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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Preamble
 Articles
 Resolution
 Back Cover






Title: Charter of civil society for the Caribbean Community
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 Material Information
Title: Charter of civil society for the Caribbean Community
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Caribbean Community Secretariat
Publisher: Caribbean Community
Publication Date: 2007
 Subjects
Subject: Caribbean   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: Caribbean
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Bibliographic ID: UF00078139
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Preamble
        Page 3
    Articles
        Article I
            Page 4
        Article II
            Page 4
        Article III
            Page 5
        Article IV
            Page 5
        Article V
            Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Resolution
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Page 21
Full Text












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CARICOM


"WE ATTACH MUCH IMPORTANCE TO THIS PROPOSAL
FOR A CHARTER OF CIVIL SOCIETY. CARICOM NEEDS
NORMATIVE MOORINGS; WE HAVE FOUND
WIDESPREAD YEARNING FOR GIVING THE COMMUNITY
A QUALITATIVE CHARACTER VALUES BEYOND THE
ROUTINE OF INTEGRATION ARRANGEMENTS; INDEED,
STANDARDS BY WHICH THESE ARRANGEMENTS
THEMSELVES CAN BE JUDGED, AND TO WHICH THEY
CAN BE MADE TO CONFORM. THE CHARTER CAN
BECOME THE SOUL OF THE COMMUNITY, WHICH
NEEDS A SOUL IF IT IS TO COMMAND THE LOYALTY OF
THE PEOPLE OF CARICOM."


The West Indian Commission Report, "Time ForAction",1992











Introduction

Preamble

Article 1
Use of Terms

Article II
Respect for Fundamental Human Rights and Freedoms

Article III
Human Dignity

Article IV
Right to Life, Liberty and Security of the Person

Article V
Equality before the Law

Article VI
Political Rights

Article VII
Meetings, Demonstrations and Petitions

Article VIII
Freedom of Expression and Access to Information

Article IX
Religious Diversity

Article X
Cultural Diversity

Article XI
Rights of the Indigenous Peoples

Article XII
Women's Rights







Article XIII
Children's Rights

Article XIV
Rights of Disabled Persons

Article XV
Access to Education and Training

Article XVI
Rights of the Family

Article XVII
Good Governance

Article XVIII
Participation in the Economy

Article XIX
Workers' Rights

Article XX
Health

Article XXI
Basic Necessities

Article XXII
Social Partners

Article XXIII
Environmental Rights

Article XXIV
Awareness and Responsibilities of the People

Article XXV
Reports

Article XXVI
Implementation

Article XXVII
Saving
Resolution






INTRODUCTION


When the Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community
affixed their signatures to the Resolution adopting the Charter of
Civil Society on Wednesday, February 19, 1997 in St. Johns,
Antigua and Barbuda, in so doing, they undertook to pay due
regard to its principles, thus giving effect to one of the strongest
recommendations of the West Indian Commission (WIC) as
contained in its report, "Time for Action."

In the words of the Commission: "We attach much importance to
this proposal for a Charter of Civil Society. CARICOM needs
normative moorings; we have found widespread yearning for
giving the Community a qualitative character values beyond
the routine of integration arrangements; themselves can be
judged and to which they can be made to conform. The Charter
can become the soul of the Community, which needs a soul if it is
to command the loyalty of the people of CARICOM."


The Heads of Government expressed similar sentiments in
accepting the recommendation for the Charter at a Special
Session in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, in October 1992,
which was convened to consider the report.

The leaders declared in the Protocol of Port-of-Spain issued
after the meeting, "that a CARICOM Charter of Civil Society be
developed as an important element of the Community's
structure of unity to deal with matters such as free press; a fair
and open democratic process; the effective functioning of the
parliamentary system; morality in public affairs; respect for
fundamental civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights;
the rights of women and children; respect for religious diversity;
and greater accountability and transparency in government."

An Inter-Governmental Task Force, under the Chairmanship of
the Secretary-General, which was established to revise the
Treaty of Chaguaramas, was also mandated to draft the Charter.
The Task Force completed this latter task in 1996, and presented
the draft document to the Standing Committee of Ministers
responsible for Legal Affairs (SCMLA) for their consideration
prior to its submission to the Heads of Government. Agreement
was reached on the texts of the Articles of this critical Community
instrument at a Special Meeting of the SCMLA held in Trinidad
and Tobago on 28-29 January 1997 and the draft Charter was
commended to Heads of Government for signature.

Conscious that the common historical, cultural and social bonds


Page 1







of the people of the Caribbean Community underpin the
commitment of the Governments and peoples of the Community
to the Charter, and in order to achieve the objectives prescribed by
the WIC, the leaders addressed a broad spectrum of human
endeavours and behaviour, including -

Respect for Fundamental Human Rights and Freedoms
Human Dignity
Rightto Life, Liberty and Security of the Person
Equality before the Law
Political Rights, Meetings, Demonstrations and Petitions
Freedom of Expression and Access to Information
Religious and Cultural Diversity
Rights of the Indigenous Peoples
Women's Rights
Children's Rights
Rights of Disabled Persons
Access to Education and Training
Rights of the Family
Good Governance
Participation in the Economy
Workers' Rights
Health
Basic Necessities
Social Partners
Environmental Rights and Awareness
Responsibilities of the People

The penultimate Article (Article XXVI) Implementation is a
declaration by Member States of their resolve to pay due regard to
the provisions of the Charter.

As Secretary-General, I wish to salute the hard work of the Inter-
Governmental Task Force whose members sought to transform
concepts such as good governance; fundamental human rights
and freedoms; respect for cultural and religious diversity into a real
framework of principles to serve as a guide for the continuance of
the democratic tradition of our Region of which we are justly proud.

The commitment which our Member States have solemnly
undertaken with this Charter is a tangible demonstration of the
Region's belief in the democratic process.





Edwin Carrington
Secretary-General
Caricom Secretariat
Georgetown, Guyana


Page 2







PREAMBLE

We the People of the Caribbean Community, acting through the assembled
representatives of our Governments;

Recalling that the Conference of Heads of Government of the Caribbean
Community at their Special Meeting in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and
Tobago, in October 1992 adopted the recommendation of the West Indian
Commission that a Charter of Civil Society for the Caribbean Community
be subscribed to by Member States of the Community;

Conscious that the common historical, cultural and social bonds of the
people of the Caribbean Community underpin the commitment of the
Governments and peoples of Member States of the Community to this
Charter;

Determined:
to enhance public confidence in governance,
thereby reinforcing the loyalty of all the people;

to ensure continuing respect for internationally recognized civil,
political, economic, social and cultural rights;

-to uphold the right of people to make political choices;

-to create a truly participatory political environment within the
Caribbean Community which will be propitious to genuine
consultation in the process of governance;

-to promote, foster and maintain racial harmony;

to uphold the principle of freedom of religion;

to promote economic growth and sustainable development
through the wise use of the human and natural resources;

to attain economic and social justice and to pursue the goals of
health, education and employment for all;

-to eliminate, as far as possible, social problems such as crime
and the abuse of drugs and other substances;

to enter the Twenty-First Century on the basis of the best
possible governance and to achieve and sustain such
governance by mobilising action for change;

Declare our resolve to pay due regard to the following principles by which
our Governments commit themselves to respect and strengthen the
fundamental elements of a civil society:


Page 3






ARTICLE I


USE OF TERMS

In this Charter, unless the context otherwise requires the following
expressions shall have the following meanings:

(a) "Social partners" shall mean the Government of a State,
Associations of Employers, Workers Organisations and such Non-
Governmental Organisations as the State may recognize;

(b) "State" shall mean a Member State of the Caribbean Community
and shall include Associate Members of the Caribbean
Community.

ARTICLE II

RESPECT FOR FUNDAMENTAL
HUMAN RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS

1. The States shall respect the fundamental human rights and freedoms of the
individual without distinction as to age, colour, creed, disability, ethnicity,
gender, language, place of birth or origin, political opinion, race, religion or
social class but subject to respect for the rights and freedoms of others and
for the public interest.

2. Those fundamental human rights and freedoms include:

(a) the right to life, liberty and security of the person;

(b) protection for the privacy of the home and other property of the
individual;

(c) protection from deprivation of property without due process and
just compensation within a reasonable time;

(d) freedom of conscience, of expression and of assembly and
association within the meaning of the constitutions of States;

(e) freedom of movement within the Caribbean Community, subject
to such exceptions and qualifications as may be authorised by
national law and which are reasonably justifiable in a free and
democratic society.

3. The States shall promote and encourage the effective exercise of civil and
political rights and, within the limits of their resources, economic, social and
cultural rights all of which derive from the inherent dignity of the human
person and which are essential for the free and full development of the
person.


Page 4






ARTICLE I


USE OF TERMS

In this Charter, unless the context otherwise requires the following
expressions shall have the following meanings:

(a) "Social partners" shall mean the Government of a State,
Associations of Employers, Workers Organisations and such Non-
Governmental Organisations as the State may recognize;

(b) "State" shall mean a Member State of the Caribbean Community
and shall include Associate Members of the Caribbean
Community.

ARTICLE II

RESPECT FOR FUNDAMENTAL
HUMAN RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS

1. The States shall respect the fundamental human rights and freedoms of the
individual without distinction as to age, colour, creed, disability, ethnicity,
gender, language, place of birth or origin, political opinion, race, religion or
social class but subject to respect for the rights and freedoms of others and
for the public interest.

2. Those fundamental human rights and freedoms include:

(a) the right to life, liberty and security of the person;

(b) protection for the privacy of the home and other property of the
individual;

(c) protection from deprivation of property without due process and
just compensation within a reasonable time;

(d) freedom of conscience, of expression and of assembly and
association within the meaning of the constitutions of States;

(e) freedom of movement within the Caribbean Community, subject
to such exceptions and qualifications as may be authorised by
national law and which are reasonably justifiable in a free and
democratic society.

3. The States shall promote and encourage the effective exercise of civil and
political rights and, within the limits of their resources, economic, social and
cultural rights all of which derive from the inherent dignity of the human
person and which are essential for the free and full development of the
person.


Page 4







4. The States shall keep the general public informed of the provisions of
this Charter and of international and regional agreements and
declarations in the field of Human Rights to which they subscribe.

ARTICLE III

HUMAN DIGNITY

The States shall, in the discharge of their legislative, executive,
administrative and judicial functions ensure respect for and protection
of the human dignity of every person.

ARTICLE IV

RIGHT TO LIFE, LIBERTY AND
SECURITY OF THE PERSON

1. Every person shall have the right to life. No person shall be deprived
of his or her life intentionally save in accordance with national law.

2. No person shall be deprived of his or her personal liberty or the
security of his or her person except by due process of law.

ARTICLE V

EQUALITY BEFORE THE LAW

1. All persons shall be equal before the law, be entitled to the equal
protection of the law and to a fair and impartial hearing within a
reasonable time.

2. The States shall use their best endeavours to have legal assistance
extended in any case where the interest ofjustice so requires.

3. No person shall be favoured or discriminated against by reason of
age, colour, creed, disability, ethnicity, gender, language, place of birth
or origin, political opinion, race, religion or social class.

4. A law shall be deemed not to be contrary to paragraph 3 if such law
provides for special measures for the sole purpose of furthering the
development and advancement of hiterto disadvantaged communities
or sections of the population to enable them to develop and realise their
potential to the fullest.


Page 5


I







4. The States shall keep the general public informed of the provisions of
this Charter and of international and regional agreements and
declarations in the field of Human Rights to which they subscribe.

ARTICLE III

HUMAN DIGNITY

The States shall, in the discharge of their legislative, executive,
administrative and judicial functions ensure respect for and protection
of the human dignity of every person.

ARTICLE IV

RIGHT TO LIFE, LIBERTY AND
SECURITY OF THE PERSON

1. Every person shall have the right to life. No person shall be deprived
of his or her life intentionally save in accordance with national law.

2. No person shall be deprived of his or her personal liberty or the
security of his or her person except by due process of law.

ARTICLE V

EQUALITY BEFORE THE LAW

1. All persons shall be equal before the law, be entitled to the equal
protection of the law and to a fair and impartial hearing within a
reasonable time.

2. The States shall use their best endeavours to have legal assistance
extended in any case where the interest ofjustice so requires.

3. No person shall be favoured or discriminated against by reason of
age, colour, creed, disability, ethnicity, gender, language, place of birth
or origin, political opinion, race, religion or social class.

4. A law shall be deemed not to be contrary to paragraph 3 if such law
provides for special measures for the sole purpose of furthering the
development and advancement of hiterto disadvantaged communities
or sections of the population to enable them to develop and realise their
potential to the fullest.


Page 5


I







4. The States shall keep the general public informed of the provisions of
this Charter and of international and regional agreements and
declarations in the field of Human Rights to which they subscribe.

ARTICLE III

HUMAN DIGNITY

The States shall, in the discharge of their legislative, executive,
administrative and judicial functions ensure respect for and protection
of the human dignity of every person.

ARTICLE IV

RIGHT TO LIFE, LIBERTY AND
SECURITY OF THE PERSON

1. Every person shall have the right to life. No person shall be deprived
of his or her life intentionally save in accordance with national law.

2. No person shall be deprived of his or her personal liberty or the
security of his or her person except by due process of law.

ARTICLE V

EQUALITY BEFORE THE LAW

1. All persons shall be equal before the law, be entitled to the equal
protection of the law and to a fair and impartial hearing within a
reasonable time.

2. The States shall use their best endeavours to have legal assistance
extended in any case where the interest ofjustice so requires.

3. No person shall be favoured or discriminated against by reason of
age, colour, creed, disability, ethnicity, gender, language, place of birth
or origin, political opinion, race, religion or social class.

4. A law shall be deemed not to be contrary to paragraph 3 if such law
provides for special measures for the sole purpose of furthering the
development and advancement of hiterto disadvantaged communities
or sections of the population to enable them to develop and realise their
potential to the fullest.


Page 5


I






ARTICLE VI


POLITICAL RIGHTS

1. The States shall ensure the existence of a fair and open democratic
system through the holding of free elections at reasonable intervals, by
secret ballot, underpinned by an electoral system in which all can have
confidence and which will ensure the free expression of the will of the
people in the choice oftheir representatives.

2. The States shall take all appropriate measures to promote and maintain
an effectively functioning representational system, including the holding
of regular public sessions of representatives of the people.

3. Every person shall have the right to:

(a) form a political party or organisation;

(b) join apolitical party or organisation ofhis or her choice;

(c) attend public meetings ofpolitical parties or organizations;

(d) participate in the activities of a political party or organisation;

(e) give expression to his or her political beliefs in a peaceful manner;

(f) make himself or herself available for nomination for and election
to any public office for which he or she qualifies.

4. The provisions of this Article shall not preclude the States from taking
measures authorised by their Constitutions to regulate persons employed
in the service of the State with respect to their participation in the
activities of a political party or organisation.

ARTICLE VII

MEETINGS, DEMONSTRATIONS AND
PETITIONS

Every person shall have the right to assemble, to demonstrate peacefully
and to draw up and present petitions, subject to such restrictions as may
be imposed by national law in the public interest and which are
reasonably justifiable in a free and democratic society.


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ARTICLE VIII


FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
AND ACCESS TO INFORMATION


1. Every person shall have the right to the enjoyment of freedom of
expression including the right to:

(a) hold opinions and to receive and communicate ideas and
information without interference and freely to send or receive
communications by correspondence or other means;

(b) seek, distribute or disseminate to other persons and the public
information, opinions, and ideas in any form whatever.

2. The right conferred by paragraph 1 of this Article shall also be
enjoyed by the media.

3. The exercise of the right conferred by this Article carries with it
special duties and responsibilities and may be exercisable subject to
such reasonable restrictions in the public interest, as may be imposed
by law and are justifiable in a democratic society:

(a) for the protection of the reputations, rights and freedoms of other
persons; or

(b) in the interest of defense, public safety, public order, public
morality or public health.

4. The States shall respect, encourage and promote the existence of a
diversity of sources of information as a means of ensuring greater
public access to information.

5. This Article shall not be construed as preventing the State from
requiring the licensing of broadcasting, transmission or other means of
communication, public exhibition or public entertainment.

ARTICLE IX

RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY

The States shall recognize and respect the freedom of conscience of the
individual to profess and practise alone or in community with others, in
private or in public, his or her religion, belief or persuasion in
accordance with the dictates of his or her own conscience, subject to
such restrictions as may be imposed by national law in the interest of
defence, public order or public safety or for the protection of public


Page 7






health or public morals or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of
others provided that such restrictions are reasonably justifiable in a free
and democratic society.

ARTICLE X

CULTURAL DIVERSITY

The States recognize that:

(a) each culture has a dignity and a value which shall be respected
and that every person has the right to preserve and to develop his
or her culture;

(b) every person has the right to participate in the cultural life of his
or her choice.

ARTICLE XI

RIGHTS OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

The States recognize the contribution of the indigenous peoples to
the development process and undertake to continue to protect their
historical rights and respect the culture and way of life of these peoples.

ARTICLE XII

WOMEN'S RIGHTS

For the promotion of policies and measures aimed at strengthening
gender equality, all women have equal rights with men in the political,
civil, economic, social and cultural spheres. Such rights shall include the
right:

(a) to be elected or appointed to Public Office and to be eligible for
appointment to positions of decision-making bodies at all levels
of their society;

(b) to be afforded equal opportunities for employment and to receive
equal remuneration with men for work of equal value;

(c) not to be discriminated against by reason of marital status,
pregnancy, lactation or health-related matters which affect older
women;

(d) to legal protection including just and effective remedies against
domestic violence, sexual abuse and sexual harassment.


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ARTICLE XIII


CHILDREN'S RIGHTS

1. Every child has, in particular, the right:

(a) not to be compelled to perform or to render services harmful to
his or her physical or mental health, upbringing, education or
social development;

(b) to protection against economic or other exploitation, physical
or mental violence, injury, neglect or abuse including sexual
abuse;

(c) where appropriate, having regard to factors including the
child's age and mental and physical development, to be
consulted and to have his or her view represented personally or
by an independent person before the courts and other agencies
or bodies which deal with the welfare of the child.

2. For the purpose of this Article and Article XV, "child" means every
person below the age of eighteen years unless, under national law,
majority is attained at an earlier or later age.

ARTICLE XIV

RIGHTS OF DISABLED PERSONS

1. Every disabled person has, in particular, the right -

(a) not to be discriminated against on the basis of his or her
disability;

(b) to equal opportunities in all fields of endeavour and to be
allowed to develop his or her full potential;

(c) to respect for his or her human dignity so as to enjoy a life
as normal and full as possible.

ARTICLE XV

ACCESS TO EDUCATION AND TRAINING

1. The States shall ensure that every child has the right to, and is
provided with, quality primary education.

2. The States shall ensure equal access to secondary and post secondary
education and reasonable access to continuing adult education and


Page 9






training.


3. Every child, irrespective of colour, creed, disability, ethnicity, gender,
language, place of birth or origin, political opinion, race, religion or
social class shall have the right to equal access to State or State-assisted
educational institutions.

4. Every child with a disability shall have the right to special education in
accordance with his or her needs funded wholly or partially by the State
up to an age determined by national law.

5. Every State shall put into place measures to ensure that parents enable
their children to make full use of the educational opportunities provided
by the State.

ARTICLE XVI

RIGHTS OF THE FAMILY

The States, recognizing the family as the fundamental unit of society,
shall endeavour to ensure:

(a) the fulfilment of the necessary conditions for the promotion of
family life and effective parenting skills, bearing in mind the
importance of the role of each parent;

(b) the full development and protection of the family,
including the extended family.

ARTICLE XVII

GOOD GOVERNANCE

1. The States shall adopt and implement all appropriate measures to
ensure good governance which is just, open and accountable.

2. The States recognize and affirm that the rule of law, the effective
administration of justice and the maintenance of the independence and
impartiality of the judiciary are essential to good governance.

3. The States, recognizing that integral to the concept of good
governance are the complementary roles of government, the social
partners and the citizenry, shall ensure that the rights and responsibilities
of all are clearly established and that the appropriate environment for
their exercise and discharge as the case may be, is fostered.

4. The States, in order to ensure morality in public affairs, agree that


Page 10






holders of public office and all those who exercise power the exercise
of which affects or may affect the public interest, shall so order their
affairs in accordance with national law that such ordering gives no
cause for conflict to arise or to appear to arise between their private
interests and their duties to the public, or to otherwise compromise
their integrity. To this end, the States agree to establish a Code
governing the conduct of the holders of public office and all those who
exercise power, the exercise of which affects or may affect the public
interest.

5. The States shall undertake:

(a) to foster continuously greater cost-effectiveness in their
operations while being facilitative and supportive of the
development process;

(b) to ensure that all persons are treated fairly, humanely and equally
by public authorities and holders of public office and all those
who exercise power so as to affect the quality of life of our people;

(c) to ensure responsiveness to the needs of the people as consumers
in the delivery of goods and services.

6. The States undertake to preserve and respect the existence of an
independent public service with attractive career opportunities open to
all on the basis of merit and which is effective, efficient, responsive,
adaptive and innovative in its conduct of public administration.

7. The States in order to further the participation of the people in the
democratic process shall establish effective systems of ongoing
consultations between the Government and the people.

8. The States shall undertake to ensure that in the process of
governance, there is no victimisation of any person.

ARTICLE XVIII

PARTICIPATION IN THE ECONOMY

1. The States shall facilitate access by their peoples to resources in
such a manner as to promote economic growth, sustainable
development and full employment, especially of the young people, and
to enhance the opportunities for the achievement by every person of a
reasonable and secure standard of living.

2. Every person shall have the right freely and on the basis of full


Page 11






equality to engage in economic activities, including the right to
participate in, establish and manage his or her own enterprise in the
commercial, industrial, agricultural, services or other sectors.

3. The States undertake to collaborate with the social partners for the
provision of creative employment for young people and the disabled and
for fostering strategies for their employment.

ARTICLE XIX

WORKERS' RIGHTS

1. Every worker has the right:

(a) to form or belong to and participate in the activities of trade
unions or other associations for the promotion and protection of
his or her interest or the right not to belong to and participate in
the activities of any such trade union or association;

(b) to negotiate or bargain collectively;

(c) not to be subjected to unfair labour practices, including
intimidation and victimisation;

(d) to work under safe, hygienic and healthy conditions;

(e) to reasonable hours of work, rest, periodic holidays with pay and
remuneration for public holidays;

(f) to receive reasonable remuneration for his or her labour and to
withhold his or her labour subject to such reasonable restrictions
as may be imposed by national law in the public interest.

2. The provisions of this Article shall not preclude the States from taking
measures imposing on persons in the service of the State, restrictions
which are reasonably justifiable in a free and democratic society.

3. The States undertake:

(a) to safeguard the right of workers to earn their living in freely
chosen lawful occupations;

(b) to recognize the desirability of workers earning a level of
remuneration which would afford them and their families the
enjoyment of a decent standard of living;

(c) in recognition of the right of workers to collective bargaining,
the responsibility to provide adequate machinery for the
recognition and certification of trade unions enjoying the


Page 12





support of a majority of the workers based on the free choice
of the workers concerned;

(d) to foster and promote a harmonious and productive working
environment by sensitising workers, trade unions and
employers as to their respective and mutual obligations;

(e) to provide protection for workers against arbitrary dismissal;

(f) to provide adequate machinery for the speedy resolution of
industrial disputes and the restoration of normalcy in the event
of strikes, lock-outs and other forms of industrial action;

(g) to provide an adequate period of leave with pay, or with
adequate social security benefits for women before and after
childbirth and to make it unlawful for an employer to
terminate a woman's employment or take any other action that
would unfavourably affect her status or promotion by reason
ofherpregnancy;

(h) to establish standards to be observed by employers in
providing workers with a safe and healthy working
environment;

(i) to provide workers with adequate social security
benefits;

(j) to ensure that every person who has attained the age of
retirement and does not have adequate means of
subsistence is provided with social and medical
assistance.

ARTICLE XX

HEALTH

The States shall use their best endeavours to provide a health care
system that is:

(a) sufficiently comprehensive to deal with all health challenges
including epidemics; and

(b) well administered, adequately equipped and accessible to all
without discrimination.


Page 13








ARTICLE XXI


BASIC NECESSITIES

The States shall endeavour to:

(a) provide adequate social services and benefits for the population at
large; and

(b) ensure that the most needy persons have access to food, housing
and other basic necessities.


ARTICLE XXII

SOCIAL PARTNERS

The States undertake to establish within their respective States a
framework for genuine consultations among the social partners in order
to reach common understandings on and support for the objectives,
contents and implementation of national economic and social
programmes and their respective roles and responsibilities in good
governance.

ARTICLE XXIII

ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS

1. Every person has a right to an environment which is adequate for his or
her health and well-being and a corresponding duty to protect, conserve
and improve the environment.

2. The States shall take steps to establish environmental standards and to
monitor compliance with such standards.

3. The States, considering the shared universal responsibility for human
survival, shall put in place measures to ensure the protection and
improvement of the environment and the conservation and management


Page 14






of its natural resources for the benefit of present and future generations.

ARTICLE XXIV

AWARENESS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
OF THE PEOPLE

The States hereby declare that the people have an important role to play
in the pursuit and maintenance of good governance. Accordingly, the
States shall build awareness, engender support and establish
programmes to foster sound values and positive attitudes and shall
enhance individual and institutional capacities to secure objectives,
including:

(a) the inculcating, nurturing and demonstration of love of one's
country;

(b) the participation in the electoral process;

(c) the development of a positive work ethic at all levels in society
in the recognition of the responsibilities of the people in the
areas ofproduction, the economy and the provision of goods and
services;

(d) the sensitising of the people to the importance of
continuous skill upgrading, training and broadening of
their skills and expertise;

(e) the building of self-reliance and the engagement in self-help
activities, whether alone or in community with others;

(f) the promotion of awareness of parents to cooperate with and
support the school system and programmes aimed at the
character formation of students;

(g) special consideration and support of the young, aged, the
disabled and other vulnerable groups;

(h) the resolution of interpersonal and domestic disputes by
peaceful means, such as mediation, reconciliation and
otherwise;

(i) the caring and protection of the environment;

(j) the preservation and protection of public property; and

(k) the promotion, establishment and maintenance of community-
based organizations.


Page 15







ARTICLE XXI


BASIC NECESSITIES

The States shall endeavour to:

(a) provide adequate social services and benefits for the population at
large; and

(b) ensure that the most needy persons have access to food, housing
and other basic necessities.


ARTICLE XXII

SOCIAL PARTNERS

The States undertake to establish within their respective States a
framework for genuine consultations among the social partners in order
to reach common understandings on and support for the objectives,
contents and implementation of national economic and social
programmes and their respective roles and responsibilities in good
governance.

ARTICLE XXIII

ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS

1. Every person has a right to an environment which is adequate for his or
her health and well-being and a corresponding duty to protect, conserve
and improve the environment.

2. The States shall take steps to establish environmental standards and to
monitor compliance with such standards.

3. The States, considering the shared universal responsibility for human
survival, shall put in place measures to ensure the protection and
improvement of the environment and the conservation and management


Page 14







of its natural resources for the benefit of present and future generations.

ARTICLE XXIV

AWARENESS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
OF THE PEOPLE

The States hereby declare that the people have an important role to play
in the pursuit and maintenance of good governance. Accordingly, the
States shall build awareness, engender support and establish
programmes to foster sound values and positive attitudes and shall
enhance individual and institutional capacities to secure objectives,
including:

(a) the inculcating, nurturing and demonstration of love of one's
country;

(b) the participation in the electoral process;

(c) the development of a positive work ethic at all levels in society
in the recognition of the responsibilities of the people in the
areas ofproduction, the economy and the provision of goods and
services;

(d) the sensitising of the people to the importance of
continuous skill upgrading, training and broadening of
their skills and expertise;

(e) the building of self-reliance and the engagement in self-help
activities, whether alone or in community with others;

(f) the promotion of awareness of parents to cooperate with and
support the school system and programmes aimed at the
character formation of students;

(g) special consideration and support of the young, aged, the
disabled and other vulnerable groups;

(h) the resolution of interpersonal and domestic disputes by
peaceful means, such as mediation, reconciliation and
otherwise;

(i) the caring and protection of the environment;

(j) the preservation and protection of public property; and

(k) the promotion, establishment and maintenance of community-
based organizations.


Page 15







ARTICLE XXV


REPORTS

1. The States undertake to submit periodically to the Secretary-General
of the Caribbean Community (hereinafter referred to as the "Secretary-
General") for transmission to the Conference of Heads of Government of
the Caribbean Community, reports on measures adopted and progress
achieved in compliance with the provisions of this Charter.

2. Reports, other than special reports which may be requested by the
Conference at any time, shall be submitted every three years on a rotating
basis to be determined by the Conference, indicating the factors and
difficulties, if any, that affect the implementation of this Charter.

3. In the preparation of their Reports, States shall, in accordance with the
provisions of Article XXII, undertake consultation with the social
partners, having regard to their crucial role in the attainment of the
objectives of this Charter.

4. (1) States shall each establish a National Committee or designate a
body to monitor and ensure the implementation of this Charter and that
National Committee or body shall comprise:

(a) representatives of the State;

(b) representatives of the other social partners; and

(c) such other persons of high moral character and recognized
competence in their respective fields ofendeavour.

(2) The National Committee or body, as the case may be, shall review
the implementation of this Charter, analysing any problems and
difficulties experienced, and receive reports of allegations of breaches of,
or non-compliance with, the provisions of this Charter attributed to the
State or to one or more social partners. No allegation of breaches or non-
compliance may be brought by any individual or entity in relation to a
matter which has been adjudicated upon by an international body, the
decision of which is binding upon the State.

(3) The National Committee or body shall notify the State or social
partner, as the case may be, of the receipt of any allegation and request
their comments thereon and the National Committee or body shall report
to the Secretary-General on allegations received, together with their
comments thereon, including their own views on the matter.


Page 16






5. (1) The Secretary-General shall submit annually for consideration by
the Conference, in accordance with criteria established by the
Conference, reports received from the National Committees or bodies
pursuant to the provisions of paragraph 4 (3) of this Article.

(2) The Secretary-General shall inform the States and their National
Committees or bodies of the results of the deliberations of the
Conference on reports submitted pursuant to this Article, together with
any recommendation emanating from their consideration of reported
violations, non-compliance, difficulties or problems experienced in the
implementation ofthis Charter.

6. Allegations of violations or non-compliance shall not impose any
obligations on a State to refrain from carrying out any decision of its
Courts or other authorities pending consideration under this Article.

ARTICLE XXVI

IMPLEMENTATION

The States declare their resolve to pay due regard to the provisions of
this Charter.
ARTICLE XXVII

SAVING

Nothing in this Charter shall be interpreted as impairing the provisions
of any regional or international agreement to which States are parties.


Page 17

















CARICOM


RESOLUTION
The Conference of Heads of Government of the Caribbean
Community at their Eight Inter-Sessional Meeting:

Reaffirming their confidence in the Caribbean Community as an
association of States and Territories bonded by a common heritage
and cooperating in the interests of their own peoples:

Being committed to the fundamental principles of human rights
and freedoms and conscious that this Charter should enhance the
integration process;

Determined to pursue the principles declared in the Charter in
response to the challenges of the Twenty-First Century;
Now therefore resolve to adopt this Charter and agree to pay
due regard to its principles and to ensure that this Charter
receives the widest possible circulation within their respective
States and Territories.



















.* ,,


CARICOM Secretariat
Bank of Guyana Building
PO Box 10827 Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: (592) 226-9280-9
Fax: (592) 226-7812 13098, 225-7341
E-mail: carisec3@caricom.org
carisec4@caricom.org
Website: www.caricom.org


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