• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Illustrators
 Tree mathematics
 Record section






Title: What's a tree to me? : member's manual
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078695/00004
 Material Information
Title: What's a tree to me? : member's manual
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Florida 4-H Youth Development, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida
Publisher: Florida 4-H Youth Development, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078695
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Acknowledgement
        Page 2 (MULTIPLE)
    Illustrators
        Page 3
    Tree mathematics
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Record section
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 12
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





MEMBER'S MANUAL


4H FOM 10


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What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


This educational material has been adapted for use in Florida by Cynthia L. Thomson, Graduate Assistant, School
of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, in cooperation with Florida 4-H.

The material was originally prepared for 4-H use by the Department of Education, New York State College of
Agriculture and Life Sciences, through a special grant from the International Paper Company Foundation.
Administration of the grant was by Cornell Cooperative Extension Service New York City 4-H office. Original
publication was through the National 4-H Council, 7100 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815.

Reviewers

Mr. B.J. Allen, Associate Professor and Extension 4-H Youth Specialist, 4-H and Other Youth Programs

Miss Linda L. Dearmin, Associate Professor and Extension 4-H Youth Specialist, 4-H and Other Youth Programs

Dr. Suzanne G. Fisher, Assistant Dean and Chairperson, 4-H and Other Youth Programs

Dr. D. Mitchell Flinchum, Associate Professor and Extension Forestry Specialist, School of Forest Resources and
Conservation

Mr. Anthony S. Jensen, Associate Professor and Extension Forestry and Wildlife Specialist, School of Forest
Resources and Conservation

Dr. Wayne R. Marion, Associate Professor and Extension Wildlife Ecology Specialist, School of Forest Resources
and Conservation

Dr. Nancy Pywell, Assistant Professor of Natural Resources Education, School of Forest Resources


October 1990


Page 2







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Illustrators

Mrs. Joyce M. Lottinville, Illustrator, and Dr. Nancy Pywell, School of Forest Resources and Conservation











ne day a very old man left his house early in the
morning and returned several hours later with a
sapling. The sapling was half as tall as you are and
as thin as a wooden pencil. The old man began
planting it at the roadside in front of his house. He
worked slowly because he was old and because he
enjoyed the work. As he planted, a neighbor came
by and looked at the tiny sapling.

"Why you silly old man," the neighbor laughed, "you're wasting your time planting such a small sapling!
You'll be gone before it grows large enough to fill this space with beauty and shade."

"You are correct," the old man calmly replied as he continued planting. "But, I am not planting this tree for
myself. All my life I have had fine trees to look at and walk under because when I was young, old people planted
trees. Now, I plant trees -- for those to come!"











What's a Tree to Me? was developed to teach you more about trees their importance, value, usefulness, and the
pleasure they give. If you live in the city, the suburbs, or the country, trees are an important part of your life. What
would your neighborhood be like without trees?

You will learn how trees grow, what trees do for people and the environment, and how you can help trees. There
are many exciting activities and opportunities to invite guest speakers to your meetings. You can also learn about
careers that deal with trees. The more effort you put into this project, the more benefits you will receive from it.
Have a TREEmendous time!


October 1990


Page 3







TREE MATHEMATICS

Have you ever seen the bumper sticker that says, "Have you hugged a tree today?" Suppose you did hug a tree.
What could you find out from that? If your fingers just touched on the other side, how big around would the tree
be? Try making as big a circle as you can by touching your fingers out in front of you. Have a partner measure
how far it is around the inside of this circle. How does it compare with what you thought?

Some trees are too big to reach around. Some are small enough to reach around with one hand. But are hands a
good way to measure? Why?


A ruler is much better for measuring. But only for
certain things. It is not easy to measure round things
with a ruler. It is better to use a tape.


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What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Look for some round things to measure. Try a record, a can, a wastebasket, a bicycle wheel, a paper plate, or a
Frisbee. Use a tape to find out how far it is around each one. Then use a ruler or a tape to find out how far it is
across each one. Keep a record. Try as many round things as you can.


OBJECT DISTANCE DISTANCE
AROUND ACROSS


R-RECORD 94 c m 30cmr
PAPER PLATE 7 6 cm 25 cm
BIKE WHEEL 210cm 67er
WASTE BASKET
CAAN


The distance around something is called circumference. What is the circumference of a record? Do all records
have the same circumference? Do all Frisbees have the same circumference? How about all trees?

The distance across a round object is called diameter. What is the diameter of a coffee can? What is the diameter
of a paper plate?


October 1990


Page 5


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What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Now look at your record of circumference and diameter for different objects. In each case, about how many
diameters would equal the circumference? How many times bigger is the circumference than the diameter? Or,
what is the ratio of the circumference to the diameter? This ratio (3.14 or about 3) is called pi (pronounced "pie").
It is the same for all round objects. The symbol for this ratio is iT, the greek letter. When you see this letter in a
math formula it always means 3.14.

Now suppose you wanted to measure the diameter of a tree. Could you tell what it was if you measured the
circumference? Sure!

Try finding the diameter of some nearby trees. First, use a tape to find the circumference. Then, from your record
of the ratio of circumference to diameter (or ir), figure out the diameter of each tree. What is the diameter of the
largest tree near you? What do you think is the diameter of the largest tree in the United States?












--' ;,


October 1990


Page 6







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


The giant sequoia is one of the largest trees in the
United States. Its diameter is almost 10 meters (about
30 feet). From that diameter, what would its
circumference be? How does that compare to the
length of a classroom in your school?

How does the largest tree near you compare with the
huge trees in the table below?



KIND OF TREE
& DIAMETER
LOCATION

White oak near 2.5 meters
Philadelphia, 1675 (8 feet)

White pine 1.7 meters
New Hampshire, 1674 (5 feet)

Tuliptree 2 meters
Maryland, 1970 (6.5 feet)

American elm 4 meters
Connecticutt, 1950 (13.5 feet)

Eastern cottonwood 2 meters
New York, 1945 (6.5 feet)

Sugar pine 3.1 meters
California, 1955 (10.2 feet)

Douglas fir 4.4 meters
Washington, 1825 (14.5 feet)


October 1990


Page 7







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Many of these large trees were cut years ago. Why do you suppose that near-record trees are seldom found today?
Since the largest trees may take hundreds, or even a thousand years, to get that big, what chance would a tree have
to live that long in a park, along a street, or in your yard?

The tallest tree ever measured in the United States was a Douglas Fir from Washington that was 124 meters high
(385 feet)! That's longer than a football field!


October 1990


Page 8







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Record Section

PROJECT REQUIREMENTS

I. ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS


1) What do the words "diameter" and "circumference" mean?










2) What is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter?




3) List three of the largest types of trees found in the United States. Where are they found?








4) How many feet equal a meter?




II. CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING PROJECTS TO DO


1) Find out what each instrument listed below measures on a tree and how to use it. Ask your city or
county forester if he or she would be willing to help.

a) increment borer b) calipers

c) DBH tape d) relaskop

e) biltmore stick f) clinometer



2) Demonstrate to your club the use of at least two of the instruments mentioned above.


October 1990


Page 9







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


3) Take a core from a pine tree using an increment borer. Glue the core onto a piece of wood, and label
each year's growth. Label your specimen with your name, the type of tree it was taken from,where the tree
was found, and the age of the tree.


III. WRITE A STORY ABOUT YOUR PROJECT


Include what you learned, problems you had, and what was the most fun.


** ATTACH ADDITIONAL PAGES, IF NEEDED **


October 1990


Page 10

















Name:


Age:


County: 4-H Club:

Years in 4-H work: School:

Leader's Name: Do you live in the City?


UFI UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA
IFAS Extension


1. This document has been extracted from 4H FOM 10 (section 4 of 11 sections) which
supercedes 4H-480, one of a series of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation for 4-H
Youth Development Program, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Date reprinted October 1990. Please visit the
FAIRS Website at http://hammock.ifas.ufl.edu.

2. Cynthia L. Thomson, Graduate Assistant, School of Forest Resources and Conservation,
Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, Gainesville, 32611.


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES,
Christine Taylor Waddill, Director, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this information to further
the purpose of the May 8 and June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, age, sex, handicap or national origin. The
information in this publication is available in alternate formats. Single copies of extension publications (excluding 4-H and youth
publications) are available free to Florida residents from county extension offices. Information on copies for out-of-state purchase is
available from Publications Distribution Center, University of Florida, PO Box 110011, Gainesville, FL 32611-0011. Information about
alternate formats is available from Educational Media and Services, University of Florida, PO Box 110810, Gainesville, FL 32611-0810.
This information was published as 4H FOM 10, which supercedes 4H-480, Florida Cooperative Extension Service.




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