• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Yellow flags
 The voyage of the Kate
 What the frog saw
 A hero
 By the river
 Trespassing
 Youth and beauty
 Dreaming
 Maud and Marjorie
 The boy and the fishes
 An invitation
 Lottie and Dottie
 Back Cover














Group Title: By the river : verses
Title: By the river
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078567/00001
 Material Information
Title: By the river verses
Physical Description: 24 p. : col. ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bourdillon, Francis William, 1852-1921
Berkeley, Edith ( Illustrator )
Marcus Ward & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Marcus Ward & Co.
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [ca.1890]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Bldy -- 1890
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by F. W. Bourdillon ; pictures by Edith Stanley Berkeley.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078567
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002218920
notis - ALF9099
oclc - 180188680

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Yellow flags
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The voyage of the Kate
        Page 4
        Page 5
    What the frog saw
        Page 6
        Page 7
    A hero
        Page 8
        Page 9
    By the river
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Trespassing
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Youth and beauty
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Dreaming
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Maud and Marjorie
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The boy and the fishes
        Page 20
        Page 21
    An invitation
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Lottie and Dottie
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text





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(BY THE RIVER


VERSES BY F. W. BOURDILLON


PICTURES BY EDITH STANLEY BERKELEY



LONDON
MARCUS WARD & CO. LIMITED


BELFAST AND NEW YORK








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YELLOW FLAGS I

OH, what a lovely flower,
Yellow like gold!
It is just like a fairy's bower,
Where the petals fold.

And the dragon-fly is the fairy:
It was sitting here,
With its gauzy wings so airy,
Till I came near.

I wish in my lesson hours,
For an exercise,
I might learn the language of flowers
And of dragon-flies!

For then when I came near them,
If they saw it was me,
They would stay and let me hear them
Talking quite free.









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THE VOYAGE OF THE KATE



HURRAH for The- Kate!-that's the name of this ship;
She's just coming home from an extra long trip:

I am the Captain, and Baby's the crew,
And Jessie's the people on shore come to view.

She's been to the Indies for sugar and tea;
She met with rough weather-those ripples you see:

She nearly got wrecked on a dangerous reef;-
You can see it out yonder, that great lily-leaf.

A pirate-the wicked old swan-came in chase,
But she showed him a clean pair of heels in the race;

And now she's safe home the excitement is great,
And the Captain and all shout Hurrah for The .Kate!"













WHAT THE FROG SAW



A WISE old frog sat under a reed
Where the river winds away:
"Good even !" said he : "Good even !" said I,
"And what have you seen to-day?"

"This morning I saw six eggs," said he,
"Where the river winds away:
And now there are six little ducks," said he,
"All in the river at play."


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A HERO


Do you know our dear old Nero?
He's a dog, and he's a hero!
Once,-'twas in his younger days,
When he was rougher in his ways,-

He and I were romping here,
And my sister standing near,
When a push he chanced to give her,
And she tumbled in the river.

Yes, but hardly was she in it,-
In sprang Nero-in a minute
Caught her by the pinafore,
And drew her safely to the shore.

So he really is a hero,
Isn't he, our dear old Nero!
Though he condescends to tricks,
Such as fetching walking-sticks.












































i BY THE RIVER




SHE has taken her book

To the river side:

At her favourite page

It opened wide.


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TRESPASSING

" How I wonder what is meant
By that long word 'PROSECUTED'!
What would happen, if I went
In there, where the paling's bent?
Perhaps it's some grand punishment
To grown-up people suited."


Little Maggie looked and sighed;
Nobody was there to see her;
The opening was so nice and wide,
She could squeeze through if she tried:
Soon she found herself inside,
Naughtier but freer.

Oh, she gathered flowers of gold,
And she gathered flowers of white,
Gathered all her arms could hold;
Nobody came near to scold;
She grew bolder and more bold,
And ventured in outright.


Suddenly two necks of snow
From the long reeds hissing rose;
Two great wings flapped to and fro,
Terrified poor Maggie so,
That in haste she turned to go
From such fearful foes.

Help or harbour saw she none,
And the long grass caught her feet,
And she tried in vain to run;
All her little breath was done;
All her flowers dropped one by one
In her wild retreat.


Safe at last! oh joy! to cling
To loving arms, as she saluted
Thus her mother wondering:
"Oh mother, mother, such a thing
Has happened! I've been trespassing,
And oh so near got PROSECUTED!"


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YOUTH AND BEAUTY



PIGGY-WIG, Q Piggy-wig!
What a pity
One so pretty
Must grow ugly, old and big!
Grunting, squeaking,
,- Almost speaking,
S '.'.With your black coat brushed so 'neatly,
..,_ And your pink nose turned up sweetly,
I' I could really
Kiss you-nearly.

', 1- Piggy-wig, O Piggy-wig!
S, What a pity
S.One so pretty
'Must grow ugly, old and big
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DREAMING
DOES she float in her dreams
Down more wonderful streams,
Where the lilies are silver and gold,
And the green rushy places
Are full of bright places
Of fairies delightfully bold?

And the fishes below,
As they swim to and fro,
Do they come when she calls them, and take
The crumbs from her hand,
As the birds do on land ?-
Oh, dear! what a pity to wake! :


Though the lilies she'd far
Rather have as they are,
And the river might be just the s
And of fairies,-sweet maid,
She's a wee bit afraid,-
Oh! if only the fishes were tame !


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SMAUD AND MARJORIE
MAUD and Marjorie
Out in the meadows,
Playing in the sunshine,
Chasing the shadows.

Running, romping, racing,
Like two young fillies.-
Look," cried Marjorie,
Look, what lovely lilies!

Let's make a chain of them,
As if they were daisies!"
Marjorie makes the chain,
Maud sits and gazes.

They tie themselves together
With the lily-chain pliant;
Pretend they're prisoners,
Taken by a giant.

Pretend the chain is iron,-
So the giant's cruel will is,-
Till a kind, lovely fairy
Turns it into lilies.










THE BOY AND THE FISHES


THERE was a little urchin,
Who tried to pull a perch in, -'
All by himself one day;
But the line went crack,
And sent him on his back,
And the perch swam peacefully away.

But the perch swam about,
With the fish-hook in his snout,
Which all his brother perches thought so fine,
That they went swim, swim,
To get a hook like him;
And the boy had soon another on his line.


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It is dull, she said,
In the house to-day;
And I have no one
To help me play.

And the 'butterflies
They fly too fast:
And I tumbled down
When I caught the last.

But here by the river
'Tis nice to sit,
And read a little,
Then think a bit.


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While the swallows sweep
On dark ,blue wings,
And the fishes rise
In-widening rings.

And the water-lilies
Laugh in my face,
And the tall reeds curtsey
With courtly grace.

And all the creatures,
And all the flowers,
Say-This little girl
Is a sister of ours!









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AN INVITATION











LiTLL hishes-, little fishes,
\ don't you li:t'tn to our wishes ?
Comr., come, come, and bite!
Pull the tloat down out of sight!

Don't you find it dull down there ?
Only water everywhere!
Never anyone to talk to,
Only just one way to walk, too!

Here it's much more interesting;
I know where a lark is nesting,
Over there among the broom;
And the cowslips are in bloom.

And so fast the hay is growing,
It will soon be ripe for mowing.
There's such lots of fun about:
Won't you let me help you out?


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SLOTTIE AND DOTTIE


THE LITTLE GIRL SPEAKS:
I AM Lottie:
This is Dottie;
He's my very, very own;
He's the saddest,
Prettiest, baddest,
Dearest doggie ever known.
THE LITTLE DOG SPEAKS:
I am Dottie:
This is Lottie;
She gives me food, and keeps me clean;
She's the haughtiest,
Prettiest, naughtiest,
Dearest mistress ever seen.




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