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The Comic almanack
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078634/00019
 Material Information
Title: The Comic almanack
Physical Description: 2 v. : fronts. (1 fold.) illus., plates (part fold.) ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878 ( illus )
Thackeray, William Makepeace, 1811-1863
Smith, Albert, 1816-1860
Beckett, Gilbert Abbott, 1811-1856
Mayhew, Horace, 1816-1872
Mayhew, Henry, 1812-1887
Hotten, John Camden, 1832-1873
Publisher: J. C. Hotten
Place of Publication: London
Creation Date: 1853
Publication Date: [1870-71]
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Almanacs, English   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000632441
notis - ADG2054
lccn - 31004883
System ID: UF00078634:00019

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
        Front Matter 3
        Front Matter 4
        Front Matter 5
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Frontispiece
        Image
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Front Matter
        The comic almanack for 1853
            Unnumbered ( 10 )
            Well sir ! it is my duty to inquire into your intentions towards miss 1853
                Page 386
                Page 387
            January
                Page 388
            February
                Page 389
            March
                Page 390
                Page 391
            April
                Page 390
                Page 392
            May
                Page 393
                Page 394
            June
                Page 395
            July
                Page 396
                Page 397
            August
                Page 398
            September
                Page 399
                Page 400
            October
                Page 401
            November
                Page 402
                Page 403
            December
                Page 404
            More railway assurance
                Page 404
            Australian eclogue
                Page 405
                Page 406
                Page 407
            Family epistle from a Chinese emigrant to his wife
                Page 408
                Image
                Page 409
            Change in the weather
                Page 410
                Image
                Page 411
            Election intelligence with the rights of women recognised
                Page 412
                Page 413
            Scrap from a new seasons
                Page 413
            Full dress
                Page 414
                Image
                Page 415
                Page 416
            Mysteries of Paris
                Image
                Page 417
                Page 418
                Page 419
                Page 420
            Harmless accompaniment to Mr. Cruikshank's plate on the opposite page
                Image
                Page 420
            Wanted a dibdin : apply to the first Lord of the admiralty
                Page 421
            Vulture : an ornithological study
                Page 422
                Page 423
                Page 424
                Page 425
            Domestic tragedy ; being the result of over female emigration and the impossibility of obtaining female servants
                Page 426
                Image
                Page 427
            Answer to correspondents
                Page 427
            Advertisements
                Page 428
    New book list 1871
        Book List 1
        Book List 2
        Booklist 3
        Booklist 4
        Booklist 5
        Book List 6
        Book List 7
        Book List 8
        Book List 9
        Book List 10
        Book List 11
        Book List 12
        Book List 13
        Book List 14
        Book List 15
        Book List 16
        Book List 17
        Book List 18
        Book List 19
        Book List 20
        Book List 21
        Book List 22
        Book List 23
        Book List 24
        Book List 25
        Book List 26
        Book List 27
        Book List 28
        Book List 29
        Book List 30
        Book List 31
        Book List 32
    Back Matter
        Back Matter 1
        Back Matter 2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text
















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NOTICE.


The FIRST SERIES of THE COMIC ALMANACK"
from 1835 to 1843, a nine years' gathering of the BEST
HUMOUR, the WITTIEST SAYINGS, the Drollest Quips, and the
Best Things of THACKERAY, HOOD, MAYHEW, ALBERT SMITH,
A'BECKETT, ROBERT BROUGH, with nearly one thousand Wood-
cuts and Steel Engravings by the inimitable CRUIKSHANK, HINE,
LANDELLS-

may now be had of the Publisher, crown 8vo, 600 pp.,
price 7s. 6d.

SThe First Series and the present (or Second Series) comprise
THE COMPLETE WORK, extendingfrom 1835 to 1853.






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THE


COMIC ALMANAC

AN EPHEMERIS IN JEST AND EARNEST, CONTAINING

MERRY TALES, HUMOROUS POETRY,
QUIPS, AND ODDITIES.

BY
THACKERAY, ALBERT SMITH, GILBERT A BECKETT,
T-HE BROTHERS MAYHEW.



:tI T'


"THE APPROACH OF BLUCHER.-INTREPID ADVANCE OF THE 1ST FOOT."

igity mang unbnkb llastrations
4B Y GEORGE CRUIKSHANK.
AND OTHER ARTISTS.

SECOND SERIES, 1844-1853.

LONDON:
JOHN CAMDAN HOTTEN, 74 & 75, PICCADILLY.
'NEW YOK : SCRIBNER. WELFORD AND CO.
















THE


COMIC ALMANAC

FOR I853.







THE COMIC ALMAKACK.


U"a


"WELL, SIR! IT IS MY DUTY TO INQUIRE INTO YOUR INTENTIONS TOWARDS
Miss 1853.

TAXING into consideration the hourly increasing inquisitiveness of the
Age, and, above all, the restless desire to pry into the secrets of Futurity,
as evinced by the feverish agitation, on all sides, of vitally important ques-
tions, such as the following:-
What is to be done for the people?
Who's who in 1853 ?
What next ?-
we have resolved on considerable improvements in the Prophetic department
of our publication.
This feature indeed may be said to have been (in proof of which we are
going to say it) hitherto the only unsatisfactory one of our otherwise com-
plete work-having been confined to the prediction (in six neatly printed
pages at the commencement of the yearly volume) of the particular week-days
on which each day of the month would fall; the number of days to be con-
tained in each month; the periodical changes of tire moon, &c., &c.-pre-
dictions which have invariably been verified; but, from the comparatively unin-
teresting nature of the events foretold-considered as a supply to the enormous
demand for Prophetic Intelligence alluded to above-may be open to a charge
of inadequacy.
For the Future we intend'to be more explicit as to it; and will foretell
events of a more general nature, calculated to set at rest all the throbbing
questions of the day, to which an answer will oblige-only stipulating
that, in the case of any prediction not appearing to be satisfactorily fulfilled,
the reader will withhold his judgment till such time as he shall have pur-
chased our next number.
Our extra amount of foresight has enabled us to present the reader with
sixteen pages of matter more than he has been in the habit of receiving The
usual blank pages for the purposes of journal and cash entries will be no
longer necessary, the accounts of the year being already made up for him by
ourselves.


[853.V






1853.] THE COMIC ALMANAC. 387

JANUARY. FEBRUARY.
ON the 1st of Ja-
o e nuary, two elderly
gentlemen (having
dined together on
the previous day)
will meet in New e n
OxfordStreet. One
will poke the other i
in the stomach, and
remark that he has
not seen him since lst year. The other
will reply that it is very odd; but that
he is glad to find his friend so little al- A country gentleman will be a ...- tad
tered. Both elderly gentlemen will laugh to Westminster by an erroneous concep-
and adjourn for something to' drink. tion of the Queen's method of opening
Parliament in person.
IsT tiCEIVoLFD ASSORTMENT
1 ---i SATE S' iert J


Several young gentlemen home for t
holidays being informed that if they (
so much Twelfth Cake they will ma
themselves too ill to go back to school
Monday-there will be an extra dema
for that article.


i rival opera houses will open for the
ion. Increased exertions will be
eI on both sides to secure the public


la The materials for gold-washing, liuw-
est ever, come expensive, and some time is
necessarily occupied in Winkinson's get
ting a supply.
cc2







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


JANUARY.
JANUARY derives its name from the Roman deity Janus. It is the
first month of the year-following December, and taking prece-
dence of February. It contains thirty-one days.
We have been induced to make the above remarks by the convic-
tion that no work, however brilliant, has a chance of success in the
present day, unless containing a certain amount of really sound
and valuable information. Considering we have established our
powers in that line triumphantly, we will proceed to foretell the
principal events of the month.
On second thoughts though, the month is so absurdly near at
hand, and the events themselves will so soon happen, that it is hardly
worth while. It has even occurred to us that it would be an insult
to our readers-the very notion of which makes our blood run cold!
Of course, under the circumstances, we cannot think of anything
of the kind.
DIRECTIONS FOR BEGINNING THE NEW YEAR WELL.-Go OUt to
dinner on the 31st of December. Select the best house you know
for the purpose. Eat and drink of the best, and spend the evening
cheerfully. See the new year in, and accept your host's offer of a
bed. Breakfast with the family; be in excellent health and spirits,
and have a legacy left you.
FAMILY RECEIPTS.-Those given by the landlord on the 26th
ultimo are the most appropriate to the month, and should be taken
care of in case of accidents.
To AVOID CHOPPED HANDs.-Have your meat properly jointed by
the butcher, and don't attempt to chop it yourself.

\ // SCRAPS OF INFORMATION,
USEFUL AND ORNAMENTAL,
(The latter through the kind assistance of Mr. H. G. line.)
CHEONOLOGIOAL NOTES FOB TIH EBAB 1853.
Golden Number, or Cyele of Shrove Sunday, Feb. 22.
the Moon, 11'. Ah Wednesday, Feb. 9.
Epaot 20Su14. Easter Sunday, March a7.
Dominical Letter, B. Whit Sunday, May 15.
Julian Period, 6565. Trinity Sunday, May 22.
Septuagesimna Sunday, Jan.
22ge ay, Advent Sunday, Nov. 27.
THE GOLDEN NUMBER.
ECLIPSES OF THE BSU AND MOON IN 1853.

JUNE 6.-Total Eclipse of the Sun, invisible.
JUxE 20.-Partial Eclipse of the Moon, invisible.
SNovnMBnE 30.-Total Eclipse of the Sun, invisible.









THE COMIC ALMANAC.


l b


THE CEREMONY OF HER MAJESTY GOING IN STATE TO OPEN PARLIAMENT
WILL TAKE PLACE AS USUAL-THESE EXPENSIVE PAGEANTS BEING CAL-
CULATED TO GIVE EMPLOYMENT TO A LARGE CLASS OF THE INDUSTRIAL
POPULATION.

FEBRUARY.
As influential inhabitant of a provincial borough will take a party
of friends with him to the House of Commons, to show them how
intimate he is with the new member, whose return to Parliament
he was mainly instrumental in effecting, and who has professed the
greatest attachment to him and his family. He will lie in wait
(bidding his friends to look on) in the strangers' lobby for the new
member. He will see the new member entering the building with
conscious dignity. He will rush at him with extended hand, ad-
dressing him by name. The new member will suddenly see some-
body he wants to speak to, and rush madly away in an opposite
direction. The influential inhabitant will return to his provincial
borough with altered politics.
On the 14th, exactly 1,098,276 valentines will be delivered in the
United Kingdom.* Out of these, 9,765,007 will commence with
"The rose is red, the violet's blue;" 6,000,821 will be written on
sugar-paper and sealed with thimbles; 1,098,275 will contain faults
of orthography and syntax; 890,782 will be illegibly directed; and
3 prepaid.
News will arrive of the fitting out of an American squadron (by
private enterprise) for the invasion of England-the grounds of at-
tack being that the island was discovered, some centuries back, by a
Roman ancestor of Mr. Julius Caesar Chollop (of Connecticut, U.S.),
Sand by right should become the property ot his descendants.
We consider this daring accuracy of statistics something like prophecy.
Of course, we challenge investigation.











THE COMIC ALMANAC.


MARCH


The formation of volunteer rifle corps,
with a view to the protection of life and
property, will be strongly recommended.


The rate of cab fares of the metropolis
will continue at 4s. 6d. per mile. Drivers,
as heretofore, will be encouraged to en-
force its payment from a parsimonious
British public.


Greenwich Fair will present the usual
endless variety of intellectual recrea-
tions.


HE hears, moreover, that the gold lies
twenty-five feet below the surface of the
soil, and thinks he had better try if he
could dig a hole that deep. He takes
up two flag stones in the back kitchen,
and makes the experiment.


APRIL.
GREAT SELLS OF THE FIRST.











A gentleman, invited out to dinner, will
wait patiently in the belief that his tailor
really means to send home his new coat
by four o'clock.










The .same gentleman's bootmaker will
wait patiently in the belief that his debtor
really means to call and settle that little
matter by four o'clock.







The printer's boy will be sent to out
residence to ask for copy.
Our boy will be despatched on an errand
to the printer's to inquire for proofs.






The strictest discipline will be enforced
among the Railway Companies' officials.
Nor is he quite sure that his constitu-
tion will stand livingin a tent. Hejudges
it expedient to contract for a month's re-
sidence with a distinguished Egyptian fa-
mily on Blackheath, by way of probation.


I[1853.







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


.








o
GREAT IRISH F TE ON ST. PATRICK'S DAY.

MARCH.
As Irish Fete will take place on St. Patrick's Day-established in
successful emulation of the annual Scottish FAte in Holland Park.
The following national sports will form a portion of the pro-
gramme :-
Throwing the Hatchet,
Drawing the Long Bow,
Shooting the Moon,
And (in effigy, out of consideration for Saxon prejudices)
Shooting the Landlord.
There will also be a general run of excisemen and tax-gatherers
for their lives. Prizes will be awarded, which the losers will be at
liberty to contest with the conquerors after their distribution.
On Easter Monday, Greenwich Fair will offer its attractions to
an intellectual British public. A great falling off will be'observed
in this time-honoured festival. The shows will be found stripped
of their brightest pantomimic and melodramatic ornaments: but
Richardson will not give up the ghost !
Parliamentary business will be suspended for the Easter vacation:
Much curiosity exists as to what statesmen do with themselves on
such occasions. A slender middle-aged gentleman, of Jewish
aspect, with an immense quantity of glossy ringlets, will be seen
enjoying three sticks a-penny in the park on Easter Monday. A
much shorter gentleman, wearing a pasteboard nose, and blowing"a
penny trumpet, will be robbed of his handkerchief, in the same lo-
cality, whilst getting into a round-about, in company with an
elderly gentleman in plaid inexpressibles and a retrouss6 nose. That
handkerchief will be fund marked J. R. with a coronet. For once,
we decline being definite, and say nothing.











THE COMIC ALMANAC.


MARCH


The formation of volunteer rifle corps,
with a view to the protection of life and
property, will be strongly recommended.


The rate of cab fares of the metropolis
will continue at 4s. 6d. per mile. Drivers,
as heretofore, will be encouraged to en-
force its payment from a parsimonious
British public.


Greenwich Fair will present the usual
endless variety of intellectual recrea-
tions.


HE hears, moreover, that the gold lies
twenty-five feet below the surface of the
soil, and thinks he had better try if he
could dig a hole that deep. He takes
up two flag stones in the back kitchen,
and makes the experiment.


APRIL.
GREAT SELLS OF THE FIRST.











A gentleman, invited out to dinner, will
wait patiently in the belief that his tailor
really means to send home his new coat
by four o'clock.










The .same gentleman's bootmaker will
wait patiently in the belief that his debtor
really means to call and settle that little
matter by four o'clock.







The printer's boy will be sent to out
residence to ask for copy.
Our boy will be despatched on an errand
to the printer's to inquire for proofs.






The strictest discipline will be enforced
among the Railway Companies' officials.
Nor is he quite sure that his constitu-
tion will stand livingin a tent. Hejudges
it expedient to contract for a month's re-
sidence with a distinguished Egyptian fa-
mily on Blackheath, by way of probation.


I[1853.







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


CAPITAL FIRST OF AlRIL JOKI. EMIGRATION AGENTS PERSUADE INTEND-
ING EMIGRANT THAT THEY ARE SHOWING HIM THE WAY TO AUSTRALIA.

APRIL.
THE excellent working of the convict system will be summarily dis-
played in Australia. The convicts, by a decisive coup, will succeed
in obtaining the upper hand. The colonial executive will be van-
quished and replaced by a provisional government on an entirely
new principle. A new and original code of laws will be organized,
by which honesty will be made criminal, and rascality rewarded.
No man will be allowed to claim any property, unless he can prove
that he has stolen it, and no documents whatever will be considered
binding except forgeries. The Gold Fields will be at the disposal
of the government, who will grant licenses (to be paid for in counter-
feit coin) for the assassination and plunder of the individuals who
have been sent out (officially) to rob the diggers.
Emigration will, however, continue unchecked. Labour will be at
an incredible premium. 400 a year will be refused by a groom,
because he is expected to attend to the stable, and refused the use of
the piano. Desertion in the army will be carried to such an extent
that Lord Hardinge himself will be compelled to mount guard at
Folkstone, to keep out the French invasion-his only hope of the
safety of the country being derived from the knowledge that all the
soldiers of the Emperor Napoleon III. have deserted too, and that
that potentate is constitutionally opposed to.the ordeal of single com-
bat. There will be no policemen left. The magistrates themselves
will be compelled to assume the uniform in case of any malefactors
remaining the country. Mr. Norton's beat will be Westminster
Bridge; that of Mr. Broderip, Vauxhall Road and its environs;
whilst the safe custody of the Borough will be entrusted to the
vigilance of Mr. A'Beckett.


[I853.









1853-] THE COMIC ALMANAC. 393

MAY. JUNE.
BETTING OFFICE t Y ALL THESE
B0EllDICTIO
Sro Fl TOLEI ARFE? -




The international copyright treaty with
L France having come into action, several
dramatic authors will be thrown out of
At about noon on the day succeeding the employment.
Derby race, several gentlemen will call
at a popular betting office, and will be
surprised to find that the proprietor and
clerks have not come yet. E


SThe umbrella manufacturers of the me-
tropolis will felicitate themselves on the
prospect of a brisk demand for their mer-
chandise.
The omnibus drivers, blass to the ex-
citement of unchecked racing on level
ground, will avail themselves of the
repairs in Fleet Street for the purpose of
,a steeple chase.


S- There is no use in doing things hur-
S riedly. Winkinson intended starting by
the next packet, but he has just learnt
.. nr that it is impossible to stand the fatigues.
j of the diggings without drinking an
enormous quantity of peach brandy, by
way of fortification. It would be mad-
Sg-- ness to commence the journey till he has
seasoned himself a little to that sort of
He is also nervous about the sea voy- -thing.
age. There can be no harm in a trip as N.B. Beards are worn at the diggings.
far as the Nore, to set him all right on Winkinson has allowed his to grow, and,
his sea legs. in consequence, forfeited his-situation.








THE COMIC ALMANAC.


THE MEMBERS OF A "CRACK" REGIMENT WILL BEHAVE IN A GALLANT
AND DASHING MANNER.


MAY.
THE DERBY.-OUR OWN PROPHECY.
AFTER the announcement of our prophetic intentions, the most
thrilling anxiety will doubtless exist in the sporting world, to know
what we have to say on this important subject. To oblige so large
and so respectable a class of our readers, we have given it our closest
attention.
The only matter of any importance connected with the Derby,
we decline saying anything about at all, is the name of the winner.
This comparatively slight reservation is made solely from a dis-
inclination to interfere with vested interests.
On the great day, Members of Parliament will insist upon a
holiday, claiming it as their right as Britons. The Right Honour-
able Mr. Disraeli will remark that it is all Race.
The members of a crack regiment will amuse themselves on their
return from Epsom, by throwing brickbats, vitriol, &c. at the foot
passengers. The blame will be laid on a respectable stockbroker,
who will be imprisoned for the offence, the military gentlemen
proving an alibi. A weak-minded young ensign of the party
having expressed some regret that the innocent should suffer, and
hinted that the real offenders ought to give themselves up like men
-will be cashiered, with a severe reprimand from the commanding
officer, for his want of esprit de corps and true gentlemanly feeling.
Several shop tills and betting-office stools will be found vacant
on settling day.
TURF MAxIM.-Never look a gift horse in the mouth without
taking care of your fingers.








THE COMIC ALMANAC.


A NEW PICTURE WILL BE PURCHASED BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE NATIONAL
GALLERY FOR 40,000, AND WILL ATTRACT GIEAT ATTENTION.


JUNE.
BALLOON ascents on a scale of peril hitherto unattempted will be
the features of this month. Madame Poitevin will go up from Cre-
morne Gardens attached to the bottom of the car of the Globe Bal-
loon by six penn'orth of wafers only. The veteran Green, by the
announcement of his 8000th ascent, suspended by warranted unsafe
cords, will prove that, in spite of his vast age and experience, he is
not yet-old enough to know better.
A gentleman from one of the East-end gardens will be indicted
by the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals-for at-
tempting an ascent on a live donkey. The Magistrate will dismiss
the case, very properly, by sending both parties to the pound to-
gether.
The principles of aerial navigation will not yet be discovered. A
man of consummate genius, however, will turn the invention of the
balloon to considerable account. He will hire one as a family resi-
dence in order to dodge the Income Tax. He will send down ironical
messages to the commissioners by means of parachutes.
The usual cheap, excursion trips will commence for the season-
the competition between companies leading to still further reduction
of fares. Passengers will be booked through to Paris and back,
first class for eighteenpence (half the fare to be refunded in case of
sea-sickness); with the privilege of speaking to the man at the
wheel; hotel expenses for a week; the use of a courier; tickets for
all the balls at the Tuileries; instruction in the French language;
the cross of the Legion of Honour; and the right of smuggling.








THE COMIC A'LMANACK.


I[853.


JULY AUGUST.



IO


The wild sports of Smithfield market
being abolished, there will be compara-
The air bei.g onarged with electricity, tively little doing in the accident ward
all wives of well-regulated minds will of St. Bartholomew's Hospital.
insist on their husbands promising not
to ride in any omnibus unprovided with
a lightning conductor.
The great demand for sherry-cobblers
will completely exhaust the metropolitan
supply of straw. Livery-stable keepers
will be driven to singular expedients for
the nocturnal accommodation of their
lodgers.
IOTEL I


Not that it matters to your poor wife,
but if you had the feelings of a man, you
might see that the dear children are
dying for a little sea air.
You will naturally wish to prove. that
71 you have the feelings of a man, and will
The demand for whitebait will be un- treat the dear children to a little.
usually brisk at Greenwich.








By the way, if he doesn't start till next
The thing is to keep your gold when month, he will get out to Australia in
you have got it: there are so many un- ,
principled characters about the diggings. the most beautiful season of the year-
Winkinson, anxious to test his powers of and first impressions are everything
defending his life and property, visits a Winkinson will make himself cmfot-
uspicious neighbourhood after dark withelf comf
twvo sovereigns in his pocket. able and devote a month to his friends.







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


NOTlOE
NamE

'H:0'C
oOZ Di

~i uZZLMED
jj|i M 2 1E


A DISTINGUISHED PHILANTHROPIST WILL INSTITUTE A CIIAAITY FOE THE
PROVIDING OF 1)Do IN HUMBLE CIRCUMSTANCES WITH MUZZLES.


JULY.
JULY will be a very hot month. Several cases of hydrophobia will
occur. In each instance the dog will be killed as soon as he has
bitten a sufficient number of people to amount to a conviction. The
theory of prevention, by muzzling or chaining up, will be suggested
by many people, but will continue to be disregarded, as entirely
opposed to the spirit of the British Constitution. .
A terrible act of injustice will be committed. A very sensible
dog indeed will be killed as mad-for refusing to drink a drop of
Thames water.
The Emperor Napoleon III. will issue a decree fixing the number
of dishes to be contained in the dinner of every Frenchman who,
after so many months of an enlightened and paternal government,
Smay be able to afford one; the quality of pomatum to be used for
his whiskers ; and the number of antibilious pills he may take in
the course of the week.
The Humane Society willbe very active. Baths and wash-houses
will be instituted for the benefit of individuals who may have been
imprudent enough to bathe in the Serpentine.
1M. Jullien will be engaged at the Surrey Zoological Gardens for a
series of Concerts d'Ete. The feature of the season will be an
entirely new set of quadrilles, entitled Les B&tes, in which (in addition
to the usual performers) all the animals of the menagerie will be
introduced. It will make a very great noise indeed. As none of the
animals will be muzzled or chained up, several members of the
orchestra may be expected to make their last appearance on the
occasion.







398 THE COMIC ALMANAC. [1853-


:,'
| ill 1 Ii














IN CONSIDERATION OF THE EXTREME HEAT OF THE W/EATHEE, THE USUAL
STRICT DRESS REGULATIONS OF THE OPERA WILL BE SUSPENDED.


AUGUST.
bEVErAL Parliamentaryreporters will begin to let their moustaches
grow, from which the speedy close of the session may be expected.
The metropolis will be threatened with a fearful amount of sick-
ness. Children, hitherto the models of rude health, will be dis-
covered by their anxious mammas to be looking pale. Husbands
who never had a day's illness in their lives (and are in the habit of
boasting to that effect) will be assured by their better halves that
if they continue to stick so closely to business, they will be dead in
a month-and with so many depending on them, they should show
some. regard for their precious health. They themselves (the
poor wives) are used to suffering; but even they would like to be
spared for a short time, if only for the sake of their families. It
will also be discovered that, being out of town, and having no ap-
pearance to keep up, you can live at the seaside for next to nothing;
so that it will be a downright saving.
The heat of the weather will increase in intensity. Considerable
modifications of the national costume will be found necessary. The
fashions of the month (male) will be confined to a gauze shirt and
a pair of light crochet inexpressibles.
An astute theatrical manager will pocket a considerable sum by
announcing-" Glorious unsuccess Anything but crowded houses!!
Not more than three people in the pit!! !" Large numbers will
flock to the establishment'in hopes of coolness and ventilation, and
will be refused their money back.








THE COMIC ALMANAC.


SEPTEMBER.
One of our married readers will leave
home for a couple of days' shooting, pro-
mising faithfully to send his wife some
birds.











He will keep his promise faithfully.












You will meet your Oxford Street tailor
on the pier at Boulogne, but will not re-
cognise him, albeit the hiefficacy of the
British code on an alien soil would enable
you to do so with impunity.


OCTOBER.


In the dearth of Parliamentary intelli-
gence, the newspaper reader will be
startled by the appearance of an enor-
mous gooseberry I







He will, moreover, be interested in the
remarkable longevity of three old gen-
tlemen resident in Stoke Pogis Work-
house, whose united ages amount to 190
years; and in the singular coincidence
of their all three having been born in
the same hemisphere.

X He will also be induced to
W remark upon the peculiar
4 mildness of the season. One
of the phenomena attendant
S on which will be a shower
X of frogs.


The fact is, Winkinson has been going
it rather, and the idea of commencing
three months' voyage in such a shaky You must consider that Winkinson's
state is out of the question. It isn't grandmother brought him up, and in the
every day a man leaves his mother coun- ordinary course of things she can't last
try, and when thers noprospet of your long, and his farewell must be a final
try, and when there no prospect of your one. It would be downright cruelty not
seeing each other again for years, it is to spend a month with the old lady pre-
certainly excusable. vious to his departure.


1 .~i~LI r? H
8
nn







THE COMIC ALMANACK.


SEPTEMBER.
SEVERAL genteel establishments will be closed, the blinds drawn
down, and the drawing-room furniture enveloped in brown holland.
In answer to inquiries, the visitor will be informed that the family
has left town for Baden-Baden, Palermo, the Continent, or
Brighton. Baden-Baden is a small watering-place on the coast of
Kent, known to the inhabitants as Ramsgate; Palermo is an adja-
cent settlement, familiarly termed Margate; "the Continent" and
" Brighton" are synonyms for the two-pair back, with the use of
the attics for sleeping apartments.
The annual Scottish f6te will take place in Holland Park.
Several distinguished chieftains will appear in the national
undress. An attempt will be made by some energetic female mis-
sionaries to distribute Bloomer tracts among the assembled Celts,
and bring them to a sense of their trouserless position-but will
not be attended with any great success. In order to eclipse the
daring achievements of former years, a magnificent prize will be
offered to any Scot who will perform the herculean feat of return-
ing to his own country. There will be no candidates.
All London being at the seaside, there will be a greater quantity
of donkeys seen on the sands of Brighton and Ramsgate than
usual. Speculators on the Chain Pier will realize large fortunes
by letting out telescopes to hire during the hours devoted to bath-
ing by the ladies.
On and before the 29th, the great question of Tenant Right will
be set at rest. The tenant, generally speaking, will remove his
goods in the night, and leave the key (not wishing to deprive the
landlord of his property) in the door. The tenant will be-all
Right!











IT NEVER REIGNS BTE IT BORES.


S400


i853-







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


THE MOST INEXPLICABLE ATMOSPHERIC PHENOMENA WILL BE DISCOVERED
BY A DISTINGUISHED SAVANT" ON HIS WAY HOME FROKM A MEETING OF
THE SCIENTIFIC BODY TO WHICH HE BELONGS.



OCTOBER.
A GREAT many things will happen in October on various days of
the month, at different hours of the day, whose influence will be
felt in numerous quarters of the globe. Nothing, however, of suffi-
cient importance to be noticed in this department of our publica-
tion will take place. Should anything of the kind inadvertently
transpire, it shall be faithfully noticed in our next number. We
cannot possibly say fairer.
The fact is, October is a very uninteresting month. It takes
place at the very slowest period of the year. It comes after the
excitement of quarter-day, and before we have begun to trouble
ourselves about winter. Nothing whatever -is seasonable to it, as
it belongs to no season whatever. Nothing can be done with it,
and anything will do for it. We will therefore do nothing what-
ever.

THEATRICAL ANECDOTE (QUITE GOOD ENOUGH FOR OCTOBER).-We
overheard a stage-manager apply to a gentleman who was just
going on to the stage to represent the Ghost in Hamlet," the-sin-
gularly inappropriate' exhortation of "Now, then, old fellow, look
alive!"
APHORISM FOR EMIGRANTS WHO HAVE PAID TIIEIR PASSAGE-MONEY.
-There is many a slip between the tip and the ship.
DD


L i~a~c~d








402 THE COMIC ALMANAC, [1853,

NOVEMBER. DECEMBER.









The most elegant and appropriate ob-
jects will be suggested by advertising
One of the great National Theatres willhopkeepers as Christmas pre t.
be opened for the ddbat of a distinguished
tragedian from the provinces.


The dignitaries of St. Paul's Cathedi
will avail themselves of the rush of vi
tors on Lord Mayor's day to turn
honest penny.

The most appropriate additions will
made to the Lord Mayor's procession.


At last Winkinson has taken his pas-
sage, and got his luggage on board. The
ship starts at half-past four in the morn-
ing. This, however, is no reason why
he should not enjoy a parting glass with
his friends, who have come down from
London on purpose to see him off.


An individual of great mechanical ac-
quirements will fairly earn the 2001.
offered by Messrs. Chubb, as a prize to
any one who will open one of their
patent locks.





"a L


~7
All things considered, Winkinson is
very comfortable where he is, and
doesn't think he'll go.


I







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


ON THE FIFTH OF NOVEMBER, A GROSS INSULT WILL BE OFFERED'TO A
GENTLEMAN SUFFERING FROM INFLUENZA.
Serrant Girl(loq.) If you please, sir, here's some boys at the door want to know if
you'll be good enough to remember the poor Guy."

NOVEMBER.
WE candidly confess that we are again somewhat thrown back
in our prophecies-November being generally a month in which it
is difficult to see your way clearly.
We have not, however, entirely lost our way. On the 5th, all
foreign refugees wearing beards and extraordinary hats will find
that England does not offer that safe asylum from persecution they
had been led to imagine. They had better keep out of the way,
for fear of being arrested, or, as the familiar Saxon expresses it,
" smugged," in order that political and religious intolerance may
be displayed in the most awful Guys! The wearers of ponchos,
tartans, wide-awakes, and railway rugs, will incur similar perils.
A calamitous fire will take place in the pocket of a young gentle-
man who has incautiously been entrusted with sixpence, which he
has laid out in squibs. The young gentleman will be very much
put out indeed.
Therd will be a heavy fog on the 9th. The guardian angel of
London will kindly throw 'a veil over the metropolis, so as to conceal
as much as possible a pageant calculated to give a very contemptible
idea of city intelligence.

HIGH WATER AT L NDON BEiDGE IN NovEMBEn may be ascertained
by calculating the cubic space occupied by the thousands who are
induced by the national complaint of the spleen to throw themselves
into the river during this dispiriting month,-From a French Serious
Almanack.
DD2


I853.]








TiiE COMIC ALMANAXCK.


DECEMBER
Tms month will be characterized by the general issuing of dinner
invitations to dine all classes, exclusive of those to whom a dinner
is really an object.
On Christmas Eve, Watkins will bring several friends home
with him to partake of egg-flip, assuring them that he always
makes egg-flip on Christmas Eve, because his father did so before
him, and there is nothing like keeping up those good old customs.
The egg-flip will be made-its component parts being table beer,
gin, butter, eggs, sugar, nutmeg, and other bilious materials. The
friends will be compelled to drink an immense quantity of it, and,
when quite ill, will be dismissed by the host calling on Heaven to
bless them, and wishing them a merry Christmas. The friends will
think Watkins the best fellow in the world, and not see for a
moment the bitter mockery of his parting wish.
The Sowster family will spend Christmas Day admirably. Old
Sowster likes to have all his family about him on this occasion, that
they may be cheerful and united, without the interference of
strangers, at least once a year. He will go to sleep immediately
after dinner, and not wake up till supper time. Jack and Bob
Sowster, disgusted at having had to refuse so many nice invitations,
because the old boy insisted on it, will sulk for the whole day. The
Misses Sowster will pick quarrels with them, having nobody else's
brothers to talk to in a more agreeable manner.
Other people will spend Christmas in a more jovial and agreeable
manner. We will for one; and we are sure that the intelligent
reader, holding this volume in his (or her) hand, will for another.



MORE RAILWAY ASSURANCE,
WE have received official information respecting a new bill about to be
brought into Parliament, for the protection of Railway Companies. The fol-
lowing are among the clauses enacted:-
That the directors of any company announcing the departure of a train at any par-
ticular time, may start it an hour later-or two hours earlier-or when they like-or not
at all.
That trains announced to contain third-class carriages shall consist exclusively of
first-class carriages; and that any passengers made to wait by these arrangements,.shall
be compelled to pay for the use of the waiting-room.
That it shall be legal for the officials or any company to stop a train when half-way
towards its destination, and refuse to take the passengers on, till they have paid their
fares over again-in which case the engine-driver need not proceed unless it suits him.
That in case of collisions, all injury done to the line, carriages, &e. shall be made
good by the'passengers-the train having been run for their accommodation. In case of
fatal accidents, the directors may come upon the representatives of the deceased parties
for damages, as compensation for the loss of traffic likely to be caused by the report of
such unpleasant affairs.
That no passenger shall exercise any control whatever over his own luggage; and
that no director, chairman, station-master, policeman, guard, porter, engine-driver, or
stoker in any of the companies' employ, shall be responsible for anything whatever.


[1853-








TiiE COMIC ALMANAXCK.


DECEMBER
Tms month will be characterized by the general issuing of dinner
invitations to dine all classes, exclusive of those to whom a dinner
is really an object.
On Christmas Eve, Watkins will bring several friends home
with him to partake of egg-flip, assuring them that he always
makes egg-flip on Christmas Eve, because his father did so before
him, and there is nothing like keeping up those good old customs.
The egg-flip will be made-its component parts being table beer,
gin, butter, eggs, sugar, nutmeg, and other bilious materials. The
friends will be compelled to drink an immense quantity of it, and,
when quite ill, will be dismissed by the host calling on Heaven to
bless them, and wishing them a merry Christmas. The friends will
think Watkins the best fellow in the world, and not see for a
moment the bitter mockery of his parting wish.
The Sowster family will spend Christmas Day admirably. Old
Sowster likes to have all his family about him on this occasion, that
they may be cheerful and united, without the interference of
strangers, at least once a year. He will go to sleep immediately
after dinner, and not wake up till supper time. Jack and Bob
Sowster, disgusted at having had to refuse so many nice invitations,
because the old boy insisted on it, will sulk for the whole day. The
Misses Sowster will pick quarrels with them, having nobody else's
brothers to talk to in a more agreeable manner.
Other people will spend Christmas in a more jovial and agreeable
manner. We will for one; and we are sure that the intelligent
reader, holding this volume in his (or her) hand, will for another.



MORE RAILWAY ASSURANCE,
WE have received official information respecting a new bill about to be
brought into Parliament, for the protection of Railway Companies. The fol-
lowing are among the clauses enacted:-
That the directors of any company announcing the departure of a train at any par-
ticular time, may start it an hour later-or two hours earlier-or when they like-or not
at all.
That trains announced to contain third-class carriages shall consist exclusively of
first-class carriages; and that any passengers made to wait by these arrangements,.shall
be compelled to pay for the use of the waiting-room.
That it shall be legal for the officials or any company to stop a train when half-way
towards its destination, and refuse to take the passengers on, till they have paid their
fares over again-in which case the engine-driver need not proceed unless it suits him.
That in case of collisions, all injury done to the line, carriages, &e. shall be made
good by the'passengers-the train having been run for their accommodation. In case of
fatal accidents, the directors may come upon the representatives of the deceased parties
for damages, as compensation for the loss of traffic likely to be caused by the report of
such unpleasant affairs.
That no passenger shall exercise any control whatever over his own luggage; and
that no director, chairman, station-master, policeman, guard, porter, engine-driver, or
stoker in any of the companies' employ, shall be responsible for anything whatever.


[1853-











AN AUSTKRLIANi EOLOGUEE.
"The Pastoral, as a feature in English poetry, has long ceased to exist. The Arcadian
characteristics, however, of our Australian colonies-recently brought to light-afford
every excuse for its revival. Pope says something very clever about pastorals in connec-
tion with Theocritus, for which see his works, and find out the passage, if possible. A
great many other writers have alluded to the same subject."-(See British Museum Cata-
logue, Vol 1 to 398.)
BUGGINS.
HAIL, gentle shepherd I thou whose only care
Has been, for so much by the month or share,
To tend the playful flock through plain and thicket-
(Of course, I mean since you obtained your ticket)-
And ne'er with sorrow moaned along the vale:
I beg your pardon, shepherd, I said "hail!"
MUGGINs.
Shepherd, you did; you needn't speak so loud;
You seem to be of your distresses proud,
And take of me a most mistaken view;
But stop a minute-have some kangaroo ?
BUGGINS.
Shepherd, I thank you; take a pinch of snuff.
I'm somewhat peckish, though it's rather tough.
A little mustard-what you had to say-
I'm all attention-shepherd, fire away !
MUGGINS.
No swain more sad than I in all the run
(I hope you like the settlement)-not one!
Not that I pine for wealth or cities' din,
Or at the distance we've to go for gin:
Peaceful my lot-the frugal damper cakes
That simple-hearted Amaryllis bakes,
Season'd with pickled pork, my wants supply;
And calmly on my cow-skin couch I lie;
But for the thought-shepherd, I'm overcome-
Have you a case about you with some rum ?
BUGGINS.
Shepherd, I drank the last a week ago,
In desperate attempts to drown my woe;
But while 1 polish off this kangaroo,
Tell me your dismal story-shepherd, do!
MUGGINs.
In distant London, leagues beyond the sea,
I was policeman Six, division B.
BUGGINS.
Oh, mighty Jove! I, too, was in the force-
A Twenty-One-you've heard of me, of course ?









THE COMIC ALMANACK. [1853.

MUGGINS.
Familiar to mine ear the number sounds;
In Bedford Square I went my nightly rounds.
BUGGINs.
For years was Buggins known upon a beat
In the vicinity of Baker Street.
MUGGINS.
I loved a maid-a housemaid-Mary Ann-
They kept a page, three females, and a man.
BUGGINs.
I loved a housemaid, too-Matilda Jane-
A noble-hearted girl, though rather plain.
MUGGINS.
Would that were all my sorrowing heart might tell;
I loved a cook-Jemima Briggs !-as well.
BUGGINS.
Not you alone such double pangs must brook-
I too have known what 'tis to love a cook.
MUGGINS.
You know not yet what pangs my bosom tear-
I loved eight nursemaids in the self-same square.
BUGGINS.
Hearts too for me with mutual throb would beat,
In every other house in Baker Street.
MUGGINS.
Can Baker Street's cold western claims compare
With the'staunch genial worth of Bedford Square ?
BUGGINS.
Could vulgar Bedford venture to compete
With the gentility of Baker Street?
MUGGINs.
We needn't have a row-it's not worth while;
Let's test the question in the ancient style :
Let each in glowing terms, and decent grammar,
(As far as possible)-the praises clamour
Of the lost Paradise for which he sticks
Up as the champion ; and we'll see which licks.
I'll back my Bedford Square at two to one
In bobs against your Baker Street-say done ?
BUGGINS.
Done But a question the arrangement shakes:
Where can a cove be found to hold the stakes?








AN AUSTRALIAN ECLOGUE.


MUGGINS.
Lo, Coorabundy comes a native nigger-
He shall decide who cuts the ablest figure.
(COORABUNDY cs installed as umpire.)
Shepherd, begin, and do the best you can.
And don't exasperate the h in Hann.
BUGGINS.
What heav'n-born rapture, unalloy'd by pain,
Like eating drumsticks grill'd by 'Tilda Jane,
Except the something warm which fate allots,
Mix'd by the practised hand of Sairey Potts.
MUGGINS.
Prince Albert's cook-not he nor any man's-
Makes scallop'd oysters such as Mary Ann's:
A delicacy which I may say tops
Jemima Briggs's way of doing chops.
BUGGINS.
Ann Jinks, the very best of all the set,
Would bring me out my supper in the wet;
Many a time I've took it in the airy,
Getting my beer from Number Nine's maid-Mary.
MUGGINS.
I've had green peas in May from Thompson's Charlotte;
And beans as well, both French and common scarlet.
Rather than me (though Thompson was a snarler),
She'd let them go without things in the parlour.
BUGGINS.
When "grass" was selling at a pound a bunch,
Susan has cook'd me all there was for lunch:
Risking to say it must have been the cat-
Fancy a girl who'd go as far as that.
MUGGINS.
Jemima, when we took our walks in town,
Always put on her missis's best gown.
BUGGINS.
Louisa, knowing how quick linen dirts,
Gave me a dozen of her master's shirts.
MUGGINS. ,
Selina's savings kept me for a year,
In skittles, gin-and-water, pipes and beer.
COORABUNDY
(Bousing himselffrom a lethargy into which he has fallen),
You two big fools-you talkee here all night;
Black fellow got de stakes-him hold 'em tight.
S(Be decamps with theproceeds.)








THE COMIC ALMANAC.


A FAMILY EPISTLE,
FROM A CHINESE EMIGRANT TO HIS WIFE.
See plate (improved willow pattern) opposite.
KA-L--ron-wE, 8019th Summer of the Empire.
Feast of Con-fut-zee.
BELOVED TEE-TEE,
According to my promise, oh, apple of my eye I dip my
brush in the ink-dish of love, to communicate my adventures in
the land of the barbarian. Tee-Tee think not I have forgotten
thee-nor yet that it was those little domestic differences (which I
look upon as gnats in the bright s inshine of our wedded happiness)
which made me join that tremendous movement-now threatening
the Celestial Empire with depopulation-and presenting to the
imagination the terrible possibility of the Brother of the Sun and
Moon (may his stomach extend!) being compelled to brush out
his own pigtail!
Blame me not for leaving thee in the night secretly. I could not
have borne a parting. I know thy love for me is such that, hadst
thou known my intention, thou wouldst have become frantic-and
I should have been quite overcome. My heart failed me as I stole
past thy bedchamber door on tiptoe;. my shins quivered with emo-
tion when I thought of thy tiny gold-shodden foot; my cheek
burned as thy delicate hand seemed to press against it; and when
I pictured to myself thy long and graceful nails, I was as a man
without eyes!
Enough, oh, Tee-Tee! This comes hoping you are quite well,
as it leaves me at present-Fo be praised for the same!
Our labours have not yet been crowned with success. I speak
not of the vulgar seeking after gold-to which motives the oppo-
nents of progress and light have basely attributed the Great Chinese
Emigration Movement which has shaken the barbarian world to
its foundation. Thou knowest better. If thou dost not, after all
I have told thee, all I can say is that it is just like thee, for a stupid
obstinate mule as thou art.
Our mission was to civilize the whiskered and shirt-collared
heathen. The light of wisdom had been too long concealed from
the outer world by the Great Wall. Thou mayst remark it was
odd we never thought of civilizing them till we heard of their
finding gold -gold limitless as the glories of the empire! here and
in their other settlement of Aus-tra-lee-ah.
Such a remark, oh, Tee-Tee! would be just about as sensible as
thy remarks usually are.
It was because the barbarians had found this gold they stood in
need of our assistance more than ever. Could such people be ex-
pected to know the use of wealth; I ask-could they ? And as
for once in my life in addressing thee, I can have all the talk to
nyself-without waiting for thy doubtless illogical reply-I answer,
No, they couldn't.


[1853.




A i"Ll 1, ?iCki~r~ rC~J~~;aa ~it n



left~t





On,~"








1853.] A FAMILY EPISTLE FROM A CHINESE EMIGRANT. 409

It became our duty, at all hazards, to teach them. We resolved,
even at the pain of leaving our homes and wives (it's no use thy
getting into a passion, oh, Tee-Tee!), to go forth amongst them,
and accept the presents of gold and treasures they would doubtless
be too glad to lay at our feet, in exchange for that intellectual
wealth which we alone are capable of dealing out with a layish
hand. At any rate we could prevent their doing much mischief-
by taking the treasures from them.
But they are such a set of fools!
Our words of wisdom they receive with mocking laughter, or by
calling on their idols to send down curses on our eyes and limbs.
So ignorant are they, that they have no fear of the Emperor before
their eyes; and tell us, if we want gold we must dig for it.
And this is our reward Of course digging, for a true-souled
Chinaman, is out of the question. In the first place, we should
have to cut our nails. In the second place, we should have to exert
ourselves. In the third place, one process indispensable to the work
of gold-seeking is called washing-a revolting idea!
The result is, that did we not, in our superior wisdom, know the
value of rat and puppy (which the barbarians despise), the chop-
sticks of your Poo Poo and his companions would be unoccupied.
We are not alone, however, in our misfortunes. There are several
men here of a superior tribe-which I think I have heard called
Dan-dees-who, like ourselves, have been trained in the ways of
wisdom, to despise mere physical labour, and think only of Man's
superiority as evidenced in their own persons; who came like our-
selves, expecting to be received with rich gifts and open arms by
the drudging savages, whose wilderness they had condescended to
enlighten by their presence. These men are reviled and neglected
because they do not like to soil their hands-and have never learnt
to do anything !
My paper is out; and as, I dare say, thou hast already forgotten
me, and taken up with that atrocious rascal, Tom Tom-to whom
thou wilt probably hand this letter for a pipe-light, without having
even looked at it-I need add no more than the signature of the
unfortunate POO POO.


TRAY AND THE DBUCE.








THE COMING ALMANAC.


THE CHANGE IN THE WEATHER.
"Well, what do you think of the Weather ?"
(Smith, whom we meet frequently.)
THE English climate, so long considered a capital joke, is becom-
ing a very serious matter. They were not Dog-Days last summer;
they were Hymna, Kangaroo, Elephant, Boa-Constrictor days.
If so unnatural a state of things is to be repeated, England will
no longer occupy her present position in the world. She will be
somewhere else. There will be no place like home. Home itself
will not bear the slightest resemblance to it. We shall be all
abroad-every British child will be born a foreigner.
Nationality will be at an end. With the loss of our climate, on
which the British Constitution so closely depends, it is impossible
that we should continue to be the same people.
What will avail the boast that Britons never never shall be
slaves, when there is such an immediate likelihood of their becom-
ing niggers ?
Our isolated position makes the prospect all the more alarming.
The county must be in a continual state of hot water.
The Comic is not, strictly speaking, a Weather Almanack. Still
the heat of last summer made us so uncomfortable (we do not
mean merely in a physical sense), that we thought it our duty to
inquire into the matter. We have, therefore, condescended on this
occasion to look into futurity with a weather eye, of which we
hasten to present the reader with a few "shoots,"-such, we
believe, being the term usually applied to the natural emanations
from the eyes of a Murphy.
We regret to say our worst fears have been confirmed. The
page in the Book of Destiny that has been opened to our inspec-
tion is closely printed, and presents the aspect of a number of the
Times, dated August 2nd, 1980. We leave our readers to form
their own opinions on the following extracts:-
THE WEATHER AND THE Cnors.-The season continues to be
unusually backward. The plantains in the neighbourhood of
Wolverhampton have scarcely passed the flower. The cotton
fields, however, of the West Riding are in a healthy condition-
several trees being already in pod. It is feared that there will be
a great loss in consequence of the dearth of labourers. It is true
that immigration from Iceland, Nova Zembla, and the manufac-
turing countries generally, continues to a great extent; but
nothing can atone for the impossibility of arousing the native slave
population to exertion. The prospects of sugar are far from satis-
factory, the siroccos of the last month having completely devastated
the plantations-the canes on Clapham Common present a disas-
trous spectacle! The bread-fruit trees on Blackheath promise an
abundant supply of half-quarterns.
FRGHTFUL ACCIDr T.-On Wednesday last, Mr. Edward Jack-
son, landlord of the Cocoa-Nut," Tottenham Court Road, having






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1853.] THE MONSTER SWEEP. 411

had the imprudence to bathe in the Serpentine, was attacked by a
ferocious alligator, who devoured both his legs so as to make
amputation, we regret to say, unnecessary.
ENoRMous PALM CABBAGE.-A gigantic specimen of this national
plant grown in the open air by a native slave named Higgins, in
the little garden attached to his shanty, was exhibited on Tuesday
at the meeting of the Agricultural Society. It measured six feet
in circumference, and weighed twenty-three pounds four dunces.
A medal was awarded to the grower, and was accepted by the
Rajah Simpson, his owner, whose family subsequently dined off
the cabbage, expressing themselves highly gratified.
Sronirn INTELLIGENOE.-His Majesty's elephants threw off
yesterday from Richmond Park at four o'clock in the morning (the
absurd old-world custom of sporting and transacting business in
the heat of the day having, we are happy to say, exploded among
the intelligent classes); a fine tiger was scented in the jungles of
Slave Common, and soon broke cover. The run was a short one.
"Puss" was brought to bay among the bamboos of Isleworth
swamp, and speared by Coolies Walker and Smithers (eating, by
the way, a considerable portion of the latter). His Majesty was in
at the death, and returned to tiffin at 8 A.M.
HEALTH or THE METROPOLIs.-The deaths in the metropolis
during the last week, as certified by the Registrar-General, are as
follows :-
Yellow Fever. . . 1640
Black do. ................. .870
Green do. . . . ... 651
Ague. . . . 923
Coup de Soleil . . . 130
Eaten by personal acquaintances (cannibalism being,
we regret to say, rather on the increase among
the benighted lower orders) .. ... 24
Eaten by savage animals, stung by reptiles (including
a family of six in Judd Street, devoured by the
house tiger, who had broken his chain, and was
unfortunately not muzzled), &c. . ... 18
Influenza (old English complaint) almost obsolete 1
Total 4257

Altogether a most satisfactory return, showing a marked im-
provement since last week.

'THE MONSTER SWEEP.
WE beg to propound the following question for the consideration
of the members of the Peace Society. Is the Cannon who has
lately created such a sensation in London, one they'would like to
see let off?








THE COMIC ALMANAC.


ELECTION INTELLIGENCE,
WITH THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN RECOGNIZED.
(For which the Ladies are referred to Mr. Oruikshank's charming
picture of the Future.)
SmR CHARLs DAINm (the Ladies' Candidate), presented himself
on the hustings amidst a general waving of handkerchiefs, and spoke
as follows:-
Ladies and-(with a smile)-need I say gentlemen P (Titters and
"Droll creature !") I think not. Gallantry forbids my recognizing
their existence-in any light other than as the devoted slaves of
that divine sex, of whom I am proud to esteem myself the humblest.
(Cries of How nice 1")
Ladies, then, angels, goddesses (" Oh!" from an elderly bachelor,
who was removed by the police), for the thrilling position in which
I am placed, how can I be sufficiently grateful to that glorious re-
form in our electoral system, which has partially recognized the
true position of lovely woman P (" Partially!" in a tone of sarcasm,
from a member of Mr. Screwdriver's committee). My honourable
and gallant friend objects to the adverb. I say partially, for by
admitting the ladies to the Franchise with the gentlemen, they are
but recognized as equals, instead of superiors. (Great sensation.)
Yes, ladies, and it shall be my earnest endeavours as your repre-
sentative (" Yah!" and "Not yet !" from Mr. Screwdriver). My
honourable and gallant friend observes "Not yet." It is true Ihave
a formidable rival to contend with. The charms of his person,
(screams, and "the Old Fright!") his known politeness, above all
his taste in dress (here the laughter and clapping of kid gloves ren-
dered the speaker inaudible for some moments)-compared with such
claims, mine are worthless (" Do listen!" and "The Duck!"), ex-
tending no farther than a willingness, I may say a downright anxiety,
to die in the cause of the fair creatures, who, I believe I may say,
have done me the honour to elect me as their champion (" Yes!
Yes!") With the ladies' voices in my favour, I believe I need not
fear those of the gentlemen being exerted against me. (Cries of
"We should like to see them," "Speak up, Alfred, do," "I'm
ashamed of you," &c.) I thank you, gentlemen-or rather I do not
thank you; 1 honour you for your-may I say obedience? (" Oh yes!"
in a rapturous tone, from the'engaged gentlemen), though, after all,
I don't see how you were to help yourselves. (Great applause, and
numerous bouquets thrown.)
The Honourable Mrs. Poser stepped forward, and begged to be
allowed-to address a few questions to the candidate.
Mrs. Poser. What are Sir Charles's views with regard to the
existing Excise regulations ?
Sir Oharles. My first measure will be to bring in a bill legalizing
the smuggling of laces and French ribbons. (Rapturous cheering.)


[I853.







1853.] sCRAPS FROM A 'EW "SEASONS." '413

A Voice. About the Sanitary Movement P
Sir Charles thought every family should leave town at the end of
the season.' It was his opinion, that all husbands paying the in-
come tax should be compelled to take their wives and children to
the seaside for the autumn months. It should have his earliest
attention. In answer to another speaker, he considered that
Assembly-rooms should be maintained in every town by the public
purse.
Mrs. Poser. What Foreign Policy will you advocate P
Sir Charles would advocate peace with France at all hazards,
that nothing might endanger the immediate importation of Parisian
fashions. (Cheers and bouquets.)
A Young Lady. About the Army P
Sir Charles. 1 am for keeping up a standing army, to consist
entirely of regiments of horse-guards, composed exclusively of
officers. (Immense sensation.)
Mrs. Poser. I should like to hear your intentions, as to the
tobacco duties.
Sir Charles. To prohibit the importation and cultivation of that
objectionable plant altogether, so that there may be no more
smoking.
A show of parasols was demanded, and Sir Charles Darling was
declared duly elected.


SCRAP FROM ANEW "SEASONS."
BY THOMPSON, OF THE LONDON DAILY PRESS GENERALLY.*

And now September comes, and Parliament
Hears, and obeys, for once, the nation's cry,
By "shutting up" at last. Forth to the moors
Hies the tir'd senator: his high-born dame,
Seeking her rustic bower, entertains
A most select and fashionable circle.
Now stares the peasant at the season's strange
Ethereal mildness! Not a hundred miles
From the secluded village where we write
(Small worth its humble name), the troubled sky
Pours down in wrath a mystic show'r of frogs !
Bewilder'd fly the scared inhabitants,
Of whom the Oldest fails to recollect
A like phenomenon! Now erst are seen
Enormous gooseberries--*- *

The amountpaid for this short contribution may be ascertained by a
simple process of linear enumeration-and reference to the pence table.







1853.] sCRAPS FROM A 'EW "SEASONS." '413

A Voice. About the Sanitary Movement P
Sir Charles thought every family should leave town at the end of
the season.' It was his opinion, that all husbands paying the in-
come tax should be compelled to take their wives and children to
the seaside for the autumn months. It should have his earliest
attention. In answer to another speaker, he considered that
Assembly-rooms should be maintained in every town by the public
purse.
Mrs. Poser. What Foreign Policy will you advocate P
Sir Charles would advocate peace with France at all hazards,
that nothing might endanger the immediate importation of Parisian
fashions. (Cheers and bouquets.)
A Young Lady. About the Army P
Sir Charles. 1 am for keeping up a standing army, to consist
entirely of regiments of horse-guards, composed exclusively of
officers. (Immense sensation.)
Mrs. Poser. I should like to hear your intentions, as to the
tobacco duties.
Sir Charles. To prohibit the importation and cultivation of that
objectionable plant altogether, so that there may be no more
smoking.
A show of parasols was demanded, and Sir Charles Darling was
declared duly elected.


SCRAP FROM ANEW "SEASONS."
BY THOMPSON, OF THE LONDON DAILY PRESS GENERALLY.*

And now September comes, and Parliament
Hears, and obeys, for once, the nation's cry,
By "shutting up" at last. Forth to the moors
Hies the tir'd senator: his high-born dame,
Seeking her rustic bower, entertains
A most select and fashionable circle.
Now stares the peasant at the season's strange
Ethereal mildness! Not a hundred miles
From the secluded village where we write
(Small worth its humble name), the troubled sky
Pours down in wrath a mystic show'r of frogs !
Bewilder'd fly the scared inhabitants,
Of whom the Oldest fails to recollect
A like phenomenon! Now erst are seen
Enormous gooseberries--*- *

The amountpaid for this short contribution may be ascertained by a
simple process of linear enumeration-and reference to the pence table.







THE COMIC ALMANACK.


FULL DRESS.
THEE was a sound of revelry by night,"
(In fact the neighbours couldn't sleep a wink)
Mingled with that of double knocks, and slight
Remarks from coachmen, overcome with drink,
Not indispensable to our narration,
And totally unfit for publication.
There came a knock-a double-treble rap,
That startled all the square from its propriety,
Made Fanny Thompson scream and cling,
To Captain Smith (the artful thing!)
As in a dewu temps round they flew,
(The Prima Donna, best of the variety);
Shook the gold oats in Lady Boozle's cap;
Sent Charley Finch in Lucy Lightfoot's lap,
(The rogue had stayed there, but he knew
The folks would talk-quite proper too);
Checked Jeames in an upstair-ward rush,
And with a tray of lemonade,
Fantastic maps of England made
Upon his whilom spotless plush.
(He was discharged next day for insobriety)-
Made Croop revoke;
Brown's only joke,
Arrested ere 'twas said;
His only chance that ev'ning dish'd,
Oh! how he wish'd
To punch that brazen-knocker's lion head.
The circling throng,
Stooping to catch Miss Jenny Linnet's song-
The feeble quavers heard no more.
The knock had quite upset them all,
Sing, Jenny, more than ever small!
In vain thy chirping notes outpour;
Gone is thy light of other days,
One chorus now all voices raise
Of Who dat knocking at de door P"
Who can it be ?
It must be somebody of some pretension:"
All flock to see
The Great Announced, or hear the footman mention
The name of one, whose birth or prosp'rous dealings
Have given him the true patrician right
Of disregarding other people's feelings.
"A city knight P


[C853.




























'. yo<


V"







1853.] FULL DRESS. 415

-A peer-a minister-a pure Caucasian,
Who has contrived to solve the myst'ry Asian,
Of gaining millions to downright satiety P
The Smythsons see extremely good society !"
The fever waxes hotter,
When enter James,
Who coldly names-
"Mr. and Mrs. Trotter."
Each grey-beard thinks himself a boy again,
And feels inclined to bellow, Ah-bal-loon!"
Two strange round figures up the staircase strain,
Each like a Lord-Rosse telescopic moon;
With difficulty is the doorway pass'd.
Come! Mrs. Smythson's rooms are full at last.
Full! there's no moving-Mrs. Trotter's skirt
Covers the whole saloon, and Trotter's tie,
(Which Jones-that very oddest fish-
Says is a tie that he could wish
Had bound the Trotter to his home)
In rigid folds on either side
A yard away, and quite as wide,
In search of mischief seems to roam-
With menaced hurt,
Mutely advising each to mind his eye.
And Trotter's sleeve!
Each sleeve would hold two Trotters and a half in it:
One might believe
He'd had it made to hide himself and laugh in it;
And of his pantaloons, the spacious work
Would stamp him as the extra great Grand Turk;
But (what might cause that theory to totter)
No harem of the grandest kind
Could be constructed room to find
For two sultanas such as Mrs. Trotter.
On! sweeping all
Before them like the hay in time of mowing,
Upsetting chairs and tables in the way;
The ornaments, by Mrs. T.'s bouquet
(Of peonies and dahlias all a-blowing)
Brush'd from the mantelpieces, fall;
The fiddlers into corners crouch;
The guests away in dudgeon slouch,
As from the hunter's spear shrink otters,
Impalement on the tie of Trotter fearing-
Into back rooms and closets disappearing.







THE COMIC 'AMANACK.


The halls are empty, Empty-pshaw!
Fill'd-as a new-dined turkey's craw,
By the triumphant and expansive Trotters.

"Now really, Trotter" (Smythson. from the door--
He couldn't enter), tell me what this means.
I'm glad to see you-no one could be more;
But still in good society-these scenes-
You're a good fellow-no one could be better-
I know how very deeply I'm your debtor;
Still, you ought not-
You know that I invited you (I told you)
Purely from the esteem in which I hold you;
And as a wish to come your wife expressed,
I couldn't well refuse; but still, this jest-"
Says Trotter, "What?"

"What ? why, my guests are going, every one."
"My eyes,' says Trotter, is the game all finished ?
Well, blow me! there's been precious little fun-"
It isn't that-'tis you who have diminished
The evening's pleasure." We! well, that's a droll 'un;
We as come here resolved to go the whole 'un-"

But think-so strangely dress'd!
Yourself a full-sail'd ship-your wife St. Paul's,-
A little outre, it must be confess'd-"
Well, I'll be blest !"
Exclaim'd the wondering Trotter, but I calls
That out-and-out. D'ye mean to say that this is
Wot ain't the regular thing? Just hear him, missis'!
After the many hog, bull, bob, and tanner
We've spent to get puffed out in this here manner !
It's his own words-Ill keep him to it!
Didn't you say we couldn't come unless
We came togg'd out in regular FULL DRESS ?
What-yes P
Well, then, we thought we'd do it."



A GREAT MISTAKE.
To suppose that the American heroes, planning the Lone Star
expedition against Cuba, have any -deeply-rooted antipathy to
.SPANISH.











a wt e 4 0


ea, -O r~,NW- TOM -wK.
5- u















eli fPut& Knve ccr Xdiw-ut ~ of- lhKnowitvj, k-rd8"oP&JutqK56 Inte)eZ to COT14a-r'a oftltkst
y tar Sb4L ol polt RW4UWl'0''ot~k.~dLso~ts









MYSTERIES OF PARIS,
TOTALLY UNEXPLAINED, BY A RmGULAR BRITON.
IN the first place, I should like to know what they mean by
wearing those enormous fur hats They may be an intelligent
people. All I know is-I never saw such a set of muffs as they
look.in all my'life. And such tight trousers! reducing the legs
of Young France to next to nothing, and presenting an appearance
of top-heaviness that is absolutely uncomfortable to contemplate.
They talk of their stable government! The heads of the nation
could never have been in a more tottering condition than they seem
now-and I don't see how things can possibly go on long on such
a slender footing.
Why should such a difference exist between the civil and military
states P I have heard a great deal of the admirable discipline of
the French army; but in a great many regiments there appears to
be no recognisable head worth speaking of. Quite the contrary.
Are we indeed to believe the scandal that all the boasted cares and
energies of the saviours of France have only been directed to the
basest endsP


eg











This is the baker! The circular article he holds in his right
hand is a loaf! So is the longitudinal ditto in his'left! I am at a
pedients resorted to by the Frencl
for making their bread. It is true
that one species possesses the great
recommendation, to the heads of
families, of going a very long way.
But, on the contrary, the other is a
description of food which the
smallest child could get through in
no time.
This gentleman is supposed to be
BE






Q0
I[83.
[18,53.


THE COMIC ALMANAC.


conducting himself in this re-
markable manner from an
excess of enjoyment and high
spirits; the French, generally,
being supposed to be a gay
and light-hearted people. Does a close
inspection of the expression of the gentle-
man's countenance, in the height of hns
hilarity, warrant either supposition P
Would it not rather be thought that he is
.performing a terrible act of penance for
some sin that can never be wholly expiated P


They have policemen in Paris, I suppose. Indeed I know they
have. Why, then, is so strong a detachment of the military neces-
sary to conduct that little boy to prison P Is it that the civil offi-
cers are less to be trusted with a service of danger than our own
gallant Blues, or that juvenile delinquency exists in France to an
extent unknown in our favoured clime P












Who is he, I wonder!!!

I should like to know why the French can't allow their trees to
grow as they like, instead of cropping and clipping them, like so
many whiskers on the face of Nature. These singular-looking ter-







MYSTERIES OF PARIS.


restrial spheres, planted in square tubs, in the Luxembonrg
Gardens, I am told are orange-trees. Very good. Their resem-
blance to oranges is certainly striking. I should be happy to accept
their appropriate rotundity as a precedent for the invariable rule
(as having an instructive tendency), but that, on inspection, I do
not find the neighboring groves to consist of pear-trees as, judging
from appearances, I was induced to imagine.


The French, I am told, down to the lowest grades of society, are
proverbial for their gallantry and consideration for the fair sex.
Appearances are certainly deceptive; but there is no trusting to
them in Paris. For instance, these individuals, I have ascertained,
belong to the class ouvrier:-


















To avoid the slightest mistake, I have hunted up the dictionary
meaning of that word. I find it to be home qui travaille-in-
dustriel.
EE2


1853.]







420 /HE COMIC ALMANAC. [1853.












They are certainly a strange race. How anybody can sleep, with
gentlemen parading the streets about a hundred at a time,before
daybreak, and continuing their what's-his-name's tattoo every
ten minutes, is a puzzler.












How anybody can sleep with these gentlemen--is another ques-
tion!


HARMLESS ACCOMPANIMENT TO MR. CRUIKSHANK'S.
PLATE ON THE OPPOSITE PAGE.
A RTEND of ours (had we been writing in the last century, we
should have said a wag), was expressing himself in terms of the
highest indignation with, or rather without, respect to his shoe-
maker for presuming to emigrate to Australia, on the pitiful plea
that he (our friend) was the only customer he had left. We re-
marked that we could see nothing reprehensible in his conduct-
especially as all his former patrons had deserted him. What are
his former patrons to me P" exclaimed our friend; I am the only
one remaining to him-and a cobbler ought to stick to his-last."
We laughed. Gentle reader, drop a smile if you can possibly
manage it.






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l~~t~& ~Le /-bivc YAcne'xo 4;z cotO7uy p oa2l6&rs ~r5w~ o h
4h, e.~po~M C~Irikemer, on d ive~pt w 31ibjed4 a& ty &I-rsd~ scp

r;-, a~ ~ay~ ~Y= am e- ~ ai







420 /HE COMIC ALMANAC. [1853.












They are certainly a strange race. How anybody can sleep, with
gentlemen parading the streets about a hundred at a time,before
daybreak, and continuing their what's-his-name's tattoo every
ten minutes, is a puzzler.












How anybody can sleep with these gentlemen--is another ques-
tion!


HARMLESS ACCOMPANIMENT TO MR. CRUIKSHANK'S.
PLATE ON THE OPPOSITE PAGE.
A RTEND of ours (had we been writing in the last century, we
should have said a wag), was expressing himself in terms of the
highest indignation with, or rather without, respect to his shoe-
maker for presuming to emigrate to Australia, on the pitiful plea
that he (our friend) was the only customer he had left. We re-
marked that we could see nothing reprehensible in his conduct-
especially as all his former patrons had deserted him. What are
his former patrons to me P" exclaimed our friend; I am the only
one remaining to him-and a cobbler ought to stick to his-last."
We laughed. Gentle reader, drop a smile if you can possibly
manage it.











WANTED, A DIBDIN.

APPLY To THE FasT LoRD OF THE ADMIRALTY.
WE hear a great deal of the prevalence of discontent in the navy.
It is said that the sailors are constantly grumbling at the way
they are treated, in the matter of unwholesome food and unsafe
ships.
A great many suggestions have been offered as to the best remedy
for this evil. Some weak-minded practical persons have proposed
fresh provisions and new ships.
We propose a DIBumN
It is a notorious fact, that the late Charles Dibdin, during the
war, did the State great service by his sea songs, which had the
effect of persuading the British sailor that fighting was avery jolly
thing; that Frenchmen ought to (and might easily).be exterminated;
and that all the unpleasantness of a tempest might be satisfactorily
overcome by climbing up into the rigging and thinking of an absent
Sue or Polly.
Why not employ a competent person to do something of the samt
kind in the present day ? It would be much better to reconcile thL
British seaman to existing hardship, than to encourage a mutinous
and dissatisfied spirit. Of course, we put removing the-difficulty
out of the question, as totally opposed to all precedent.
We annex a specimen or two of the sort of thing on which the
proposed silt-water laureate might be advantageously employed.
Go, patter to lubbers and swabs, do -you see,
About dainties, and stews, and the like-
A chunk of salt horse and some biscuit give me,
And it isn't at maggots I'll strike.
Avast I and don't think me a milksop so soft,
To be taken by trifles aback,
What would turn a fine gentleman's nose up aloft
Will be quite good enough for poor Jack.
Or in this style:-
Come all ye jolly sailors bold,
Who life as next to nothing hold,
While English glory I unfold,
Huzza for the Arethusa.!
She is a frigate quite used up,
Leaky and cracked as an old tea-cup,
Her sides are thin,
And the rot's got in;
So if your dauntless pluck you'd show
Iow is your time a cruise to go
On board of the Arethusa.








THE COMIC ALMANAC.


THE VULTURE:
AN ORNITHOLOGICAL STUDY.

AFTEit THE LATE EDGAR A. POE.
The Vulture is the most cruel, deadly, and voracious of birds of prey. He is remark-
able f6r his keen scent, and for the tenacity with which he invariably clings to the victim
on whom he has fixed his ripe. He is not to be shaken off whilst the humblest pickings
remain. He is usually to be found in an indifferent state of feather.-New Translation of
COvier.













ONCE upon a midnight chilling, as I held my feet unwilling
O'er a tub of scalding water, at a heat of ninety-four;
Nervously a toe in dipping, dripping, slipping, then outskipping,
Suddenly there came a ripping, whipping, at my chambers door.
"'Tis the second floor," I mntter'd, "flipping at my chambers door-
Wants a light-and nothing more !"

Ah! distinctly I remember, it was in the chill November,.
And each cuticle and member was with influenza sore;
Falt'ringly I stirr'd the gruel, steaming, creaming o'er the fuel,
And anon removed the jewel that each frosted nostril bore,
Wiped away the trembling jewel that each redden'd nostril bore-
Nameless here for evermore !

And I recollect a certain draught that fann'd the window curtain
Chill'd me, fill'd me with the horror of two steps across the floor,
And, besides, I'd got my feet in, and a most refreshing heat in,
To myself I sat repeating-" If I answer to the door-
Rise to let the ruffian in who seems to,want to burst the door,
I'll be that and something more.

Presently the row grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
Really, Mister Johnson, blow it !-your forgiveness I implore,
Such an observation letting slip, but when a man's just-getting
Into bed, you come upsetting nerves and posts of chambers door,
Making such a row, forgetting"-Spoke a voice beyond the door-:
"'Tisu't Johnson"-nothing more!







. THE VULTURE.


Quick a perspiration clammy bathed me, and I uttered "Dammy!" -
(Observation wrested from me, like the one I made before)-
Back upon the cushions sinking, hopelessly my eyes, like winking,
On some stout for private drinking, ranged in rows upon the floor,
.Fix'd-and on an oyster barrel (full) beside them on the floor,
Look'd and groan'd, and nothing more.
Open then was flung the portal, and in stepp'd a hated mortal,
By the moderns called a VULTURE (known. as Sponge in days of yore),
Well I knew his reputation! cause of all my agitation-
Scarce a nod or salutation changed, he pounced upon.the floor;
Coolly lifted up the oysters and some. stout from off the floor,
Belp'd himself, and took some more !


Then this hungry beast untiring fix'd his gaze with fond admiring
On a piece of cold boil'd beef I meant to last a week or more, .
Quick he set to work devouring-plates, inr quick succession, scouring-
Stout with every mouthful show'ring-made me ask, to see it pour,
If he quite enjoy'd his supper, as I watched the liquid pour;
Said the Vulture, "Never more.'


Much disgusted at the spacious vacuum by this brute voracious
Excavated in the beef-(he'd eaten quite enough for four)-
Still, I felt relief surprising when at length I saw him rising,
That he meant to go surmising, said I, glancing at the door-
"Going? well, 1 wont detain you-mind.the stairs and shut the door- "
'Leave you, Tomkins!-never more."


' 423







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


Startled by an answer dropping hints that he intended stopping
All his life-I knew him equal to it if he liked, or more-
Half in dismal earnest, half in joke, with an attempt at laughing,
I remarked that he was chaffing, and demanded of the bore,
Ask'd what this disgusting, nasty, greedy, vile, intrusive bore
Meant in croaking Never more ?'
But the Vulture not replying, took my bunch of keys, and trying
Sev'ral, found at length the one to fit my private cupboard door;
Took the gin out, filled the kettle; and, with a sangfroid to nettle
Any saint, began to settle calmly down the grate before,
Really as he meant departing at the date I named before,
Of never, never more!


Then I sat engaged in guessing what this circumstance distressing
Would be likely to result in, for I knew that long before
Once (it served me right for drinking) I had told him that if sinking
In the world, my fortunes linking to his own, he'd find my door
Always open to receive him and it struck me now that door
He would pass, p'raps never more !

t- t i "-- ,


Suddenly the air was clouded, all the furniture enshrouded
With the smoke of vile tobacco-this -was worse than all before;
" Smith I" I cried (in not offensive tones, it might have been expensive,
For he knew the art defensive, and could costermongers floor);
"Recollect it's after midnight, are you going ?-mind the floor."
Quoth the Vulture, "Never more!"







THE VULTURE.


' Smith!" I cried (the gin-was going, down his throat in rivers flowing),
"If you want a bed, you know there's quite a nice hotel next door,
Very cheap. I'm ill-'and, joking set apart, your horrid smoking
Irritates my cough to choking. Having mentioned it before,
Really, you should not compel one-- Will you mizzle-as before?"
Quoth the Vulture, "Never more !"
"Smith-!" I cried, "that joke repeating merits little better treating
For you than a condemnation as a nuisance and a bore.
Drop it, pray, it isn't funny; I've to mix some rum and honey-
If you want a little money, take some and be off next door;
Run a bill upfor me if you like, but do be off next door."
Quoth the Vulture, "Nevermore "
Smith !" I shriek'd-the accent humbler dropping, as another tumbler
I beheld him mix, "be off! you drive me mad-it's striking four.
Leave the house and something in it; if you go on at the gin, it
Wont hold out another minute. Leave the house and shut the door-
Take your beak from out my gin, and take your body through the door!"
Quoth the Vulture, "Never more !"













And the Vulture never flitting-still is sitting, still'is sitting,
Gulping down my stout by gallons, and my oysters by the score;
And the beast, with no more breeding than a heathen savage feeding,
T'he new carpet's tints unheeding, throws his shells upon the floor.
And his smoke from out my curtains, and his stains from out my floor,
Shall be sifted never mor 1







THE COMIC ALMANAC.


A DOMESTIC TRAGEDY;
-eing the Result of over Female Emigration, and the Impossibility of
obtaining Female Servants.
(For mise en scene, decorations, and cast of characters, see Plate opposite.)
Mas. PIPER (superintending the chops and neglecting her punctua-
tion)-" Oh dear, dear, dear it's enough to drive anybody crazy
with all the trouble I've had with the huzzies the nasty good-for-
nothing, idle, lazy-the wicked presumptuous bad creatures, to
think of their taking such a start. Don't talk to me, Piper; it's
the fault of you men for taking their part. Can't blame them in-
deed for wanting to better their situations I-of course my servants:
were very ill used I understand your insinuations. No doubt it's
a treat to you to see your poor wife made into a slave-not that
there's any novelty in that I wish I was in my grave 1-melted to
death and getting into such a mess with the chances I have of
even getting a new dress-at those dratted chops for you to guzzle.
If you had the feelings of a man, you'd do something to help me.
Oh! I daresay you're doing all you can-a pretty kettle of fish
you're making of the Irish stew. Ah! there goes the poker on to
the plates-don't tell me-you do it on purpose-you do. I didn't
say you touched the poker but you do all you can to flurry me in
one way or other-Tom, you naughty, unfeeling boy, how dare you
join in the conspiracy against your poor mother P If your father's
burnt you, it's just like him go and rub your hand with soap-
though you'll be clever to find it-Yes-Mr. Piper, you're satisfied
now, I hope-with your institutions and lectures and South
Australia panoramas I wish Mr. Prout and all the rest of the
wretches at the Polytechnic were pounded to death with sledge-
hammers-putting notions of emigration into the heads of a set of
brazen faces-but they've been a great deal too well treated, or
they would not have had time to go to such places; and those
newspapers talking about their rights and freedom if they'd minded
their work they wouldn't have had time to read 'em. In my poor
dear mother's time, no servant could get a place who knew how to
read. Ought to be treated like human beings P a pretty story, in-
deed I know what you mean Piper you needn't try to keep your
gravity-but they were always thinking of husbands and settling
in life or some such depravity.
Arabella and Jane you idle things don't stand staring there,
but go and lay the cloth before your father begins to swear. All
the tumblers are broken ? Well, to. be sure, I might have expected
that but I'm astonished at you Arabella for daring to tell me it was
the cat. If it was that minx, Jemima-yes, I see very well, Mr.
Piper that we don't get on as well without her as if I wanted her to
go, the viper! when she knew the whole comfort of the family de-
pended on her staying to be off to Australia the ungrateful thing





oi- qI,,,


/


t\fOct 4iVfl








i853-J ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 42

she deserves flaying. With the beautiful kitchen she had only she
never took a pride in it let alone seven pounds a year and her tea
found with sugar 'beside in it. But of course madam must have a
farm and want to be some scamp's wife-never thinking what I've
to get through with my two poor girls to settle in life. Jane bring
a dish this minute do. What I do you mean to say there's only one'
and that's cracked, on the shelf P Well, I've done all human nature
can do, Mr. Piper you may get your dinner yourself. If the chops
are black I can't help it well you needn't mention it-I see-if
there's one on the floor you may pick it up Ah! I knew how it
would be. The gridiron's tumbled over with what I've to go
through, how can you expect me to attend to it? I've not been
used to this sort of thing the chimney's on fire and there's an end
to it. The house must be burnt down Oh yes I call the police, but
you may call for ever if you find a policeman now all the servants
have gone to Australia, all I say is you'll be clever." [Scene coses.



ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS.
SNIKMTx.-Your conundrum was received in 1846, and has been in type ever
since. We shall probably be able to find room for it in the course of a few
years. Do not be impatient. We have all had our beginnings.
WALTER THE DOUBTEI.-The circulation of the Comic Almanack is eight mil-
lions. The editor's salary is ten thousand a year. But these things are not
done for money.
J.-Your offer has had our most careful consideration. We fear that a novel
in ten books, each containing eighty chapters, to be published at the rate of
a chapter per year, will scarcely suit our publication. It would be difficult to
sustain the interest for so long a period and at such considerable intervals.
WoRIaT.-There are three thousand and ninety-five editions of Uncle Tom's
Cabin published, It is estimated that every adult Briton has purchased nine
copies of that remarkable work and read them all.
JULTANETTA says she could love us madly if she could make up her mind to
believe that we don't dye our whiskers. We do.
RUM DICKEY assures us he is just the fellow for our money. He is very clever
at finding out conundrums; knows three comic songs; and has a friend who
is intimate with an Ethiopian serenader. We will think of it.
WAxIINsmnA.-Our pay is nineteen and sixpence per,line for prose-two
guineas for verse; only we don't accept contributions.
WAPSHOT informs us that he has occupied all his leisure hours for the last
twelve months in trying to find out the rebus, signed Lilly," in last year's
Comic Almanack. He hopes, after all the trouble he has taken, we will not
publish any other answer to it till his arrives. We pledge him our honour.
ENQumos wishes us to inform him the day of the month, and in what year,
Julius Caesar landed in Britain; the number of lines in the Iliad; what we
consider the best receipt for tartar in the teeth; whether Mrs. Glover ever
played Ophelia or not in early life-and if she did, at what theatre, and to
whose Rosencrantz; how he had better set to work to obtain a-commission
in the army without interest; if A pegs one tob many by accident, has B a
right to score four; which year's volume of the Litle Warbler we would
recommend for general purposes, in preference to the others; and if we know
of a good shop for elastic trousers. Perhaps some of our readers will oblige
him with an answer.








i853-J ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 42

she deserves flaying. With the beautiful kitchen she had only she
never took a pride in it let alone seven pounds a year and her tea
found with sugar 'beside in it. But of course madam must have a
farm and want to be some scamp's wife-never thinking what I've
to get through with my two poor girls to settle in life. Jane bring
a dish this minute do. What I do you mean to say there's only one'
and that's cracked, on the shelf P Well, I've done all human nature
can do, Mr. Piper you may get your dinner yourself. If the chops
are black I can't help it well you needn't mention it-I see-if
there's one on the floor you may pick it up Ah! I knew how it
would be. The gridiron's tumbled over with what I've to go
through, how can you expect me to attend to it? I've not been
used to this sort of thing the chimney's on fire and there's an end
to it. The house must be burnt down Oh yes I call the police, but
you may call for ever if you find a policeman now all the servants
have gone to Australia, all I say is you'll be clever." [Scene coses.



ANSWER TO CORRESPONDENTS.
SNIKMTx.-Your conundrum was received in 1846, and has been in type ever
since. We shall probably be able to find room for it in the course of a few
years. Do not be impatient. We have all had our beginnings.
WALTER THE DOUBTEI.-The circulation of the Comic Almanack is eight mil-
lions. The editor's salary is ten thousand a year. But these things are not
done for money.
J.-Your offer has had our most careful consideration. We fear that a novel
in ten books, each containing eighty chapters, to be published at the rate of
a chapter per year, will scarcely suit our publication. It would be difficult to
sustain the interest for so long a period and at such considerable intervals.
WoRIaT.-There are three thousand and ninety-five editions of Uncle Tom's
Cabin published, It is estimated that every adult Briton has purchased nine
copies of that remarkable work and read them all.
JULTANETTA says she could love us madly if she could make up her mind to
believe that we don't dye our whiskers. We do.
RUM DICKEY assures us he is just the fellow for our money. He is very clever
at finding out conundrums; knows three comic songs; and has a friend who
is intimate with an Ethiopian serenader. We will think of it.
WAxIINsmnA.-Our pay is nineteen and sixpence per,line for prose-two
guineas for verse; only we don't accept contributions.
WAPSHOT informs us that he has occupied all his leisure hours for the last
twelve months in trying to find out the rebus, signed Lilly," in last year's
Comic Almanack. He hopes, after all the trouble he has taken, we will not
publish any other answer to it till his arrives. We pledge him our honour.
ENQumos wishes us to inform him the day of the month, and in what year,
Julius Caesar landed in Britain; the number of lines in the Iliad; what we
consider the best receipt for tartar in the teeth; whether Mrs. Glover ever
played Ophelia or not in early life-and if she did, at what theatre, and to
whose Rosencrantz; how he had better set to work to obtain a-commission
in the army without interest; if A pegs one tob many by accident, has B a
right to score four; which year's volume of the Litle Warbler we would
recommend for general purposes, in preference to the others; and if we know
of a good shop for elastic trousers. Perhaps some of our readers will oblige
him with an answer.








THE COMIC ALMANAC.


ADVERTISEMENTS.

NO MORE MOSQUITOES! CATCH 'EM ALIVE!-To
destroy these noxious insects, the scourge of an English summer, use Wil-
kinson's EXTRACT OF UPAS, prepared only by him at his plantations, Hampstead
Heath, and sold (with directions) by all respectable chemists, in bottles, at Is. 14.,
2s. 9d., and Is.

THE PALMS, PECKHAM.-Delightful Family Residence to
BE LET, immediately; consisting of six rooms (all snake-proof), flat roof,
with verandah; capable of making up five beds, stable for two camels, hippo-
potamus sty, ostrichry, slave shed, and the usual offices. Apply personally to Mr.
JuKEs, 14, Chancery Lane, any morning before sunrise.

AN ENGLISH SUN AND AN ENGLISH SKY.
An English sun and an English sky,
Tally hi ho hi ho, boys I
About this time, in the hot July,
Themselves begin to show, boys.
The former fierce, and the latter hot,
As Coleridge says, like copper;
But a different state of affairs.would not
Be seasonable or proper!
What should we do when the sun and sky,
STally hi ho I hi ho, boys I
Bake us to death, should we yet say die ?
Certainly not, we know, boys !
Let us be brave, and the heat to face,
Be off, despondency loathing,
To-MosES and Sons' and our forms encase
In appropriate summer clothing.

THE ORIGINAL MONSTER MARTS of E. MOSES & SONS,
Established upwards of 150 years, supply the public with the following
articles of national and seasonable attire, at the lowest possible prices:-
Complete Nankeen Suit .... .1 5 0
Plantain Hat. . 0 4 9
Barege Shirts, per dozen. . 1 3 0
A small quantity of book-muslin great-coats, remaining on hand since the last
severe winter, are being disposed of at an alarming sacrifice.

-WANT PLACES.
ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO BE POST PAID.
AS SNAKE-CHARMER IN A SERIOUS FAMILY.---A na-
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to look after a camel, and make himself generally useful. Apply to J-n Sm-th,
6, Jaguar Place, Broad Street.


A STOUT, ACTIVE MAN, an experienced driver-to look after
a Nigger. Address P. Q, Elephant and Castle.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.


Special List for 1871.

"4' NOTE.-/In order to ensure the correct delivery of the actual IWorks,
or Particular Editions specified in this List, the name of the Publisher
should be distinctly given. Stmps or a Post-Office Order may be remitted
direct to the Publisher, who willborward per return.


Charles Dickens-The Story of his Life. By the
Author of" The Life of Thackeray." This day, price 7s. 6d., with
numerous Portraits and Illustrations, 370 pp.







-,- --
--5











Dickent's Summer House.
"Anecdotes seem to have poured in upon the author from all quarters.
Turn where we will -...... i. l-. easant pages, something
morth reading is sure to meet the ey -


--Ib.- Another Edition. Uniform with The
CHARLES DICKENS EDITION," and forming a supplementary
volume to that favourite issue, crimson cloth, 3s. 6d.

Artemus Ward, Complete. The Works of Charles
arrer Browne. better known as "ARTEMUS WARD," noW FIRST
COLLECTED. Crown 8vo, with file portrait, facsimile of hand-
writing, &c., 540 psges, cloth neat, 73. 63.
Comprises all that the humorist has written in England or America.
Admirers of poor Artemus Ward will be glad to possess his writings in a com-
plete form.

John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, 1W. I









VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

Earthward Pilgrimage (The). By Moncure D. Con-
way, the eminent Minister of South Place, Finsbury. Crown 8vo, 400
pages, cloth, neat, 7s. 6d.
*'+ This volume has excited considerable discussion, as it advances many entirely
new views upon the life hereafter. The titles to some of the chapters will con-
vey an idea of the contents of the work :-" How I left the world to come for
that which is."
Dickens's Speeches, Literary and Social. Now first
collected. With Chapters on Charles Dickens as a Letter Writer,
Poet, and Public Reader." This day, price 7s. 6d., with fine Portrait
by Count D'Orsay, 370 pages.
















i" is capital speeches. Every one of them reads like a page of 'Pick-
wick.'"-The Critic.
His speeches are as good as any of his printed writings."-T7le Times.
--Ib.-- Uniform with The CHARLES DICKENS
EDITION," and forming a supplementary volume to that favourite
issue, crimson cloth, 3s. 6d.
--- Cheap edition, without portrait, in paper wrapper, as.

Made and the Fairy Content. A Charming
Child's Story. By BLANCeHARD JERROLD. Intended to inculcate a
Spirit of Contentment. With nearly eoo Pictures of the Industry
requisite to produce the Christmas Pudding. 49. 6d.

A Third Supply of Yankee Drolleries, comprising
the best recent Works of American Humorists. A. WAnn's'Fe NIANS;
MARK TWAIN ; AUTOCRAT BREAKFAST TABLE ; BRET HARTE ;
INNOCENTS ABROAD. With an Introduction by GEOcGE AUGUSTUS
SALA, Crown 8vo, 700 pages, cloth extra, 39. 6d.
*S An entirely ene .s ... r Transatlantic humour. Fourteen thousand
copies have been sold Y r ....i 2nd series.


John Camden Iotten, 74. and 75, Piccadilly, IV.


3








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

UNIFORM WITH MR. RUSKIN'S EDITION OF GERMAN
POPULAR STORIES."
New Book of Delightful Tales.-" Pamily Fairy Tales;"
or, Glimpses of Elfland at Heatherston Hall." Edited by CnoLroN-
DELEY PENNELL, Author of "Puck on Pegasus," &c., adorned with
beautiful pictures of "My Lord Lion," "King TT ........ and
other great folks. Handsomely printed on toned .... i .i green
and gold, price 4s. 6d. plain, 5s. 6d. coloured.
*** This charming volume has been universally praised by the critical press.

The Rosicrucians; their Rites and Mysteries. With
Chapters on the Ancient Fire- and Serpent-Worshippers, and Explana-
tions of the Mystic Symbols represented in the Monuments and
Talismans of the Primeval Philosophers. By HARGRAvE JxENINGS.
Tos. 6d.
*%,' A volume of f facts and oliioes upon this very mysterious
subject, illustrated by nearly 300 eingravings.
Curious as many of Mr. Hotten's works nhve been, the volume no i
I i .i i the most remarkable. Tlhe work purplorts to describe the i. ,i
S It dilates on the ancient Fire and Serpent Worshippelrs. i
devoted an enormous amount of labour to tlhse memorials of the IROSE-clOSS-otherwise tlh
Rosierucians."-The Sun, 21st March, 1870.

Gustave Dore's Favourite Pencil Sketches.-His-
torical Cartoons; or, Rough Pencillings of the World's History from
the First to the Nineteenth Century. By GUSTAVE DORE. With
admirable letterpress descriptions by THOMAS WRIGn'r, F.S.A. Oblong
4to, handsome table book, 7s. 6d.



--"', 4

S -? y < -- --: -,'-



** A now book of daring and inimitable designs, which will excite considerable attention, and
doubtless command a wide circulation.

Captain Castagnette. His Surprising, almost Incre-
dible Adventures. 4to, with GUSTAVE DORE'S Illustrations. IS. 9d.
(sells at 5s.)
DIRECT APPLICATION must be made to 1r17. H-Iotte, for this book.

Cent. per Cent. A Story written upon a Bill Stamp.
By BLANCHARD JERROLD. With numerous coloured illustrations in
the style of the late M*r. Leech's charming designs, price 7s. 6d.
*** A Story of The Vampires of London," as they were pithily termed in a recent notorious
aose, and one of undoubted interest.
John Caoden lHotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.








THE NEW "PUNIANA SERIES" OF

CHOICE ILLUSTRA TED WORKS

OF HUIMOUR.


'' "'-
: ',






'lr




Elegantly printed on toned paper, full gilt, gilt edges, for the
Drawing Room, price 6s. each:-
1. Carols of Cockayne. By Henry S. Leigh.
Vers de Soci6te, and charming Verses descriptive of London life.
With numerous exquisite little designs by ALFRED CONCANEN
and the late JOHN LEECH. Small 4to, elegant, uniform with
"Puniana," 6s.
"'An awfully Jolly Book for Parties."
2. Puniana. Best Book of Riddles and Puns
ever formed. Thoughts Wise-and Otherwise. Edited by the
Hon. HUGH ROWLEY. With nearly ioo exquisitely fanciful
drawings. Contains nearly 3,000 of the best Riddles and Io,ooo
most outrageous Puns, and is one of the most popular books ever
issued. Third edition, price 6s.
Why did Du Chaillu get so angry when he was 'Gorilla?
Why? we ask.
Why is a chrysalis like a hot roll? You will doubtless remark, PB.
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Why is a wide-awake hat so called ? Because it never had a nap, and
never wants one.
The Sa, I -- ... .. -
and pre-e I .
tobeso: I I. ,. -
people, it .,1 .. i- I. I : :,r .








VERY IMPORTANT NVEW BOOKS.

The Conscript. A Story of the French and Ger-
man War of 1813. Translated from the French of MM. ERCKM1ANN-
CHATRIAN. Fcap., Is.
_** An authorized and unmutilated popular edition of this now famous work.
The translations, hitherto published in this country and in America, can be
regarded as little more than abridgments.
Napoleon III., The Man of his Time:
PART I.-The Story of the Life of Napoleon III., as told by JAs. W.
BASWELL.
PART 11.-The Same Story, as told by the POPULAR CARICATURES Of
the past 25 years.
Crown Svo, 400 pages, 7. 6 !.








I, I _
,












** The object of this Work is to give both sides of the Story. The Artist has
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quarter of a century, and a very interesting book is the result.

Bismarck, the Great German Statesman. The Story
OF HIS CAREER, told for Popular Reading. By Mr. GEO. BULLEX, of
the British Museum. Feap., is.
** An admirable account of the "Man of Blood and Iron;" giving numerous
very characteristic anecdotes.
Echoes from the French Poets. An Anthology front
BAUDELAIRE, ALFR3D DE MUSSET, LAMARTINE, VICTOR HUGO, A.
CHENIER. T. GAUTIER, BERANGER, NADAUD, DUPONT, PARNY, and
others. By HARRY CURWEN. Feap. 8vo, cloth, 5s.; half-morocco, 63.
"A pleasant little volume of translations from modern Frenchpoets."-Graphic,
Aug. 20, 1870.

4 John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

NEW SOCIETY BOOK,
By the Author of "Puniana."
Gamosagammon; or, Advice to Parties about to
Connubialize. By the Hon. Hugh Rowley. With numerous exquisite
and fanciful designs from his pencil. Small 4to, green and gold, 6s,




e,

tV>



%* The Quaintest, Funniest, mo niOriin .l Pok published forn 1n"-!im
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** An entirely new book of Housebold Amusements. An Appendix gives
the various Songs set to Music for accompaniment upon the Pianoforte.


1 ,.- ..... f. ,' ".-;' "

'I I aN l
Ia ,jj5 : -i' -I'



{,, r i3~-





Cruikshank's Comic Almanack. A nine years'
gathering of the BEST HUMOUR, the WITTIEST SAYINGS, the Drollest
Quips, and the Best Things of TIIACKERAY. HooD, MAYHIEw, ALnE.T
SI-ITs, A'BECKETT, ROBERT BROUGII. With nearly one thousand.
Woodcuts and Steel Engravings by the inimitable CsRUIKSHAnK,
HINE, LANDELLS. Crown 8vo, 600 pp., 7s. 6d.
John Canden Hotten, 74 ande 75, 1 _, WI









VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.
NEWV SERIES OF ILLUSTRATED HUMOROUS NOVELS.
1. he 'Story of a IHoneymoon. By CHAs. H. Ross and
AMBROSE CLARKE. With numerous Illustrations. Crown 8vo, cloth
gilt, 6s.











I. I ventures and troubles of anewly-married couple. Not unlike

2. Cent. per Cent. A Story written upon a Bill Stamp.
By BLANCHARD JERROLD. With numerous coloured Illustrations.
Crown 8vo, cloth gilt, 6s.







,i,,









MILf MOSS, IN TIE DISCOUNT'S LINE.
A** A capital novel, intendedd not only for City renders, but for all interested in money
mnLttlers."-Athc7t nR .
T2ie Genial Showman; or, Adventures vwit Artemnus
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R, UNTO, ZI -Life in tho Far West, on the
S. d across tie Rocky Mountains;

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The Secret Out; or, One Thousand Tricks with
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CREniEX, Junr. With 300 engravings, crdwn 8vo, cloth, 4s. 6d.



II /








A perfect Cyclopoedia of Legerdemain. Under the title of Le Magicien
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Art of Amusing (The). A Collection of Graceful
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*.' One of the most entertaining handbooks for the amusement of Society
over published.

2 John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.







VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

Midsummer Eve, a Pairy Tale of Love. By Mrs. S.
C. HALL. New Edition, Ios. 6d. Elegantly bound, gilt edges, pro-
fusely illustrated by Sir Noel Paton, Maclise, Kenny Meadows, Hine,
and other eminent artists.

THE STANDARD EDITION.
Robinson Crusoe, Profusely Illustrated by Ernest Griset.
Edited, with a New Account of the Origin of Robinson Crusoe, by
WILLIAM LEE, Esq. Crown 8vo, 7s. 6d.

















*** This edition deserves SPECIAL ATTENTION, from the fact that it is
the only correct one that has been printed since the time of Defoe. By
the Idndness of Mr. Lee a copy of the rare and valuable original, in
3 vols., was deposited with the printers during the progress of the work,
and all those alterations and blunders which have been discovered in
every recent edition are in this case avoided. There is no living artist
better adapted to the task of illustrating Crusoe than Ernest Griset.

Fables of lEsop. With Illustrations by Henry L.
STEPHENS. 4to, with 56 full-page inimitable designs by this Artist.
Cloth and gold, gilt edges, 35s.
*** In artistic circles the very highest praise has been accorded to the above designs.

The Rosicrucians; their Rites and Mysteries. With
Chapters on the Ancient Fire- and Serpent-Worshippers, and Explana-
tions of the Mystic Symbols represented in the Monuments and
Talismans of the Primeval .Philosophers. By HARGRAVE JENNINGS.
Crown Svo, 316 wood engravings, Ios. 6d.
John, Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W. 3








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

FPkgellation and the Flagellants; a History of the
tod in all Countries, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time.
By the Rev. WILLIAM CooPER, B.A., with numerous illustrations.
Thick crown So, 12s. 6d.




i/,


-,. -







*, "A very remarkable, and certainly a very readable, volume. Those who
care for quaint stories of the birch will find much matter for reflection, and not
a little amusement, in Mr. Cooper's 'Flagellation' book."--Daily TelcUyruph.
The Englishman's House, from a Cottage to a
Mansion: a Practical Guide to Members of Building Societies, and all
interested in Selecting or Building a House. By C. J. RIJ.cHAnDSOm,
Architect (Author of Old English Mansions," &c.). Second Edition,
corrected and enlarged, with nearly 600 Illustrations. Crown 8vo-
550 pages, cloth, 7s. 6d.


i


: ,' ., -. _-.












*' This Work might not inappropriately be termed A BOOK OF HoUrSES."
It gives every variety of house, from a workman's cottage to a nobleman's palace.
The book is intended to supply a want long felt, viz., a plain, non-technical
account of every manner of house, with the cost and manner of building.

John Oamden Ilotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W. 7




. w w- i


VERnY 1JIPORTAIVT VEr 0(BOOK.

Mbary Hollis; a Rtomauce of the days of Charles II.
nrd W1 i ,-i, Prr.:.. ..f Or -.x -, f.t-...m tbe Drit.: I ..t H. J. Jj'.Lruii.-,
the S r W ti,:i .:t .:.t H l. ; .:. ..:r.:.U .:. i ii .
r- r -. '- l' .' n, .r t .,' i ...- history. [ r ',, .,,i ri, .
S r. II -, J tr several I I. ,. ir :


UNIFORMM WITH DOCTOR SYNTAX, r
Wonderful Characters. MlIemoirs and Anecdotes 'of
Ri.ri-i,!. inrid E.... -n.: Persons of Every Age and Nation. From' .
t i.-e t.:t ...-1 It;r 1i iiLr:'. and JAMES CAULFIELD. 8VO. SIXTY-ONE
i ii-i LL-r EGi,.i i ':: i0: EXTRAORDINARY PERSONS, 6. 76d.,










* ... 1 1... ;




,. -.. .:. 34 i.: ,r.. i ... I ,, .- .. L .i ., L -:,,," ,
r. .I. 1 l..F y... .I il [. 1 i tr .' : m i f .


Artemuns Ward in London. Includinghis well-known
L' ,: .:tt: r' ., !. f Piunih."c ,. ~.i i 1i6md, 'i. .& ; : i.: .., zs.
r. li ,- ..-i.m j of Wit and Fan by the famous humorist, and one which is sure to


S"NEW E,:O:IK ON THE LONDON PARKS.
S A'ing the Air; or, the Story of Our London Parks..
S' B J \o L ir. w, r, .. W ith uru,.:,..., iilrl t;..ns. V .AI i, Hrd'
Parki : \ .:.1 ii .. St. .Tii,:?': P F .ri. 'i' r'c P l'i:, an. Ml 'y B.:.ne
G ai- i 1 P :_ t L. ht. c :,l.im .r
m ir. I'.J rIc .. lb.- r 1. I r.. "



1 J l ,,. C i ~.h r .'l.... .74 i J F 75 i. :'...' I. :. -
'7 m 31 : : v '









VERY JMPORTAr ,r XERn BOi.'A.S.

An Epic of Women, and other Poems. By Arthur
\. L. O'SHAUGHNESSY, With some Original D,-;gpos by Alr. J. T:
NETTLESHIP. Just out, fCap. 8r7, with woodcuts, cloth, very neat,
price 6s.
What he has given us is remarkable. With its quaint title, and quaint illu-
trations, AN EPIC OF WoEN will be a rich treat to a wide circle of admirers."
-Athenceum, Nov. 5, 1870. ,
"Combine Morris and Swinburne, and inspire the product with a fervour
essentially original, and you have, as we take it, a fair notion of Mr. O'Shaugh-
nessy's poems."--Dispatch, Oct. 3% 1870.
Anacreon. Illustrated by the Exquisite Designs of
GIRODET. Translated by THOMAS MOORE. Oblong i6mo, in vellum
cloth and Etruscan gold, i2s. 61.
















+ hA





*** A MOST BEAUTIFUL. AND CAPTIVATING VOLUME. The well-known
Paris house, Firmin Didot, a few years since produced a very small er1tion of
these exquisite designs by the photographic process, and sold a iija i lt r:-n jt
f 2 per copy. The designs have been universally admired by' I..:L rt. .LI
poets.
'Albert Durer's "Little Passion." As Engraved by,
the distinguished artist in 1509-10, consisting of .- mr.'rtablIa designs
upon wood. With a survey of Durer's Works by \i. C. Prime. Royal
4to. The illustrations in exquisite facsimile, emblka.:l; binding. 2..
*%* Only soo copies of this beautiful book were printed.
.8 John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, 17.









': VERY JIPORT IAT NELT EOOt.l .

The Champion Fig of England. A Capital Story for
Schoolboys. "Cloth gilt. With spirited Illustrations by Concanen,
coloured and plain, 3s. 6d.


UNIFORM WVTIT MR. RUSEKINL S EDITIONi OF C**E G MAN
POPULAR STORIES." ,
Prince Ubbely Bubble's N ew Story Book.
THE DRAGON ALL COVERED WITH SPIKES.
THE LONG--TAILED NAG.
THE THREE ONE-LEGGED MEN.
THE OLD FLY AND THE FYUN,; FLY.
TOM AND THE OGRE.
And many other tales.
:By J. TEMPLETON LUCAS With numerous I_.].-iyti.:.n. by Matt
.If.r.ar. Bi-r.::, Gordon Thompson, Brunton, uad .:.tLUr a~tlr. In
S a mLI 4t.:., 1., r, and gold, 4s. 6d.
-. -- Gilt leaves, 5s. 6d.







-'V

*'.. .This is %n entirely new story-book, and one that is likely to become
' very:popular.

Acrostics in Prose and Verse. Edited .by A. E. H.
zmo, gilt cloth, gilt edges, 3s.
S- SECOND SERIES. izmo, gilt cloth, gilt edges, 3s.
--- THIRD SERIES. limo, gilt cloth, gilt edges, .3s.
---FOURTH SERIES. With 8 Pictorial Acrostics. izm6, gilt
cloth, 3s-
:-- FIFTH SERIES. EasyDouble. Historical. S. riptiral A.'.:..:.
.' 2mo, gilt cloth, gilt edges, 3s.
The most popular Acrostics-published.
s F. r ... .. .... ,..., .. ... .. 1. .... fl.-e,..r..r.- t.s
( I Fa I ,i ,.. ..?- ., .I.
S The whole complete in a case, "The A 'r....t : B.: ," price iSs:.
Johls Camclden Hotte-, 74 ann 75, Piccadilly, W.


;. "C~i*s -;~hV


*Jft^-;.'.'' /.\









ENTIRELY NEW SOCII I EV ITHE A TLiUTii.k .Fr

3. Gamosagammon; or, Hints on Hymen.
For the Use-of Parties -i:.,:'r r:. I:.....,III ..I'il L,' i!e lHon.
HUGH ROWLEY. With :.....: : ..pi.:a.. :.ad f inc.ul der na
-from liis pencil. Price 6s.
** The quaintest, funniest, most original book published' i:r i i a-r. i': ihr.:e. '
years since it was announced under the title of "Advice to I :..i: jt-t ..r r: MN -.'." A ',: .
4. Artemus Ward's Lecture at the Egyptian
Hall, with the Panorama. .Edited by T. W Rc:.Li ri-.:.
(Author of- "Caste," "Ours," "Society," &c.l ul.l. E. P.
HINGSTON. Small 41.:. printed green .i..' ..::', vi i i-I '
.NUMEROUS TINTED ILLUSTRATIONS, price 6s.















"Mr. Hotten.has conceived the happy idea of i-.l.ini; .\Arteuiu;
Ward's 'Lecture' in such a way as to afford the reader ra n a...:ii i r,.:..,:.n
of the emphasis, by-play, .&c., with which it was deli-.,. '. hi .
no hesitation in saying that Mr. Hotten has almost r .u....1 0I.' 1ri
humorist to the flesh."-Daily Telegraphk.

I- I i .. ii .i .i i r,. b, i r. 1. r


i.: L..:.r: i : .I .- I .l of information "- .i
"It adds one to the books of genuine fun we have got,"- -
5. Country House Charades for Acting. By
CAPTAIN NUGENT. With numerous Illi:itr'i.:.i: b, \V. R.
SNOW. 'In elegant green and gold, price 6s.
."' ..: :.r.:;i i--.: i.-h :.. -:1-. ld amusement-practical in what it :-' 1 : and
.r .r i.r: n Th .'..,r -- ys, "In the first place, I have take ...: : rl-
th.. .ri.. .1' iT. p..rl rri I. ,', a dozen, or thereabouts; secondly ii-. : r..-:'ire
no scenery, very little dressing, and not more than two or three rehearsals.




.0. :L.- .. ..


VERY IMPORTANT E W BOOKS.

SJohn Ruslin and George Cruikshank. "German
P.:.Fulir Stori.e." C(,:.-.:b :t: b the Br..th,br- G( ruhs fr..m Oral
Tr .Lti.,,:.an .l Tran,.l iti t.7 Er,;.;'i T, -Lop. E.it.'.l, [.v.J, R 'siuN.
MWTH TWINTi'.Tri I'LL U R.ITi' S AIF.ER THE NIMMI.
TABiLE L'E.iGi. Ci'FP E i. :EL i-ll.HA.iE. B.:ith ,.b eri-.3 corm-'
pitet in I r..i. V ic ;h .:.: Il pn- t.: in ill 4t.:., pr ,, 6a. &


t ,p" f- -.1. F- R ,Q
.* N." .; ar-i rr,, .i: ,-..., r,,..r, i *.I r.r r. r ., .it: r,,,:r.T" 1il 11 fa r 1f :.v,' u ll *" ^.^
r.. C r .,k ;[aiu l. ,. ". r 'r ,J ..- I h .. u ll,.J r. :,i 1 I, I ,. .11 1in I : ,-
A. .' .. .i ,f r : .C ,. .. .r 1 1 11. I aIL.. ir ,


a. ;i ] r .I 6, ,.I- y ,i ,1 II L F- I I i I L ,'l ,,,, .l I r: i, .Lb -i. ll ', .J L "

"' r ^ IB J ru l, I- + L,1. J ,i r .L[ .r LI i, :il w IL.Lr fj. i ,- i I- : ,ir, ,r r l
r .I :,,


o: : old's Whims and Oddities," 1826. A New and
very Cheap Edition of ; i rU.ll.-lr -a Book, with the Autor' 40
iiiiamitably funny W...:.d. ta. Square izmo, price Is. stiff cover;
or cloth neat, is. 6d.




17 ... t 3










(' hrlict:.r-r N..rth c.r.:- r nirIr.i ,.f tli LI:. tI.t '"it o tanined
m-r.. t, m .. n .i .L.:. .n [-a .t: b t l*r' ;f *" A


:Hawthorne's Note Boolr. A new and most interesting
.lu e -i t Aut. .:,i-ri:.al Fa ._-i...i L..i:eia i, and Su, -esationM
7 thin debch tli. "auth.:.r, let..d f,:.m L;a .rate Notd Book ,
S quire m I.:., till ..:. r, 13.; cr c.:.th ncit, t .
:' Tb, p.:.et L.:.ngl'ti.:. th i- i. p t, thi. .harnAi r.' bo:k:- "Live
ever, s ,et, '.,:.: t..:..:.k. it -.:m.: tr.:.IL tL. a i nd i .f a n f an a geni a .' ,
Everything a ...ut t i theL frt:.,8 .f mctfn:niri; ad M y."

.TohJn Cadend Rotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.


a- Ii..








rEP Y IMPORT.LJT XEnEW BOOKS.
Seymour's Sketches. A Companion Volume to "Leech's
Pictures." The B,....k ,f C.:.eko& v Sp.,rt-, Wbmin and Oddliie. Nearly
20o highly amusing Illstratiso Oblong 4to, a huandomj volume, aflf
morocco, price 2IS.
*.* re I -,-,e .f tr m .a 'a.s p.'tri.lrl ..-,ric blctue bhic wtrre o n plalIa r it.rl y .r. s re The
volume .adnl.,rsl t.lv dfialled r a lobl. -L h. Leoi lt n* :',, r p .illl .-.,i'l.A 5-II ,u .. rt. it. ,..
* ,P Pl1qcl Peg'1ra. '

The Famous DOCTOR SYNTAX'S" Three Tours.
Ons of the most Amusing and Laughable Bboks ever published. With.'
the whole of Rowlandson's very droll full-page illustrations, in colours,:
after the original drawings. Comprising the well-known Tous:- ,
i. In Search of the Picturesque.
2. In Search of Consolation.
3. In Search of a Wife.
The three series complete and unabridged from the original editions in
one handsome volume, with a Life of this industrious Author-the Ln.
glish Le Sage-now first written by John Camde-n Rotten.







< ..



*I* It is not a little surprising that the most voluminous and popular
Englisb writer since the days of Defoe should never before, have received
the small honour of a biography. This Edition contains the whole of the
original, hitherto sold for i us. 6d., but which is now published at
Ys. 6d. only.

A VERY USEFUL BOOK. In folio, half morocco, cloth sides, 7s. 6dL
Literary Scraps, Cuttings from Newspapers, Extracts,
Miscellanea, &c. A. FOLIO SCRAP-BOOKE OF 340 COLUTMNS,': .
formed for the reception of Cuttings, &c., with guards.
*" Authors and literary men have thanked the publisher for this useful
book.
* A most useful volume, and one of the cheapest ever told. The book is sure to be appreelatdt,
and to become popular,

Hone's Scrap Book. A Supplementary Volume to the
"Every-Day Book," the "Year Book," and the "Table-Book." From
the MSS. of the late 'WILLIAM Ho E, with upwards of One Hundred
and Fifty engravings of curious or eccentric objects. Thick 8vo, uniform
with i" Year-Book," pp. 800. [I preparation. i

Johsn Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W. 9 4








VERY IMPORTANT NEW B OOKS.

More Yankee Drolleries. A Second Series of cele-
brated Works by the best American Humorists. ARTEMUS WVARD'S
TRAVELS; HANS BREITMANN ; PlROFESSOR AT THE BEIEAiFAST-TABLE,
BIGTLO PAPERS, Part. If.; JOSH BILLINGS. With an Introduction
by Geoige Augustus Sala. Crown Svo, 700 pages, cloth extra, 3s. 6d-
*** An entirely now gathering of Transatlantie humour. Twelve thousand copies of tho First
series have been sold.

UNIFORM WITH DR. SYNTAX.
Life in London; or, the Day and Night Scenes of
Jerry Hawthorn and Corinthian Tom. Crown 8vo. WITH TIHE
WHOLE OF CRUIKSHANK'S VERY DROLL ILLUSTRATIONS
IN COLOURS, AFTER THE ORIGINALS. Cloth extra, 7s. 6d


'\ ', '






\\ :..,.,,

Tmn and Jerry taking a sItni.
n-- fl most popular books ever issued. It wns an immense favourite with George IV.,
S Loundn life SC often quoted by T'hackeray, w'io devotes nle of
his Roindlaoult papers" to a j I t Clean second-land copies of this work always
realise from 1 to 2.

Pierce Egan's "Finish" to "Life In and Out of
London," 8vo, cloth extra, WITH SPIRITED COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS
BY CRUIKSHANK, ISs.
*** This is the quaint original edition of one of the most amusing pictures of London life eves
written.
Apply to JIr. Hotten DIRECTfor this swork.

Pine Old Hunting Books, with Coloured Plates.
MR. JORROOK'S JAUNTS AND JOLLITIES.
LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF JACK MYTTON.
ANALYSIS OF THE HUNTING FIELD.
LIFE OF A SPORTSMAN. BY NI IROD.
Apply to Mr. Ilotten DIRECTfor these books.

John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, IW. 9









VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

Mark Twain's New Pilgrim's Progress. A delight-
fully fresh and amusing Volume of Travel. Companion to the popular
"IlNOCENTS ABROAD." 34. 6d. ; paper, is.
Readers who approved of this Author's quaint story of The Jumping
Frog," will be very well satisfied with the "New Pilgrim's Progress :" there has
been no work like it issued here for years.

Mark Twain's Innocents Abroad. 'THE VOYAGE
OUT. Price 3s. 6d. clh extua; a paper ednion, Is.





.,'


I )








A dcnliTftini f-i nr h i nid 'mino "i'm' of travels. Readers who appre-
ciate true .r .' !.,I .*u ., I ,'r, i.... with "The Innocents Abroad."

The Luck of Roaring Camp, and other Stories.
By BRIET HARTE. Crown 8vo, toned paper, 3s. 6d.; a paper edition, is.
-* The Work of a new candidate to literary honour. The Publisher of a book
is not perhaps always the most unbiassed person to give an opinion about it;
but in the present instance the writer has no hesitation in saying that. ...;
readers will be charmed with these inimitable stories of strange life in 1 i ,
West-away on the Pacific slope. The fun, the very humour of the thing, has a
May freshness about it, which smacks not of the Old World.
Champagne: its History, Manufacture, Properties,
&c. By CHARLES TOVEY, Althor of Wine and Wine Countries,"
British and Foreign Spiris,' &c. Crown Svo, with numerous illus-
trations, 5;.
A practical work, by one of the largest champagne merchants in London.

Acrostics. An Entirely New and Original Work,
constituting the FIFTH SERIES of the popular A. E. H. Acrostics.
12mo, cloth elegant, 4s. 61.
t* The authoress is a lady of high position in the North of England, and her
books are very popular amongst the best Families in the country.

John Camdca Horen, 74 and 75, 9








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

.AARON ?~3T L'ZE ,: Shetching in Water Colours, 21g.
By the Author of 1 i .: i, I, .-hool of Painting in Water-Colours,"
&. ILLUSTRATE. ,.1 1 .-ONE BEAUTIFUL CHRO30-LITIIO-
GRAPHS, produced with the utmost care to resemble original W'rATR-
COLOoul DRAWING's. Small folio, the text tastefully printed, in hand-
some binding, gilt edges, suitable for the drawing-room table, price zis.
** It has lon] hrpn felt thf t the magnificent w ork .
S vator-cCoour, plblished at 4 I ., was too 1ilar for
tile in trutlol. n i ent-oo b0emlltiful spccimelns of wiater-colour
painting. ir 18 .. I t A OUNG LAI)Y.


A Clever ana Brilliant Book (Comepanieon to the "Bon Gaultier
Ballads"), PUPC ON PEGASUS. BY H. CHOLMONDELEY
PENNELL.


















.-t*s already
rseceisvig
'' praise as a clever
TO NO OTHER
S WORKf OF THE PRESENT DAY HAVE
SO MANY DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS CONTRIBUTED ILLUS-
TRATIONS. To the designs of GEORGE CRUIKSHIAN, JOHN
tLEECH, JULIAN PORTCH, "PHIZ," and other artists, SIR NOEL
PATON, MILLAIS, JOHN TENNIEL, RICHARD DOYLE, and M.
ELLEN EDWARDS have noto contributed several exquisite pictures,
thus making the new edition-.which is TWIICEG THE SIZE OF THE OLD ONE,
aned contains irresistibly funny pieces-THE BEST BOOK FOR THE
DRAWING-ROOM TABLE NOW PUBLISHED.
In' 4to, printed evithitn an india-paper tone, and elegantly bound, gilt,
gilt edges, price los. 6d. only.

Joh a C.ide Hoitttn, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.










VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

MOST AMUSING NEW BOOK.
Caricature History of the Georges (House of Hanover).
Very entertaining book of 640 pages, with 400 Pictures, Caricatures,
Squibs, Broadsides, Window Pictures. By T. WRIGHT, F.S.A. 73. 6c.





















*** Companion Volume to "History of Signboards." Reviewed in
almost every English journal with highest approbation.
"A set of caricatures such as we have in Mr. Wright's volume brings the surface of the age
before us with a vividness that no prose writer, even of the highest power, could emulate.
Ilacaulay's most brilliant sentence is weak by the side of the little woodcut from Gilltay which gives
us Burke and Fox."-Saturday Review.
A more amusing work of its kind never issued from the press."-Art Journal.
TThis is one of the most agreeable and interesting books of the season."-Public Opinion.
"It seems superfluous to say that this is an entertaining book. It is indeed one of the most
entertaining books we have read for a long time. It is history teaching by caricature. There is
sl.dly an event of note, hardly a personage of mark, hardly a social whimsey worth a moment's
S I i I pages. We have here the caricaturists from
S la .u a 1., l .. ,.. I I. -AMorning Star.
"It is emphatically one of the liveliest of books, as also one of the most interesting. It has the
wofold merit of being at once amusing and 00 odd pages which make up the
goodly volume are doubly enhanced by some v '. ii. ,,i of which a dozen are full-page
rngravings."-Maorning Post.
"Mir. Thomas Wright is so ripe a scholar, and is so rich in historical reminiscences, that he
cannot fail to make an interesting book on any subject he undertakes to illustrate. lie has achieved
a success on the present occasion."-Press.

Notice.-Large-paper Edition. 4to, only 100 printed,
on extra fine paper, wide margins for the lovers of choice books, with
extra Portraits, half-morocco (a capital book to illustrate), 30s.

Romance of the Rod: an Anecdotal History of the
Birch in Ancient and Modern Times. With some quaint illustrations.
Crown Svo, handsomely printed. [In preparation.

John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W. Il









VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

The History of Advertising in all Ages and Countries.
A Companion to the HISTORY OF SIGNBOARDS." With many very
amusing Anecdotes and Examples of Successful Advertisers. By
MESSRS. LAnWooD and HOTTEN. [In preparation.

Signboards: their History. With Anecdotes of Famous
Taverns and remarkable Characters. By JACOB LA nOOD and JOHN
CAMDEN HOTTEN. A book which will delight all."-Spectator. This
day, Fourth Edition, pages 580, price 7s. 6d. only.




From the Time,." r.;o the" Tim,."
"It is not fair on -*., we could not in lhe
ipick to pik out I il srs.
rho plas of an ,|11d and Hot-.'II a
authors book, thus jihi ,,l ,ti ;
filching o y his i good thigs r
cream, and leaving I so n roo to
little but skim-milkm delthl.,no l
reno:ining; but, even sale depredation.--
So ver ... i 1 Revierw of three
maliciously inctined,o|!wls
1 .L. jyiriijnun'ai ar namut *..i, ..' s.or jtoi
BULL AND MOUTH.
(Angel St., St al-tin's-le-Gran d, circa 1800.)
t*h Nearly 100 most curious illustrations on wood are given, showing
the various old signs which were formerly hung from taverns and other
houses. The frontispiece represents the famous sign of "The Man
loaded with Mischief," in the colours of the original painting said to
have been executed by Hogarth.
Totice.-" Large-paper Edition," with Seventy-Two
extra Illustrations (not given in the small edition), showing Old
London in the days when Signboards hung from almost every house.
In 4to, half-morocco neat, 30s.
** Only a small number printed on extra fine paper with wide margins for the lover of fine books.

The Parks of London. Their History and Asso-
ciations from the Earliest Times. By JAcoB LAEW6OD. WITH ILLUS-
TRATIONS BY THE AUTHOR. [In the Press.

AN EXTRAORDINARY BOOK.
Hotten's Edition of "Contes Drolatiques" (Droll
Tales collected from the Abbeys of Loraine). Par BALZAC. With
Four Hundred and Twenty-five Marvellous, Extravagant, and Fan-
tastic Woodcuts by GUSTAVE DORE. Beautifully printed, thick 8vo,
half morocco, Roxburghe, izs. 6d.
T** The most singular designs ever attempted by any artist. This book is a fund of amusement.
Mo crammed is it with pictures that even the contents are adorned with thirty-three illustrations.
Direct application must be made to Mr. Ilotten for this work.

John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, IV. 13









VIERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

NEW BOOK BY THE "ENGLISH GUSTAVE DORE."-
COMPANION TO THE "HATCHET-THROWERS."
Iegenads of Savage Life. Ey James Greenwood, the
famous Author of A Night in a W'orlkhouse." With 36 inimitable
droll illustrations, drawn and coloured by EIRNe:s' GRISET', the
English Gustave Dord." 4to, coloured, 7s. 6d.; plain, 5s.
i; Readers wbo found amusementin the "I Hatehet-Throwers will not recret ally acquaintance
te y mIy form ll wth I!is comical work. The pictures ae pi ae among the tlost sprisig \, which hav
come from this rtlist i, pencl.
"A Mullchaloen sort of book. The drawings by M. Griset are very powerful rnd eccentrie."-
Saturday lerlew.

school Life at Winchester College; or, the Meisi-
niscences of a Winchester Junior. By the Author of "The Log of
the Water Lily," and "'The Water Lily on the Danube." Second
edition, revised, coloured plates, 7s. 6d.


--I








*1 This book does for Winchester what Tom Brown's School Days" did for Rugby.

Log of the "WIater Lily" (Thames Gig), during Two
Cruises in the Summers of 1851-5z, on the Rhine, Neccar, Main,
Moselle, Danube, and other Streams of Germany. By I. B. MaANs-
vFIELi, B.A., of University College, Oxford, and illustrated by AFlRED
TinoliUso, B.A., of Trinity College, Cambridge. [In preparation.
S* This was fth earliest boat excursion of the kind ever made on the Continental rivers. YTry
S, ubjeet has been revived galin in thile exploits of Mr. lacG(reor ill his lRob Rloy
,volne will be folld mlos interesting to tihoe o ho propose taking a similar tip,l,
h]iether otl tile Continent or elsewhere.

Th.e Klatchet-Throwers. With Thirty-six llunstra-
tions, coloured after the Inimitably Grotesque "' of ERNEST
GRtSET, the English Gustave Dore. 4to, cloth ; 6d.; plates,
uncoloured, 5s.
c** Comprises the astonishing adventures of Three Ancient Mariners, the Brothers lrass of
Bristol, Mr. Corker, and Mungo T Midge.

M4elchior Clorles. By Zenry Aitchenbie. 0 vols.
8vo, I use. 6d.
*** The Newi Novel, illlustrative of Mecmeric Influence." or whatever else we mirt clloose to
term that strange power which some persons excise over others.

John Canade lf1otten, 74 cad 75, 1 W.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS

Original Edition of Blake's Works.
NOTICE.-Mr. Hotten has in preparation a few facsimile copies (exact
as to paper, printing-the water-colour drawings being filled, in by a(
artist) of the ORIGINAL EDITIONS of the Books written and Illustrated
by WILLIAM BLAKE. As it is only intended to produce-with utmost
care-a few examples of each work, Mr. Hotton will be glad to hear from
any gentleman who may desire to secure copies of those wonderful books.
The first volume, "MMAR IAGE OF HEAVEN AND HELL," 4to, is now being
issued, price 30s., half morocco.
"Blake is a real name, I a sure you, and a most extraordinary man he is. if he still be living.
Io is the Ilanke whose wild designs accompany a splendid edition of 'Bllir's Grave.' lie paits ii
water-colours marvellous strange pictures- ns o hs o brain--hich he asserts hea r s shenu. T1hei
hac great merit. I must look upou him as one of the most extraordinary persons of te age."-
CI1unLES LAbII.

George Chanman's Plays, from the Original Tezxs.
Edited, with Notes and an Introduction, by ALGERNON CHARLES
SWINBURNE. 4 vols., tastefully printed, uniform with Wm. Picl-ering's
Editions of the "Old Dramatists." [Is, preparation.

UNIFORM WITH MR. SWINBURNE'S POEMS.
Fcap. 8vo, 450 pages, Fine Portrait and Autograph, 7s. 6d.
Walt Whitman's Poems. (Leaves of Grass, Dram-
Taps, &c.) Selected and Edited by WILLIAM MICHAEL ROSSETTI.
ni i, i i r i needs to be read as a whole, and then the volume and torrent
of I a long w ith it and away.--He is really a fine fellow."-
Luhmbers's Journal, in a very long Notice, July 4lt, 18b8.







.3 A great deal of pr vadice ir this coientr l as been shown again st
this very remaarkable author. His work should be read, by independent
minds, and an opinion formed total j apart from the attacks that have
been made spon hinm.

Eossetti's Criticisias on Swinburne's Poems. Price
3s. 6d.

The Prometheus Bound. of .Eschylus. Translated in
the Original Metres by C. B. CAYLEY, B.A. Cloth, price 3s. 6d.

SECOND EDITION.-Now ready, 4to, 1os. 6d., on toned paper,
very elegant.
Bianca. Poems and lBallads. By Edward Brennan.

18 John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.










VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.


Fair Rosamond, and other Poems. By B. M ont-
GOMERIE RANKING (of the Inner Temple). Fcap. 8vo, price 6s.


Strawberry Hill, and other Poems. By Colburn
MAYNE, Esq. In strawberry binding, fcap. 8vo, 7s. 6d.
"It is a bright, clever little book. in which we find a great deal of good rhyme, and some genuine
atd pleasing ., T- -- --- ral charming pictures of the historic group, which we knovr
from Horace l .-I i I i Joshua's paintings."-Morning Star.


Infelicia. Poems by Adah Isaacs Ienken. Illus-
trated with NUMEROUS GRACEFULLY PENCILLED DESIGNS DRAWN ON
WOOD, IBY ALFRED CONCANEN. Dedicated, by permission, to CHARLES
DICKENS, with photographic facsimile of his letter, and a very beau-
tifully engraved portrait of the Authoress. In green and gold, 5s. 6d.
"A pathetic little a poet? Through-
volmne exquisitely out her verse there
got up."--Sun. runs a golden thread
It is full of -of lrich d ip
pathos and senti- poetry."--lres.
mnit, disphlys a i There is a pas-
keen appreciationtof l, s donate richness
beauty, and lias re- -- '*L' J'j :' about many of the
markable earnest- poems w which is al-
nessand passion."- most
Glob. -_e tay y
"A loving and --- Whet ecn we
delicate cre las r-,. ~ay of thi gifted
been bestoowed on f- and no vys wrd
perhaps the dain- woman, the mxit-
tilet pages of verse :' nco of whose better
issued for moano- snture will hbe sug-
iesu ."d r an gestoed for nthe first
yae uar. -- Lo y d time to many yy the
ulews. m _-u v posthumous disclo-
"Few, if any, sure of this book?
could have guessed We do not envy the
the power and t man who, reading
beauty of the it, has only a sneer
thoughts that pos- / for its writer ; nor
messed her soul, andi the woman who
found expression in finds it in ier heart
language at once \ to turn away with
puie and melodious, averted face."-
Who shall New York Round
say leniken was not Table.
An amusing little book, unlhappily posthumous, which a distinguished woman has left as a
legacy to mankind and the ages."-Saturday llrview.


Anacreon in English. Attempted in the Metres of
the Original. By THoIAS J. ARINOLD. A choice little volume, price 4s.

The Village on the Forth, and other Poems.a" By
PHILIP LATIMER Just published, elegantly printed, price 3s. 6d.

Baudelaire. Translations from Chas. Baudelaire,
with a few Original Poems. By R. HERNE SHEPHERD. Feap., same
size as Tennyson's Maud," price 5s.

John Canndeln Hotten, 74 and 75. Piccadilhi V-









VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

MR. SWINBURNE'S NEW BOOK.
** "A wonderful literary performance."-" Splendour of
style and majestic beauty of diction never surpassed."-WILLIAMI
BLAKE: A CRITICAL ESSAY. With facsimile Paintings,
coloured by hand, from the original drawings painted by
Blake and his wife. Thick 8vo, pp. 350, 16s.
"An extraordi., with a sense of
ary work: vio vitality." Daily
nary work: vio- .. -- "Newvs, Feb. xz,
lent, extravagant, News, Feb. iz,
perverse, calca 1 1868.
late to startle, to -.1 "It is in every
hock, and to alarm way worthy of MIr.
many readers, but r Swinburne's high
abounding in E- fame. Innoprose
beauty, and cha- work can be found
racterised by intel passages of keener
lectual grasp. .-- poetry or more
S. His power of finished grace, or
word- painting is ,- more impressive
often truly won- --' =-:-_--_ harmony. Strong,
derful-sometimes, --- vigorous, and
it must be ad- musical, the style
mitted, in excess, sweeps on like
but always full of a river."-Sunday
matter, form, and' T'imes, Jan. iz,
colour,andinstinct Il68.
Mr. Swinburne's Neew Poem. -A Song of Italy.
Feap. 8vo, toned paper, cloth, price 3s. 6d.
r* The Athenaum remarks of this poem-" Seldom has such a chant been heard so full of glow,
strength, and colour."
Mr. Swinburne's Poems and Ballads. Third Edition.
Price 9s.
Mr. Swinburne's Notes on his Poems, and on the
Reviews which have appeared upon them, is now ready, price Is.
Mr. Swinburne's Atalanta in Calydon. New Edition,
fcap. 8vo, price 6s.
Mr. Swinburne's Chastelard. A Tragodly. New
Edition. Price 7s.
Mr. Swinburne's Queen Mlother and Bosamond.
New Edition, fcap. 8vo, price 5s.
Iar. Swinburne's Bothwell. A NEW POEM.
[In preparation.

John Camdezl Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccad.lly, W. 17










VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS

Best Guide to Reading Old M1SS., Records, &c.-
"Wright's Court Hand Restored; or, Student's Assistant in Reading
Old Deeds, Charters, Records, &c." Half morocco, los. 6d.
l 3 e A New Edition, corrected, of AN INVALUABLE WORK TO ALL WHO
HAVE OCCASION TO CONSULT OLD MSS., DEEDS, CHIA TERS, 'c. It
contains series of Facsimiles of old MSS. from the time of the Conqueror,
Tables of Contractions anca Abbreviations, Ancient Surnames, 4c.

'Handbook of Family History of the English Counties:
Descriptive Account of 20,000 most Curious and Rare Books, Old
Tracts, Ancient Manuscripts, Engravings, and Privately-printed
Family Papers, relating to the History of almost every Landed Estate
and Old English Family in the Country; interspersed with nearly Two
Thousand Original Anecdotes, Topographical anc Antiquarian Notes.
By JOHN CAMDEN HOTTEN. Nearly 350 pages, very neat, price gs.
*t* By far tl i collection of English and Welsh Topography and Family History ever
formed. Each I I a small price alnxed for the convenience of those who may desire to
possess any book or tract that interests them.

Higgins' (Godfrey) Celtic Druids; or, an attempt to
show that the Druids were the Priests of Oriental Colonies, the
introducers of the first or Cadmean System of Letters, the Builders of
Stonehenge, of Carnac, and other Cyclopean Works in Asia and
Europe. 4to, numerous plates of Druid monuments, rare, 32s.
*0* The most philosophical digest of the .'- of Druidical
Worship. Copies have been sold for 7. At i .. '.'cheap, com-
pared with tihe sums of money that have been paid for it very recently. Large paper copy, boards.
85s., very scarce.
DIRECT APPLICATION must be imade to procure at these reduced prices.

Esholt in Airedale, Yorkshire: the Cistercian Priory
of St. Leonard, Account of, with View of Esholt Hall. Small 4to,
is. 6d.

London Directory for 2667, the Earliest Known
List of the London Merchants. Izmo, very choicely printed, price
6s. 6d. See Review in the Times, Jan. zz.
*** This c lious little volume
to be io exis enc. It contains s
in the list.
For historical anId genealogical purposes the little books of the greatest
value.

EXACT FACSIMILE, LETTER FOR LETTER, OF THE EXCES-
SIVELY RARE ORIGINAL,
E'ach ,AGo about Nothing. As it hathl been sundrie
timr- -1,1; -.- --1ly tho Right Ionourable the Lord Chamberlaino
his i h.. by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, 1600.
Small quarto, on fine tonod paper, half-bound morocco, Roxburghe
style, only 4s. 6d. (Original price, tos. 6d.)

John Cainden ITottca, 74 clnd 75: Piccadilly, W.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

Lost Beazties of the English Language. Revived
and Revivable in England and America. An Appeal to Authors,
Poets, Clergymen, and Public Speakers. By CHARLES MACKAY, LL.D.
Ia crown 8vo, uniform with the Slang Dictionary," price 6s. 6d.
[In preparation.

Captain Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,
1785. A genuine unmutilated Reprint of the First Edition, price 6s.
1 -- ., r -'" r 1: -_,. curious, book have been printed
for'. j .. .. .. onedpaper, half-bound morocco,
gilt top.

slang Dictionary; or, the Vulgar Words, Street
PHRASES, and "FAST" EXPRESSIONS OF HIGH AND Low SOCIETY;
many with their Etymology, and a few with their History traced.
WITH CURIOUS ILLUSTRATIONS. A New Dictionary of Colloqial
English. Pp. 3z8, in 8vo, price 6s. 6d., by post, 7s.




f:- r^, I IIIS 7
S Egyptianz rierogrypric ver.,
S' i to be drnk, showing the amp-.
tation of a man's leg. See
S 70 under Bcassr Lrs (viz.
Strong Drink) in the Dictioa-
-Bee Two nrors TTss, is a, p. 1.
the Dictionasj, p. 264.

k One hund'ec and forty newspapers in this country alone h7av
revieweed with approbation this Dictionary of Colloquial English. It
,may be doubted if there exists a more amusing volume in the English
language."-SPrECTATOR. Vahlable as world of refereence."-SATURDnAY
EREVIWn. "All classes of society will find amusement and instruction in
its pages."-TIMES.

Original Edition of the Famous Joe silver's Jests;
or, the Wit's Vade-Mecum; a Collection of the most brilliant Jests.
pblitest Repartees, most elegant Bons-Mots, and most pleasant short.
Stories in the English Language. London: printed by T. Read, 1739.
An interesting specimen of remarkable facsimile, 8vo, half morocco,
price 9s. 6d.
*' ONLY A VERY FEW COPIES OF THIS HUVIOROUS AND
RACY OLD BOOK HAVE BEEN REPRODUCED.

John Camden Hotten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

In preparation, an entirely
New Book by the late Artemus Ward. Edited by
his executors, T. W'. Robertson and E. P. Hingston. Illustrated with
35 pictures, taken from his world-renowned Panorama.
Immediately, cloth, very neat, zs. 6d.
The Works of Charles F. Browne, better known as
"ARTEMUS WARD." Portrait by Geflowski, the Sculptor, and fac-
similes, &c;

History of Playing Cards. With Anecdotes, Ancient
and Modern Games, Conjuring, Fortune-Telling, and Card-Sharping.
With Sixty curious illustrations. Skill and Sleight-of-Hand; Gambling


r











and Calculation; Cartomancy and Cheating; Old Games and Gaming.
Houses; Card Revels and Blind Hookey; Piquet and Vingt-et-una
Whist and Cribbage; Old-Fashioned Tricks. Pp. 550, price 7s. 6d.
A highly-interesting volume."--Morning Post.

Cruikshank's Comic Almanack. A complete set, as
published in the original numbers from 1835 to 1853. 19 vols., neatly
bound in 5 vols., half-morocco, Roxburgh style, 3 3s. Containing
MERRY TALES, JESTS, HUMOROLOUS POETRY, WHIMS, ODDITIES, &c., by
THACKERAY, THOMAS HOOD, ALBERT SMITH, and other well-known
comic writers. Illustrated with nearly ONE THOUSAND WOODCUTS
AND STEEL ENGRATVINGS by the inimitable GEORGE CRUIKSHANK and
other Artists. Very scarce.

Mr. Sprouts his Opinions. The Nlew and Genuine
Book of Humour. Uniform with "Artemus Ward." By RICHARD
WIITEING. New Shilling Edition now ready.

John Camden Hottes, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, W.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

Pictorial description of Abyssinia.
DEDICATED TO HEIR MAJESTY THE QUEEN BY ROYAL ConmsMrD.
Views in Central Abyssinia. With Portraits of
Natives of the Galla Tribes, taken in Pen and Ink under circumstances
of peculiar difficulty, by T. Zender. With letterpress description by
SOPHIE F. VEITCH, daughter of the Chaplain to the Bishop of
Jerusalem. 4to, price 12s.
*** A book of peculiar interest at tie present moment, as it gives a marvellously faithful pano-
rama of the country, about which so much has recently been said. The soiled worn volume from
which these facsimiles were taken is quite a curiosity, having been constantly secreted about the
person of the draughtsman, fearing the observation of the native chiefs, who do not allow drawings
to be made.

LMary Lamb's Poems and Letters; with Xnedited
Remains of CHARLES LAMB. Now first collected, with numerous
illustrations of Lamb's favourite haunts in London and the suburbs.
Facsimiles on old paper of the title-pages of the rare first editions of
Lamb and Coleridge's works. Facsimile of a page of the original
MS. "Essay on Roast Pig," Hancock's admirable Portrait of the
essayist now first correctly reproduced, and many other relics of thie
delightful essayist. Crown 8vo, price los. 6d.


7t--


-_ r ( --_

7 --
1. _- .1'








FAIt ROSAMOND'S COTTAGE

The Collector. Choice Essays on Books, Authors,
Newspapers, Pictures, Inns, Doctors, Holidays, &c. Introduction
by Dr. DORAN. A Choice Book, on toned paper, half morocco, 6s.
*0* A charming volume of delightful Ess ys, i" -- -' '
Collector busily engaged at his favourite prs ir n
volume to Disraeli's Curiosities of Literature," j I
by Mir. John Bill Burton.
"A comely and suitably named volume. -His humour .i i I i
displays the latter with the frankness of a collector not I I I i i '
former with unflagging spirit and excellent eofect."-Atleneau .

z John Camden Hotten, "4 and 75, Piccadilly, W.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.


A TRULY MAGNIFICENT WORK.-" LHVES OF
THE SAINTS." Enriched with Fifty-one exquisite Full-page
Miniatures, in gold and colours. Every page' of the Text within
Engraved Borders of Beautiful Design. In thick 4to, sumptuously
printed, and bound in silk velvet, enriched with gold, preserved in a
case, 7 7s.; in morocco, extra gilt, inlaid, 1o 15s.
a THIS VERY IMPORTANT WORK, commenced three years since,
has at length been coivpleted, and fully justifies the hih expectations
formed of it during its progress through the press. Taking the text of
the Rev. Alban Butler as his guide, the Editor has, wherever practicable,
carefully verified the references of that eminent divine. The delicacy and
finish of the beautiful miniatures have never before been approached in
any similar swork in this country. They exhibit a beauty and exquisite
softness of colousr ihich have hitherto only been realized by the most
SThe ewo r'c musst be seen to *... .'. 7,
inad. The preparation has .. ..''
and slow that the book is never likely to decrease in value.

A VERY SPLENDID VOLTUME.-SAINT 'iUSULA,
PRINCESS OF BRITAIN, AND HER COMPANIONS. With
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4to, beautifully bound in silk and gold, 3 I5s.
*** The finest Book-Paintings of the kind ever published. The artist
obtained the Gold Prize at the Paris Exposition.
cr- THE BOOK MUST BE SEEN TO BE APPRECIATED. The
illustrations are exact reproductions of the exquisite paintings of the
Van Eyck school, and in finish and beauty are far above any similar
book-paintings issued in this country. As the preparation of the work
has been so costly and slow it is never likely to decrease in value.

Exquisite Miniatures and Illuminations.-" Golden
Verses from the New Testament," with 50 Illuminations and Minia-
tures from celebrated MISSALS and BOOKS OF Houns of i4th and
i5th centuries in GOLD and COLOURS. The text very beautifully printed
in letters of gold on fine ivory paper. 4to, in a very handsome cloth
case with silk ribbons, 30s.; or bound in a volume, morocco, gilt
edges, z 5s.

Common Prayer. Illustrated.by Holbein and Albert
Durer. With Wood i ..r.--,,_ of the Dance of Death, a singularly
curious series after II. i .., ,i. Scriptural Quotations and Proverbs
in the Margin. 8vo, exquisitely printed on tinted paper, 8s. 6d.; in
dark morocco, Elizabethan style, gilt edges, i6s. 6d.
Apply DIBECT for this e qguisite volume.

Brunet's LManual du Libraire. 5 vols. royal 8vo, half
morocco, top edge gilt, z5s. only.
2 John Camden Hot/-, 74 aWr 75, Piccadilly, W.









VERY IMPORTANT NEIW BOOKS.

NEW AND CHEAPER EDITION OF SIR DAVID BREWSTER'S
WORKS.
Brewster (Sir David, LL.D.) More Worlds than
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Brewster's (Sir D.) martyrs of Science. Galileo,
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*** This makes the Third Edition of tils favourite work.

Brewster's (Sir D.) The Kaleidoscope Practically
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Brewster's (Sir D.) The Stereoscope Practically
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*** This was the great philosopher's last contribution to practical science.

The Book of Nature and the Book of Plan, in their
Relation to each other. By CsIAs. O. GnooMi NAPIER, F.G.S. Nume-
rous Wood Engravings and Photographs of Objects from Nature.
With an INTRODUCTION by the late LORD BRoucGsAM. Demy 8vo, cloth
extra, 18s.
*** An entirely new work on Christian Philosophy, and one that is calculated to be very popular.

Darwinisnm Tested by the Science of Language. By
PROFESSOR SCHLEICIIER. Translated by Dr. A. V. W. BIKERS.
Crown 8vo, cloth, 3s. 6d.
L I .Languages to n Asiatic source. The work ha,


LMalone's (Ed.) Life. By Sir James Prior, with his
Manuscript Anecdotes, Maloniana," &c. A handsome library vol.,
with fine portrait. Sells at 14s. Cloth new, 4s. 3d.
Apply to Mir. Hotten DIRECT for this bool.

Pedigrees. Msarshall's Znde-3 to the iPrinted-
Pedigrees of the Heralds' Visitations. evo, cloth, a very useful book
to the Student of FAMILY HISTORY. Sells at 5s. zs. 6d.
Apply DIRECT for this wuol'.
zz Johl Camnden Hotlon, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, TV.








VERY IMPORTANT NEW BOOKS.

Hotten's "Golden Library"
OF THE BEST AUTHORS.
4(nA charming collection of Standard & Favourite Works, ele-
gantly printed in Handy Vol"'mes, uniform with the Taachnitz Series,
' published at exceedingly low prices. bI The New Volumes are:
HOLMES ------AUTOCRAT OF THE BREAKFAST
TABLE. Is. In cloth, is. 6d.
THE CLERGY -THE BOOK OF CLERICAL ANEC-
DOTES, and Pulpit Eccentricities. Is. 4d. In
cloth, is. sod.
CHAS. LAMB -THE ESSAYS OF ELIA. Complete.
Both/ Series. Is. In cloth, is. 6d.
DICKENS -- -SPEECHES UPON LITERARY AND
SOCIAL TOPICS. 2s.
SHis Speeches are as good as any of his printed writings."-- Te Times.
A, WARD---- IN LONDON, with the "PUNCH"
LETTERS. Is. 6d. In cloth, 2s.
TENNYSON-- OLD PROSE STORIES OF IDYLLS
OF TLE KING. Is. In cloth, Is. 6d.
DISRAELI, GLADSTONE, AND BRIGHT'S SPEECHES
are issued in separate vols., at Is. 4d. Cloth, Is. od.
They comprise all the important speeches of these great statesmen during the past 25 years.
CARLYLE----ON THE CHOICE OF BOOKS. Is
In cloth, Is. 6d.
Should be read and re-read by every young man in the three kingdoms.
HOLMES --- PROFESSOR AT THE BREAKFAST
TABLE. is. In cloth, is. 6d.
A companion volume to The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table."
LEIGH HUNT---TALE FOR A CHIMNEY CORNER,
AND OTHER ESSA YS. Is. 4d. Cloth, Is. Iod.
A volume of delightful papers, humorous and pathetic.
HOOD --- -- WHIMS AND ODDITIES. 80 Illus-
trations. 2 Series, Complete. Is. Cloth, Is. 6d.
"The best of all books of humour."-PROFESSOR WVILSON.
LELAND -----HA NS BREITMANN'S BALLADS,
COMIPI.ETE. is. In cloth, Is. 6d.
HAWTHORNE-- -NOTE BOOKS. English and American.
Is. In cloth, is. 6d.
6 John Caamden Holten, 74 and 75, Piccadilly, 1V.