• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Miss Sunshine's window
 A little school-boy
 A fine lady
 Sue's kite
 Dick goes a-fishing
 Hope at the sea-shore
 The little baker
 The baby's doll
 Carl's butterflies
 Johnny's little sister
 Dicky Dilver
 Jack's ride
 Nursery tiles with timely rhymes...
 Slate pictures for little folks...
 Child-life on the farm - The children...
 Rainy-day plays and how to play...
 Doll Rosy's days and all her...
 "Just for fun" - Laughs for little...
 Back Cover






Title: Very good pictures and tales
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078661/00001
 Material Information
Title: Very good pictures and tales to laugh at, to draw, and to colour
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bodfish, W. Parker ( William Parker ) ( Illustrator )
Sweeney, Morgan J ( Illustrator )
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean & Son
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1890?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1890   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Francis, "Boz," and Bodfish.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
General Note: Some illustrations are silhouettes.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078661
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225081
notis - ALG5353
oclc - 180989950

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Miss Sunshine's window
        Page 1
    A little school-boy
        Page 2
    A fine lady
        Page 3
    Sue's kite
        Page 4
    Dick goes a-fishing
        Page 5
    Hope at the sea-shore
        Page 6
    The little baker
        Page 7
    The baby's doll
        Page 8
    Carl's butterflies
        Page 9
    Johnny's little sister
        Page 10
    Dicky Dilver
        Page 11
    Jack's ride
        Page 12
    Nursery tiles with timely rhymes and silhouettes
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Slate pictures for little folks with pencils
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Child-life on the farm - The children and the children's pets
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Rainy-day plays and how to play them
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Doll Rosy's days and all her doings
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    "Just for fun" - Laughs for little folks
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text













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"SOW, WHAT SHALL I DRAW "






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VERY GOOD PICTURES AND TALES.


TO LAUGH


AT, TO DRAW,


AND TO COLOUR.




F "o, aid 13ii.
Francis, "Boz," and Bodfish.


London: Dean & Son, Publishcrs, 16oa, Fleet St., E.C.






















OUTLINE


PICTURES


WITH "COLOR" STORIES



































MISS SUNSHINE'S WINDOW.

Outside the sun shines, the sky is blue; but the garden and lawn are
white with snow.
The only green things growing are the flowers in Miss Sunshine's
window. Miss Sunshine calls the south window her bit of summer. Get
your brushes and paints" and color the picture and see if she is not right.
The walls are light, olive, the curtain creamy gray; the flower pots
greenish red; the box is stone color, with touches of dull red and blue;
and the flowers--you surely know how to color them-one with a
crimson bloom, one with a blossom yellow as a solid bit of sunshine.
Miss Sunshine herself, with pink cheeks and gold-brown hair, wears
a dull blue gown, with golden hair ribbons, sash, and collar.


































A LITTLE SCHOOL-BOY.

Trudge! trudge! through the white snow-drifts goes Frank to school.
The snow is piled against the gray stone walls and green fir-trees. But
the cold weather only makes Frank's black eyes snap, and his cheeks
grow redder. His gray overcoat is warm with brown fur; and his.fur
cap, and his scarlet leggings, mittens and muffler, are thick and warm.
So off he goes with his red-framed slate under his arm.
But oh, how our boy enjoys the dancing red fire in the gray soapstone
stove when he comes home at night. Off goes the gray overcoat, scarlet
muffler, mittens and leggings! Out steps Frank in black velvet, with blue
stockings and azure necktie! Down sits mamma's home-boy in the old
oak chair, to toast his toes, and think that fire is better than snow after all!



































A FINE LADY.

One day last week, a fine lady was seen walking up and down the
brown floor of our attic. She came out of a russet leather trunk-at
least her clothes did. She wore a large bonnet lined with old gold, tied
with a big red bow, and trimmed with a red plume. On her hands were
long buff gloves, and she carried a red fan with silver spangles and feather
fringe. On her feet were buff stockings and bronze slippers with red
rosettes. Her gown was a blue brocade, dotted with silver; and her
.cloak of black velvet lined with scarlet was carried by a little page clothed
in green, with a tall buff beaver hat. It was a fine sight, I tell you; and
the great lady's name was Sister Rosybud, and the name of the tiny
page was Brother Tommy.



































SUE'S KITE.

Black-eyed, black-haired, red-cheeked Sue said girls were just as smart.
as boys. Her brother made kites ; and Sue said she could make a kite, and
fly it too. She put on her blue hat with the gold feather and went out to the
barn where Ned kept his old kite-frames and papers, and there she cut.
and pasted, cut and pasted, just as fast as she could.
By noon Sue had a red kite with a long gilt tail.
She took the kite and went out of doors. There was a high wind. It
flapped her blue dress and gold sash until 'she feared she might turn
into a kite herself and sail off. She tossed up the kite, clapping her hands
to see it go, and forgetting to hold on to the string. In five minutes that
kite was out of sight, and Sue never saw it again.




































DICK GOES A-FISHING.

It was a dark stormy day. The wind blew and the rain beat against the
window panes.
But as Dick had made up his merry mind the night before to go
fishing he put on his old gray suit and felt hat and started off. He
walked along under the gay green landscape picture in the gold frame, with
the peacock feather over it, until he came to Lounge Brook. The soft brown
banks of Lounge Brook were speckled with pink flowers and green leaves
which grew in rows. In this quiet spot Dick sat down to fish. He had a
very good fish-hook, and he soon filled his little yellow basket. He caught
three spools of thread, a doll, and a little white cotton rabbit. Was not that
good luck for one day?


































1OPE AT THE SEA-SHORE.

How Hope clapped her hands when she first saw the blue, blue sea!
How she laughed at the little brown donkey with his big ears! Mamma
laid the gold and purple afghan on his back, and Hope rode up and down
the soft gray sand. The sun was hot, but Hope's blue-trimmed hat
shaded her, and she raised her Japanese parasol. Soon, too, the sea-
breeze blew, and fluttered her golden locks, and her rose-colored skirts;
and Hope was so jolly that the donkey stuck out his red tongue as if
he were laughing too.
Next morning there was better fun still. Hope and her baby sister, in
their blue dresses, went down to the beach and sat under a big brown
umbrella, and built sand houses; and they found a star-fish, too!



































THE LITTLE BAKER.

Little flaxen-haired Peter's mother dressed him up clean in green jacket
and trousers, and red stockings, and sent him out to play while she went to
make a call.
Little flaxen-haired Peter played till he was hungry. Then he went
in. No one was there, and he could not open the cupboard door. A
pan of flour stood on the table, and a bowl of berries. I can make a pud-
ding," said little Peter. So he poured water into the bowl of berries, and
stirred in flour until it was thick. Then he set it in the old red brick oven,
and ran out to play. He ran in again just as his mother came home. She
found him with a little raw berry pudding in his hand. The little baker had
forgotten to build a fire !




































THE BABY'S DOLL.

The black-haired baby was fast asleep. He lay on the great crimson sofa.
His black eye-lashes rested on his moist pink cheeks. He did not once stir
among the white pillows. He was covered close with the pink and gold
blanket. Joe, his doll, was sure that he was asleep.
Joe's little green suit was very tight-fitting, but he threw up his arms,
opened his mouth, and spoke aloud:
"Of all bad things," said he, "the worst is to be a baby's doll! You
have no rest! He takes you to pound with! He takes you to strike his
mother and sister with You never go to bed You are left lying about!
You are held by a string while he sleeps! Pity, oh, pity the sorrows of
a baby's doll!" Just then the baby stirred, and Joe spoke no more.



































CARL'S BUTTERFLIES.

Carl had no brothers and sisters; yet he was a very smiling boy so long as
the sun shone. His blue eyes sparkled, his red cheeks dimpled.
But ah, you should have seen Carl when the stormy days came--
then Master Carl looked sober. He looked out often to see if there was
any blue sky; then he played with the cat and the dog. He made
tops and kites, and whittled out wooden Jacks. One snowy day he
had a happy thought. He made some gilt paper butterflies, and flew them
about from his mother's scarlet fan. That was fun Carl actually laughed
in the face of the flying snow-flakes. Hurrah! he cried, as he fanned the
glittering creatures about. "Hurrah! a fine summer day see what a
swarm of butterflies !"


































JOHNNY'S LITTLE SISTER.


I'll take care of Sissy," said brother Johnny.
Baby was so sweet and rosy! Mamma had just dressed her, all white
and fair. Johnny held out his arms to her.
Johnny was very proud to be trusted with his little sister. He sat down
with her in the great green easy-chair, and put both arms round her.
"Now Sissy shall hear a nice story," he said, all about Christmas.
"Sissy shall have beautiful things Christmas.
"A big ivory rattle with long red ribbons, and a picture book, and a
dolly with black hair, and a soft ball all blue and yellow and brother
will buy them for her all himself."
Baby said, Goo-goo," and smiled a honey-smile.




































DICKY DILVER.


When the first snow-flake fell, black-eyed Dicky Dilver began to get ready
for a good time. First, he brought "Flash," his blue sled, down from the
attic.
He was so glad to see "Flash again that he caught hold of the yel-
low leather lines, ran out-doors bare-headed, and galloped off down the walk
as fast as he could go. Then lie came in and hunted up his speckled red mit-
tens, leggings and scarf. Hurrah! he cried, come on with your snows
and blows, old Mr. Winter, I'm ready!" But the sun shone next day, and
next day, and next day, for two whole weeks. Then, one night, a big snow-
storm came and such a snow-ball as Dicky Dilver rolled up to the front
door next day !


_


































JACK'S RIDE.

Jack's hair was the color of gold. His cheeks were the color of wild
roses. He had a little brown velvet coat and brown velvet trousers,
and he wore cardinal red stockings and bronze slippers. But he was
not happy. Christmas was a stormy day, and he could not go to
grandpa's. He cried and cried. But finally he said, "I will go to
grandpa's." So he made a carriage and got into it, and rode to grand-
pa's all the forenoon. The oak camp-chair with scarlet cushion and
gold fringe, and the brown-and-blue camp-stool, with the dark green um-
brella, made a capital carriage.
Now put these colors on the picture, with a gray back-ground, and see
if you do not wish you were Jack with his red whip in his hand.





















NURSERY


TILES


WITH TIMELY RHYMES AND SILHOUETTES
































FRESH GRASS.


Hear him rumble and grumble,
Bibbety, babbety, bumble !-
The great black king of all the bees,
Who wades in honey to his knees.


Hark, how, over and over,
He growls at the red-top clover,
With a bag of sweetmeats on his thigh,
And a wicked twinkle in his eye.

Whene'er I hear his humming,
I sigh, The king is coming -
The great black king with bands of gold,
Who nothing does but scold and scold."

Bibbety, babbety, bumble!
Hear him grumble and mumble:
"If I find a boy of any size,
I'll bite his finger till he cries!"





























APRIL SHOWERS AND APRIL SUNSHINE.


The little gray duck's daughter
Lives in a pool of water,
And wears the pretty three-toed shoes
Her careful mother bought her.


And in the showery weather
The goslings dance together,
And cry, If it should pour a week
We'd never turn a feather."


Yet I know a lazy fellow -
But who I'll never tell a
Single soul -who when it rains
Calls out for an umbrella.











A bandbox would be handy,
In which to put this dandy;
I'm sure he must be made of salt,
Or else of sugar candy.

























"THE MARCH WINDS DO' BLOW."


An old-fashioned roundelay
The wind begins to play;
He opens up the jubilee
With do, re, mi!

Cries the leader of the choir,
"Pitch the measure higher!
You're all too low and all too slow,
Fa, si, la, si, do !"





49 -
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Whining treble, hollow bass,
Join in the noisy race;
All disagree upon the key
For do, re, mi!

Yet all the more they roar and roar,
Louder than before!
Low they go, and high they blow,
Fa, si, la, si, do !


























K f0
..... .... ...


POP CORN


In this little cage of wire,
Hung above the glowing fire,
See the kernels skip and hop !
Corn begins to pop !

Every funny little fellow
Wore at first a coat of yellow;
Now he blossoms out in white -
Such a pretty sight !

What if in this fine commotion
Each should take a sudden notion,
As he bobs and leaps about,
To come jumping out ?

rj -T *^^<'^~ ->


Why, there'd nothing be to hinder
Them from being burnt to cinder.
And the coals, to say the least,
Would have all the feast.














































Little old woman up in the sky,
See how she makes the feathers fly
She sits in the twilight overhead
And picks her geese for a feather-bed.


50I


The gray geese flap their heavy wings ;
The little old woman sings and sings:
"How strange that the people down below
Should call my bits of feather, snow I


" Here is a handful soft and white -
That is to cover the crocus tight.
Here is another, whiter still,
And that is to hide the daffodil.

" Here is one for the great fir tree,
And another here for the chickadee !
Little old woman overhead,
What will become of your feather-bed ?


A CHRISTMAS DINNER.


0
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WISH YOU "MERRY CHRISTMAS!"


Old Santa Claus, when he come
Down the open fire-place,
And sees what I see in the fire-]
Will laugh all over his face.

And will say with finger upon i
And a wag of his wise old hel
"I wonder whose are the little
And whose the cardinal red?






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s to-night -

ight, -

is no, And when he lowers his monstrous pack,
his nose,
Sj I'll take a peep at the show -
ad :
u 'Tis the greatest wonder his dear old back
blue toes,
'Wasn't broken long ago I-

And I'll whisper to him before he goes:
"The little ones are in bed;
_It is Gold Locks' stockings that have blue toe
--- _And Ted's are cardinal red."


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THANKSGIVING.


Turkey, turkey, gobble-ty gee,
I'll roast you brown as brown can be;
I'll mince your liver, bit by bit,
And a nice sweet gravy make of it!




A'





Duck in the water, quack-e-ty, quack,
When every feather is off your back,
I'll tie your little fat wings across
And roast and serve with apple-sauce I


Pigeon, pigeon, coo, coo, co-o,
Such a dainty dish I'll make of you -
The flakiest crusts that ever were seen
In a pie, and you stewed in between !

Turkey, and duck, and pigeon, and then
One thing more the little black hen !
Cackle-ty cackle, with comb so red,
I'll broil her over the coals for Ted.




























SOUTHWARD HO!


Something in grandpa's garden These, then, are the tramps that Tony
Call Tony from the house! Was called upon to bite I-
I'm sure I saw a robber move / Hark, quails in the covert of the hedge
High up in the apple boughs Call out, "All right! All right!"

Come, Tony! a tramp! You know, sir, / *'
What we expect of you !-
To growl and bark your very best- /
And I hope you'll bite him too! --

Will you and can you believe it ? -
There, perched upon a limb, .
Is Ted with an apple in each hand,' -
And Gold Locks close to him / .
/ (:94




























FALLING LEAVES AND DROPPING NUTS.


Out in the grass are the crickets
Tuning up ready to begin;
Squeak, squeak, squeak goes the fiddle,
And s-c-r-a-p-e, the second violin.

An old darkey in the corner,
Tall and shiny and lean,
Stands six feet in his stockings,
And plays on the tambourine.


One little fellow has a bugle,
And one beats the big bass drum,
Another picks away at the banjo -
Hi how he makes it hum!

So all night long in the moonlight,
And even to the break of day,
'Tis twang-twang, pipe and twittei.
From the cricket orchestra.






























ON A MIDSUMMER DAY.


Now, then, the orchard is our forest,
Silent and thick and green ;
Here I swing my birch-bark cradle
Leafy trunks between.











Tie it fast with a-thong of deer-skin -
'--- i-~








This is my babies' bed.
(Were ever the locks of papoose golden ?
Was ever one named Ted ?)


Put them in it, the dusky children,
Safe as birds in a nest -
What, little Indians, are you laughing ?
Hush lie still and rest i


. -- -
2/


Swing, 0, swing, my white papooses
Birch-bark cradle and all!-
Gold Locks, what is the matter with you ?
Ted, look out, you'll fall!




























UNDER THE OLD APPLE TRE.E.


Have a fan, Ted, have a fan Have a fan, Ted, have a fan J
A very warm day for a gentleman Take this little one from Japan,
If you like it, here is a split bamboo, Silk, with feathers a-top 'twill blow
Or perhaps a plain palmleaf will do. A wind as cool as mountain snow.


And here is an odder fancy yet -
Some kitten tracks for an alphabet;
And plenty of almond-eyed Ah-Sins,
With hair all skewered up in pins.


Here is a blue, and there a gold ;
They flutter and whisper as they unfold:
" We'll make you fresh as ever we can "
So take a fan, Ted, take a fan !




























THE SHEPHERD BOU


Said white sheep to black sheep,
Nibbling at the grass,
"Little Nan, my woolly one,
Has run away -alas "


Said black sheep to white sheep,
"Pray, what shall we do,
For naughty Blat, the lazy one,
Has run away too "


Get a lantern from the barn,
B-a-a, b-a-a !
Tell the boys to blow the horn,
M-a-a, m-a-a !

Home comes hobbling lazy Blat,
Tired enough to drop!
While in skips the nimble Nan,
Hippity, hippity. hop !












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SLATE PICTURES

FOR LITTLE FOLKS WITH PENCILS













































































































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SLATE PICT-URE.- CHRIST-MAS EVE IN THE WOODS.


SLATE PICT-URE.- WHAT CAN THEY DO ABOUT IT?































SLATE PICT-URE- THE NIGH:!. BE-FORE THANKS-GIV-ING.


SLATE PICT-URE.--TIL-LERS OF THE SOIL.


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SLATE PICT-URE.--A HOME KINDER-GAR-TEN.


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SLATE PICT-URE THE LIT-TLE PLAY-MATES.


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SLATE PICT-URE.-THE MORN-ING WALK.


SLATE PICT-URE.--THE HOUSE IN THE AT-TIC.

























































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SLATE PICT-URE.- TAK-ING KIT-TY'S PICT-URE.


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LATE PICT-URE. --IN THE KITCH-EN.













































SLATE PICT-URE--TWO FRIENDS.


1'MA-RY HA ) A I.TT-TT.E LAMB."--SLATE PICT-URE.























CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM

THE CHILDREN AND THE CHILDREN'S PETS






























































































































































































































































































































































I .












































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-THE IN-TRO-DUC-TION.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.--THE FIRST LES-SON.













































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.- A NO-VEM-BER RAIN.


CHILD-LTFE ON THE FARM.- PIG-GY'S FRIENDS.











































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-A RIDE A-ROUND THE BARN-YARD.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.--THE ES-CAPE.




































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.- THIS IS FOR YOU COLT-IE!"


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.-- DON T EAT UP MY CHRIST-MAS WREATH "








































CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.--HELP-ING BROTH-ER


CHI.T-LIFE ON THE FARM.-THE LIT-TLE CLIMB-ER.


































"SHE'S A-SLEEP!"--OUT-LINE PICT-URE TO COL-OR.


CHILD-LIFE ON 'THE FARM.--THE SCHOOL IN THE MEAD-OW.





















RAINY-DAY PLAYS

AND H.OW TO PLAY THEM



































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RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

It rained. Five pairs of eyes looked sadly out of the windows. Five
little noses were pressed against the glass. Five voices said, "0 dear, how
it does rain! Then a sixth little voice shouted, "Have a carriage, sir?
Carriage ? Have a hack?" The five sad faces turned away from the win-
dows and broke into five smiles. You see instead of crying because it
rained so hard he couldn't play outdoors, Bobby had found something to
do in the house. He had hitched his rocking-horse to a big chair and to
his own little chair, and was ready to take anybody to ride who wanted
to go. "I'll take a carriage," said Bessie, glad of the fun. "I shall get
quite wet through soon in this rain." So she seated herself in the carriage,
and Bobby, the coachman, got up in front, and off they went as fast as
the rocking-horse could take them. "Bobby is my sunbeam," said mamma.
"Now, children, we shall have many rainy days this summer, and just try
to think of some new play every rainy day."

































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

The fifth rainy day it did rain. The wind blew, the rain beat against
the windows with a great racket. Mamma peeped into the play-room. A
span of horses were pulling a plough up and down the room. The span
looked just alike. Their hair was the same color, their eyes were the same
color, their noses tipped just alike, they were exactly of the same size,
they were dressed just alike, and as I said, they looked exactly alike.
They were aunt Sue's twins, Edward and Richard. "Who thought of this
game?" asked mamma. "We did!" cried both the horses. As they opened
their mouths to say it, down dropped the bits, of course. "0 g'long
there! mind what yer about!" shouted the driver. And the horses took
their bits in their mouths and began to plough again. "And when it's all
ploughed," said Bessie, we're going to plant the corn six kernels in a
hill. 'One for the blackbird, one for the crow, one for the cutworm and
two to let grow!' I'm going to drop it." "And I'm going to cover it,".
added Sam. "And what a crop we'll have!" said .mamma.

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RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

These children live in Boston in the winter. So they know all about
,the police. They thought, one rainy day, it would be a fine thing to play
police. Only each one wanted to be a policeman. "You can take turns,"
said aunt Sue. That's so," said Tom. So they took turns. You can see
how they made their jail. They locked it with a big padlock, which Per-
kins-gave them. Perkins is the man who does the farm work. Perkins
made the clubs for the policeman. Bessie made the police badges, because
she knows how to print nicely. They took turns at being jailer, too. Per-
kins lent them his keys; the big keys that he uses to lock the stable,
; and carriage-house, and tool-house, and granary with, every night. The
police brought in a great many prisoners, to put into the jail. "What's
this fellow been doing?" asked the jailer, as the police brought in Master
Ned. "Threw a ball and broke a sidelight," said the police. "In with
him, into jail!" said the jailer. I do not believe a real policeman would
shut up a boy for throwing a ball and breaking a sidelight. Do you?



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(C_
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RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

"R-rags! r-rags! r-rags wanted! old rags! old rags!" That was
the noise Mamie heard. It came from the halls. A wagon was heard
rattling by. There was a tramp-tramp, like the feet of horses. "0 it's
the rag-man," she cried,'and she hurried to open the play-room door. Yes, it
was Sam, the rag-man. "Any old r-rags, marm?" asked the rag-man.
"0 piles and piles," said Mistress Mamie. "I've just finished my spring
cleaning, and here's a big bundle of white rags. How much do you pay
for rags, Mr. Rag-man?" she asked. One quarter of a cent a pound for
colored rags, and one half a cent a pound for white ones," replied the
rag-man. The rag-man weighed the rags. "Are there any stones in 'em ?"
he asked. "Folks sometimes put stones in to make 'em weigh high."
"What awful mean creatures!" said Mamie. The rag-man looked like a
big rag himself; his big coat was ragged and his hat was ragged. How
Toddlekin did stare at him. She did not know it was Sam. She thought
he was a real-rag-man.

*1 ,
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S".PAY HERE 't















RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

"Restaurant would be nice to play, if Betty would only let us have
things," said Mamie. "You can ask her," replied mamma. So Betty was
asked. She is the cook and a very good-natured cook, too. She smiled,
and made a pitcher of nice, hot, cambrie tea, right off. Then she gave
them some tarts for pies, and sponge-cake drops for the loaves of cake,
and some chicken and duck, and a charlotte russe. Bessie brought out her
whole housekeeping set of dishes. This was the set dear uncle Joe brought
her from Paris. And Eliza, the table girl, lent them the breakfast castor.
The girls wore mamma's and aunt Sue's long skirts, just as they did when
they played shop. Mamie took the cash, and it was real money, too!
For they all had a few cents, all except Tom. Tom never has any money.
If he gets any he always spends it right away. The people came in very
fast, and the food went off very fast. Betty made another pitcher of hot
cambrie tea, and filled the cake-plate a second time. They could have
anything they asked for, and nothing cost more than a cent.


1~_*~I




-ra*4


RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

Tom always thought it would be great fun. to be a shoemaker. So
on the third rainy day he had a chance to try it. All the boots and
shoes in the house were pulled out to furnish his shop. Bobby came and
bought a pair of boots big enough to get into all over. Mrs. Bessie came
to get a boot mended. It was a very, very shabby boot, indeed. It was
full of holes, and you could see Bessie's pink stocking right through the
bottom! "Can you mend it, sir?" asked Bessie. And she smiled as if it
was a very funny thing to have a shabby boot. Mr. Shoemaker smiled
too. He knew that boot. It was one of ,his own! No, marm," he said,
"if 'twas mine, I should throw it away. "But I have some sweet New-
port ties for your son," he said. But the "son" didn't want any Newport
ties. He stood with his finger in his mouth, staring at Mr. Shoemaker.
"0! fit Dolly Varden to some Newport ties!" said Bessie. Poor dear!
she's been barefoot all her life." So Mr. Shoemaker fitted Dolly Varden
with four gilt ties, with blue silk strings. Dolly Varden was the. kitty, .;
































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

"Umbr-r-rellas to mend! Umbr-r-rellas to mend! any umbr-r-rellas to
mend! "It's a queer time to be mending umbrellas in this rain," said
mamma. She was just going to the window to look out, when Hally said,
Why, mamma, don't you know? it's our rainy-day play. Sam is getting
-up the play to-day, and that's .he." For, you see, these children had
planned that each one should think of some play for each day. "Look
at him!" said aunt Sue. "Where did the boy get such a pile of broken
umbrellas?" "Plenty of 'em to be found in a house of fourteen people. An
umbrella is broken or lost every week, and nobody loses a broken one,"
said mamma. 0 my pink one is just lovely to mend!" cried Hally, and
she hurried to get it, and open it. The broken rib stuck up beautifully.
S'Can you mend it, sir?" she asked. "Make it as good as new, marm,
better, too," replied the umbrella-man. Toddlekin was looking out of the
door. He could not quite make out how Sam could be an umbrella-man,
and/Tom, a shoemaker.


































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

On the sixth rainy day they played barber's shop. -There was a sweet
odor of cologne, and bay rum, and lavender water, when aunt Sue peeped
in. Tom was in the chair, having his hair cut. He had just been shaved
with mamma's paper-cutter. A very stout little man, in a long coat and
big hat, was being brushed. Aunt Sue did not know this little man at
first. She looked a second time; it was Bessie! One of the twins was
waiting to be shaved. He was reading the Daily News. He had on Becky's
goggles, and he looked a good deal more like an owl, than he did like a
twin. "I think I should like to be shaved myself," said aunt Sue. Then
the barber laughed, and his comb fell out of his mouth, into Tom's eye,
and Tom jumped and knocked the bottle of cologne out of the barber's
hand, and the cologne run all over the floor. "Now see what you have
done, mamma," said the twin with the goggles. You are a naughty boy
and you had better run right home." And aunt Su3 laughed and rani
away.

































RAINY-DAY PLAYS

"Girls can't play tailor shop, can they?" asked Bobby. "Of course
they can," answered Patty Brown. Patty had ruin over to spend the day.
"It'll be real fun." And Patty ran out, and put on big brother Will's
coat and cap, and a very nice looking little boy she made. She bought
the most elegant suit in the shop. It was black velvet. Will it wash ?"
asked Patty. She had heard a woman at Hovey's ask that very question
when she went shopping with mamma. "0, it'll wash beautiful," said the
curly-headed clerk. The curly-headed clerk was Ned. Tom came into the
tailor's shop, and was measured for a suit of clothes-a sailor suit of navy
blue. The tailor took his measure. From waist to ankles, "thirty-one
inches," and the entry clerk at the desk put the number down in his
book. "Length of waist, ten inches," and the clerk put that down.
"Length of arm,. twelve inches." Round the waist, twenty-two inches."
"At the wrist, five inches." And the clerk put them all down in his book.
The entry clerk was Sam.





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RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

"0, mamma, can't you think of a nice play to-day?" they asked.
"Yes," said mamma, it is a nice day to go to sea. Suppose you build
a ship and take a voyage." Mamma had to help make the ship, and rig
the sails. Becky's clothes-stick made a very good rudder. The boys put on
their sailor suits. Aunt Sue made some pasteboard spy-glasses. The girls
were passengers. They set sail. "Ship ahoy!" shouted captain Tom.
Then Toddlekins fell overboard. Man overboard! man overboard! cried
the sailor at the helm. And then they had to get out the little boat,
and rescue Toddlekin from drowning. They saw two whales and an iceberg.
They made a voyage to the East Indies and brought home a cargo of
spices. They made another voyage to Spain, and brought home a cargo of
oranges. They sailed round Cape Horn to California, and brought home a
cargo of gold. They went to Greenland, and brought back a cargo of
furs. Finally they had a storm. The ship was wrecked. They were all
drowned, except one. That one was Toddlekin.
































RAINY-DAY PLAYS

I think Dick's rainy-day play was the jolliest. The day before, he had
been to the blacksmith's. He had never been in a blacksmith's shop before.
He watched the smith as he shod the horses. The old horses stood very
still. The smith lifted first one foot and then the other. He pared their
hoofs. He pounded in the nails, and they never moved. They knew what
it all meant. They knew they could walk and trot easier, after the smith
had fixed their shoes. But there was one colt who had never been to a
blacksmith's before. He did not know what to make of it all. The forge
fire and the noise frightened him. He jumped, he pranced, he kicked. He
tried to stand on his hind feet. He tossed his pretty head and mane, and
snorted. He tried-yes, he even tried to bite! So when they played black-
smith's shop, Dick knew just how to act; for Dick played that he was
the colt. They caught him by his head and his mane. His collar was
his mane, you know. They tied him up so he couldn't kick. Then they
shod him with a pair of Perkin's shoes.

































RAINY-DAY PLAYS.

"Such a lovely day for shopping!" said Bessie, as Bobby stopped his
carriage at Chandler's. It was really the nursery door, but the sign over
the door said, Chandler & Co. "You can wait, coachman," she said.
" Have you any pink satin?" she asked of one of the clerks. 'Cause
Mabel is 'vited to a kettle-drum!" "Here's an elegant piece," replied the
clerk, as he held up aunt Sue's pink mantle, which she had kindly lent
to play shop with. How much is it?" -asked Bessie. "Fifty dollars a
yard." "Isn't that rather high!" "0 no! just look at its quality, marm!
right straight from Paris." Well, Mabel, love, how do you like it?"
asked Mrs. Bessie, holding it up before her. Mabel stared at it, but said
nothing. (She couldn't, you know, being a doll.) "She thinks it's lovely,"
continued Mrs. Bessie. "I'll take a hundred yards." 0 Bessie, a hundred
yards! exclaimed Mamie. She was pricing linen. "Mamie," said Bessie
severely, just tend to your own shopping." Then Mamie looked grave and
said she'd take one hundred huckabuck towels.























DOLL ROSY'S DAYS
AND ALL HER DOINGS




























































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DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-PLAY-ING SCHOOL.

The nic-est play for a rain-y day
Is school, with dol-lies for schol-ars,
To brush their hair and have them wear
Clean frocks and rib-bons and col-lars.

And to set them so in an e-ven row,
And tell them to stud-y nice-ly,
That their re-cess of an hour or less
Will be at twelve pre-cise-ly.'

Some-times you'll find that dolls won't mind,
That Ro-sy is naugh-ty, ver-y,
And that Mar-guer-ite will leave her seat
When it is-n't nec-es-sa-ry.




















DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-THE BATH.
'Tis time Doll Ro-sy had a bath,
And she'-ll be good, I hope;
She likes the wa-ter well e-nough,
But does-n't like the soap.
Now soft I'll rub her with a sponge,
Her eyes and nose and ears,
And splash her fin-gers in the bowl
And never mind the tears.
There now--oh, my! what have I done?
I've washed the skin off-see!
Her pret-ty pink and white are gone
En-tire-ly! oh, dear me!



















A-WAY WE GO THROUGH THE SNOW.


DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-THE SLEIGH-RIDE.

We can have dog To-ny for a po-ny,
SN He's too cur-ly for a horse, 'tis true;
But hitched to a sled, by a strap on his head,
And a string of bells, he'll do.

We will wrap Doll Ro-sy up so co-sey,
She will need her tip-pet and her coat;
And was ev-er such a sweet lit-tle thing as Mar-guer-ite,
With a blue scarf round her throat?

And now, with a tin-gle and a jin-gle,
A-way we go through the snow!
But hark, To-ny, hark! a po-ny should-n't bark!
He nev-er will learn, I know!




















DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS. -A BAD HAB-IT.

Doll Ro-sy is the love-li-est creat-ure,
With eyes as blue as vi-o-lets,
But I'm sor-ry to say she's fond of pea-nuts,
And eats them ev-er-y chance she gets.

There's a lame man with a cart at the cor-ner,
He hob-bles a-bout up-on a crutch,
You can smell his nice fresh pea-nuts roast-ing,
Doll Ro-sy likes them ver-y much.

It costs five cents to buy a pack-age;
She's sure to want them, and to tease,
And we some-times sit right on the curb-stone,
And eat them un-der the ma-ple-trees.





















DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-THE QUAR-REL.
It makes me ver-y sad to see
My lit-tie chil-dren dis-a-gree;
Doll Ro-sy, go at once to the clos-et!
And Mar-guer-ite, come here to me!
I see, Doll Ro-sy, by your face
You're ver-y sad at this dis-grace,
And I know as well as an-y-bod-y
The clos-et is a dark bad place.
You could find a nice seat an-y-where,
Yet each must have the rock-ing-chair!
And oh, for shame to have a quar-rel
A-bout the rib-bons in your hair!























DOLL RO-SY'S


I'm sure Doll Ro-sy isn't well,
She looks a lit-tle pale;
She went out walk-ing yes-ter-day
With-out her heav-y veil.
I'll have the doc-tor! Nurse, see h
Run for the doc-tor quick,
Tell him he's want-ed here at once
Tell him Doll Ros-y's. sick!
He'll sit be-side her bed, I know,
Look kind, and say, "A-hem!
Here's half a doz-en lit-tle pills,
They're sug-ar swal-low them !"


ere,


DAY S.-THE H


SICK DOLL.


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DOLL ROSY'S DAYS.-THE PUN-ISH-MENT.

I have a great deal of trou-ble
And wor-ry, as you will see,
And I've had to pun-ish Doll Ro-sy
For say-ing, "I won't," to me.

I shook her a ver-y lit-tle,
And sat her down in a chair,
And said, "You are ver-y naught-y,
For shame, Doll Ro-sy there!"

If she hadn't act-ed sor-ry
And cried real wa-ter-tears,
And prom-ised she would do bet-ter,
I should have boxed her ears.





















DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.- THIM-BLE COOK-IES.


Of course you would like the rec-i-pe
Of the cook-ies I made for dol-ly's tea:
A heap-ing tea-spoon full of su-gar,
And but-ter a-bout as large as a pea.
I stir some flour and wa-ter in
With bak-ing pow-der, then roll out thin,
And cut with mam-ma's sil-ver thim-ble,
And bake in a shal-low, pat-ty-tin.
And, last of all, I sprin-kle a drop
Of pow-dered su-gar up-on the top;
And when the dol-lies be-gin to eat them
They nev-er know when nor where to stop.





















DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-GOOD MAN-NERS.
Do use your fork, Doll Ro-sy,
You'-ll be a la-dy soon;
You're quite too big a girl to eat
Po-ta-to with a spoon;
And let me pin your nap-kin
A-bout your neck, this way;
And try not drop so man-y crumbs
Up-on the floor, I pray.
And don't in-sist on hav-ing
What mam-ma has re-fused;
And when you've fin-ished eat-ing, say,
"Please may I be ex-cused?"




















DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-KITCH-EN TROU-BLES.

Now there's Doll Ro-sy's cam-bric suit
With lace to pull, and ruf-fles to flute;
I have washed it, starched it, sprin-kled it, too,
But the i-ron-ing is still to do.
Now Bid-dy has pots and ket-tles and cans
And spi-ders and skil-lets and grid-dies and pans,
All o-ver the stove, till there isn't a spot
To heat my lit-tle flat-i-ron hot!
Oh, dear! when I am a la-dy grown
I'll have a kitch-en all of my own,
And no-bod-y there, like Bid-dy, to say,
"Run a-way, lit-tle girl, don't both-er to-day!"




















TOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-WHAT TIM-TIM DID.
Oh, what do you think has hap-pened?
Doll Ro-sy al-most died!
It fright-ened me so dread-ful-ly
Of course I cried and cried.
I rocked her to sleep this morn-ing,
And laid her in the chair;
Tim-I im, the pus-sy, did-n't know
That .I had put her there!
And so, when he got sleep-y,
What should he do but curl
His great gray bod-y in a ring
Right on my lit-tle girl!




















DOLL RO-SY'S DAYS.-HER CARE-LESS-NESS.
I won-der where your gloves are,
Your hat with the red wing-
I've tried to look your ward-robe up,
But can't find an-y-thing.

I think you will re-mem-ber
That love-ly day we played
Take tea with a-corn plates and cups
And sau-cers in the shade!

It rained that night so dread-ful,
And rained the next day, too;
I think you must have left your things
Up-on the grass; don't you?






















"JUST FOR FUN"

LAUGHS FOR LITTLE FOLKS

















I























The dan-cing les-son.


San-ta Claus is struck by the mod-es-ty of little boys.


























































Two ill-behaved young fel-lows.


II -


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Bergetta Relates her Misfortunes.























Y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ \~x I,=~ne~i*r ;J4 41U~ICrflC~c fli bzd.- ey
K -t-

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-. ..' -. .


S- H-- A motbh_-er's lul-la-by-

A moth-er's lul-la-by.

























A Successful Raid.


Not so easy.

































A wild '--treat.


1- /Ci1


Molt-er.-" Come in out of the rain, my chil-dren "


'^ /.


~NJ~b~























It is din-ner-time.


A moving.


But din-ner is-n't read-y.




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