpa," said Carrie, in more of a submissive manner,
"I think I understand it better. They ought to have obeyed God;
but I am sorry, all the same."
We are all sorry about it, darling. A great deal of trouble has
come to the world from that willful disobedience. It turned the lives
of men into a wrong direction at the. very start. It was the pebble
in the brooklet's bed which turns the course of the entire stream.
And all this trouble came from trifling with a serpent."
"Well, I don't understand that," said Mary. "I read about that
serpent in Genesis iii, and I don't know what it means."
To help us understand, suppose Mary reads Revelation xx, 2,"
said Grandpa.
Mary quickly found the place and read: "He laid hold on the
dragon, that old serpent, which is the Devil, and Satan, and bound
him a thousand years."
Here we see who is the serpent that did the harm. It is the
source of all evil and the opposer of all good, known as Satan or
the devil," said Grandpa.
But wasn't there any snake in the business, then ?" asked Charley,
seemingly disappointed at this explanation of the story.
Perhaps not," replied Grandpa. "Satan may have entered into
a genuine snake, and so have quietly glided up to Eve and talked
with her; or he may have made himself look like a snake, and so
have come near her; or he may have come to her in a gliding,
stealthy way simply, as a snake would approach, and so have sug-
gested his evil ideas. This is my own notion of the case. He came









A HUNDRED YEARS JOB. 69


A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB;

OR, A MARVELOUS PIECE OF JOINER WORK.

SEVERAL evenings had passed and Grandpa had been unable

to meet the children for their chat on Bible subjects, but at
last he was again with them, and they clamored earnestly for
another story.
Well," said the kind-hearted old gentleman, "of whom shall we
talk to-night?"
Of anybody you please," said Mary. "Everybody interests me
when you talk about them."
"Thank you, Mary," said he, smiling. "I will tell you about a
man who, at five hundred years of age, began a job which lasted a
century. He was a great-grandson of the oldest man that ever
lived. Who was that man ?"
"Methuselah !" shouted they all.
But," added Grandpa, with a merry twinkle in his eye, "how
could he be the oldest man when he died before his own father ?"
"Why, he couldn't," said Charley, very positively, "or his father
would have been the oldest man."
"I know, Grandpa," shouted Carrie, clapping her hands. His
father was Enoch, who didn't die at all."
"Oh! yes, I forgot," said Charley. "So he did-I mean, so he
didn't-for God took him to heaven without dying."
But who," asked Grandpa, was the man who undertook this big
job of work when he was so old ?"
Silence rested on the company for a moment, and then Mary spoke
up somewhat doubtfully: "You mean Noah, don't you? It took
5









70 A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB.

him a hundred years to build the ark, but I didn't think he was so
old when he began."
You have hit it, Mary. I mean Noah," said Grandpa. He was
one of those singular men who walked with God, as Enoch did.
And the Bible calls him just and perfect, and says he found grace, or
favor, in the eyes of the Lord. The rest of the world was so wicked
that God determined to destroy all men and animals, but Noah and
his family God determined to save. For this purpose God set Noah
at that marvelous piece of joiner work-the building of the ark. No
person sympathized with the good man in his queer undertaking,
though many must have helped him. I am sure the people laughed
at him and called him a crank; but Noah worked away in faith, as it
is said in Hebrews xi, and moved with fear, too, for he fully believed
that the flood would come, and so he pushed on with his work."
What was the shape of the ark ?" asked Mary. I have seen ever
so many pictures of it and no two of them are the same."
Nobody can answer that positively," replied Grandpa. It is not
likely that it had a rounded prow, like modern ships, for such work
was then unknown, in all probability, and such a prow would have
been useless, as the ark was not to sail and to be steered. A great
covered, scow-like affair, a sort of floating barn, would have answered
every purpose, and is probably more like the ark Noah built."
How big was the ark ?" was the next question. This came from
Charley, whose mind ran to the practical side of things.
That is not positively known," replied Grandpa, because the
length of the cubit in which its size is stated is not entirely clear.
But we are sure that the ark was at least four hundred and fifty feet
long, one hundred and fifty feet wide, and forty-five feet high, and
that its appearance was more like an immense block of warehouses
than an ordinary ship."
Why was it made so big, Grandpa, when only one family was to
sail in it ?" asked Carrie.
Because," said Grandpa, "with that family there needed to be









A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB. 71

kept, for a year or more, enough domestic animals to serve for sacri-
fices and for all future needs of men until another supply could be
raised. Birds, also, and many other living creatures were to be kept
there, and immense quantities of provisions were needed for them
while in the ark and to supply them for a considerable time after they


"And Noah did according unto all that the Lord commanded him."-Genesis vii, 6.
should leave it. The greatest ship ever built was the Great Eastern,
which has about the same carrying capacity as had Noah's ark."
How did Noah manage to build such a monstrous affair, with
nobody to help him?" asked Mary.









A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB.


He worked on it for a long time," said Grandpa. "No doubt his
family and servants worked with him, and at times other help was
hired as needed. Very likely, the neighbors would occasionally lend
a hand, by way of a frolic if for no better reason. They cared
little for his supposed freak, but went on in their own ways, eating,
drinking, and carousing right before Noah's eyes, and under the very
shadow of the ark worshiping their dumb idols, while he was hard
at work."
But how could Noah get everything just right ?" asked Carrie.
"I think he would have made lots of mistakes."
"God showed him how to do it. The wood to be used, the
height of the stories, the number and size of the rooms, the window,
the door-everything, in short, was directed by the Lord, to whom
Noah was always attentive and obedient. That was the way by
which he avoided mistakes," said Grandpa.
But why didn't other people come and help Noah, and get saved
in his ark ?" asked Charley.
Simply because they did not believe God," was the reply. "I
am sure Noah urged them, for Peter calls him 'a preacher of
righteousness,' and Paul says he condemned the world,' so we may
judge that he was not silent. He did preach. At his work and in
his rest, he told the story over and over, and warned the people of
the coming flood. Every blow of his axes and hammers was a call
to men to turn from their sins and be saved, and yet nobody came.
That is why only Noah and his family were saved. Nobody else
was willing to enter the ark."
"When the work was all done," asked Charley, did the flood
come right off?"
No. The ark was finished, the rubbish was cleared away, and
it stood complete, but unoccupied, until God one day said to Noah,
' Come thou and all thy house into the ark.' Seven days were then
allowed them to get settled in the great boat. It was a busy week.
Noah's family, the beasts, the birds, the food, the seed, everything









A HUNDRED YEARS' JOB. 73

needed for the long voyage and the wonderful change which was at
hand, was brought and stowed away safely; and then the Lord shut
him in' and shut out all the world besides. So the hundred years'
job was ended, the ark was occupied, and everything was ready for
the threatened flood."
"Oh! tell us about that," cried Charley.
"Yes, do, please do," echoed Mary and Carrie; but Grandpa
shook his silvery head and said, Not to-night, my dears. To-mor-
row night we will talk about that, if nothing prevent."
"I remember," said Mrs. Reed, "a little tract I saw when I was a
girl. Its title was Noak's Carpenters."
"Noah's carpenters !" exclaimed the children, Mary asking, "Who
were they, pray ?"
Why," answered their mother, the men who at one time and
another did work on the ark. Though they helped prepare the
vessel which saved Noah and his family, yet they themselves were
lost. They built an ark, but for them it did no good. They are
dead, but many of the same stock live to-day."
"Why who, mother, are like them to-day ?" asked Carrie. "I don't
know anybody who is so foolish."
Don't you, darling? Let us see. Sunday-school children who
gather in the poor or contribute their money to send tracts and books
to the destitute or to aid the work of missions, and yet do not for them-
selves enter the ark of God's full service, are like Noah's carpenters.
Parents who instruct their children in the doctrines of the gospel,
and yet fail to illustrate these doctrines in their lives and to seek a
personal interest in the Lord's work, are like Noah's carpenters."
"Oh! I see, I see," answered Carrie, "and I, for one, will try to be
in the ark."
"And I," answered Mary; to which Charley gave his not uncim-
mon," Me too "









74 TOO WICKED TO LIVE.



TOO WICKED TO LIVE;

OR, THE GREATEST STORM ON RECORD.



T 'VE been thinking about the people who were shut out of the
I ark, Grandpa," said Carrie, opening the conversation of another
evening. "Why were they shut out and' drowned ?"
"Because the world had become so full of wickedness that God
determined to destroy all its inhabitants. They were too wicked to
live. God gave them time to repent though. For a hundred years
or more work on the ark went ahead, and Noah preached to them.
But they did not become better; so at the end God shut them out of
the ark and they all perished."
Mustn't they have felt awfully when they saw the ark shut?" said
Mary.
I doubt it," replied Grandpa. "The final loading up of the ark
was probably a great frolic for them. Getting in the animals and
provisions was like a circus day in a country town. Everybody turned
out to see the sights. Some may have had misgivings; but there
was no sign of a storm, so they quieted their fears. Perhaps a few
had anxiety in the stillness of the night which followed, but when
clouds began to gather and torrents of rain to fall, then, no doubt,
they were full of fear and wished themselves safely in the ark."
It must have rained mighty hard to make a flood big enough to
drown everybody."
"It did rain hard, sure enough, Charley," replied Grandpa-" so
hard that the Bible says, The windows of heaven were opened. Win-
dows mean flood-gates-gates which keep back floods of water. It
rained as if such gates were opened in the skies, allowing fearful









TOO WICKED TO LIVE.


torrents of water to be poured upon the earth. It may be that up
to that time rain had never fallen, which would make these torrents
a fearful surprise. It is said also that the fountains of the great deep
were broken up; that is, the waters rolled in over the land as if their
banks had been washed away. Men then lived east of the Mediter-
ranean Sea where a slight sinking of the ground would permit water
to flow from the Black and Caspian Seas on the north, from the Pa-
cific Ocean by way of the Red Sea and Persian Gulf on the south,
and from the Mediterranean Sea on the west. By causing the land
to sink even a little, this whole country would quickly be under water
deep enough to cover every hilltop."
But I don't see, Grandpa, how the sinking of that one part of the
earth could make a flood all over the world."
I do not suppose there was a flood over all the world, Mary.- All
the world inhabited by man was flooded. What need was there of
more ? What the Bible says applies to this narrower limit just as well
as to the entire world. Nor do I suppose all existing animals went
into the ark. Why should they? All such as might be destroyed
by the flood went in and were saved."
That's a new idea," exclaimed Mary, "but I must admit it seems
to be right."
Were n't there lions and tigers in the ark, Grandpa ?"
Why should there be, my boy? They live far beyond where the
flood reached and were in no danger of being blotted out, even though
some of them were drowned. I don't believe any wild animals were
there, though in this opinion I have against me all the picture-books
and Noah's arks of the toy stores."
Pshaw! the ark wasn't half as grand, then, as I thought it was."
You thought it was a menagerie, didn't you, Charley ?" asked
Mary, with a laugh. Charley made no answer, but looked cross.
"How long did the flood last ?" asked Carrie.
"Rain fell forty days and nights, but the ground continued to sink
even longer, and the flood rose forty days more. Then the waters









76 TOO WICKED TO LIVE.

stood over the hilltops for a hundred and fifty days. Then they
began to flow off as the land rose again, and at the end of seven
months the ark rested on the top of Mount Ararat. In two more
months lower hilltops appeared. In forty days more Noah sent out
a raven, which found plenty of dead bodies to feed on and did not
return to the ark. Next he sent out a dove, which found nothing
suiting its pure tastes, so it came back. After another week the
dove was sent again, and this time it brought back a branch from an
olive tree, which showed that the trees were budding. In another
week the dove was sent again, but it did not come back. Noah
then knew that the ground was fit for man to live upon. It was one
year and ten days from the time Noah went into the ark till God told
him to go out of it."
Mustn't there have been fearful suffering during that flood?" said
Carrie, sadly.
No doubt there was," replied Grandpa. "When rain began to
fall and water to flow in from the seas the people were startled, but
they hoped it would soon be over. The first night must have been
terrible. Driven from their houses, they huddled together on higher
ground. Men, women, children, cattle, sheep, horses, dogs, and even
wild beasts, were there. All were wet, cold, shivering, panic-stricken.
The awful night dragged through only to bring a day of terrors.
Cattle bellowed, sheep bleated, dogs howled, men shouted, women
screamed, children cried. Some, caught in the rushing waters, were
quickly drowned; others clambered to higher places, and were there
overtaken by the rising waters; some reached the highest hilltops,
but death reached them even there; some died from fright, some from
exposure, some from hunger, but more by drowning. Men, beasts,
birds, and serpents clustered on the highest places, all struggling for
life. Still the waters rose until every trace of life was gone except
the ark, which floated in safety over a deluged world."
"That was awful," said Charley. "I'm glad I wasn't there."









CHOOSING COMPANIONS. 33



CHOOSING COMPANIONS-

OR, HOW THE LORD GOT HIS HELPERS.



" RANDPA, you spoke last night about a man named Nico-
demus who was a friend to Jesus; was he an apostle ?"
G'- No, Carrie. He was a ruler of the Jews; that is, a mem-
ber of their great council, the Sanhedrim, about which we shall hear
more as we talk on. He was a wise and honest man. He had known
of Jesus and His miracles, which had convinced him that Jesus was
certainly a teacher sent from God. Desiring to know more of God,
he sought out Jesus that Jesus might teach and help him. Desiring
no interference with his plans, he went by night and had a quiet, pri-
vate talk with the Lord."
"How lovely that must have been !" exclaimed Carrie.
"Yes, it doubtless was so. There were many things Nicodemus
could not understand, and he frankly said so; but Jesus explained
them and taught him of God's wonderful love, and Nicodemus be-
came a true disciple of Jesus, though not of the open, active sort that
the apostles were."
"Did he ever do any great thing for Jesus ?" asked Mary.
"One that we know of, but probably many more. He it was who
with the rich man Joseph went to Pilate and begged permission to
take the body of Jesus from the cross and bury it. This has immor-
talized his name in the early Christian history."
That was noble, certainly," said Mary, for almost everybody left
Jesus then. But how did Jesus get His disciples at first?"
"So far as the apostles were concerned, Jesus gathered them to
Himself in various ways."










334 CHOOSING COMPANIONS.

"What is meant by apostles, Grandpa ?" asked Carrie.
"The word means, men sent out. The name is specially given to
those men whom Jesus sent out to preach and to work for Him."
"Who were they?" asked Charley.
. fW. i S ,-,--, ._;.Ei' l W.11R8lll l illll:ll ll liillllB ll lllll l illl I.ll lll ll lllulll'llll lil l i li .


Nicodemus answered and said unto him, HIow can these things be?"-John iii, 9.

"Mary may turn to Matthew x, 2-4, and read the answer to your
question."
Mary read: Now the names of the twelve apostles are these:
The first, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother; James,
the son of Zebedee, and John his brother; Philip. and Bartholomew ;









338 A DEN OF THIEVES.



A DEN OF THIEVES;

OR, THE RASCALS TURNED OUT.


" '\ID you ever know what a tremendous stir Jesus made in
DJ the Temple one day in the early part of His ministry?"
"Why, no, Grandpa," answered all the children. "What
was it ?-Do tell us."
You remember Carrie's plan of the Tabernacle, with its Holy of
Holies, its Holy Place, and its Court.* The Temple was on the
same general plan, but it was a solid structure of stone-not a mov-
able one of curtains and poles, like the Tabernacle. It had its Holy
of Holies and its Holy Place. Around these was the Court of the
Priests, where none but they and their helpers, the Levites, were
permitted to enter. Around this was the Court of Israel, where the
men of Israel who came to worship might stand. Beyond this was
the court where the women and Gentiles might go-a court, in fact,
that was common to everybody. This was the place where Jesus
made the stir."
"What did He do there, Grandpa ?" urged Charley, whose expec-
tation was aroused for something lively.
One day when the feast of the Passover was about to begin,
Jesus went into this outer court of the Temple and found it crowded
with tables and cages and stalls and all sorts of business contri-
vances. There were men with coins spread out, ready to make
change, so that exact money could be had with which to make pur-
chases or to make gifts to the Temple treasury. Oxen were needed
for sacrifices, and right in the Temple were stalls, and rude cattle-

See page 19o.


1~1_~__ ~___ ___~ ~_i__ ;_I___









A DEN OF THIEVES.


dealers were there to make a trade with any purchaser; others were
selling lambs and doves and provisions and catch-penny wares of
all sorts."
"A sort of cattle show," said Mary, "or country fair-wasn't it,
Grandpa ?"


'' And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he arove them all out of the temple."-John ii, I5.

"Not unlike such.gatherings; and of course this was very improper
for the house of God. Jesus said, when He saw it, that while this
place was called a house of prayer, these dealers had really made it
a den of thieves."









340 A DEN OF THIEVES.

"The people there were a rascally, cheating set, I guess," said
Mary.
"Yes; they were there solely to make money-honestly if they
could, but to make it at any rate. They had no respect for the place
or its services. When Jesus went to the Temple and saw this He
was full of indignation. Twisting up a bunch of cords into a scourge
or whip, He charged on the money-changers and cattle-dealers,
overturning their tables, spilling their goods, scattering their money,
loosing their cattle, and driving the entire crowd pell-mell out of the
Temple."
"Good!" shouted Charley; "served them right. But why didn't
they turn on Him and bounce Him ?"
"Don't you remember what the old proverb says ?-The wicked
flee when no man pursueth, but the righteous are bold as a lion. He
was righteous; they were in the wrong. He was not afraid; they
were. Nor could any of the official guards of the Temple stop Him,
for He was doing what they ought to have done long before, and
they knew it. He was doing a good work for a good place when
He turned out those base intruders."
"It seems odd to see Jesus having such a time with those men,"
said Carrie.
"I guess those chaps kept away after that. They wouldn't want
to be whipped out that way many times."
No, Charley. They made so much money there that they soon
crept back, and later in His life Jesus did the very same thing over
again. This was on the last day He spent in Jerusalem before His
crucifixion. So He began His work by driving intruders from the
Temple, and He ended it in about the same way."
"Too bad that they should act so, but it isn't very different from
the way some act in church even now," said Mary, in a thoughtful
way.
One thing I don't understand, Grandpa. Those money-changers
with their tables of money-who were they ?"









A DEN OF THIEVES. 341

"Glad you speak of it, Carrie. I will explain. The law of Moses
required that every male of Israel who was twenty years old or over
should pay into the sacred treasury each year a half-shekel. The
richest paid no more-the poorest paid no less; and this sum must
be paid in the sacred coin known as the half-shekel of the sanctuary."
"How much was a skekel ?" asked Charley.
"The half-shekel which they gave was not far from thirty cents of
our money. Of course, every person who paid his dues in this coin
had to get it of a money-changer, who charged about three cents
premium for his service in the case. At the time of feasts, therefore,
when many visitors came to the Temple, these coin-dealers would
drive a brisk trade and make lots of money."
"I see !" exclaimed Carrie. "And the cattle and lambs would be
bought at good prices, with lunches, peanuts, apples, and all such
notions."
I'm not sure about the peanuts and apples, darling; but you
have the idea correctly. Just as about parades, shows, and crowds
of all kinds with us the vender of peanuts and other truck is found,
so there. Purchasers for all sorts of things were at the Temple; that
drew the sellers, also, that they might make money."
"Well, I hope Jesus gave them a slashing," said Mary. "They
might have done their trading outside the Temple and have shown
some respect for a sacred place."
So Jesus thought; and thinking so He drove them out," said
Grandpa.









THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND.


THE CHILDREN'S FRIEND;

OR, JESUS AMONG THE LITTLE ONES.



RANDPA," began Carrie, "I know that Jesus loves children.
Won't you tell us about that to-night?"
"" Yes, darling, with pleasure. He was often among the
little ones, and He always showed Himself the children's Friend.
Mark tells in his gospel of a time when many women began to bring
their children to Him that He might touch them. They knew His
touch healed disease and restored sight, and they probably thought
it had some magical power in it w ich would do the children good-
as people say, give them good luck. So great a rush of this kind
set in that the disciples rebuked the women, thinking to put a stop
to it. But Jesus was displeased with their rebuke and spoke those
memorable words, Suffer the little children to come unto me and
forbid them not, for of such is the kingdom of God."
It was real sweet in Jesus to be so kind to the little children," said
Carrie. "Those disciples were in too big a hurry trying to stop
them."
This is the story," chimed in Mary, "that we sing about some-
times-
"I think when I read that sweet story of old,
When Jesus was here among men,
How He called little children like lambs to His fold-
I should like to have been with Him then.
"I wish that His hand had been laid on my head,
That His arms had been thrown around me,
And that I might have heard His kind voice as He said,
Let the little ones come unto me."



















































































SHALL WE CUT IT DOWN'









SEEKING IN EARNEST.




SEEKING IN EARNEST:

OR, DETERMINED TO WI



ARRIE and I have been to
Christ, an we are both

ana effort
encour:
neve









392 SEEKING IN EARNEST.
^ -- ^-^- _--------------------------
a dealer in precious stories, and traveled everywhere seeking the
finest gems, especially pearls. These grow in the shells of large
oysters. In warm climates fishermen dive for them and seek them
very carefully at the bottom of the sea. A large pearl will make a
fortune for its finder. It is "sid-

"There are two i moments in the diver's life:
One when, a beggar, he prepares to plunge;
Then when, a prince, he rises with his pearl."

"Why, are pearls so vjfuable as that?" asked Mary. "I know
they are much admired and very beautiful, but I did not know they
cost much."
"Why, yes. Small pearls are worth from fifty cents to three dol-
lars each; single fine pearls cost from five dollars upward; pearl
necklaces cost from five hundred dollars to fifteen thousand dollars.
A single pearl, found in a South American river, sold in Paris in
1858 for two thousand dollars. A famous pearl, owned by Sir
Thomas Gresham, of England, was valued at seventy-five thousand
dollars; one, owned by the crown of Spain, was valued at one hun-
dred and fifty thousand dollars; while history tells that Cleopatra,
on a mere banter, destroyed her pearl ear-drops, which were valued
at four hundred thousand dollars."
Heigh ho!" shouted Charley; "I think a diver that gets one of
those pearls makes his fortune sure enough."
The man of whom Jesus was telling met a pearl-fisher, most likely
a Malay, who had a pearl of great size and immense value. This
pearl the man wanted. He offered what money he had by him, but
it was not enough. He then sold all his other possessions, turned
into money everything he owned, and handed it over for this one
great pearl. You see how earnest he was."
"Yes," replied Carrie, "and earnest for that one pearl. No other
suited him. He was bound to have that one. But why was he, so
persistent for that particular pearl ?"





























































IC-?
i': "i-


BARGAINING FOR A SPLENDID JEWEL.


I_1 _


-,.1. Wtv-









394 SEE. ING IN EARNEST.

him who sought the hidden treasure, him who sought the pearl of
great price, and her who soIght the lost piece of money."
"Why, she reminds me cf a story my teacher told," said Mary.
"A man working in his barn'iost some money. He knew he had it
after he entered the barn and "hat it was lost before he left, so, said
he, I will find that money if I r'love every straw. At the search he
went in this spirit. In a little yhile he came out of the barn shout-
ing to his wife that it was fourqd. She then turned the matter back
on him, saying, When you search for the way of eternal life as you
have searched for that money, you will be just as sure to find it and
just as glad when it is found."
"I knew a little girl," chimed 'in Carrie, who caught the story-
telling fever, "who was very good at finding anything her mother
wanted. When on a hunting errand she spurred herself every little
while by saying, It must be somewhere; It must be somewhere."
"Very good," said Grandpa. Earnest seekers are sure finders,
as a rule. Each of you who means to seek a life more full of good
fruits, remember the text Carrie quoted, Seek, and ye shall find."
"And remember my man in the barn," added Mary.
And my little girl who hunted," added Carrie.
"And my example," added Charley, as he strutted from the room
amid roars of laughter from all the party.
































































































SEARCHING FOR THE LOST COIN.


i.l


I "'"
i.









46 LEA V.ING A HAPPY HOME.



LEAVING A HAPPY HOME;

OR, FROM PEACE AND PLENTY TO TOIL AND TEARS.


WHEN the family were again assembled, Carrie began with
the exclamation:
"Poor Eve! I have been so sorry for her. I could
have cried a dozen times to-day. Where did they go after they
sinned? and what did they do ?"
"I am glad," answered Grandpa, "that you have thought so much
about her. Let it warn my little girl never to disobey God."
"I'm sure I never want to," she answered, in a most serious tone,
Charley adding, Nor do I;" and Mary, Nor I."
"And now," said Grandpa, drawing a roll of paper from his
pocket and opening it upon the table, here is a picture by a fam-
ous illustrator of Bible scenes. I want you to look at it carefully
and then each tell me what seems the most striking thing in it. Let
Mary tell first."
They all look so sorry, Grandpa.. See poor Eve! Adam can't
bear to look up at all. And the angel seems grieved. The dog,
even, looks worried and as if he wondered what it meant. Why the
old serpent himself looks sorry, though I guess it's more mean and
ashamed that he looks. But oh! they are so sad!"
Just see the thorns and the thistles outside that gate," said
Carrie, "and the stones. Inside there were none of these, were there,
Grandpa? Now they will have to work among briers and all sorts
of troubles, won't they ?"
See that big bird," said Charley, "he's pecking Eve's head, isn't
he? and there's another flying over them and squalling at them:










LEAVING A HAPPY HOME.


and there's a wasp or hornet after them, too. O my! It's too bad
all these things had to happen. And here's that old snake. If I
were Adam I'd pick up a stone and v/hack him on the head, so I
would. I wouldn't have him crawling ,near me. But, Grandpawhat


" The Lord God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was
taken."-Genesis iii, 23.

a queer old sword the angel has. It looks as if it was splitting all
to pieces."
That, my boy, is the flaming sword which turned every way to
keep Adam and Eve from the garden. We read about it in Genesis
iii, 24," said Charley's mother, who was gazing at the picture.









BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS. U



BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS:

OR, A WICKED BROTHER'S BRUTAL DEED.



'* NE of the pictures we looked at last night," said Grandpa,
after some other conversation had occupied a little of the
evening, "showed us the first two boys who ever lived.
Cain, the elder, was with his father, probably trying to help work the
ground. He grew up a farmer-a tiller of the ground, as the Bible
calls him. Abel was with his mother, among the sheep, of which,
probably, she took care, and he grew up a shepherd-a keeper of
sheep. Cain was probably a stronger, rougher, lad than Abel. He
was more like the father; Abel more like his mother."
I never did like Cain," said Carrie. I always thought Abel was
a great deal nicer."
Cain, no doubt, was a very troublesome boy. He was self-willed
and passionate, and his parents knew nothing of the way in which
such a boy should be trained. He became tyrannical and abusive
as he grew older; for nobody suddenly becomes a murderer. The
heart is full of murder long before the hands do the deed. By the
continual indulgence of wicked feelings, Cain was prepared for his
dreadful crime, and killing Abel was only the natural result. Such
a son must have been a great trouble to his parents; he added ter-
ribly to their many other sorrows."
"But did they not teach Cain and Abel to love and serve God ?"
asked Mary.
I have no doubt of it," responded Grandpa; for the very occa-
sion of Abel's death was that both he and Cain offered sacrifices,
and Abel's pleased God, while Cain's did not."










BURNING THE FIRST FRUITS.


rie. "I should think they ought to be saved. The poorer things
might very well be burned."
"Why," replied Mary, God ought to get the best, and unless it
was burned up it would only be a make-believe gift; for the man
would have it for himself after all."


-. l- --.


" It came to pass, when they were in the field, that Cain rose up against Abel his brother, and slew
him."-Genesis iv, 8.

"You have the right idea," said Grandpa. "Adam and Eve had
taught this to their boys, both of whom came to sacrifice to the Lord.
Abel came with a loving desire to please God, and God was pleased
with him and his offering. Cain came in some other spirit. Maybe
4









THE VOICE OF BLOOD.


THE VOICE OF BLOOD:

OR, A STRANGE CRY FROM THE GROUND



E VER since last night," began Mary, when the family was
Again seated in the sitting-room, "I have fancied I could
see Abel lying dead in the field where Cain had left him.
It was an awful sin for him to kill Abel, wasn't it?"
"And I," said Mrs. Reed, have been thinking of his poor mother.
I am sure Abel was a loving boy, who always hurried home when
his day's duties were done, and who always greeted his mother with
a kiss. On the morning of his death he left home alive and well,
full of hope and love, and she had thought of him often as the day
passed by. At last evening approached and she expected him to
supper; but he did not come. She looked out from the door, but
could not see him. I can imagine all the worriment of her motherly
heart as darkness came and Abel had not returned. She had long
been afraid that Cain would do harm to Abel; now she is sure of
it, for Cain, too, is away. So she spends the night in anxiety.
Adam only half sympathizes with her. He thinks it will come out
all right and goes to sleep, but Eve is wide awake. Morning comes,
and out they go to seek the boys. Abel's sheep are wandering
without care; Cain's work lies unfinished; but where are the bro-
thers? Eve sees something yonder. It is Abel lying on the ground.
Is he asleep? She hurries to him. Adam follows. They reach
the body. It is battered and bloody. It is cold and dead. Eve
calls, but Abel does not answer. She lifts his head, but it drops
limp and heavy from her hands. She calls, and calls again, but no
answer comes. Then she weeps, O so bitterly, over her dear, dead































III i Ilk.









*
N-
I,


FLEEING FROM THE DEAD.


i -. ;:: -94::


I--
-
-


I-~--~~--~--









0 ALONE, YET NOT ALONiE.



ALONE, YET NOT ALONE;

OR, THE UNSEEN COMPANION OF A SINGULAR MAN.



" HAVE but a little while to spend with you this evening," said
Grandpa, as he seated himself in his favorite chair; "but I
would feel that something was lacking in the day's work if we
did not have our little talk about a Bible story. I want to tell you
about a very singular man who had a companion whom nobody saw.
Can you guess to whom I refer ?"
Guesses were made by all the children, and holy men of every
period were named, but the correct name was not given. Grandpa
then asked, "What was the name of the city built by Cain ?"
"Enoch," was shouted in reply by the entire group.
After whom did Cain name that city ?"
"After his eldest son."
"Yes," continued Grandpa, "and some years after that there was
another Enoch, and he it is of whom I will now tell you. His father
was Jared and his son was Methuseleh, who is famous for what ?"
"For being the oldest man that ever lived," answered Carrie.
"How old did he become ?"
"Nine hundred and sixty-nine years," answered both the girls.
"Yes; Methuseleh became very aged and .his father was very
godly. Read what was said of him in Genesis v, 24."
The place was quickly found, and Mary read, "And Enoch walked
with God; and he was not, for God took him."
"When you are coming home from school, Carrie, with which girls
do you walk ?" asked Grandpa.
With those I like."
















































































WALKING HEAVENWARD.


I ------~---rr ---~--~---~---T--- ----- F-r--- ~-;--~- -1~


-^- -^


i









66 ALONE, YET NOT ALONE.

"With those you like and who go your way," added Mary.
Carrie assented, saying, Of course, I don't walk with girls who go
another way any more than I walk with girls who stand still."
Well, now," interrupted Grandpa, "just that is the idea I want
you to get about Enoch. As he walked with God, three things are
true of him and God. What are they?"
They both walked," answered Mary. They did not stand still."
Yes, they did walk; that is, both of them made progress. Neither
God nor men stand still. Men go on becoming better or worse all
the time. This is their walk. We are all walking. We are going
on-you children to manhood and womanhood; your father and
mother to old age; I to my end, which is not far off; all of us, I trust,
are going to a better world. What other thing is true since Enoch
walked with God ?"
"God and he loved each other," answered Carrie.
"Yes, they were pleased in each other's society. That Enoch
should be pleased with God's company is not surprising, but it is
strange that God should be pleased with the society of any man;
but in Hebrews xi, 5, it is expressly said that Enoch pleased God,
so we need have no doubt at that point. God and he kept very close
together, for they were well pleased with each other. Now, what
other fact is sure since Enoch walked with God ?"
"Why, Enoch went God's way," said Charley. "I guess God
wouldn't walk in any man's way; He's too great for that."
"Correct," said Grandpa. "God has His own perfect way of
thought, feeling, and action, which He could not and would not
change to suit a man or an angel. Enoch shaped his thoughts, feel-
ings, and acts so that they should be like those of God. In this way
they thought alike, felt alike, and acted alike. Enoch would not go into
any way where he could not keep company with God. Wicked peo-
ple might coax him, everything in other ways might look very bright
and pretty, but he walked with God, though he walked alone."
"Enoch must have been kind of lonesome, walking that way."









ALONE, YET NOT ALONE. 67

"Yes, Charley, I presume he was lonesome as men judge of lone-
someness, and yet he never was alone, though he seemed to be.
He always had a companion whom nobody else saw, but who to him
was very real, very near, and very dear. Sometimes he would lift
up his eyes as if charmed by some beautiful vision, but other people
saw nothing; sometimes he would look so glad, but others knew
not why; he often would talk tenderly, but others knew not to
whom; they thought him very queer; they called him a singular
man; but his unseen companion heard his words and spoke tenderly
in reply. So Enoch was happy, though the reason for it the world
did not know."
Grandpa, I should think Enoch would have become tired of so
singular a life, even though God did walk and talk with him. It
seems to me I would want companions whom I could see and talk
with as I see you and talk with you and others."
"But, Mary, he did not tire of it. We are told in Genesis that he
walked with God three hundred years; so he held out pretty well,
didn't he ?"
I should say so," answered Mary, smiling. But the story also
says, He was not, for God took him. What does that mean ?"
"Turn to Hebrews xi, 5, and you will see precisely what it means."
Mary turned to this verse and read aloud: "By faith Enoch was
translated, that he should not see death, and was not found, because
God had translated him."
"Oh !" exclaimed Carrie. He was not found anywhere on the
earth, because God had taken him up to heaven."
"Yes, God had translated him; that is, had taken him out of this
into another world," added Grandpa. But long before he was
taken there were places where he was not. Can you name some of
them ?"
"Taverns," began Charley. "In bad company," said Carrie; and
so they rattled in their answers until theatres, horse-races, beer-shops,
ball-rooms, street-corners, and many other evil and doubtful places









78 THE BOW OF BEA VTY


THE BOW OF BEAUTY;

OR, A TOKEN OF GOOD THINGS TO COME.



/- RANDPA, you said it was a year and ten days that Noah
Swas in the ark. But the ark rested on the mountain long
before that. Why didn't Noah go out of the ark sooner ?"
"Noah did not go into the ark, Carrie, till God commanded it, al-
though-the ark had been finished for some time; nor would he go
out of it till God commanded it, though he knew the earth to be
dried. He obeyed God in all things. Neither his own opinions, his
curiosity, nor anything else was allowed to rule him. He waited till
God said, Go forth of the ark. Then he and all that were in the
ark did go forth, and right glad they were to do so, I am sure. I
can imagine how the birds soared, the animals capered, and Noah's
family sang praises as they came down the gangway of the ark and
stood once more on dry land."
They must have been glad to walk out again after having been
shut up more than a year."
"Yes, Mary. And what do you suppose was the first thing they
did after leaving the ark?" asked Grandpa.
"I know what I would have done," said Charley. "I would have
ran off to see how things looked after the flood and to see what I
could find."
Many other people would have done just so, Charley," added
Grandpa; 'but Noah and his sons began rolling great stones
together with which to build an altar. They then took one of every
suitable beast and bird, and having killed them beside the altar, they
burned their bodies as an offering to God. This showed their grati-




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