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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Acknowledgement
 Illustrators
 Batter up!
 Record section






Title: What's a tree to me? : member's manual
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078695/00001
 Material Information
Title: What's a tree to me? : member's manual
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Florida 4-H Youth Development, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida
Publisher: Florida 4-H Youth Development, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078695
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Acknowledgement
        Page 2 (MULTIPLE)
    Illustrators
        Page 3
    Batter up!
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Record section
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida





MEMBER'S MANUAL


4H FOM 10


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What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


This educational material has been adapted for use in Florida by Cynthia L. Thomson, Graduate Assistant, School
of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, in cooperation with Florida 4-H.

The material was originally prepared for 4-H use by the Department of Education, New York State College of
Agriculture and Life Sciences, through a special grant from the International Paper Company Foundation.
Administration of the grant was by Cornell Cooperative Extension Service New York City 4-H office. Original
publication was through the National 4-H Council, 7100 Connecticut Avenue, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815.

Reviewers

Mr. B.J. Allen, Associate Professor and Extension 4-H Youth Specialist, 4-H and Other Youth Programs

Miss Linda L. Dearmin, Associate Professor and Extension 4-H Youth Specialist, 4-H and Other Youth Programs

Dr. Suzanne G. Fisher, Assistant Dean and Chairperson, 4-H and Other Youth Programs

Dr. D. Mitchell Flinchum, Associate Professor and Extension Forestry Specialist, School of Forest Resources and
Conservation

Mr. Anthony S. Jensen, Associate Professor and Extension Forestry and Wildlife Specialist, School of Forest
Resources and Conservation

Dr. Wayne R. Marion, Associate Professor and Extension Wildlife Ecology Specialist, School of Forest Resources
and Conservation

Dr. Nancy Pywell, Assistant Professor of Natural Resources Education, School of Forest Resources


October 1990


Page 2







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Illustrators

Mrs. Joyce M. Lottinville, Illustrator, and Dr. Nancy Pywell, School of Forest Resources and Conservation











ne day a very old man left his house early in the
morning and returned several hours later with a
sapling. The sapling was half as tall as you are and
as thin as a wooden pencil. The old man began
planting it at the roadside in front of his house. He
worked slowly because he was old and because he
enjoyed the work. As he planted, a neighbor came
by and looked at the tiny sapling.

"Why you silly old man," the neighbor laughed, "you're wasting your time planting such a small sapling!
You'll be gone before it grows large enough to fill this space with beauty and shade."

"You are correct," the old man calmly replied as he continued planting. "But, I am not planting this tree for
myself. All my life I have had fine trees to look at and walk under because when I was young, old people planted
trees. Now, I plant trees -- for those to come!"











What's a Tree to Me? was developed to teach you more about trees their importance, value, usefulness, and the
pleasure they give. If you live in the city, the suburbs, or the country, trees are an important part of your life. What
would your neighborhood be like without trees?

You will learn how trees grow, what trees do for people and the environment, and how you can help trees. There
are many exciting activities and opportunities to invite guest speakers to your meetings. You can also learn about
careers that deal with trees. The more effort you put into this project, the more benefits you will receive from it.
Have a TREEmendous time!


October 1990


Page 3







BATTER UP!


Where do baseball bats come from? A store? A room in the school gym? A rack in the dug-out?

Baseball bats come from trees! Ash trees! Every year thousands of trees are cut to make baseball bats. Before
they are cut, the trees grow. They produce wood in layers. The layers show in everything made from wood.
Even in baseball bats!







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Look at a wooden bat. Look at the end of the handle. Can you
see lines there? Do the lines look like those in the picture?
Look at the lines closely. The light ones have little pits or pores
in them. The pores make the wood soft. The soft wood grew
when there was plenty of rain. Then the new growth had big,
soft cells a whole layer of them.


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During the dry season there was less water for the tree. The
layer of wood that grew had small, hard cells. They were darker. This
layer did not have many pits or pores.


By fall the tree slowed its growing almost to a stop. All winter it just
stood in the cold. Not dead, but not growing, either. It just stood
dormant, without leaves.


The next wet season, it began to grow again. It grew a layer of soft wood
with big cells. Then came dry weather and another layer of hard wood
with small cells.


One year: a layer of soft wood, and a layer of hard wood. The year after,
that: another layer of soft, and a layer of hard wood.


Year after year... soft, hard soft, hard... soft, hard... Look at the bat again.
Can you mark one year of wood?


How many year's growth are there in the handle of the bat? Which took
longer to grow you or the wood in the handle?


Now look at the big end of the bat. How many years did it take to grow
that end? How does that compare with your age? How long did it take to
grow the whole piece of wood that made the bat? That's a long time!
You can't grow a bat in a hurry! A lot of bats takes a lot of trees!


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October 1990


Page 5

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What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


Often the lines (layers of wood) in the bat handles curves. They curve because they were curved in the tree. In the
tree, the layers were in cylinders.


Look at your bat. Are the lines or layers curved? How big a
cylinder did they come from?

\ N, *Where do you think the center of the tree would have been?
What makes you think so?

If the tree begins to grow at the center, how old would it have
been when it grew your bat?

\\hat \ would the diameter of the tree have been? Could it have been bigger
than that' \Why do you think so?


Record Section

Project Requirements

I. ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS

1) What kinds of trees are wooden bats made from?




2) When does soft wood grow? What makes it soft?







3) When does hard wood grow? What makes it hard?







4) How old is the wood at the thinnest part of your bat or the demonstration bat?


October 1990


Page 6







What's A Tree To Me? Member's Manual


5) If a fast-growing tree has more hard wood than a slow-growing tree, is slow-grown wood or fast-grown best
for bats?



6) When the bat was growing, which end was up?



7) What other sports equipment is made from wood?




II. CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING PROJECTS TO DO

1) Visit a wood products factory or store (furniture, sporting goods, sawmill, etc.). Look for annual rings in the
wood products. Report the experience to your club, or write a report about the trip.
2) Call a local sporting goods representative or baseball player. Ask him or her to come talk with your club
about wooden sports equipment.


III. WRITE A STORY ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Include what you learned, problems you had, and what was the most fun.



















** ATTACH ADDITIONAL PAGES, IF NEEDED **


October 1990


I


I


Page 7

















Name:


Age:


County: 4-H Club:

Years in 4-H work: School:

Leader's Name: Do you live in the City?


1. This document has been extracted from 4H FOM 10 (section 1 of 11 sections) and supercedes
4H-480, one of a series of the School of Forest Resources and Conservation for 4-H Youth
Development Program, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Date reprinted October 1990. Please visit the
FAIRS Website at http://hammock.ifas.ufl.edu.

2. Cynthia L. Thomson, Graduate Assistant, School of Forest Resources and Conservation,
Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, Gainesville, 32611.


U f UNIVERSITYof

IUFLORIDA
IFAS Extension


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES,
Christine Taylor Waddill, Director, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this information to further
the purpose of the May 8 and June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, age, sex, handicap or national origin. The
information in this publication is available in alternate formats. Single copies of extension publications (excluding 4-H and youth
publications) are available free to Florida residents from county extension offices. Information on copies for out-of-state purchase is
available from Publications Distribution Center, University of Florida, PO Box 110011, Gainesville, FL 32611-0011. Information about
alternate formats is available from Educational Media and Services, University of Florida, PO Box 110810, Gainesville, FL 32611-0810.
This information was published as 4H FOM 10, which supercedes 4H-480, Florida Cooperative Extension Service.




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