• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Prince Dimple: How he looked
 Prince Dimple: What puzzled...
 Prince Dimple: What was the...
 Prince Dimple, and his bath
 Prince Dimple, and the five little...
 Prince Dimple, and a new toy
 Prince Dimple, and the woolly...
 Prince Dimple: His first word
 Prince Dimple, and a new song
 Prince Dimple, and his dolls
 Prince Dimple, and the pussy
 Prince Dimple, and his visitor
 Prince Dimple, and Sallie...
 Prince Dimple: The fun he had
 Prince Dimple: Where was papa
 Prince Dimple: A nice game
 Prince Dimple, and the diction...
 Prince Dimple: The lemon lamb
 Prince Dimple: The gingerbread...
 Prince Dimple, and his drum
 Prince Dimple: His funny cough
 Prince Dimple: Sukey's eye
 Prince Dimple: The owl
 Prince Dimple: His generosity
 Prince Dimple, and the hamper
 Prince Dimple, and the flowers
 Prince Dimple: "How big is the...
 Prince Dimple, and the cherrie...
 Prince Dimple, and the paint-b...
 Prince Dimple, and Don, the...
 Prince Dimple: The baby in the...
 Prince Dimple: The sugar-barre...
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Prince Dimple and his every-day doings
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078889/00001
 Material Information
Title: Prince Dimple and his every-day doings told for the little ones
Series Title: Prince Dimple
Alternate Title: Prince Dimple and his everyday doings
Physical Description: 129, 3 p., 8 leaves of plates : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Paull, George A., 1859-1895
A.D.F. Randolph & Co ( Publisher )
University Press (Cambridge, Mass.) ( Printer )
John Wilson and Son ( Printer )
Publisher: Anson D.F. Randolph and Co.
Place of Publication: New York (182 Fifth Avenue)
Manufacturer: University Press ; John Wilson and Son
Publication Date: c1890
 Subjects
Subject: Infants -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Infants -- Development -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Prince Dimple (Fictitious character) -- Fiction   ( lcshac )
Babies -- Fiction   ( lcshac )
Photographs -- 1890   ( gmgpc )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Photographs   ( gmgpc )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
 Notes
Summary: A very small baby starts to learn about his world.
Statement of Responsibility: by Mrs. George A. Paull (Minnie E. Kenney).
General Note: Frontispiece: Here is his merry little face.
General Note: Illustrated with halftone photographic reproductions.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078889
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002230520
notis - ALH0880
oclc - 47922855

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Dedication
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    List of Illustrations
        Page ix
        Page x
    Prince Dimple: How he looked
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Prince Dimple: What puzzled him
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 16a
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Prince Dimple: What was the joke?
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Prince Dimple, and his bath
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Prince Dimple, and the five little pigs
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Prince Dimple, and a new toy
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 34a
    Prince Dimple, and the woolly dog
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Prince Dimple: His first word
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Prince Dimple, and a new song
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Prince Dimple, and his dolls
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Prince Dimple, and the pussy
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Prince Dimple, and his visitor
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Prince Dimple, and Sallie Shadow
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 60a
        Page 61
    Prince Dimple: The fun he had
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Prince Dimple: Where was papa
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Prince Dimple: A nice game
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Prince Dimple, and the dictionary
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 76a
        Page 77
    Prince Dimple: The lemon lamb
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Prince Dimple: The gingerbread cake
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 84a
    Prince Dimple, and his drum
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
    Prince Dimple: His funny cough
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Prince Dimple: Sukey's eye
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Prince Dimple: The owl
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Prince Dimple: His generosity
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Prince Dimple, and the hamper
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
    Prince Dimple, and the flowers
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Prince Dimple: "How big is the baby?"
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 112a
        Page 113
    Prince Dimple, and the cherries
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Prince Dimple, and the paint-box
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
    Prince Dimple, and Don, the dog
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Prince Dimple: The baby in the glass
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Prince Dimple: The sugar-barrel
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 128a
        Page 129
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




























































The Baldwin Library
_W mPof
PlaBida


II I I












































































" HERE IS HIS MERRY LITTLE FACE."


i




3,









PRINCE DIMPLE

AND

HIS EVERY-DAY DOINGS


Colb for te Little oDnes


By MRS. GEORGE A. PAULL
(MIHNNIE E. KENNEL Y)


ANSON D.


NEW YORK
F. RANDOLPH AND CO.
182 FIFTH AVENUE



























Copyright, 1890,
BY ANSON D. F. RANDOLPH AND CO.


























HN WILSON AND SON, CAMBRIDGE
JOHN WILSON AND SON, CAMBRIDGE.



























TO


PRECIOUS LITTLE PRINCE DIMPLE,


THIS BOOK

IS LOVINGLY INSCRIBED,

BY

HIS MOTHER.



















CONTENTS.


PAGE
PRINCE DIMPLE: HOW HE LOOKED . .. .II
PRINCE DIMPLE: WHAT PUZZLED HIM . .. .14
PRINCE DIMPLE: WHAT WAS THE JOKE? .... .20
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS BATH .... .23'
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE FIVE LITTLE PIGS 27
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND A NEW TOY . .30
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE T OOLLY DOG . 35
PRINCE DIMPLE: HIS FIRST WORD .... .. 39
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND A NEW SONG ...... 43
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS DOLLS . 46
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE PUSSY ........ 50
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS VISITOR. . 54
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND SALLIE SHADOW ... 57
PRINCE DIMPLE: THE FUN HE HAD . .. .62
PRINCE DIMPLE: WHERE WAS PAPA? . 65
PRINCE DIMPLE: A NICE GAME ...... 569
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE DICTIONARY ... 75
PRINCE DIMPLE: THE LEMON LAMB . .. .78


CHAPTER
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
VII.
VIII.
IX.
X.
XL
XII.

XIII.
XIV.
XV.
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.








Contents.


CHAPTER
XIX.
XX.
XXI.
XXII.
XXIII.
XXIV.
XXV.
XXVI.
XXVII.
XXVIII.
XXIX.
XXX.
XXXI.
XXXII.


viii


PAGE
PRINCE DIMPLE: THE GINGERBREAD CAKE .. 8
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS DRUM . 85
PRINCE DIMPLE: HIS FUNNY COUGH. ... .88
PRINCE DIMPLE: SUKEY'S EYE ... 91
PRINCE DIMPLE: THE OWL . .. 96
PRINCE DIMPLE: HIS GENEROSITY. . ... 99
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE HAMPER .. .. 102
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE FLOWERS . 105
PRINCE DIMPLE: "HOW BIG IS THE BABY?" I.
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE CHERRIES. . 114
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE PAINT-BOX ... I I8
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND DON, THE DOG. ... .121
PRINCE DIMPLE: THE BABY IN THE GLASS .. 124
PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE SUGAR BARREL . 127















ILLUSTRATIONS.




PAGE

HERE IS HIS MERRY LITTLE FACE ... ... .Fronspiece.

His NURSERY . .. .. II

" MOTHER WOULD NOT SPEAK TO HIM" .. ... 16

"LAUGHING AT THE JOKE" . .. . 21

"THE DOG IN ONE HAND AND THE TAIL IN THE OTHER" 34

HE SAID, "A-Goo I A-GOO !" . . . 49

" PRINCE DIMPLE WAVED HIS HAND ". . . 60

HIS PART OF THE GAME. . . . 69

"THE BOOK WAS ALMOST AS BIG AS HIMSELF" . 76

"HE HAD A NEW GAME THAT DAY" . .. 84

"HE BEGAN TO CRY WITH ALL HIS MIGHT" .. .. 112

DON AND THE PRINCE . .. . 122

" WHY COULD N'T HE CATCH HIM?" . . .. 126

"ALL SMILES AND SUGAR" . . .. 128






















His NURSERY.


CHAPTER FIRST.

PRINCE DIMPLE: HOW HE LOOKED.

PRINCE DIMPLE had the very softest,
fuzziest hair in the world. It was just like
the fuzz on a peach, or the down on the wing
of a butterfly, and you could hardly see it at all,
unless you looked very closely. Indeed, Aunt
Anna always had to put on her glasses when she
wanted to see it, and then she would say,--







12 Prince Dimile.

"Why, I can see quite a fuzz; how fast his
hair is growing, to be sure."
It was as yellow as the down on a little
duckling's back, and every one who loved
Prince Dimple thought it was quite the
prettiest hair in the world.
Prince Dimple had two big blue eyes, and a
dear little red mouth that was just made for
kisses, at least that was what everybody
seemed to think it was made for, though
Prince Dimple himself thought it was a little
hole to put everything into. He did not have
a very good idea of the size of this little
mouth, for he tried to put all sorts of things
into it. Sometimes he even tried to eat Jack
the Harlequin.
Jack the Harlequin was Prince Dimple's
greatest friend, and he told Jack everything.
There were a great many things that Prince
Dimple could not understand, and he liked to
talk them over with Jack. To be sure, Jack







How He Looked. 13

never said anything, but he looked as if he
knew all about it.
Jack was always cheerful. He wore gay pink
and yellow clothes, trimmed with little golden
bells that rang whenever he moved, and he had
a tall peaked cap, and little pointed shoes.
Jack always smiled at whatever Prince
Dimple told him. Even if he was sorry, he
smiled; but this was because the corners of his
mouth turned up, and so of course he could n't
do anything but smile.
Prince Dimple and Jack the Harlequin had
a great many nice times together. Prince
Dimple told Jack a story that he never told
any one else, because he knew that nobody
but Jack could understand it.
Jack never told any one, but I heard Prince
Dimple telling Jack all about it, and so I will
tell you.







14 Prince Dimple.






CHAPTER SECOND.

PRINCE DIMPLE: WHAT PUZZLED HIM.

A LL this happened when Prince Dimple was
a very little baby, only six months old.
Prince Dimple knew his mother, because she
was so different from every one else. Other
people walked around, and sometimes when
Prince Dimple looked out of the window he
would see them in the street; but his mother
was always in bed, except now and then, when
she would have on a soft pink and white wrap-
per, and sit in a big chair.
Prince Dimple loved this wrapper. It was as
soft as the fuzz on his own little head; and he
loved to rub his face against it, and go to
sleep with his head cuddled on mother's arm.







What Puzzled Him.


Other people could carry him around, and take
him out in the sunshine, and make pretty
music for him, but after all he loved mother
best, if she was so quiet.
Prince Dimple always went to sleep with his
head on his mother's shoulder, while she sang a
soft little lullaby to him. Even if mother's
eyes were shut, she could always hear the
very faintest cry from Prince Dimple, and she
would cuddle him in her arms till he would for-
get all his troubles against that pink and white
wrapper.
The doctor said it was the wrapper that
Prince Dimple loved, and not his mother; but
Prince Dimple told Jack the Harlequin that
the doctor was very much mistaken.
One day a very sad thing happened to
Prince Dimple, and he told Jack all about it
afterward. Aunt Anna took Prince Dimple
into his mother's room and put him down in
his bassinette, with his rattle. Prince Dimple


15







Prince Dimple.


looked at the bed, but there was no mother
there. Prince Dimple rolled up his lip and was
just going to cry, when he saw mother hanging
over a chair. He wondered what mother could
be doing, with her head hanging out of sight
over the back of the chair, and he thought it
was very strange that she did not look up at
him.
A-goo," said Prince Dimple in his very
sweetest voice; but mother did not seem to
hear him.
"A-goo! A-goo!" he said again, with a little
quiver in his voice. Still mother did not
answer; and Aunt Anna had gone out of the
room, so Prince Dimple could not ask her to
take him over to mother.
Perhaps if he spoke a little louder, mother
would answer; so Prince Dimple shouted with
all his might, "A-goo! A-goo-goo!"
Even then his mother did not pay any at-
tention to her dear little boy. There she hung


























































"MOTHER WOULD NOT SPEAK TO HIM."


:' y- u







What Puzzled Him. 17

with her head over the chair, and she never
moved. If she would only lift up her face
and look at Prince Dimple, but she did not
seem to hear him at all.
Prince Dimple's heart swelled with grief. If
mother would not speak to him, what should
he do? His lip rolled up till it looked like a
curled rose leaf, his blue eyes filled with tears,
and he cried just as hard as he could cry.
Not even that made mother move and look
at him. Aunt Anna came running into the
room, and took him up in her arms, and said:
"Was he lonely all by his precious little self?
Here comes mother to her baby."
It was n't mother though. Prince Dimple
knew better than that. Mother was hanging
over that chair, and this Somebody with
mother's face in a black dress, who tried to
take him, was not mother at all.
Poor little Prince Dimple! He stretched out
his arms to. the pink and white wrapper, and
2







18 Prince Dimple.

he cried with all his might; but mother never
stirred, and this stranger took him and tried to
cuddle him, just as mother always did. She
could not comfort him though; and Prince
Dimple cried so hard that at last Aunt Anna
had to carry him into the other room.
Prince Dimple thought that they were very
stupid not to know what he was crying about.
He told Jack that Aunt Anna said,--
He must be afraid of your black dress,
because he has always been used to seeing you
in a pink and white wrapper."
Now this is what puzzled Prince Dimple:
What was mother doing with her head hanging
over the back of a chair, and why would she not
speak to him? It was enough to make any lit-
tle boy cry, to have his dear mother behave in
that way. When Aunt Anna took him to her at
bedtime, his mother had on her soft wrapper,
and held out her arms for him, and called
him her own precious little darling, just as







What Puzzled Him. 19

she always did, and Prince Dimple was happy
again.
Squeaky Sam heard this story as Prince
Dimple was telling it to Jack the Harlequin,
and he said, -
"Perhaps it was only your mother's wrapper
hanging over the chair."
But Prince Dimple did not listen to Squeaky
Sam. He always had so much to say that no-
body ever listened to him. If any one rocked
on him, he squeaked; if Prince Dimple pinched
him, he squeaked; and he always squeaked
whenever he was stepped on.
Squeaky Sam was a very fat rubber doll,
with red cheeks, and blue eyes. Prince Dimple
did not like him as well as he did Jack the
Harlequin, for Squeaky Sam would make such
a noise whenever Prince Dimple tried to eat
him that the Prince would drop him at once;
for who would -want to eat a doll that squeaked
all the time?






20 Prince Dimple.







CHAPTER THIRD.

PRINCE DIMPLE: WHAT WAS THE JOKE?

PRINCE DIMPLE and Jack the Harlequin
had a Joke that no one else understood.
When Prince Dimple was a very tiny little
baby, Aunt Anna carried him into the sitting-
room one day for the first time.
There was a small red cushion hanging on
the wall, that looked just like a ripe tomato.
Prince Dimple looked at this cushion with his
big blue eyes, and then he smiled at it.
"Why, he is really smiling at that cushion "
every one said, in great surprise; for Prince
Dimple- was such a little baby that no one
thought he knew how to smile.







What Was the yoke


No matter how tired or sleepy Prince Dimple
might be after that, as soon as he was carried
in to see his Joke, as every one called the
cushion, he would smile at it. There was
something very funny about that cushion to
Prince Dimple, though no one else could un-
derstand what it was.












LAUGHING AT THE JOKE."
By and by when Jack the Harlequin came,
Prince Dimple explained the Joke to him.
Sometimes Prince Dimple would lie in his
carriage and laugh at the Joke.







Prince Dirmle,


Prince Dimple could never take the cushion
in his own hands because it was full of sharp
needles, but he enjoyed looking at it on the
wall.
"What makes the baby smile at that
cushion?" people would say; but Prince Dimple
wouldn't tell them, and Jack the Harlequin
couldn't tell them, so no one ever knew. And
I am afraid that by the time Prince Dimple is
old enough to tell us, he will have forgotten
all about it, and nobody ever will know about
the Joke.







And His Bath. 23





CHAPTER FOURTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS BATH.

EVERY morning Prince Dimple had a bath;
and he thought bath-time was the very
best time of the whole day. As soon as he
saw Nurse Mary filling his little tub with
water, he would begin to jump and crow, he
was so glad.
He did not want to wait for mother to take
his clothes off, he was in such a hurry to get
into the water.
Did you ever see a little bird take its bath?
Do you know how it shakes its wings, and
splashes the water all over? That was just the
way Prince Dimple always did. He would
shout with delight as soon as he was in the
water, and he splashed with his little rosy feet







24 Prince Diml1e,

and hands until the water fell about him in a
shower. Of course he did not like to be taken
out of the tub. Just as soon as he saw
mother put the blanket in her lap, he would
take fast hold of the sides of the tub, and
begin to scold in a cross little voice.
It did not help matters any, though; for in
another moment he would be all rolled up in
the blanket, and Mary would carry the tub
away.
Then mother would tell him the sad story of
the little bread-crust. "Listen she would ex-
claim, and Prince Dimple stopped to hear what
mother was going to say. He meant to go on
with his scolding in a moment, but he always
got so much, interested in the story that he
would forget all about the bath-tub.
"Once upon a time there was a little bread-
crust," mother said, rubbing away as fast as
she could. "And this little bread-crust fell into
the bath-tub one day; and he liked the water







And His Bath.


so much that he did not want to come out.
He was cross when some one wanted to take
him out, and he said, 'Let me bel I want to
stay in the water.' The little bread-crust had
his own way and stayed in the water, and
what do you think happened to him?"
"A-goo," said Prince Dimple, which meant
"What?"
Mother was rubbing the little feet by this
time, and she talked very slowly, so the story
should last till Prince Dimple was ready to
dress.
"'Well, I will tell you what happened. The
little bread-crust stayed in the water for a long
time, and at last it began to get soft. It grew
softer and softer and softer till at last it fell to
pieces, and became little crumbs; and then the
fishes came and ate it all up. Poor little bread-
crustl there wasn't anything left of it when the
fishes were through with the crumbs. It was
all eaten up."







26 Prince Dimple,

Oh! oh!" said Prince Dimple in a sorry
little voice.
"-Prince Dimple wouldn't want to stay in the
water as the bad little bread-crust did, would
he?" asked mother, kissing the ten little pink
toes that were so dry and warm.
By this time Prince Dimple had quite for-
gotten that he meant to scold; and he smiled
sweetly at mother, and said, "A-goo-goo," as if
he surely would never be like the naughty little
bread-crust, and scold because he had to come
out of the water.
Prince Dimple never was tired of the story
of the bad little bread-crust; and if mother
sometimes told it to him two or three times
while she was dressing him, he liked it better
every time.







And tIe Five Little Pigs. 27


CHAPTER FIFTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE FIVE LITTLE PIGS.

T HE playmates Prince Dimple liked best
were his ten little pigs. If he could
only have-had them whenever he wanted them,
he would have been a very happy baby; but all
day long they were kept in two little silk pens,
and were only allowed to come out for a little
while every morning and evening when Prince
Dimple was being dressed and undressed.
Perhaps you would not have known that they
were little pigs. You might have thought that
they were only Prince Dimple's ten little pink
toes that were hidden away in his little silk
stockings; but Prince Dimple and mother knew
that they were little piggies.








28 Prince Dimple,

When evening came, and Prince Dimple was
undressed, he loved to lie on his back in
mother's lap, and play with those ten little soft
toes. He would grab for them with both his
chubby fists, and hold them tight while he
cooed to them. When he got tired of playing
with them, mother would sing to him his own
little song about the piggies.
Sometimes Prince Dimple's blue eyes would
shut while mother was singing, and he would
go to sleep. This is the song she sang:-



This lit-tle pig to mar-ket went, Ev'-ry day when he was sent;


To and fro, to and fro, This lit tie pig gie used to go.
Fine.

Such a hap-py lit-tle pig-gie! Sucha hap-py lit-tie pig-giel


This lit-tle pig at home must stay, All a-lone by him self all day.








And the Five Little Pigs. 29



Poor lit-tle pig-gie sat and cried, When the oth-er pigs at play he



spied. Poorlit-tle lone ly pig-gie I Poor lit tle lone ly pig gie !
This little pig had buttered bread,
Very nice it was, he said.
Picnicking all alone,
This little pig would share with none.
Such a greedy little piggie I
Such a greedy little piggie!
This little pig, alas had none;
His brother would n't give a crumb,
Though piggie cried with all his might,
And begged him for just one tiny bite.
Poor little hungry piggie!
Poor little hungry piggie !

This pig can't climb the barn door sill,
He's so tired, yet trying still.
Hear him cry, Wee, wee, wee,
Somebody come and help poor me! "
Such a noisy little piggie!
Such a noisy little piggie!

This was the song of the five little pigs that
Prince Dimple liked to hear, and mother sang
it to him every evening.







30 Prince Dimple,


CHAPTER SIXTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND A NEW TOY.

PRINCE DIMPLE had the toothache one
day. He did not know what was the
matter, but mother did. He never guessed
that he was so uncomfortable just because a
little pearl of a tooth was trying to find its
way out into the world; and so he fretted, and
wouldn't play with any of his toys, and even
pushed Jack the Harlequin away when he tried
to comfort him.
"What shall we do to amuse the baby?"
every one said, when nothing pleased him, and
that little tooth troubled him so much that he
could not enjoy even Aunt Anna's watch.
Nobody knew, but just then Maggie came
up from the kitchen, and she said, -






And a New Toy.


"Let me take baby down to see me make
bread. Perhaps that will amuse him a little
while,"
"Does baby want to go?" mother asked; and
baby stretched out his arms to Maggie, he was
so glad to go.
Prince Dimple had such a nice time down
in the kitchen that he almost forgot about his
tooth. Maggie put him in his high-chair by
the table, and gave him an iron spoon.
It was a very nice spoon, and it made beau-
tiful music when Prince Dimple pounded
against the side of the bread-pan with it.
He wondered why there were not such nice
things upstairs.
By-and-by he grew tired of the spoon, and
then he had something still nicer. Maggie
gave him the egg-beater; and when he found
that he could twirl it a little, he laughed out
loud, he was so happy. The egg-beater would
make almost as nice music as the spoon, if he







Prince Dimnle,


pounded it against the pan; but Maggie would
not let him do that.
Prince Dimple remembered his tooth then,
and began to scold again.
Never mind the old egg-beater," Maggie
said. "Here is something for baby to play
with."
She put something down on the table in
front of Prince Dimple, and he looked at it a
minute before he picked it up in his little
dimpled fingers. What could it be? It was
white and soft, and there was something like
powder all over it.
A-goo-goo-goo," he said; but Maggie did
not understand that he was asking her to tell
him what it was, so he tried to find out by
pinching it.
It did not squeak when he pinched it as
Squeaky Sam did, and it was easier to pinch.
Prince Dimple found out something else about
it, too, pretty soon. It stayed pinched. If he







And a New Toy. 33

pinched Squeaky Sam, just as soon as he let
go, Sam would be as round as ever; but this
new plaything was just as he left it. If he
squeezed it tight in his little hand, he could
see the marks of his fingers on it when he
dropped it. It was very strange that this
should be so, when Sam and his rubber ball
were so different.
After a while Prince Dimple thought he
would taste it and see if it tasted like Squeaky
Sam, and when Maggie was not looking he
tried to put it in his mouth. He was very
glad to take it out again, though, for he did not
like the taste of it at all. Some of the powder
got into his mouth; and when he tried to rub it
out, he only got more powder on his face.
You look just like a little miller," Maggie
said; and Prince Dimple wondered what that
meant.
By-and-by mother came downstairs to see
what Prince Dimple was doing, and he held up
3







34 Prince Dimple,

his new plaything for her to look at. A-goo,"
he said;. which meant, See what I have!"
"He's been as pleased with that piece of
dough as if it was a fine toy," Maggie said;
and mother laughed as she kissed her little
boy.
"Shall we keep a piece of dough among
your toys?" she asked; and Prince Dimple
answered, -
"A-goo! A-goo-goo-oo."











I


4$


"THE DOG IN ONE HAND AND THE TAIL IN THE OTHER."


~1Pt~






And the Woolly Dog.


CHAPTER SEVENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE WOOLLY DOG.

PRINCE DIMPLE had a little woolly dog,
fastened at the end of a long rubber
string, that jumped when any one pinched the
ball at the other end of the string.
Prince Dimple could not make the dog jump
himself, but he liked to play with the little
dog, and look at its bright yellow eyes. One
day he was playing with it, when suddenly the
tail came off in his hand. Prince Dimple had
been pulling it a little too hard, but of course
he had not expected that it would come off.
"Oh! oh !" said Prince Dimple, looking very
much amused, and holding the dog in one hand
and the tail in the other.






36 Prince Dimple,

If Prince Dimple ever hurt himself with his
rattle, or bumped his head, mother always made
the hurt place well with a kiss.
Prince Dimple must have remembered this,
for soon he called to his mama, and when she
came to him, he held the poor dog up for her
to kiss.
Mother kissed Prince Dimple first, and then
she kissed the little black dog, and carried it
away with her into the next room.
When she came back a few minutes later,
what do you think? Why, the little woolly
dog's tail was all right again!
One day Prince Dimple broke something that
mother could not mend with a kiss. He was
sitting at the breakfast table in his high-chair,
and when the eggs were brought in, he wanted
one very much indeed.
"I will give him one when it gets a little
cooler," said papa. "I don't believe he would
break it."







And the Woolly Dog. 37

"I am almost afraid," said mother; but
Prince Dimple wanted it so very much that
she tried to think he would be very gentle
with it.
For a few minutes Prince Dimple patted it
very softly, and talked to it in a sweet voice;
but all at once he shouted, and pounded the
egg with a spoon as hard as he could.
"Ohl oh I" Prince Dimple said, in his sweet
little sorry tone, when he saw what he had
done; and this time mother said "Oh! oh!"
too.
The egg was broken; and it ran all over the
table-cloth, and some of it fell on Prince
Dimple's clean white dress.
Prince Dimple picked up a piece of the shell,
and held it up for mother to kiss. He thought
she could mend it as she had the woolly dog,
if she would only kiss it.
But mother did not kiss the eggy shell;
she would rather kiss Prince Dimple.







38 Prince Dimple.

When she took him upstairs to put on a
clean dress, she told him the story of Humpty
Dumpty. Did you ever hear that story?

Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a bad fall.
All the king's horses and all the king's men
Could n't put Humpty Dumpty together again.







His First WVord.


CHAPTER EIGHTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE: HIS FIRST WORD.

O NE day when he was about ten months
old, Prince Dimple surprised everybody
very much indeed. He had never said any
word, but had only made little soft cooing
noises, that mother of course understood very
well. Jack understood them too, but other
people thought everything he said sounded just
alike.
One day mother had rocked Prince Dimple
to sleep; and when she was quite sure that
the blue eyes were fast shut, she gently put him
down in his bassinette, and covered him up.
Prince Dimple liked mother's arms a great
deal better than his soft little nest; and unless






40 Prince Dimple.

he was very sound asleep, he would open his
eyes as soon as he felt mother putting him
down, and begin to fret to be taken up
again.
To-day he just nestled his head into the pil-
low, so mother was sure he would not awaken,
and kissing him very softly, she started to go
out of the room.
Perhaps it was the kiss that awakened Prince
Dimple. He may have thought that a little
fairy was coaxing him to wake up and play,
for all at once his eyes opened, just as mother
was going out of the door. In another
moment she would be gone, and poor little
Prince Dimple would be all alone. There was
no time to lose, and what do you think that
Prince Dimple did? He sat up and held out
his arms to mother and said, Ma-ma "
Don't you think mother was surprised to
hear him call her so plainly? She came back
to him and took him up in her arms, and







His First Word.


quite forgot that he was going to take his
nap.
Ma-ma!" said Prince Dimple once more,
with a merry smile, as if he too thought it
was a funny, thing that.he could call mother
just as plainly as any one else.
Then mother kissed him and cuddled him,
and called him the most wonderful baby in the
world so many times that Prince Dimple was
all ready for a good frolic, and forgot all about
his nap too.
"Come and hear baby call Ma-ma,"' mother
said to Aunt Anna; but when Aunt Anna came,
Prince Dimple only smiled at her, and no one
could get him to speak.
"Are you sure he really said it, or did you
only imagine it?" Aunt Anna asked at last.
Oh, he did say it," mother answered, "but
I am afraid he has forgotten it."
But Prince Dimple had not forgotten his
new word. He had found out that it would







42 Prince Dimple,

bring mother to him quicker than even a cry;
so after a while when she got up to go out
of the room, a sweet little voice called after
her, Ma-ma Ma-ma I" And of course mother
came back to her baby.







And a New Song. 43


CHAPTER NINTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND A NEW SONG.

EVERY morning after Prince Dimple had
his bath, he always went to sleep.
He liked to cuddle his head on mother's
shoulder, and listen to a little song that
put him to sleep quicker than anything else
that mother could sing. It was an easy
little song that Prince Dimple could under-
stand, all about a pussy-cat, a dog, and a
lamb.
"Is n't it a beautiful. song?" Prince Dimple
said once to Squeaky Sam.
"I don't know," said Squeaky Sam. "I
think it sounds very much alike, -as if it
were the same thing all the time."







44 Prince Dim5ple,

That is because you are stupid," said
Prince Dimple.
Jack the Harlequin never said it was very
much alike. To be sure he never said any-
thing, but if he could have spoken, Prince
Dimple knew that he, too, would have said
that it was a beautiful song.
There was something very nice about this
song. It always lasted till Prince Dimple went
to sleep, and as he shut his eyes there would
be a smile on his lips as he thought of all
the nice things that mother was singing about,
to a funny little tune. She never knew where
she found the tune; but it just suited the
little song.

_Q_*f ~~~ ?
-- 1 -- -r1 VS^


Lit-tie pus-sy-cat said, "Mew-mew, Mew-mew," ba by dar ling.


Lit tie pus-sy-cat said, "Mew-mew, Mew-mew-mew. Mew-mew-mew,"


_ -^-9-ej ^


!







And a New Song.


Little doggie said, "Bow-wow,
Bow-wow-wow,
Bow-wow-wow."
Little doggie said, Bow-wow,
Bow-wow," baby darling.
Little lambie said, Baa-baa.
Baa-baa-baa,
Baa-baa-baa."
Little lambie said, "Baa-baa,
Baa-baa," baby darling.
The rest of the song told what the little
chickens said, and the mooly cow, and the
mouse, and the horse; and there was always
something different to sing about till Prince
Dimple was fast asleep.
If I should tell you all the rest of it I am
afraid you would go to sleep too; and so if
you want to hear the other verses you must
come and hear mother sing it to Prince
Dimple.






46 Prince Dimple,


CHAPTER TENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS DOLLS.

O NE day papa tried to take Prince Dimple's
picture with his new camera. It was
very hard work, for Prince Dimple did not
understand that he must sit very still; and
just as soon as papa was ready to take his
picture he would begin to laugh and crow,
which made him look very sweet of course, but
quite spoiled the picture.
When papa put his head under the black
cloth, Prince Dimple would sit very still and
watch to see where he had gone; but as soon
as he could see papa's face again, and knew
that his head had not been lost under that
cloth, then he thought it was some kind of a







And His Dolls.


game of hide-and-seek, and he would shout
and clap his hands.
Papa. tried a great many times, but Prince
Dimple always moved, and at last papa said,
" Perhaps Jack the Harlequin would sit still.
I will see if I can make a picture of him that
Prince Dimple will know."
Papa made a group of all Primce Dimple's
dolls. Jack the Harlequin was in the middle,
and he put his arm around Sukey, because she
could not sit up alone.
Sukey could not sit up, because she was too
soft. She was made of string; and when she
first came to see Prince Dimple he was very
much afraid of her because her eyes were so
big and black. They were made of shoe-buttons,
so of course she could not help staring, when
she could never shut her eyes, no matter how
hard she tried. Sukey's arms were made of
two braids of string tied with a little red ribbon.
She had two braids of hair that grew out






Prince Dimple,


of the top of her head, and were tied with
red ribbon too; and as they were just the size
of her arms, Prince Dimple could never tell
the difference, and sometimes he would pick
her up by the arms, and sometimes by the hair,
which must have hurt her very much of course,
but Sukey never said anything about it.
Prince Dimple liked Sukey because she was
so nice and soft to bite; and sometimes he
would hold her in his teeth, and shake his
head as if he were a little dog.
Wun Lung was in the picture too. He had
once had a funny little circle of hair on the
top of his head, but Prince Dimple had pulled
it off one day, and now poor Wun Lung had
a shiny bald head, with just one little lock of
hair in front, which had been painted on or
Prince Dimple would have pulled that off too.
He had bright black eyes, and a funny little
flat nose, and a queer little mouth that was
always smiling.







And His Dolls.


Squeaky Sam was in the picture. He
looked so fat and good-natured that he made
every one else smile too.
Tom the piper's son was there with his
drum, and Baby Bunting, who sat in a round
basket with her rattle.
They all sat still and never even winked,
and papa made a very nice picture of them.
When he finished the picture he showed it
to Prince Dimple.


HE SAID, A-GOO A-GOO! "







Prince Dimple,


CHAPTER ELEVENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE PUSSY.

pRINCE DIMPLE had a furry pussy-cat
that he liked to play with. It looked
just like a real cat; and it mewed when it
was squeezed, and had green eyes and black
whiskers, like any other pussy. He used to
take the pussy out to ride with him in his
carriage, and if the poor pussy had a great
many falls over the side of the carriage she
did not seem any 'the worse for it.
"Prince Dimple ought to have a real cat, he
enjoys this one so much," said Aunt Anna one
day; and the next time she went out she got
him one.
It was a pretty little black kitten; and when
Aunt Anna put it in Prince Dimple's lap it







And the Pussy.


curled itself up into a little round ball and
began to purr.
Prince Dimple looked at it for some time
without touching it. That was a funny noise
for a kitten to make, and he wondered if it
were broken anywhere. Presently he thought
he would look and see; so he leaned forward
and picked the kitten up just as he always did
his own, by the tail.
The kitty was very much surprised at this,
and in a moment Prince Dimple was very
much surprised too.
Prince Dimple had once been scratched by
a pin, and he had never forgotten it. When
mother had on that pin, he would look at it,
and say, Oh! oh!"
That had been bad enough, but when he
picked pussy up by her tail, Prince Dimple
thought that a whole paper of pins were
scratching him at once, and he let go of pussy
and began to cry as loud as he could. It was







Prince Dimple,


enough to make any little boy cry to have a
kitty treat him so, just because he wanted to
see if it were broken.
Prince Dimple's feelings were hurt as well
as his hand, and it was a long time before he
could be comforted.
The naughty pussy had run away; and when
Aunt Anna went to look for her, she found
her under the kitchen stove, drinking a saucer
of milk.
As soon as Prince Dimple saw her he began
to cry again, and the pussy mewed and strug-
gled to get away. Perhaps she remembered
how Prince Dimple had picked her up by the
tail, and she was afraid he would do it again.
She did not know that Prince Dimple was too
little to understand that her tail was not the
handle by which to pick up a pussy-cat.
As Prince Dimple did not like the pussy,
and the pussy did not like Prince Dimple, she
was sent home again, and Prince Dimple







And the Pussy. 53

played with his own little furry pussy-cat, which
had no sharp claws, and never objected to
being lifted by her tail or ears, or in any other
way that suited Prince Dimple.






Prince Dimple,


CHAPTER TWELFTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS VISITOR.

EVERY evening Prince Dimple had a little
visitor in the nursery. Where she came
from he did not know, and he never knew where
she went to, either.
When Prince Dimple had been undressed,
and mother had put on his long white night-
gown, and he was already to go to sleep, then
she moved her rocking-chair to the end of the
room, where there was a white space on the
wall without any pictures.
It was very strange that just the moment
mother and Prince Dimple sat down, this
visitor would come. "Little Sallie Shadow,"







SAnrd His Visitor.


mother called her; and as mother sat down
in the rocking-chair, and rocked back and
forth, then little Sallie Shadow would begin to
dance.
Sallie Shadow had a little round head, like
Prince Dimple's own, and if Prince Dimple
waved his hand to her, she would wave her
hand back again to him.
She did everything that she saw Prince
Dimple do. If he raised his head from
mother's shoulder, then the little black head
on the wall would move too; and every
time the rocking-chair swung back and forth,
Sallie Shadow would dance backward and
forward.
While Prince Dimple was watching her,
mother would sing him a little song about her,
and he- would go to sleep with Sallie dancing
just before him.








56 Prince Dimple,




Lit-tle Sal-lie Sha-dow, Danc-ing on the wall, When the sun is shin-ing I can't see you at all.



Lit-tle Sal-lie Sha-dow, Tell me where you go, Tell me all a bout it, Ba-by wants to know.

Little Sallie Shadow,
Do you go away,
Are you only sleeping
All through the long bright day?
Little Sallie Shadow,
Tell me where you go,
Tell me all about it.
Baby wants to know.







And Sallie Shadow. 57


CHAPTER THIRTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND SALLIE SHADOW.

T was very strange where Sallie Shadow
went to every evening. Prince Dimple
talked it over with Jack the Harlequin, and he
could not understand it at 'all. When he went
to sleep on mother's shoulder, there was Sallie
swinging back and forward on the wall; but the
next morning she was gone, and would not
come back again all day.
Prince Dimple often looked for her on the
wall, but saw nothing there. He was sorry
she would not come in the daytime, because
then he would have been able to play with her,
but in the evening he went to sleep so soon
that he could see her only a very short time.







58 Prince Dimple,

He wondered if she came to the nursery some-
times when he was out, and he told Jack the
Harlequin to watch and tell him if he saw her;
but Jack said she never came. I should say
rather, that Jack never said she did come; so
though he did not speak at all, Prince Dimple
knew what he meant by it.
What do you suppose happened one day
when Prince Dimple was out riding in his
carriage? He really saw little Sallie Shadow l
He was sitting in his carriage and looking
at the dogs and horses, when he saw another
baby-carriage coming toward him.
Prince Dimple thought at first that it was
Prince Darling, who lived next door to him,
and who often threw him kisses, and whom he
often met out riding; but when the carriage
came closer, he saw it was not Prince Darling
after all. It was Sallie Shadow
Of course it was Sallie Shadow, there could
not be any mistake about it. A little black







And Sallie Shadow.


baby with a white cap sat in the carriage, and
just as soon as Prince Dimple saw her, he
remembered her.
When he saw Sallie's little black head on the
wall every evening, it was not likely that he
could meet her in the street, and not know
her.
Oh, Prince Dimple was so glad I He
jumped up and down, and shouted, and crowed.
When Mary saw how pleased he was to
see the other baby, she stopped his carriage,
and the other baby's carriage stopped too,
and Prince Dimple looked very earnestly at
Sallie.
He had never seen her eyes and mouth
before, for on the wall she always had the back
of her head toward him, or so it seemed to
Prince Dimple. She had bright black eyes, as
bright as Wun Lung's, and when she opened
her mouth and smiled at Prince Dimple, he
saw two little white teeth.







Prince Dimple,


Pretty soon Prince Dimple waved his hand,
and then there could not be any doubt about
its being Sallie Shadow, for she waved her
little black hand at him.
Prince Dimple would have been glad to stay
a long time and talk to Sallie, but Mary
pushed his carriage along, and he did not see
her any more.
When he went home, Mary said to
mother, -
Prince Dimple saw a nice little colored
baby this morning, and he was so pleased with
her that he wanted to stay and play with her."
"I wonder who it was," mother said.
Prince Dimple told Jack the Harlequin all
about it, and then he said, "I think people are
very stupid things. Why, not even mother
knew that it was little Sallie Shadow, and I
thought she would understand all about it.
Perhaps it was because she did not see her,
though," as Mary said.



















































"PRINCE DIMPLE WAVED HIS HAND."


y'<. -







A.nd Sallie Shadow. 61

"Perhaps it was not Sallie Shadow at all;
perhaps it was only a little black baby," said
Squeaky Sam, who had been listening.
Was not that very stupid in Squeaky Sam ?
As if Prince Dimple could make a mistake
like that!







62 Prince Dizmple.


CHAPTER FOURTEENTH.
PRINCE DIMPLE: THE FUN HE HAD.

PRINCE DIMPLE had a very nice time one
morning all by himself. The only trouble
was that mother did not seem to enjoy it too.
Prince Dimple was sitting on the bed in
mother's room, with Jack the Harlequin.
Mother was crocheting a pretty white fluffy
thing for Prince Dimple.
She had not told Prince Dimple that it was
for him, but he knew it; for were not all the
pretty things that mother and Aunt Anna made
always for him?
Maggie called mother, and she had to go
downstairs to see the meat man. Before she
went, she put Prince Dimple in the middle of
the bed, where he surely could not fall off, and







The Fun He Had.


then she put her work on the bed, well out of
his reach, for she did not want any help from
Prince Dimple's little fingers.
Prince Dimple put Jack the Harlequin down
when mother had gone out, and thought he
would like to play with that pretty white fluffy
thing that mother was making.
It was almost too far away for him to reach,
and he lay down and stretched his arms out as
far as he could, to see if he could not reach it.
For a minute it did seem as if he could not
get it, but by kicking with his feet against the
pillow, he pushed himself along a little way
and just touched it with his fingers.
After that it did not take very long for him
to get it in his hands, or at least one end 'of
it. He pulled to see if it would not all come
over to him, but it was too heavy for him to
draw toward him in that way.
Something very funny happened, though.
When he pulled the end of the string that he







64 Prince Dimple.

held in his hand, it kept growing longer and
longer, and it was all crinkly and wavy.
This was more fun than 'if he could have
dragged it all over. He laughed and crowed,
and pulled harder and harder.
Can you guess what he was doing? He was
ripping out the stitches that mother had been
taking in his new sacque, and by the time she
came upstairs again, the dear little mischief had
nearly ripped it all out.
Oh! oh!" said mother, sorrowfully, when
she saw what Prince Dimple had done.
"Oh! oh!" shouted Prince Dimple, looking
up in mother's face with a merry smile. Mother
picked Prince Dimple up and kissed him over
and over again for being so mischievous.
You did n't know you were ripping out
mother's work, did you, darling?" asked mother,
and Prince Dimple answered, -
A-goo-oo."







Where Was Paa ?


CHAPTER FIFTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE: WHERE WAS PAPA?

pRINCE DIMPLE was sitting in his car-
riage at the side of the house one day,
when he heard papa's voice calling to him, -
"Prince Dimple Prince Dimple!"
Prince Dimple looked everywhere to see
where papa was. He leaned over the side of
the carriage and looked in the grass.
There were some pretty dandelions there, but
no papa. Then he looked over the fence, but
only the 'big black dog was there.
He looked at the apple-tree, but the fat
red robin that was swinging on the end of
a bough had not called him with papa's
voice.







Prince Dimfle.


Where could papa be? Prince Dimple was
just going to cry, because he could not find
papa, when he heard the voice once more,
calling, -
"Prince Dimple! Prince Dimple!"
Look up here, darling," said mother, putting
her hand under Prince Dimple's chin, and turn-
ing his face up.
There was papa, looking out of the study
window.
He waved his hand to Prince Dimple, and
Prince Dimple waved his hand back at papa.
The light was so strong that it made Prince
Dimple wrinkle his face all up, and papa shut
down the window pretty soon, so that Prince
Dimple would not look up any more.
The next day Prince Dimple was in the
nursery, when he heard papa calling from the
hall, -
"Prince Dimple!"
What do you suppose Prince Dimple did?






Where Was Papa .


He remembered how he had looked every-
where for papa yesterday, and found him at
last by looking up in the air, so he laid
back in his bassinette, and looked up at the
ceiling, expecting to see papa there. Oh,
dear, there were so many things that Prince
Dimple could not understand at all in this
world.
Why should papa have been up in the air
yesterday, when he could not see him, and why
should he be somewhere else to-day?
Prince Dimple rolled his lip up when he
found that papa was not going to put his head
through the ceiling, and made up his mind
that he must certainly cry about such a disap-
pointment as that; but just then papa came
in through the door, and so he forgot to cry
till it was too late.
But he did not forget to wonder why papa
had not put his head through the ceiling, and
he did wish that some one would explain it






68 Prince Dimple.

all to him. When mother took him on her
lap at bedtime, he tried to ask her about it,
but she did not understand what he meant,
and only kissed him, which was very nice of
course, but after all it did not explain things
very well.







A Nice Game.


HIs PART OF THE GAME.


CHAPTER SIXTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE: A NICE GAME.

T HERE was one very nice game that
Prince Dimple and Aunt Anna played
only on rainy days, when Prince Dimple could
not go out in his carriage.
It was a very nice game, and Prince Dimple







70 Prince Dimrle.

would have been glad to play it any time, but
somehow Aunt Anna never seemed to think of
it except when it was raining.
The first part of the game was with a
work-basket, and this was the way they
played it.
Aunt Anna's part of the game came first.
She would take all the needles and pins and
scissors out of the basket, and then she would
put Prince Dimple on the bed beside the
basket.
Can you imagine what Prince Dimple's part
of the game was?
He would be so eager to see all that was in
the basket, that he would pucker his mouth up
as if he were going to whistle, and wave his
hands as if they were wings and he was going
to fly away with them.
He would lean over the basket, and pull out
one thing after another, till the basket was
quite empty.







A Nice Game.


When this was done, he would take the
spools of thread and silk, and try to unwind
them. He could generally do this very well
indeed; and by the time this part of the game
was done, the bed would be covered with long
strands of silk and thread, and all the buttons
would be pulled out of the button bag, and it
would look as if things could never be put in
order again, possibly.
When Prince Dimple could not unwind the
spools any more, and when he was tired of
playing with all these things, then Aunt Anna's
part of the game began again.
She would untangle the thread and silk,
and wind the spools all up neatly again,
and gather up the buttons and put them
in the bag. The thimbles and cushions had
to be picked. up from the floor, where Prince
Dimple had thrown them, and this part
of the game took Aunt Anna quite a long
time.







Prince Dirnile.


She did not enjoy this quite as much
as Prince Dimple did his part of the game,
but perhaps it was because it took more
time.
The next part of the game was even nicer,
Prince Dimple thought.
Aunt Anna would take Prince Dimple in
her lap and sit in front of her bureau. Then
she would open the top drawer, and let Prince
Dimple look in.
There were such nice playthings in that
drawer Prince Dimple could never understand
why every one else had nicer playthings than
he had.
For one thing, there was a pile of stiff cuffs
and collars, and Prince Dimple would take
them up one at a time in his little fingers, and
say, "Oh! oh!" as he did when he was very
much pleased and surprised. After he had
looked at each one, he would throw it down
on the floor.






A Nice Game.


This part of the game lasted a long time,
for there were so many things in the drawer.
After the collars and cuffs had all been
thrown out, then came the handkerchiefs. They
were all folded up in a neat pile, and Prince
Dimple would take them out one by one, and
shake them out of their folds, and hold them
against his little nose, and then drop them
down with the collars and cuffs.
It was a very nice game to empty Aunt An-
na's drawer, and when everything had been taken
out of this top drawer, there were still three
others, which sometimes were a part of the
game.
The things in the other drawers were larger,
and so it did not take as long to empty them, but
they made the pile on the floor a very large one.
When Prince Dimple's part of the game was
ended, he was very proud to think that a little
boy like himself could make such a great pile
of things.







74 Prince Dimple,

It generally took Aunt Anna till her bedtime
to finish the. game, which was to put every
thing back in its place again, and I do not
wonder that she only played it on rainy days.
Do you?







And the Dictionary.


CHAPTER SEVENTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND THE DICTIONARY.

O NE rainy Saturday, mother carried Prince
Dimple up into papa's study to see if
she could find something to amuse him, and
make him forget that he wanted to go out in
his carriage, if it was raining.
There were a great many shelves full of
books, and Prince Dimple reached out his
arms toward them, which meant, as mother
understood very well, "Please take me over
there."
Mother put Prince Dimple down on the
floor beside the shelves, and Prince Dimple
put his hand on a book. He found that he







76 Prince Dimpie,

could move it, and he looked up in mother's
face with a happy little smile. Then he took
hold of the book again and pulled a little harder,
and this time it came out in his hand.
This was great fun! Prince Dimple dropped
this book and. tried again, and another book
came out, and another, and after a while he had
pulled out all the books on the shelf.
Prince Dimple. was tired of books by this
time, and he looked about him to see what
else he could find.
"Oh! oh!" he cried in a glad voice, for he
saw something that had drawers like Aunt
Anna's bureau, only there were a great many
more of them, and so of course it would be
ever so much better.
"That is papa's desk, darling," mother said.
" I am afraid he would not like to have you
.play with his papers."
Prince Dimple did not seem to understand
this at all, and he jumped and crowed so
























r,*


" THE BOOK WAS ALMOST AS BIG AS HIMSELF."


,

,a.







And the Dictionary.


eagerly that mother thought she would let
him play at the desk just a little while. When
she found that he wanted to play the game that
he always played with Aunt Anna, she looked
about for something else to amuse him.
Prince Dimple saw a big book standing in
a rack by the desk, and he wanted to see what
it was. Mother put him in his high-chair and
let him sit before it, while she turned over the
leaves, and showed him the pictures. The book
was almost as big as Prince Dimple himself,
and it had a great many pictures in it.
Prince Dimple could not understand very
many of the pictures, but he liked to look at
them. When papa came upstairs he laughed
to see his little boy reading out of such a big
book.







78 Prince Dimple:


CHAPTER EIGHTEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE: THE LEMON LAMB.

P APA made Prince Dimple such a nice toy
one day. It was very different from any-
thing he had, and Prince Dimple thought that
it was just the best toy any one ever had.
It was a little lamb, and what do you sup-
pose papa made it out of?
I am sure you could never guess, so I will
tell you. He made it out of a lemon. It was
not a fresh juicy lemon, either, but an old
dried up one that Maggie found on the top
shelf of the closet. It was very hard, and
Prince Dimple could n't get even his sharp new
tooth into it. Shall I tell you how papa made
a little lamb out of this old lemon?







The Lemon Lamb. 79.

He put in two pins with black heads for
eyes, then he stuck in two wooden ears, and
four straight thin legs. Mother said it looked
more like a pig than a lamb; but papa made
it for a lamb, so of course it must have been
one.
It had not any tail, but Prince Dimple did
not mind that at all, and was very much
pleased with his new pet. He took it to his
crib at night, and went to sleep with the funny
little lamb hugged up to him.
Nobody could ever tell what Prince Dimple
was going to like beforehand. Mother gave
him a music-box once that she thought he
would like ever so much, but Prince Dimple
was afraid of it; and after he had heard it once,
he cried at the sight of it, so mother had to
give it to another baby who was not afraid
of it.
Perhaps if his little lamb could have made a
noise, Prince Dimple would not have liked it







Prince Dimple.


as well; but as it was, he loved it very much
indeed. Every day he took it out in the car-
riage with him, so that it might have the fresh
air, too. Sometimes people would smile when
they caught sight of this funny plaything, and
one day a lady said, Look at that poor child
He has nothing but an old lemon to play
with."
Prince Dimple squeezed his lamb closer to
him, when he heard this remark. He did
not like to hear his dear lamb called an old
lemon.
He told Jack the Harlequin about it when
he went home, and Jack agreed with him that
any one was very stupid who did not know a
dear little lamb when she saw it, but called it
an old lemon.







The Gingerbread Cake.


CHAPTER NINETEENTH.

PRINCE DIMPLE: THE GINGERBREAD CAKE.

O NE toy that Prince Dimple had found for
himself was a hard round gingerbread
cake. It was quite safe for him to play with it,
for he had learned what "No! no!" meant, and
he knew he must not put it in his mouth.
For a few days Prince Dimple liked his
cake better than any of his other toys, and he
took it out riding with him, every morning.
One morning it was quite warm and he
went to sleep in his carriage, in front of the
house.
Mary put the carriage where the sun would
not shine in Prince Dimple's eyes, and then
she sat down on the steps to watch him.
6







82 Prince Dimple:

What do you suppose she saw? Prince
Dimple held his cake in his hand, and some
little birds must have thought it would be a
nice thing to play with, or perhaps they
wanted to eat it.
Mary heard some little sparrows chirping to
one another, and presently one of them that was
braver than the rest, flew down and perched
on the side of the carriage.
He looked at the gingerbread cake with his
bright black eye, and chirped to the other
birds.
He must have told them that it was quite
safe to eat the cake, for presently two more
little birds flew down, and perched on the edge
of the carriage.
They all looked at the cake, and talked to
each other in bird language. Perhaps they
were asking each other whether it was safe
to go so near the little hand that held
the cake.






The Gingerbread Cake.


Pretty soon one little bird hopped up to the
cake, and took a little peck at it. He gave a
chirp of approval, and then the two other birds
joined him. They all picked at the cake, but it
was so hard that they could not get very much
to eat from it.
Just then Prince Dimple opened his eyes, and
he was very much surprised to see that the
little birds were trying to eat his dear cake.
He pulled the cake close up to him, and the
birds flew away very quickly, as if they knew
they had no business to eat Prince Dimple's
cake.
Prince-Dimple might have had his cake yet
if a very sad thing had not happened one day.
He had been playing with the cake when mother
undressed him for his bath, and then she took
the cake away from him, and laid it down
on the table. Just as she lifted Prince Dimple
up to put him in the tub, he reached out his
hand and picked the cake up again.






Prince Dimple,


So it happened that the cake went into the
bath-tub with Prince Dimple. Of course you
can guess what happened! The gingerbread
cake. was not used to taking a bath every day,
as Prince Dimple was, and so. it did not agree
with it. It grew soft,-just like the little bread-
crust that mother had told 'Prince Dimple about,
and it made the water all brown.
As soon as mother saw it, she took the poor
little gingerbread cake out of the water; but it
was too late. It fell all to pieces, and that was
the end of Prince Dimple's new plaything.










































A'.... -'

If .-'-


" HE HAD A NEW GAME THAT DAY."







And His Drum. 85






CHAPTER TWENTIETH.

PRINCE DIMPLE, AND HIS DRUM.

PRINCE DIMPLE had a present one day
from Maggie that pleased him very much.
Prince Dimple was very fond of a loud noise, if
he made it himself; though sometimes if others
made it he would cry.
The present that he liked so much was a little
drum, just the right size for such a little boy.
He seemed to know what to do with it just
as soon as he took it in his hands, and he
pounded on it with the drumsticks till he made
quite a noise.
Prince Dimple had a new game that day,
which was this: Mary put all his dolls in a
row, and he beat the drum for them to march.







Prince Dimple,


They did not keep in as straight a line as
some soldiers do, to be sure; but who could
expect Baby Bunting to stand up as straight as
Tom the piper's son?
Sukey fell down in a little heap right away,
because she never could stand up straight, and
Squeaky Sam rolled over and laid on his side.
As he was nearly as broad as he was long, no
one noticed it, and so he went marching along
on his side.
Prince Dimple had a fine time, beating his
drum and shouting to his regiment.
Some soldiers might have said that they could
not march to music that was sometimes fast and
sometimes slow; but Prince Dimple's regiment
did not mind little things like that.
Jack the Harlequin smiled as if he thought it
was great fun; and if Prince Dimple sometimes
hit him with the drumsticks, instead of hitting
the drum, he did not seem to mind it at all,
but only kept on smiling.







And His Drum. 87

It is a very good thing not to be able to do
anything but smile, because then you are sure
to keep your temper, no matter what happens.
Perhaps this was why Jack was always so
good-natured.






88 Prince Dimple.


CHAPTER TWENTY-FIRST.

PRINCE DIMPLE: HIS FUNNY COUGH.

PRINCE DIMPLE was very fond of fun;
and he was not a year old when he be-
gan to do little things for mischief,. and then
turn around and laugh, as much as to say,
"Was n't that fun ? "
Aunt Anna had a bad cough,.and this seemed
to amuse Prince Dimple very much. He
thought she was doing it just to please him,
and he would laugh at her; and then as soon
as she had finished coughing, he would imitate
her as well-as he could.
A-hem! A-hem!" he would cough, in a little
affected way that made every one laugh at
him.







His Funny Cough.


After a while he would imitate every one who
coughed, whenever he heard it. One day an old
gentleman came to see papa, and Prince Dimple
was taken down into the parlor to see him,
Mother hoped that Prince Dimple would be
very good, because this old gentleman used to
teach papa when he was a little boy, and she
wanted him to be pleased with Prince Dimple.
Before Prince Dimple had been in the parlor
very long, the old gentleman coughed.
"Ha! Ha!" laughed Prince Dimple, merrily.
Mother tried to amuse him with something
else, so he would not remember to cough; but
she could not do it.
As soon as the old gentleman had finished
coughing, Prince Dimple began.
"A-hem! A-hem! "
It was such a funny little cough, that every
one wanted to laugh.
"Why, the baby has a cough," said the old
gentleman, not thinking that little Prince Dimple


- 89







Prince Dimple.


was mischievous enough to imitate him. Be-
fore many minutes he coughed again, and again
Prince Dimple coughed too.
I believe that baby is imitating me!" ex-
claimed the old gentleman, and he coughed
once more, just to see. He laughed when he
saw how hard Prince Dimple tried to imitate
him.
"You are very like your papa, sir," he said
to Prince Dimple; "he was a very mischievous
boy."
"Agool" said Prince Dimple.







Sukey's Eye. 91







CHAPTER TWENTY-SECOND.

PRINCE DIMPLE: SUKEY'S EYE.

PRINCE DIMPLE thought that Sukey would
look a great deal 'prettier without such
big staring eyes, and he tried to pick them out.
He would sit and pull away at the eyes with
his little fat fingers, and try his very hardest to
pull them out of poor Sukey's head. No one
thought he would ever succeed, for Sukey's
eyes were fastened in so firmly that it did not
seem as if a baby's little fingers could ever loosen
them.
Prince Dimple was very patient, and every
day he worked for some time at Sukey's eyes.
It would be so nice when those big black eyes
did not look at him all the time.






92 Prince Dimple.

The eyes began to grow loose after a while,
and then poor Sukey looked worse than ever,
for her eyes shook about when she was moved.
One day Prince Dimple was working away
with all his might, with his lips all drawn up
in the funny little pucker that showed he was
very much in earnest, when all at once one
of those black eyes came off and rolled into
his lap.
Oh! Oh!" said Prince Dimple, in surprise;
and then he dropped Sukey, and picked up
her eye.
Prince Dimple wondered what her eye was
made of, for of course he did not know that
the round, hard, black thing was a shoe-button.
He played with it for a little while, and then
being tired of it, he wanted to get rid of it.
He could have thrown it on the floor; but he
did not think of this way of getting rid of
it. He scolded at it for a moment, because he
was tired of it; and then he remembered the







Sukey's Eye. 93

little round hole that was such a convenient
place to put things, and opening his mouth,
he put poor Sukey's eye into it.
If poor Sukey had seen this with her other
eye,. no doubt she would have felt very bad
to see Prince Dimple eating her eye; but as
she was lying on her face, she did not know
where her eye was.
Pretty soon mother picked Sukey up, and
saw that one of her eyes was gone. Only
one eye was left, and that one shook about
and hung down on her cheek, because it was
so loose. Poor Sukey looked very funny with
one eye gone, and the other one almost out.
Mpther did not laugh, though, for she was
too anxious to know what Prince Dimple had
done with the eye.
"Where is Sukey's eye?" she asked; but
Prince Dimple only smiled. Mother looked
on the floor for it; but of course it was not
there. Then she picked Prince Dimple up, and




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs