• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The children grumble
 The children smile
 New friends
 Terrible disasters
 The little old gentleman
 The children make plans
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Some other people
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078669/00001
 Material Information
Title: Some other people
Physical Description: 47 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weber, Alice
Berkeley, Edith ( Illustrator )
Moody, Fannie ( Illustrator )
Maplestone, Florence ( Illustrator )
Connell, M ( Illustrator )
Hammond, Gertrude Demain, d. 1934 ( Illustrator )
Fenn, Harry, 1838-1911 ( Illustrator )
Maplestone, Edith ( Illustrator )
May, Gertrude ( Illustrator )
Finnemore, Joseph, 1860-1939 ( Illustrator )
Strutt, A. W ( Illustrator )
Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh ( Publisher )
Publisher: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh
Place of Publication: London ;
Sydney
Publication Date: [1890?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Measles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1890   ( local )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Australia -- Sydney
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Alice Weber ; illustrated by Edith Berkeley, Fannie Moody, Florence Maplestone, M. Connell, Gertrude Demain Hammond, Annie Manville Fenn, Edith Maplestone, Gertrude May, J. Fennimore, A. W. Strutt, R.B.A., &c.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Some illustrations printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078669
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225230
notis - ALG5502
oclc - 180989951

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The children grumble
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    The children smile
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    New friends
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Terrible disasters
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The little old gentleman
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    The children make plans
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text




















im









I'M-













INC














SOME


OTHER


PEOPLE


,, "'L; L :'!-








SOME


OTHER


PEOPLE


ALICE WEBER
AUTHOR OF "WHEN I'M A MAN."


ILLUSTRA TED BY
EDITH BERKELEY, FANNIE MOODY, FLORENCE MAPLESTONE, M. CONNELL,
GERTRUDE DEMAIN HAMMOND, ANNIE MANVILLE FENN, EDITH MAPLESTONE
GERTRUDE MAY, J. FENNIMORE, A. W. STRUTT, R.B.A., &c.









GRIFFITH FARRAN OKEDEN & WELSH
NEWBERY HOUSE
LONDON AND SYDNEY































































The Rights of Translation and of Reproduction are reserved.



























THE CHILDREN GRUMBLE


CHAPTER II.


THE CHILDREN SMILE


CHAPTER III.


NEW FRIENDS


CHAPTER IV.


TERRIBLE DISASTERS


CHAPTER V.

THE LITTLE OLD GENTLEMAN


CHAPTER VI.


THE CHILDREN MAKE PLANS


CONTENTS


CHAPTER I.


PAGE


I __ __













SOME

OTHER PEOPLE.



CHAPTER I.

THE CHILDREN- GRUMBLE.

THE children had had the measles-all four of them-Gladys, Sidney, Molly,
and Toby; and they were all in that limp and flabby state when a very little
thing makes you cross, and a still smaller thing makes you cry, and a smaller
thing still makes your bones ache as if you had been running for miles. Nobody
knew how they had caught it; but Nurse had her strong suspicions that when
they were at the seaside last August, "the seeds," as she expressed it, had been
sown. For the shore used to swarm with children like sandhoppers in number,
and Nurse said that amongst so many there must have been one child on the
verge of measles, and her theory was that "one measles would make a thousand."
She also remembered that "the day they began it-the day when she knew
something was wrong with Miss Gladys-what does Master Sidney do but
paddle about with her, he and she in their bathing toggery, with their fishing-
nets all the morning. Measles was in them then, she was sure of it, and measles
was checked-sent inside them by that fishy paddling, which she always had set
her face against, and their Ma never would!" Whether Nurse was right or
wrong, certainly the two elder children had been seriously ill; the two younger
ones were always said to hop through everything, but Sidney and Gladys took
things hard. And now it was October, and they were said to be convalescent,
which is one word for the two words, "limp and flabby." They were well
enough to go out, if it had been weather for them, but what an endless number
of wet days Sidney had noted down on his weather-chart that week!
"And mother says, 'Where's your chirpiness, Sid?' I should like to
know who could be chirpy after measles, and in all this rain "
Sidney stood in the schoolroom window, the picture of woe; it was a bow-
window that looked right over the charmingly picturesque old High Street, with
the bridge across the river at the bottom of it, but Sidney could see nothing
charming out of doors that afternoon. Blue-eyed Gladys, pale and peaky from
B


:-" 71-'i:~--~ ~) ~11'"17;r*-, inpr~-;TCir _I-. I- -1-T 7-.. -.;-~-.;--.----~T~


Az ^*%&-lS-







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


measles, said peevishly, from the depths of the arm-chair, where she sat curled
up with a book :
"I get so tired of everything! I'm tired of reading now! I wish some-
thing nice would happen! I wish doctor's children need never have
the measles! 0 Molly! how you make
my head ache! do go and play battle-
dore upstairs "
For Molly was now able-bodied enough
to spring about the room after her shuttlecock;
SI but, as she liked being with Sidney and Gladys
in the schoolroom better than being in the nursery
with that young Turk Toby, she-for a wonder
--did not argue; but, discovering that her head,
too, ached a little, went and stood in the window with
Sidney.
S"Father and mother have a secret," she said
grandly; "and it's something about us, I know."
"I wish you didn't always think you knew every-
thing!" murmured Gladys, fretfully.
.....L "And it's sure to be nothing nice," grumbled
Sidney. "Nothing nice will ever come again."
':./4 T can tell nyo some-


thing else," continued
Molly, nodding her head
wisely. Hodge says the
Ribstone pippins in his
garden are quite ripe now,
and little Jenny Hodge
i picked up the windfalls
yesterday, and sat under
the hedge eating three before they found
out. Father has sent her some medi-


..- cine."
Molly, there's Toby calling you," said Sidney, as a
shrill little voice was heard from the upper regions, crying
," out, "Molly! Molly! Tiger's come up to play wif us! Now,
* S~ Tiger was a large Newfoundland. Molly disappeared in a twink-
ling. She and Toby were very good friends; Toby was a Turk.
and a pickle, but then he was a boy, and only four years old, and pickles of
four years old may be something very good by the. time they are forty; Molly
w.as seven, and a girl, and so of course was different altogether; then, as Mr
Sepia told her, So much is expected of girls, they are the salvation of society."


L_
'P;: ~~t



i~y
.~i~c~ ~







THE CHILDREN GR UMBLE.


Mr Sepia was an artist-friend of their father's, and he had come down
from London to stay at Dr Darcy's, on purpose to paint bits of the picturesque
old town. Would you believe it? he had been in the house ten days, and in
all that time had not once been able to sit out of doors to sketch. So he had
to make the best of circumstances, which means that on that very afternoon
when the children were grumbling in the schoolroom, he had fixed his easel in
the study (called his "studio"), and had begun a picture indoors. "Such a
curus picture to make!" Molly had told Gladys and Sidney; for Molly had
gone in on tip-toe to see what-he was about, and although he had frowned his
thick eyebrows, and tossed back his shaggy hair, with a fierce "What do you
want in here ? he had, at the same time, stretched out an arm, and Molly had
calmly walked into it, and contemplated his picture.
"Such a very curus one I" she had told them; "it was a large hat, and
there was a feather in it, and there was a cup and ball by it, and there was
a bow, and a thing to hold
arrows, and then there was
an arrow stuck through
whatever it was the hat
and cup and ball were
lying on. And what do
m you think he called the
-- ____ --_--- picture? He said he called
it 'Gone Away!' And
then he told me a beautiful story about it; and it was about a
little girl, and her father, and ." But Gladys and Sidney
had begged Molly not to tell them any more, because she always
made her stories so uninteresting, they said, by putting in
so many "ands," they would rather ask Mr Sepia to tell them
himself.
And when Molly had gone up to the nursery, it struck them
that perhaps Mr Sepia would come and tell them a story, then and
there. Sidney volunteered to ask him, going out of the room
as if he were carrying a sack of coals on his back, and creeping
downstairs as if the bannisters were his sole support in life. He
sauntered into the studio. It was too dusk to paint any longer; the
firelight was dancing and flickering in the corners of the comfortable,
warmly-coloured room; through the window could be seen, away over
the line of hills beyond the water meadows, a rent in the grey curtain
of cloud that had hung there all day, and through the rent peeped a streak of
greenish-blue sky. It looked very watery outside-very warm inside. The
artist had thrown himself into an arm-chair, and was evidently napping. Sidney
leaned over the table on his elbows, and taking up a paint-brush dabbled
it about in the glass of water.







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


Hallo came from the arm-chair, "leave my things alone I" Sidney
had not even the energy to start; he pulled himself up, and went round to the
arin-chair,-it was something to lean against.
We do wish you would come and tell us a story," he said, with a sigh.
Couldn't do it. I had boiled mutton for lunch. Who could tell a story
after boiled mutton ?" replied Mr Sepia, with his eyes closed.
Sidney found this unanswerable; but after a minute's pause he began
again :
"Measles are such miserable things, Gladys and I think; we don't think we
have ever been so miserable in our lives-ever."
"Molly and Toby don't seem to think so," said the artist, still with his
eyes closed. I looked into the nursery a little while ago, and they were sledg-
ing with Tiger and the clothes-basket-Molly inside."
Molly and Toby are children," returned Sidney, superbly.
Good gracious I" exclaimed Mr Sepia, with wide-open eyes; but he shut
them again directly. There was profound silence until Sidney spoke again.
Nobody does anything to amuse us to-day; everything is so horrid. We
don't think we are ever going to see the Maynes at the Vicarage again, because
they have never had measles; and they have some darling puppies which they
are longing to show us; but we can't go to them, and they mustn't come to us.
It is miserable."
"You re-
.mind me so
much,"said
Mr Sepia,
half opening his
eyes, of a certain
jackdaw who has
been sitting on the
dead branch of that oak tree
just outside the window. Now,
jackdaws are known to be the
most contented and cheery birds;
nobody ever saw or heard of a moping,
melancholy jackdaw. But this one
S, evidently has a grievance-perhaps his
friends the starlings have measles, and he
and his family cannot therefore associate as usual-
whatever it is, he was flapping and cawing on that branch for at least a
quarter of an hour. And I took it to be his way of grumbling; he must
make himself intensely disagreeable to the other birds, as all grumbling things
and people do."







THE CHILDREN GRUMBLE. 13
Poor Sidney put his head down on the top of the arm-chair with some-
thing very like a sob, as he said :
But I don't believe that jackdaw felt as tired as I do !"
Then the artist looked up and pulled Sidney round on to his knee, and
kissing him quite in a surprising way, exclaimed :
My dear boy! I'm
sorry if I have been a
brute! Let's come to
tea; I hear a clinking of
cups and saucers in the
schoolroom."
He and Sidney got
up from the arm-chair
n .t.o together and went off
arm-in-arm to the school-
room; only it was un-
fortunate that they left the studio door open, for the consequences were disastrous.
Toby had been allowed to join the schoolroom tea-party for a treat because of the
wet weather. Not that Toby's spirits were even damped by rain; it was more
likely because the others wanted something to laugh at that he was so promoted.
Mr Sepia, too, was never cross or sulky; in fact he was always happy; and such
people are always welcome when they drop in for a cup of tea. They were really all
beginning to be quite a merry little tea-party; Toby, beaming over his bread and
jam, was announcing to the party generally, When I am a big man, I will give
you all sweet cakes,"
which Mr Sepia told
S"Gladys was a polite
reflection on the lack
of such dainties that
evening; and at that
very moment Jane,
the parlour-maid,
came into the
schoolroom, and,
with a face of dis-
may, told startling
1 -, news.
Two kittens,
children of the
Vicarage cat, and only sent to Sidney and Gladys yesterday, had strolled into
the studio together. They were said by the little Maynes to be the sweetest
kittens that ever were, and believed to be so by the Darcy children, but not by
poor Mr Sepia when Jane said:







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


Oh if you please, sir I the two kittens have been and got on the study
table, and have walked over your paints, and bitten your paint-brushes and torn
one of your painting-bottles, dreadful "
"Oh !" screamed Gladys, jumping up from her chair, "the darlings will be
poisoned !"
"Of course they will, if we don't make them sick I" cried Molly the all-wise.
"Castor oil! castor oil at once! cried Gladys; for which Sidney precipi-
tately hurried up to the nursery, the two girls rushing after him, hearing that the
kittens had been carried off there.
Mr Sepia, the only injured one, said nothing, but he felt the more, as he
went back to the studio to pick up the pieces of what remained. So Toby found
himself alone with the jam. The opportunity was a grand one; and when, after
a few minutes, the three others came back to the tea-table-having left the
kittens purring on the nursery rug, unharmed by paint, and therefore saved from
castor oil-they found the jam-pot empty.
"Toby!!!" they all three exclaimed at once. It really was enough to
crush him, but Toby was not easily crushed. He faced them all with his sweetest
smile, and said:
I petended I was a man, and stood eat eberysing I liked "-Perhaps it
was rather a pity that he did not suffer any more than the kittens did.
Mr Sepia looked in upon them before dinner; he put his head round the
door, and said:
"Those kittens have bitten two of my paint-tubes to bits, and. torn the hairs
out of three of my best brushes. Whose fault is it ?-the measles or the
weather ?"
"It is the weather's fault," cried the
children; "because if it had been fine
you would have been painting out of -
doors. Dear Mr Sepia, we are so sorry ,
but do come in and sit with us again-
Toby's gone to bed-and we have no
one and nothing to make us laugh!"
But the dinner-gong sounded, and
the artist's head vanished.
'"After dinner we shall have our
secret, I think!" said Molly, hopping -.
on one leg and clapping her hands, -
And so they had. .,















CHAPTER II.


THE CHILDREN SMILE.


THE Maynes living at the Vicarage, and the Darcys
had often thought it would be a charming thing to
their two houses;
only they had never
seen their wayclearly
to laying down the
wires through that
piece of marsh-land
which separated
them where the wild duck flew
across in the long winter nights, and
where J


living in the High Street,
have a telephone between


"Late in the autumn, on still and
cloudless evenings,
Among the golden reed-beds I heard the
starlings sing."
Gladys might have been corn orted
that afternoon in her disconsolate w
dumps if she could have heard Mlaggie
Mayne say in her cheerful tone-
Measles can't last for ever, you
know. We and the Darcys must meet
at last."
There were four children at the Vicarage: Harold and Maggie were the
two eldest,-Grace, the youngest, was only two years old and then there was a
Daisy, the same age as Toby.
"And they never have anything the matter with them i the Darcys used
to say; "never have measles or mumps, or any of the other things we are
always having!" Indeed, the Maynes were apparently born under such a
lucky star that Gladys had said on that identical wet, grumbly afternoon,
"Very likely the Maynes have been able to do something very jolly
to-day--something, perhaps, with the darling new puppies." Certainly


ii I i li~---------L_---------







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


the Darcys had missed something that was rather funny, for Harold and
Maggie had gone out into the back-yard after dinner with one of the
puppies, and the sister kitten to the Darcys' two; and they had made them
sit up opposite to one another, with their little forepaws beating the air to
steady themselves, and they were made to promise one another that they
would always be good friends, and not lead a cat and dog life-the mother-cat
watching the scene from a window-sill above. This sort of introduction was
always gone through between the Vicarage cats and dogs.
Then the rain had come pouring down; the introduction was over, and
Harold and Maggie were obliged to go indoors, like everyone else.
"Father says if this rain lasts much longer the floods will come," said
Harold.
"Shall we have Noah's ark then ?" asked Daisy. But before her question
could be answered, somebody said that the young puppies were all brought in
from the stables by their father, and were now downstairs in the hall waiting
for them. Helter-skelter downstairs rushed the children, leaving little Grace
hanging on to the nursery-gate, and peeping through the bars in wonder as to
what she would see, if she looked long enough. If she could have looked round
corners, she would have seen her father stretched at full length on the matted
hall floor, leaning on his elbows, whilst a puppy, soft and white, licked his face.
Harold, Maggie, and Daisy were down on their knees, and on all-fours with
another fat thing; whilst their mother stood in the drawing-room doorway,
with the third dumpling in her hands, cuddling it against her cheek.
How glad I am that you and father are as fond of creatures as we are,
mother! cried Maggie. "If the floods are coming, and Daisy's ark is floated,
it would be lovely for one thing, because we should have all the animals living
with us! It was rather a delightful idea, and they discussed it fully at
nursery tea, only Nurse did not seem quite to see the beauty of it. She would
persist in repeating, "Where should I air my clean things then, Miss Maggie?"
She was a dear old thing, their old Rebecca. Never a tea-time passed without
Baby Grace climbing on to her knee for the small fingers of bread and butter,,
delicately spread with brown sugar. Then the poems she used to recite to
them poetry that she had learnt when she was a little girl at school, and which
sounded so utterly unlike any other poetry, that once Harold asked her if it
were English. But there is a great charm sometimes in listening to what you
cannot understand. Another of her accomplishments was to tell fortunes from
tea-cups; many an evening did Harold pass her his empty mug with the little
black grounds of tea running up the side of it, to have it returned by Nurse
with the words:


"A successful man you'll surelie be-
Up at the top of the tallest tree 1 "







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


"Must it always be the same ?" Harold asked, for all the children used to
think that successful man sounded most uninteresting.
"Would you wish for anything better, Master Harold, my dear ?"
"To have a pack of hounds one day would be much jollier objected
Harold.
"How would that help your dear Pa and Ma?" was Nurse's answer, as
stern as she could make it, but she was not stern by nature.
To live with the Darcys all in one house would be much nicer I" cried
Maggie.
Ah Miss Maggie, happy families don't always agree; it's very difficult
to say now what you'd like as a good fortune when you're much older. Daisy,
my dearie, do you want to say what
you'd like? Say it then." For Daisy,
spoon in hand, paused before her next
spoonful with an anxious look in her
little eager face. Breathlessly she
exclaimed:
I'd like a toy boat, and a horse
and cart, and a ball, and a top, for
rmy own!"
"And so she shall one of these
fine days," rang out in their father's cheery voice, as he just then came into the
nursery. He had put the puppies to bed, and written many letters, and been
into the town since the children saw him last, and now he had come upstairs for
a cup of tea. Maggie jumped off her chair-which he instantly dropped into
-and began to make him some toast.
"Still raining, sir ?" asked Nurse.
Raining! I should think so. We shall have the floods out before to-
morrow morning."
"And then we shall have the ark to live in, and Darcys and dogs and
donkeys and dear little pussies to live wif us w"
A consummation devoutly to be wished for," said the father, laughing, as
he stroked Daisy's hair.
Father is so clever," the children used to say, we and Nurse don't always
understand his long words."

In the Darcys' dining-room that evening the great secret was revealed.
Molly and Toby had gone to bed, for it was during late dinner-time, when
Sidney and Gladys always sat in two arm-chairs with their books, until their
father took out his watch, which always meant "good-night." They particularly
liked late dinner-time when Mr Sepia was there, because he would speak to
them occasionally. Father and mother when alone generally talked to one








THE CHILDREN SMILE.


another, because, you see, father was on his rounds all day, and sometimes had
to go a long, long way into the country, so that he and mother had a great deal
to say to one another. It
was very pleasant, the chil-
dren thought, when Mr
Sepia would look at them,
even from his soup, and
.perhaps say:
Do you think, if it is
Fine to-morrow, one of you
could bring me in some
More of that Travellers'
Joy ? I want some for my
picture just to finish it."
This gave them eachasense
of being somebody, which
is always comfortable.
But now, this evening,
r"- their father himself looked
at them with his tired, kind
eyes, and said :
"Mother has a piece of
news to tell you."
Down went both books, round grew both pair of eyes, as their mother
smiled, and Mr Sepia put on his pince-nez to study the effect well.
Oh, mother please be quick i panted Gladys. Sidney pretended he was
in no hurry, but his face was glowing, and he looked ready to spring from his
chair.
"Do you remember Miss Silverton ?" said the mother at last, her smile
growing larger.
My godmother!" exclaimed Gladys, "who sends me a present on my
birthday, and has the little green parrokeets you have often told us about; and
she is so kind, and lives in London with her brother, and we have always longed
to see her; and now are we going there? Oh! then Maggie was right! "
Mrs Darcy leaned back in her chair and folded her arms complacently, as
she replied :
You know so much about it, Gladys, that I see I need not tell you."
Gladys was contrite and silenced; Sidney stood up with a protesting gasp;
and their father said :
Don't keep them in suspense, poor children." Then once more the mother
leaned forward smiling, and said :
Miss Silverton has written to ask you all to go and stay with her at Mistle-







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


toe Lodge, as she and her brother are not afraid of measles, and father and I
think you would all get well and strong much sooner in London at this time of
the year than you will amongst dead leaves and rising floods."
"Maggie and Toby too?" inquired both children eagerly, having, perhaps,
a half sort of feeling that it would be rather nice if they might be the only two
people to visit Mr and Miss Silverton at Mistletoe Lodge.
Yes; and Nurse. And I only hope that Toby's love of animals, and of
the unknown will not lead him into the parrot cage," said Dr Darcy.
"Where do you think he was found by Sepia this afternoon, my dear?
Seated, in that pouring rain, out in the yard on the old barrel, in his little white
pinafore, smiling serenely upon Tiger, who was doing 'Trust' at his
commands i Nurse had turned her back for a moment, and in that moment he
was off down the backstairs, like a shot. His plea was, 'I did want Tiger-and
Tiger did want me.' So a compromise was effected by Tiger being marched
up into the nursery."
"Maggie will be proud that she has guessed right!" observed Gladys
thoughtfully, but her meditations were scattered by marching orders being
given for "Bed."
"Well," said Mr Sepia as the children went round the table to say
good-night, "is the secret as good as you expected? will it quite cure
measles, and make you forget bad weather ?"
"Yes Quite, quite !" they cried. "We feel as if we were never going to be
disappointed now any more."
Disappointed in what ?" asked Mr Sepia, twiddling his eye-glasses. In
giving ? or in having what you want ?"
"Don't detain them, Sepia," murmured their father. "They look like two
little washed-out rags already."
The children stared at Mr Sepia without answering him, and went to bed.















CHAPTER III.


NEW FRIENDS.
IT is a wonderful thought, when we have had measles, and are cross, or when
there has been too much rain for us to be cheerful, and altogether things look
dark instead of bright,-it is a wonderful thing just to think, "We are not the
only ones in the world-somewhere there are other children-somewhere there
is other weather-somewhere there are grand plans being made-somewhere
there is grand work being done."
Far away from the Darcys and the Maynes, there lived a little girl
in London whose name was Katie. She had no brothers and sisters, and
her father and mother died when she was quite a little thing; and she lived
with her Aunt Joan, who thought herself ill when she was not, and spent most
of her days in bed. But all the servants doted on Katie; and Katie, too, had
something to dote on-her dolls; to her they were really living,-as to ever
sticking a pin into one of them, she would far rather have had one stuck into
herself. Once upon a time she had lived in an Orphan Asylum; it was soon
after her father and mother's death, when nobody knew what to do with poor
little Katie; and so she was popped into this large Home with lots of other little
fatherless and motherless children, who all wore neat little caps and pinafores,
and had their hair cut short. Katie was only there a very little while, for one
day her Aunt Joan found herself
S; well enough to think about her,
and she had told her coachman
to drive "to St Agatha's Orphan
S : Asylum." Then she had brought
Katie away with her, and ordered
Sthe lady's-maid to dress her "re-
-, spectably," and commanded the
short hair to grow as quickly as
possible. But there was a day at
the Orphan Asylum which made a
S far more lasting impression upon
Katie than her aunt taking her
away from it, and that was a visit from a lady, who, they told
her, often came to see the children, and who gave Katie a
doll for her very own. That lady will never forget the little orphan's face as







NE W FRIENDS.


she held her treasure out at arm's length before her, and said: "My own
dear darling! And the little orphan will never forget that lady's face when
she looked up into it at last from her doll's. The lady's name was Miss Silver-
ton. It was the beginning of a life-long friendship, for Miss Silverton's house
on Campden Hill was just opposite Miss Joan Catling's. Katie never wished
not to have an Aunt Joan, but she did think sometimes what a lovely aunt Miss
Silverton would make. It would be nice," she said, confidentially, to her eldest
doll, "to have an aunt who does not live in bed, and she would care for you all
much more than Aunt Joan does! Indeed, one day, when Miss Silverton was
calling upon Miss Catling, she had begged to be allowed to go upstairs and
make the acquaintance of the doll family. She found Katie giving them their
tea, and a regular introduction was then gone through.
"This one is my baby," she said, hugging the one on her lap, and her
name is Rosebud. I know she has black arms, but then she is partly African,-
her great-great-aunt was a negress living at Zanzibar, and this poor child was
brought over to England by a very kind missionary. That dear, little, cheerful
thing in a cap is Martha-she never had much hair,-we have tried everything
to make it grow. So she is obliged to wear a cap, poor little thing! she doesn't
much like it,--the others will make remarks. Mrs Crakanthorp is the worst of
them-that elderly person who stares so; she was once housekeeper in a very
large establishment, and so she thinks she may make personal remarks and
gossip; but it is not good of her, and she is old enough to know better,"-here
Katie put up her hand and whispered behind it,-" the other dolls can't bear her;
it's as much as I can do to keep the peace ; "-then aloud : "Opposite you see my
dear, sweet little Jap. I wish he would sometimes try to sit straight up; but he has
such a soft waist, I suppose he can't. That one sitting on the floor is my sensible,
good-tempered Tillie. She won't sit anywhere else, because she says she takes
so much room,-she never thinks of herself one bit. There's only one thing about
her I don't quite like: she will gum her hair down in those two great bands on
each side of her face. It is so unbecoming! but whenever I wish to alter it, she says:
'Please, please don't! I have my reasons;' but I don't know what her reasons
are, for she always cries so about it that I have to talk of something else."
After this introduction between Miss Silverton and the dolls of course she
felt a deep interest in them; and it was Katie's delight to seat them all in a.
row at the nursery window every afternoon just before her tea-time. With a
bright fire on the hearth and lamp light on the table behind them, they could
be distinctly seen from the opposite house; and Mary, the maid, would always
let the blinds remain up until something had come to pass. What do you think
that something was? Miss Silverton would pass up the stairs as the clock
struck five, and as regularly as clockwork would pause at the staircase window
and look across at the nursery window opposite. And Katie would know-
although on these darkening autumn afternoons she could not always see-that







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


Miss Silverton was kissing her hand five times to the five dolls, and then would
come always a long sixth kiss for little Katie herself; and she would wave her
handkerchief vigorously, and would hold up little Jap till he nodded and nodded
again and again. Then she knew that Miss Silverton passed on to that morn-
ing room where the tea-table
stood. She knew exactly how
Miss Silverton would stand under
-the bracket which held the little
b-J clock that boomed the hours in
Cathedral tones, beneath a waving
peacock feather and above a real Chinese teapot and
cup and saucer, and looking up at its face, would say:
Ah i it is five minutes past; the tea has stood quite
long enough; he must come now." And in answer
to her call in a low sweet tone on the landing, her
brother would step out from a room close by like a
cuckoo out of a cuckoo clock. Katie knew all this
because she spent many an hour at Mistletoe Lodge,
and she knew that Miss Silverton never
disturbed him all the afternoon until
then, for Mr Silverton had been writing
a book for twenty years, and at five
minutes past five he took a cup of tea
which had stood five minutes exactly.
But one afternoon in this very wet October, when the brother and sister
Silverton had had their tea, Mr Silverton did not return to his book as usual.
Both seemed restless. He walked up and down the room, first on one square of
Persian carpet, then on the other, never once slipping on the polished boards
between, which Katie always thought so clever of him. Up and down, back-
wards and forwards, he walked, until at last Miss Silverton, standing in one of
the curtained window recesses, said, "Here they are, Hannibal!" And then
with marvellous agility she ran downstairs. There, in the carpeted, flower-
scented hall, with the light falling in mellowed colours from the antique stained
glass lamp, with the soft south-west wind rushing in at the open door as the
luggage followed them into the house, the children and Miss Silverton met. As
they all went upstairs together, after many hugs and kisses, warm on one side,
rather shy on the other, Miss Silverton stopped them at the landing window,
and told them to look across the dusk outside at a lighted window, where stood
a little figure with five smaller figures in front of her. Katie and her family,"
said Miss Silverton ; "you will know one another to-morrow."
In less than no time Gladys and Sidney and Molly were.having their tea in
the morning room, whilst Toby sat on Miss Silverton's lap, and was fed as if he
had been a little bird, until at last Gladys said :







NEW FRIENDS.


You know Toby can feed himself quite well "; to which Miss Silverton
replied:
Ah, yes I but Hannibal does not like crumbs on his carpet."
At this Molly looked up from her bread and butter, and fixing her big
brown eyes on Mr Silverton, said:
P' Are you Cannibal, then ?"
Sidney and Gladys were much shocked at what they considered Molly's
forwardness; but Mr Silverton and his sister both laughed. She laughed merrily
S -he laughed feebly. Then Miss Silver-
ton told them, what was just like a story
out of a book, how her grandmother had
i known their mother's grandmother when
.she was quite a girl; and Miss Silverton described even
the venr dress that their great-grandmother used to wear
n those days-the large strange bonnet, the short waist,
the narrow skirts.
Her name was Dorothy, my dears, and she was so
fond of giving that she would give the very cloak off her
back if she saw anybody without one. She and my grand-
mother \\ere closest friends, and this friendship between the
two families %was kept up until your dear grandmother and
I became the friends we were--and are."
"Grandmamma is dead," observed Molly, gravely.
"But we are still friends," observed Miss Silverton.
"And who was your friend ?" asked Molly of Mr Hannibal, standing on
the rug watching them as if they were all some very strange little animals.
Once more Sidney and Gladys looked reprovingly at her across their teacups;
but Molly was not to be daunted.
I had a friend once, fairest among women,'" murmured Mr Silverton
dreamily as he looked at Molly's jovial countenance.
Hannibal, dear," said his sister, Molly will not understand Charles Lamb
yet."
"Ah, no! of course not," he replied gently. "Well, my dear little girl,
little Katie is my friend-my sweet little friend; and all the human race is my
friend."
Monkeys ?" asked Toby, inquiringly.
This stopped Mr Hannibal in anything further that might have been com-
ing, for his sister and all the other children laughed uncontrollably; indeed
Molly quite shrieked. Mr Hannibal looked at them all curiously.
"Mother said you had some dear little parrokeets," said Gladys, in a very
polite little way to Miss Silverton.
"You shall see them to-morrow, my dear; there are only two left now.
D







NE W FRIENDS.


Perhaps mother told you how Hannibal brought them years ago from Australia,
where they used to fly about in the trees."
Mr Hannibal instantly began to describe that part of the world to the
children
and all
the birds
and
beasts
that live
there;
he did
not seem
able to leave off;
and Molly, who was
sitting on a little chair :
against Miss Silverton's
knee, began to nod drow- "
sily; and Toby, looking
him full in the face, cut
short a description which sound ed
to Gladys rather like a geography
book, by asking him dpropos of nothing:
Have 'oo any dogs ?"
Mr Hannibal was dumb at once.
"Yes, a dear little terrier called Spot," said Miss Silverton,
"and you shall see him to-morrow; but now you must come to bed,
little man, and Molly too." Nurse was at the door waiting, and
Sidney and Gladys were so tired that they actually condescended to
go with the little ones.
Molly and Toby had a room with Nurse, up a charming stair-
case, with pictures on the walls. As to Gladys' room, it almost made
her feel grown-up at once. "Why, it's prettier even than mother's at
home!" she said'to Sydney when he. came in to say good-night-
"Mother always said Miss Silverton's house was like a book. It is
only children in books who have fires in their rooms in October. Oh being in
London is delicious! We only want father and mother and the Maynes, and
then we should be quite happy to live here always!"
In a very few minutes after this Gladys was fast asleep, but she had a
dream that disturbed her. She dreamt that she was in those countries where
Mr Hannibal had once been, and he was with her, and animals were making
hideous noises all around, and he was saying: "Never mind, they won't hurt,"
when a terrific roar came, and she woke with a start, to hear the roar as it






SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


seemed just underneath the window. She plunged under the bed-clothes, and
then popped out one hand to knock against Sidney's wall.
In he came at once, to see what was the matter.
She said "She was sure that there was some wild animal below, and begged
him to look out of the window." He peeped through
the blind, and there, in the broad mloonli-ghlt, he saw
St'.- cats on the garden-w\all, and a dog's head and
.,lepaws belo%%.


"Is it a tiger?" gasped
lion ?"


Gladys.


"Oh! do say! is it a tiger or a


"You silly" exclaimed Sid; "as I looked out of the window a
cat's tail and hindlegs flourished away over the wall, but there's another
hideous old tabby still there with such a back, and Spot the terrier is longing
to get at her." And Sidney thought he must try to get at her too-with
a jug of water.
Gladys was now sitting up, with the bed-clothes tucked under her chin, on
her knees, watching Sid as he took a small jug from the wash-hand stand,
and filled it with cold water; then he went to the window and gently
opened it, just as the cat on the wall began another pathetic wail for her
lost companion. A window immediately below was thrown open at the same
moment.


'40_







NEW FRIENDS. 29

Swish went the water from the jug. The cat escaped. But a head below
was hastily drawn in:
"Oh dear I" sighed Mr Hannibal, wiping his head with his towel, "how
it rains still "
"Thank you Sid !" cried Gladys, cuddling down into bed again; "that
horrid cat won't come back now. Is it still raining? "
"No-moonlight," yawned Sid.
Then perhaps the floods won't be out now down at home," said Gladys,
contentedly. "I'm so glad."



.I-
T ."


















CHAPTER IV.


TERRIBLE DISASTERS.

BUT Gladys was wrong: that night was one long to be remembered in her' home
world, for the floods were all out, and rising so rapidly that Hodge the gardener's
children, whose home was in
the water meadows, might have
been all drowned if it had not
been for Jock, the miller's son.
What did he do but wade right
across that large, vast lake
which had been meadow land
in the morning, until he reached
S .the small white cottage in the
middle of it. Pushing open the
door, he saw the three poor
little girls in their nightgowns,
crouching round the fire.
"O Jock, we can't go to
bed !" they cried, because the
water's a-comin' in and driving
us out; it's all over the floor in
.. the next room where we sleep,
and mother and father isn't
come back yet from marketing.
Whatever shall we do?"
I'm going to carry you over.
to .the mill," he said calmly-
every one of you. I must carry
-- you because Miss Thomasina
had my boat this afternoon,
and she's not brought it back.
We must start at once."
You can't take three, Jock," said Bessie, the eldest. I'll wait here if you







TERRIBLE DISASTERS.


take the two little ones. I can wait upstairs and get out on to the roof if the
water rises as it did last winter. If you carried me with them too, you'd be
dragged down."
Jock knew she was right, and there was no time to waste on words. So he
picked up the two crying little ones, and strode out into the dark waste of waters
with them. In some places the water was up to his knees; the little things in
his arms sobbed silently from terror; and the thought of that brave and lonely
little maid, waiting patiently in the rising floods behind them, made every
minute seem an hour.
All this was happening whilst Gladys was burying her head before a cat's
caterwauling, when the moon was shining calmly over London streets and pave-
ments. Perhaps the best way of describing how that night adventure for the
gardener's children ended will be to give it as the Darcys had it in letters from
home. First, there was a letter from Harold Mayne, who wrote to his great
friend Sidney the very next day.

"DEAR SID,
We have the flood, and it came last night. We are safe, you
know, because we are up the hill, but the little Hodgeses were nearly drowned.
But Jock from the mill saved them. He
carried Susie and Kitty right across to the
mill, and then went back for Bessie. And
then they were all tucked up in hot blankets.
Hodge and his wife were away at Rock-
borough, and the flood kept them there all
night. We think father must build an ark
soon, but the waters are abating, because
old Meredith, when he was digging up his
turnips this afternoon, said he saw a hedge
1K in the distance which he couldn't see yester-
day. The pups are quite well, and the
pigeons, and the mice, and the bullfinch,
and all the cats. When are you coming
back ? We all send our loves.-From your
affectionate HAROLD MAYNE."
The other letter was from Mr Sepia to Gladys:

MY DEAR GLADYS,
Terrible things have happened since you all went away. That
horrid child, Thomasina Williams, is responsible for a great deal (get out your
dictionary before you read this letter). Can you picture all the water meadows







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


a sheet of water? and Hodge's cottage in the middle of it, with the water creeping-
up higher and higher, and those three little girls all alone in it, because their
mother would go over to Rockborough that afternoon to do some shopping.
Luckily that brick, Jock, stepped across, like some long-legged-wading bird, to
look after them all. And if that rascal Thomasina had not bagged his boat
that very day! so that instead of rowing them all across to the mill, he had to
carry them. Just as he was reaching dry land he put his foot into a deep hole
and fell, children and all; of course they were soaked. But hot baths were
ready and waiting at the mill, and hot blankets, and hot drinks. Then the
plucky chap waded back for the plucky Bessie, and there he found her waiting
for him as bravely as any little woman could wait. They are all happy enough
at the mill now, not to go home yet. Mr and Mrs Hodge have come back safe
and sound, and say that Jock will always have their blessing; but the vicar
and your father mean to give him 'something more substantial. What shall we
give Thomasina ? A whipping, I should say. If I ever see you growing like
her in character, Gladys, I promise I'll tell you of it. We are very dull without
you all, but we try to be conterit. Your Vicarage darlings have eaten another of
my oil-tubes, and still they are not poisoned. Tell Toby that Tiger misses
him dreadfully. Ask Molly if she has learned anything that she did not know
already about great London town ? But I suppose that would be impossible.-
Your affectionate friend, JACK SEPIA."


"And who is Thomasina ? asked Miss Silverton, when both these letters
had been thrust on to her lap for her to read, and the three children stood around
her, their hair almost standing on end at the vivid picture of the flood that had
come at last.
Oh a horrid, horrid girl! answered Molly, vehemently, with a protesting.
stamp; "you should have seen her the day we came here getting leaves and
things out of the hedge for the harvest festival. She thought she would get all
the best of everything, because she knew we hadn't been able to do anything this
time. She is so unkind !"
"Gently, gently," said Miss Silverton, laying a hand on Molly's little fist,
which she was clenching; "and I do not yet know who Thomasina is. Tell me
Gladys."
Thomasina is Thomasina Williams," replied Gladys; and she lives just out-
side the town, and her father keeps a school, and mother says we ought to be kind
to her because she has no mother, and being so much with boys makes her rough;
still, she might wash her hands sometimes. And Maggie Mayne, who is very kind,
once gave her a piece of scented soap at Christmas, and oh Thomasina was so
very annoyed. She said it was 'a deliberate insult'-she will always use such
grand words. Poor Maggie never meant to be insulting, and she cried about it.







TERRIBLE DISASTERS.


So we had them both at our house to spend the day and 'come to terms,' as Mr
Sepia said, because he was with us then; but we called it 'making it up.' But
as soon as Thomasina saw Maggie Mayne
coming in at the gate, what do you think
she did ? She actually crawled into the dog-
kennel to hide, and we none of us knew
where she was till our coachman told us that
he had seen her do it, and then saw her
creep out and run home. She is not a nice
girl, really, godmother."
Possibly not, my dear child ; the world
Sr is not made entirely of nice people. And
now I must go out and make some calls,
and you little folk must be ready for Katie,
who will soon be here. What is little Toby
doing, I wonder?"
She might well ask, and little did she
know or guess what she would hear in
another moment. The elderly brother and
sister thought Toby a charming child, with the face of a little angel. He was
not the least bit shy; to him Mr Hannibal was a playfellow worth cultivating.
That very morning when he came in from his walk, Toby had stopped at the
study door and thumped upon it till someone on the other side had opened it,
when, without looking to the right or to the left, Toby had marched in, and
extending one little gloved paw on the table, had dropped therefrom a pebble,
which he left there, saying with great complacency, as he turned round and
trotted out of the room again, I have brought you my tone." And Mr Hannibal
really touched that stone quite tenderly, and placed it carefully in a large antique
cabinet in company with various treasures, old and new-treasures which little
Katie used to come over every morning to dust. Each little china cup, each
delicate piece of glass, she wiped with a soft silk handkerchief kept specially for
that purpose by Mr Hannibal, who sat watching her all the while, saying always,
when she had finished:
Thank you, dear little girl. Now, I must go on with my writing. Kiss
me, and go."
Katie told the Darcys that she was very, very fond of Mr Hannibal, and
they already felt that they must try and be fond of anyone Katie loved; but
as yet none of them seemed to understand Mr Hannibal as Toby did. But we
have gone far away from what Toby was doing when Miss Silverton mentioned
his name. After dinner he had been taken off to the nursery, as usual, by
Nurse; for there was a real nursery at Mistletoe Lodge, with a real toy cupboard
in it; although they had neither of them been used for many years until







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


the children had come. Toby had no intention of staying in the nursery just
to please the rest of the world. He had seen Spot, the terrier, down in the
yard below, and Spot had looked
up at him, wagging his tail; and
it ":cCL rred to the generous Toby
that .,, had dined, and perhaps
Spot had not. So, whilst Nurse
wenr t across the landing into an-
other room, Toby trotted away
du.,a stairs, and opening the garden-
door at the end of the hall, he
called in the most insinuating little
%- way: "' Spot Spot does 'oo want
oo (dinner?" Spot needed no
pressing. Into the hall he dashed
with a bound, and Toby speedily
introduced him to the dining-room,
where MTiss Silverton's cat sat purr-
ing on the rug. She and Spot
were good friends; consequently,
when Spot jumped on a chair and
surveyed the luncheon-table, she took another chair to watch what would happen
next. Toby stood on the hearth-rug watching. Does 'oo like tsicken, Spot?"
he asked. Apparently Spot liked it very much, for he seized the remains of the
J, cold chicken bodily as it lay
upon the dish. Toby's eyes
opened very wide.
"Eatdsently, Spot!" he said
warningly, having had those
words so often said to himself.
Crack went the pinion! crack
went the leg! already ordered
to be grilled for Mr Hannibal's
breakfast the next morning.
Steps were heard coming across
.the hall. Crack went the drum-
stick I and this time it was too
much for the cat's powers of
endurance. Whether she could
no longer stand such a breach
of good manners without making some protest, or whether she thought it high
time that she should have some share in the spoils, history telleth not. Anyhow,








TERRIBLE DISASTERS.


she sprang-and the dish slid-and the dog fell backwards off the chair-whilst
the dish never stopped sliding till it fell with a smash on the floor, where it lay
in two pieces. Toby alone was unmoved. The cat and dog fled, panic-stricken,
from the room, very nearly rushing between the feet of Mr Hannibal, who just
then came in to look for his eye-glasses, which he had left on the table. He
found Toby struggling with one half of the china dish, which he was trying to
lift in his small arms.
"Dear! dear!" observed Mr Hannibal, looking down upon the signs of
devastation. "Dear! dear! there seems to have been an accident of some sort."
"Spot and pussy-tat have been, and here is some tsina for 'oo tabinet."
"Too large, my little boy-too modern-too much broken!" replied
Mr Hannibal, mournfully shaking his head. "Our new dinner set that Tina
values so much. I wonder where my eye-glasses are ?" he continued dreamily,
scanning the carpet.
Toby dropped the dish in a startling way, and instantly went down on
hands and knees; pushing aside the carcase of the chicken, he held aloft the
glasses, as he sang out cheerily:
Here zay are! Under the tsicken zey was! "
Then, as Mr Hannibal took them from him, he put his little hand con-
fidingly into his old friend's, and said, cheerfully as ever:
"Tatie's toming, and we must wass our hands."
Mr Hannibal thought he must certainly wash his glasses; but he said
nothing until they reached the drawing-room, which hand-in-hand they entered
together, just as Miss Silverton was wondering what little Toby was doing.
"My dear Tina, there has been an accident," said her brother. "Your
favourite dish is broken, the cold chicken is on the floor-Spot and pussy were
in the room with Toby."
"Oh, Toby! you naughty boy exclaimed all the children at once.
Spot was hungry," was all that Toby could say, with a deep sigh. Just
then his Nurse appeared on the scene, looking so very severe that Miss
Silverton's severity melted away in her gracious smile, as she patted his
curly head, saying:
"We must forgive him this time, Nurse, but he must not do it again."
Here that most sweet and demure little maiden Katie arrived, and Miss
Silverton then said she must go out:
Be as happy as you can, my dear children," she said. You will find
materials for a feast on the dining-room sideboard, and soap bubbles waiting to
be blown in the schoolroom. Hannibal has gone to his writing, and so you will
all be left to your own devices. How is your Aunt Joan, little Katie ?"
"She is quite in bed to-day, thank you, Miss Silverton. Because, you
know," she explained to the children, as they all went their way to the school-
room, "she is sometimes in her dressing-gown on the sofa."








SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


"How awfully dull it must be for you!" exclaimed Sid. "What's the
matter with her? "
Katie shook her head as she replied:
I don't know; but it is such a good thing that she is never too ill to see
people, and she can always eat and drink and sleep. One of my dolls-
Mrs Crakanthorpe-
was getting into that
state of health once,
and I had to shake
her hard each time I
saw it beginning.
Aunt Joan doesn't al-
ways care to see me
S--but then I can al-
ways go to my dolls.
But it is better still
to come over here!
ShI'm so glad to come
this afternoon, every-
thing is so happy and
nice, and everyone is
so good "
Gladys looked into
Katie's happy face,
and exclaimed :
.6. "You are just like
the Maynes! They
are always jolly, never
have measles, nor bad
weather on the wrong
days-"
Before she could
say another word Sid
had burst in with:
What a jolly bowl of soapy water, and just look at all the pipes Miss
Silverton has given us, in case we should break some !"
In another moment Katie was seated on the floor with a pipe in her mouth,
and very soon bubble after bubble went floating about the schoolroom.















CHAPTER V.


THE LITTLE OLD GENTLEMAN.

MOLLY seized this opportunity of tripping downstairs to the dining-room to
fetch the sweets of which Miss Silverton had told them. Cakes, apples, figs,
and chocolates,-there they were in tempting array! but in her zeal and anxiety
to be the first to get them, she slipped just as she reached the sideboard, and fell
on the back of her head. It seemed almost as if some evil genius had possession of
the dining-room that afternoon, for Spot's remains had only just been picked up,
and now it seemed likely that poor Molly's remains would have to be swept up too.
Oh do someone come and pick me up she screamed, frantically.
And Mr Hannibal heard her, and came to the rescue; heard her-even
although it was only three o'clock, and who ever dreamed of disturbing him
when he was writing his book in the afternoon ?
Molly heard someone coming; and although she could quite well have
picked herself up, it seemed to complete the tragedy of her overthrow better
if she were to lie quite still with her eyes shut. She heard the somebody who
was coming draw nearer and nearer until he stopped beside her; then she
felt someone stoop over her, and then a gentle old voice murmured:
Poor child I think we must dash some cold water in her face !"
Oh, no!" cried Molly, opening her eyes wide, "please don't! It's only
my head does hurt so, and I want someone to pick me up and carry me; but
I don't think you can, Mr Cannibal."
Molly was not always right though she had a way of thinking herself so.
Very gently Mr Silverton slipped an arm under her and raised her to her
feet. Very gently he lifted her in his arms, and, as if she were an elongated
baby, began carrying her towards his library.
Oh! how you are letting my legs dangle! it is so uncomfortable!"
complained poor Molly. But when he had placed her on a most comfortable
couch drawn up by the fire-when she felt her aching head at rest on the
softest of cushions, and a wet bandage in the shape of a delicately-fine cambric
handkerchief soaked in eau-de-cologne from a cut-glass bottle that stood on
his writing-table, she said, with a deep sigh:
Oh Mr Cannibal, you are good and her broad strong little palm was
stretched out invitingly towards him. And so, what could he do but take hold
of it, and let it drag him down into the arm-chair beside her, turning his back
on his writing.







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


Did you think I was killed ? she whispered, tragically.
No, my dear, I did not think that," he answered, patting the little hand
between his own, but I am always terrified when I hear a scream. It reminds
me," he murmured-" it reminds me "- he paused.
Tell me what it reminds you of," urged Molly.
"No, my dear child, I cannot," he replied, quietly; then, rousing himself
with an effort, and with a little laugh, he said: Strange that I should just have
been writing in my memoirs the story my father used so often to tell me of his
grandfather's wonderful slide with some of his wild companions. They were
coming home from some late party one winter night-it was a winter of
unusually severe frosts-and my great-grandfather dared the others to slide
down a certain steep hill, he himself taking the lead. This particular road on
that night was like a sheet of glass. My great-grandfather fell and broke a
small bone in his ankle, which caused him to limp ever afterwards. The rest
of the story you shall read in my memoirs when you are older, my dear."
0 that is so horrid cried Molly. "I don't like being told that I must
wait till I am older."
Si jeunesse savait, si vieillesse pouvait,'" murmured Mr Hannibal, apply-
ing more eau-de-cologne to the bruised head. Just then was heard the sound
of feet outside and voices; one very soft voice-Katie's-said: "Please, is
Molly here ?" That door always opened to Katie, and now, not only Katie,
but Gladys, Sidney, and Toby all trooped in.
I fell down and hurt my head when I was going to fetch the feast," ex-
plained Molly, very sorry for herself; adding, with a touch of dignity, "and Mr
Cannibal came and picked me up, and is talking to me about his grandfathers."
"Are you telling Molly about your book, Mr Hannibal ?" exclaimed Katie,
awestruck at the very idea of such a privilege, which had never been conferred
upon her.
Oh i do tell us!" cried the other children.
"Toby, you must go up to Nurse," said Gladys, sternly; but Toby cast an
appealing glance at his friend, who instantly took him on his knee, the others
all clustering round.
So, when Miss Silverton came in from her drive she found the children-
not playing at hide and seek, nor feasting, nor blowing soap-bubbles, but-in
that sanctum of sanctums, the library; all-yes, all-even Toby, as good as
gold, with his head on Mr Hannibal's shoulder and his fingers in his watch-
chain, listening, listening, as though they could listen for ever, to stories ofwhen he
was young, and when his grandfather and his great-grandfather were young too.
Miss Silverton stood in the doorway, gazing upon them all in blank
astonishment.
"Why, Hannibal! Why, my dear children! this is what even I am never
allowed to do!" And there was just the faintest shadow of reproach in her tone.







THE LITTLE OLD GENTLEMAN.


Ah, Tina said the old
gentleman, "I have been in
a garden of roses, with sing-
ing birds and sunshine about
-it has been spring time
again!" Such love had Mr
Hannibal for little children.
But the children did not
understand what he meant;
Miss Silverton did, and gave
a small sigh, which she
smiled away in a moment
Her sigh was, perhaps, be-
cause she had not the power
of conjuring up roses and
sunshine and singing birds
in her brother's library; her
smile was, undoubtedly, be-
cause the children had that power
-and she did not grudge it them.

The Darcys did not
get strong all at once,
but they were so much
better that Miss Silver-
ton begged that they might
be allowed to stay with her
till Christmas; which was
accordingly arranged. Of
course it was not to
be all holidays; a
governess was to
come every day,
and Katie was to
learn with them.







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


"It seems a long time without seeing father and mother," said Molly,
"though it is very nice in London."
But mother says they will try to be happy without us," said Gladys; and
father says it is very unhealthy now, with so much water about."
I hope father and mother won't get ill! said Molly; upon which she was
told that fathers and mothers were never ill, especially fathers who were doctors.
Molly then.wondered why Katie was an orphan, and upon that she was reminded
that at least her father had not been a doctor.
Mr Sepia wrote another of his long letters, in which he said :-" I have got
no sketching done out of doors, and the days are getting short ; there is nothing
but water, for though it is better, there is still very much flood. I can go out
fishing instead of sketching, and I expect soon to catch sharks and whales; for if
the waters rise any higher the streams will join the rivers, and the rivers join the
seas, and nobody will know the difference between salt water and fresh-it will
all be brackish. The Maynes still talk of an ark. The house is very silent. Tiger
and I shed tears together."
The Darcys tried to explain to Katie what an extremely good comrade Mr
Sepia was.
"Should I like him as much as Mr Hannibal? she asked; and who are
the Maynes he mentions ?"
At which Gladys blushed to think that they had never told Katie about the
Maynes! She had not forgotten them, she said, but they had got rubbed out
for a time.
"I don't think that one of my dolls would ever get rubbed out." said Katie,
simply, "unless it was Mrs Crakanthorpe."
Meanwhile the little, rubbed-out Maynes were a sturdy little set-of people
who would not let themselves be effaced by any manner of means, so long as
they had something to do; and as to forgetting the Darcys didn't Maggie,
every morning, look out of her window across that waste of waters in the direc-
tion where London lay, miles and miles away, and wonder what they were doing
that day at Miss Silverton's ? She wanted to get some blackberries to send
up to them, when she heard they were not coming home before Christmas.
She knew there were quantities in Thicket Wood, because some of the school
children had been there last week, and "not only gathered hundreds, but left
thousands," so Maggie had been told. And some of those remaining thousands
she and Harold gathered one lovely October afternoon, and Gladys was greatly
delighted to receive this letter next day:
"DEAR GLADYS,
"Father has sent you a hamper of blackberries. We
got them out of Thicket Wood. Our two pups fought a frog yesterday. They
didn't touch it; they only made faces. at one another. Tell us if the black-
berries are good.-Your affectionate friend, HAROLD."







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


The Darcys scarcely knew how much they loved their home until that
hamper arrived, full of the glossy, black fruit. They declared that it actually
smelt of home. And didn't they know almost every bush the blackberries grew
on in Thicket Wood ?
"Gladys," said Harold, gravely, I daresay you are thinking of a black-
berry pudding and a tart ?"
"Yes," Gladys replied. Miss Silverton had suggested either or both.
But I am thinking of jam," continued Sid; though we none of us like it.
Because when Mr Hannibal heard that blackberries were coming, he said, half
to himself, in that funny way of his, 'Ah! blackberry jam! Those old associa-
tions with blackberry jam !' Shall we ask cook privately to make them all into
jam ?" Which they accordingly did, and wrote on the covers, Old associations
for Mr Hannibal." Such a terrible word of five syllables to spell! But they
did it-with a dictionary.
My dears," said Miss Silverton afterwards, when her brother had told her
about it, Hannibal was quite touched, I assure you."
"What was it touched him, I wonder?" asked Molly; "was it the sticky
jam ? or was it the old things with a long name?"


I' -
I














CHAPTER VI.


TIE CHILDREN MAKE PLANS.

IF there were days of flood in the country, there were days of fog in town, such
fog as the Darcys had never seen before And Nurse declared it was enough
to make one cry, it really was, to see the way clean white pinafores turned black
in one day." And the children thought the fog seemed to affect Mr Hannibal's
spirits, for he became so very silent. Just before the fogs began, he and his
sister had taken the children to the Zoological Gardens, and he had managed to
lose his way three times, from lingering behind them and then taking the wrong
turning, until at last Toby had said, "Be my good dog, and let me lead 'oo."
And Mr Hannibal had looked so sorry then for having given so much trouble,
and was so silent for all the rest of the day; and then the next day came a thick
fog, and the next, and the next, until at last Mr Hannibal was so very sad and
silent that Miss Silverton took him away to Brighton for two days, to find the
sunshine.
They took Spot with them; and poor little Spot went down on the shore
and got his tail nip-
ped by a crab, which
he did not like at all.
On one of the days
that they were away
Gladys and Sidney
were asked to join
Katie and her aunt
in a drive to the
Orphan Asylum ;
and neither Gladys
nor Sidney cared at
all about a drive in
a close carriage with
.. both windows up,
particularly as they
were to go back to
tea at Aunt Joan's,
where the butter was
always what they called "uncountrified," and the jam had a way of looking like






SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


apricot and turning out to be a very poor sort of rhubarb. Katie, however never
thought of these things, and she drew such a vivid picture of a delightful day in
the summer when she and her aunt had taken some of the orphans for a drive
into the country, and one
little girl had said she should
'like to spend the whole of
.. her life in gathering flowers,
--that Gladys rose to the
occasion and went cheerfully,
-Sidney, most reluctantly.
"Couldn't we take them
some toys ? Katie had sug-
Sgested. Aunt Joan quite
approved, but bought none
herself, nor did she give
rKatie anything towards get-
ting them. Gladys and Sid
clubbed together and bought
battledores and shuttlecocks
and books; whilst Katie,
with secret tears, washed out her baby-doll's garments, painted its cheeks,
combed its hair, wrapped it in its new long cloak and hurried to the carriage
hugging the precious baby in her arms. The dolls so often went for a drive
that nothing was thought of it; but great was the surprise of Gladys and
Sidney when, as they gave their battledores and books to some of the little
girls, they overheard Katie saying hurriedly to another, "I heard you say,
when I was here in the summer, that you would love to have a baby-doll.
This is for you. Please love her always."
"Why, Katie!" they exclaimed, as they passed out together to the carriage
behind Aunt Joan, who was hurrying along in front, finding the wind very
cold.
Oh yes please don't say anything!" pleaded Katie. "You see I couldn't
buy a doll-I hadn't enough money-and she did want one so much!"
It was a sacrifice; and none but little Katie knew how large it was.
Gladys and Sidney went home and told Nurse and Molly that Aunt Joan
was a selfish old stingy thing," who thought far more of herself than of Katie,
and gave them very, VERY stale seed cake for tea, which "Katie did eat so
cheerfully."
I think we must have Miss Katie to come and stay with us in the spring
down at home," said Nurse, as she whisked Toby's little nightgowned figure up
in her arms, before carrying him into bed. Just think what a treat it would be
for her to go out in the woods to gather primroses and daffy-down-dillies !"







SOME OTHER PEOPLE.


A vision rose before Gladys and Molly of themselves and Katie, knee-deep
in the sweet meadow grass, gathering cowslips for wine and balls. Katie had
never done this, and they had done it-how often?-without thinking of the
sweetness of it! Gladys had heard her talking of such delights this afternoon to the
little orphans as if it were all some beauti- with them al-
ful dream, not to be indulged in every ,- ways," murmured
day; and she told it all to Miss Mr Hannibal.
Silverton when she came home Nurse says
from Brighton, who said in reply: she pities those
Mly dear Glady-, some who have broke
people are only allowed to in Molly vehe-
see in beautiful dreams mently. But all
wihat other people have this actually set
in every day of their Gladys thinking,
life." and she spoke
"' s o gme i.t. a. out some of her
people have l thoughts to Sid-
the children lney; and the re-
sult was that
they both agreed,
next time they
had any odious
.. complaint like
measles, or any
terrible affliction
like floods, they
would not grum
ble one word, but
would think of all
t Other people in the
world who
wanted things
.. -t they had not got,
and would do
their best to give it, at least, to one of them. They had learnt something
whilst staying with Miss Silverton and her brother, and since they had known
Katie.

The floods disappeared at last down in the home country, and then the
children disappeared from Miss Silverton's, leaving only their toys as outward
signs that they had been.
The little Maynes made an arch of holly and ivy over the garden gate to







THE CHILDREN MAKE PLANS. 47

welcome them, and there they all stood with Mr and Mrs Darcy and Mr
Sepia, and the puppies and the kittens.
"We thought we might' have been floating away in the ark by the time
you came back !" cried Maggie.
"But we are all high and dry, though a little rusty," said Mr Sepia; "and
what do you think of London, Gladys?
mis it worth visiting? Did you get
everything you wished for?"
"I have been thinking a good
many things about it," replied Gladys,
wonderfully gravely and sweetly;
"but I don't think I can tell you
what till next spring, when the
wild flowers begin to come out,
and I sit on my favourite stile. We
have lovely plans for next spring !"




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