• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The story of Noah
 Abraham's offering
 Isaac and Rebekah
 Joseph sold by his brethren
 Gathering the manna
 Striking the rock
 The brazen serpent
 Samuel and Eli
 David playing before Saul
 Elijah fed by ravens
 Elijah raising the widow's son
 The brave Hebrew youths
 Daniel in the lions' den
 Advertising
 Back Cover














Group Title: Bible stories : Old Testament
Title: Bible stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00078090/00001
 Material Information
Title: Bible stories Old Testament
Physical Description: 32 p. : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Richard Clay and Sons ( Printer )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Publisher: S.W. Partridge & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Richard Clay & Sons
Publication Date: [ca1890]
 Subjects
Subject: Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00078090
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002218851
notis - ALF9030
oclc - 176192633

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    The story of Noah
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Abraham's offering
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Isaac and Rebekah
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Joseph sold by his brethren
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Gathering the manna
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Striking the rock
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The brazen serpent
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Samuel and Eli
        Page 18
        Page 19
    David playing before Saul
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Elijah fed by ravens
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Elijah raising the widow's son
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The brave Hebrew youths
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Daniel in the lions' den
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text





Old Teofam eflI




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JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.


L'





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BIBLE STORIES

OLD TESTAMENT









-7L







LONDON
S. W. PARTRIDGE AND CO.
8 & 9, PATERNOSTER ROW


































Bichard May & Sons, Limited, London and Bungay.















TILE ARK.


THE STORY OF NOAH.

,,.EARLY three thousand years before
2`o'A the birth of Jesus Christ, there
lived a good man named Noah.
The people of that time were so wicked
that God said all, save Noah and his
family, should be destroyed by a flood.
God told Noah to build an ark. Make
thee an ark of gopher wood," said He;
"rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and
shalt pitch it within and without."
A door and window were to be made,







and the ark was to be fashioned some-
thing like the hull of a ship, so that it
might float on the waters.
Noah built the ark as God commanded;
and he and his wife, and his sons, and
their wives, entered into it, also two each
of all animals, birds, and insects that were
on the earth. Then God shut them in.
The rain fell for forty days, and the
waters of the great deep rose, and the
earth was covered. And all that dwelt
upon it died.
The water remained on the earth for
many months, during which time Noah
and his family continued in the ark. At
length, after waiting for the waters to
decrease, Noah sent forth a raven and
a dove. The raven flew away and was not
again seen, but the dove found no place of
rest, and returned to the ark.
Noah waited seven days, and again
sent forth the dove, which returned with






an olive leaf
in her
mouth. Af-
ter waiting
other seven' l
days, Noah
once more \ ./
sent forth
the dove, (! ';,"}
which this L- ,
time found
the- earth
sufficiently -. ~
dry for her _~.._ -__
to remain
BUILDING THE ARK.
upon it.
At the end of a year the earth was fully
dried. Then God told Noah to Go forth."
So he and his wife, and all that were in
the ark, went forth; and Noah built an
altar, on which he offered a sacrifice to
God for his and his family's preservation.






ABRAHAM'S OFFERING.


OD tried Abraham, by asking him to
offer his only son Isaac as a burnt
offering on Mount Moriah.
Abraham saddled his ass, took two of
his young men, and Isaac his son, and
journeyed toward the appointed place.
When they drew near, Abraham bade the
two young men to tarry, while he and
Isaac, carrying the knife, fire, and wood,
went forward.
As they proceeded Isaac said, "My
father, behold the fire and the wood: but
where is the lamb for a burnt offering ?"
Abraham knew that Isaac was to be
the lamb, but he trusted that God would
restore him, even as from the dead.
He built the altar on the mount, laid
the wood upon it, and after binding Isaac,
placed him on the altar. Then he took
the knife to slay his son.






But God,
who saw
that Abra-
ham was
willing for
His sake to
give up his i
dearest trea-
sure, now .
stayedAbra- ~
ham's arm.
" Lay not
thine hand '
upon the / '
lad," said --
God, "for ABRAHAM AND ISAAC.
now I know that thou fearest God, seeing
thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only
son, from Me."
Then Abraham looked up, and saw a
ram caught in a thicket. This he took and
offered as a sacrifice instead of his son.






ISAAC AND REBEKAH.


|I HEN Abraham was old and Isaac
was a man, Abraham was anxious
to procure a good wife for his son.
He therefore called his oldest and most
faithful servant, and bade him go to his
kinsman at Nahor, there to procure a wife
for Isaac.
The servant took ten of his master's
camels and goodly presents for the damsel
and her parents, and set off on his long
journey. At length he came to a well
outside the city of Nahor, and there
prayed that God would show him the
damsel He had appointed for his master's
son.
Rebekah, the daughter of Bethuel,
Abraham's nephew, came with her pit-
cher upon her shoulder to draw water at
the well. The servant asked her to give
him some to drink, and by the way in
which she complied with his request, knew
that she was the damsel God had chosen






for Isaac's V ','.. .
wife. 'I '
The ser-
vant gave
her a valu-
able pres- > l'I i
ent, and ,'
went to her i ;I'I
father's '
house to ''

quest for ,:
her, for his i
master's .' -
son.-
Her par- i --
ents gave
t er con- REBEKAII GIVES DRINK TO AflRAIIAM'S SERVAI T.
their con-
sent, and Rebekah followed the servant to
his master's dwelling. As they drew near,
Rebekah saw a man walking towards them.
It was Isaac. He brought Rebekah to his
mother's tent, and she became his wife;
and later on the mother of Jacob.







JOSEPH SOLD BY HIS BRETHREN.

l _]'N the book of Genesis, in the Bible,
.- is contained the pretty story of
Joseph.
Joseph was the youngest but one
of Jacob's twelve sons, Benjamin being
younger than he. The older brothers
often grieved their father by their evil
ways, and Joseph sometimes brought his
father a report of their doings. Therefore
his brethren hated him.
But Jacob loved Joseph above all his
other children, and as a mark of his love,
made him a coat of many colours, or
pieces. This favour, however, only in-
creased his brothers' hatred.
When Joseph was seventeen years of
age, his father sent him to visit his
brethren, who were away at Shechem,
feeding their father's flock.
When his brethren looked up and saw
Joseph approaching, they took counsel
together to kill him. But one of them,











































































BINDING JOSEI'II.


----~~-r
~--~- -







named Reuben, wished to spare Joseph's
life, so he suggested that instead of kill-
ing their brother, they should put him
into a pit, and there leave him. Reuben's
intention was secretly to get Joseph out
-of the pit without his brothers' knowledge,
and to let him go in safety.
Reuben's brothers adopted his sugges-
tion. They took Joseph, and stripped
him of his coat. Then they bound him,
and let him down into the pit.
By-and-by a caravan of merchants was
seen approaching. They were Midianites,
on their way to Egypt.
Then Judah, another of his brethren,
said, "What profit is it if we slay our
brother, and conceal his blood? Come,
let us sell him!"
So they took Joseph out of the pit
and sold him to the Midianites for twenty
pieces of silver. Thus he was taken
away from father and home, and sold as
a slave into Egypt.
Reuben was away when this deed was






done, and .." .'
when he re- ,,i' '!;'
turned and -.-, ''
found Jos- f -"J1 ._*.- .
eph gone, he :.,.
ren t h is ..
clothes in
grief and .. i *
anger.
Then Jos- -- ( '
eph's breth-
ren took his i "
coat, and
killed a
young goat, --.-
and dipped __ _- _.
his coat in JOSEP 'S COAT SHOWN TO JACOo.
its blood.
They took this blood-stained coat to their
father, and said, "This have we found:
know now whether it be thy son's coat or
no ?" Jacob was greatly grieved. He felt
that Joseph was dead, and mourned for
him, and would not be comforted.






GATHERING THE MANNA.


S I-I HE descendants of Jacob and Joseph
continued in the land of Egypt for
over two hundred years; then under
the leadership of Moses they left Egypt
for Canaan.
During their journey the people mur-
mured because they wanted food. So
God sent manna for them to eat.
When the people saw it they said,
"What is this ?" Then Moses told them,
"This is the bread the Lord hath given
you to eat."
This heavenly food God continued to
give the children of Israel all the forty
years they were in the wilderness. Early
each morning they went out to gather it,
and each gathered sufficient only for the
day. But on the sixth day each gathered
a double portion, for God had said, "Six
days shalt thou gather it; but on the,
seventh day, which is the Sabbath, in it
there shall be none."





























































GATHERING THE MANNA.







STRIKING THE ROCK.


T another time, during the journey-
ing of the children of Israel towards
Canaan, the people suffered from
thirst, and murmured against Moses,
saying, "Give us water that we may
drink. Wherefore is this that thou
hast brought us up out of Egypt, to kill
us and our children and our cattle with
thirst ?"
Moses prayed to God, to show him what
to do, saying, "What shall I do unto this
people ? they be almost ready to stone
me." For there was no water that could
be given to the people.
God heard the prayer of Moses and
said, "Go on before the people and take
with thee of the elders of Israel; and thy
rod, wherewith thou smotest the river,
take in thine hand and go. Behold, I
will stand before thee there upon the






rock in !' I'
Horeb; and i' i
thou shalt
smite the ,,
rock, and I '"
there shall 2
come water
out of it, -
that the -'V,
people may .'
drink."
Moses
did as God \ ,
command-
ed. He took
his rod, and MOSES STRIKING THE 1OCK.
his rod, and
in the sight of the elders of the people,
smote the rock. Then the water came
forth, as God had said, and the people
and their cattle drank of it.
The people did wrong in murmuring
against God and Moses His servant.






THE BRAZEN SERPENT.

-777ET again, as the people journeyed,
L:" they murmured against Moses.
This time it was because of the
difficulty of the way. They came to
Moses and said, "Wherefore have ye
brought us up out of Egypt to -die in
the wilderness? For there is no bread,
neither is there any water; and our soul
loatheth this light biead."
By the "light bread" the people meant
the manna God was giving them day by
day.
God was displeased with these murmur-
ing people, and sent fiery serpents among
them, which bit many, so that they died.
Then the people came to Moses and
said, We have sinned, for we have spoken
against the Lord, and against thee; pray
unto the Lord, that He take away the
serpents from us."






Moses
prayed for
the people,
and God -"
told him to --
make a
serpent of --
brass. i
"Make thee / ',- .
a fiery ser- ,;
pent," said ,'- '
God, "and,
set it on a- -, ';,'. ;I '1 '
pole: and i ,,
it shall
come o THE BRAZEN SERPENT.
come to
pass, that every one that is bitten, when
he looketh upon it shall live."
Moses made the serpent, and set it upon
a pole. "And it came to pass, that if
a serpent had bitten any man, when he
beheld the serpent of brass, he lived."






SAMUEL AND ELI.


.)%..AMUEL helped Eli, the high-priest,
-' in the service of the Tabernacle.
He was but a young child and
dwelt with Eli.
One night, when both had retired to
rest, and the lamp was burning in the
Tabernacle, wherein was the ark of God,
the child heard a voice calling, "Samuel."
He thought it was Eli that had called
him, and ran to the old priest, saying;
"Here am I; for thou calledst me." But
Eli replied, "I called not; lie down
again." So Samuel again lay down to rest.
A second time the voice called, "Sam-
uel !" Then Samuel again went to Eli,
and said, "Here am I; for thou didst call
me." But again Eli answered as before.
Samuel did not know who it was that
called, and went back to his couch.
A third time the voice called, Samuel,"






and a third ,,. ', ,- ,,
time Samuel ,
arose and went
to Eli. Then
Eli knew that
it was the Lord ;
that had spoken S
to the little lad.
So he bade him
to "Go, lie
down; and it
shall be, if He
call thee, that
thou shalt say, SAMUEL AND ELI.
'Speak, Lord: for thy servant heareth.'"
Samuel did as Eli had said; and when
God again called, he answered: "Speak,
Lord, for thy servant heareth."
Then God made known to Samuel things
that were coming upon Eli through his
sons' sinful ways, and because he had not
reproved them for their evil doings.







DAVID PLAYING BEFORE SAUL.

''21AUL had been anointed first king
A~-' over Israel. He was a tall and
fine man, but he turned away from
God and sinned against Him.- He was
therefore troubled with an evil spirit,
which caused him much distress.
David was the youngest of Jesse's sons,
and was a shepherd, keeping his father's
sheep. He was a rosy-cheeked youth of
beautiful countenance, and a skilful player
on the harp.
On one occasion when Saul was troubled,
or terrified, by the evil spirit, his servants
said to him: "Let our lord now command
thy servants, which are before thee, to
seek out a man who is a cunning player
on a harp: and it shall come to pass when
the evil spirit is upon thee, that he shall
play with his hand, and thou shalt be
well."
The son of Jesse was recommended, and
Saul sent messengers to Jesse, saying,






SSend me -
David thy | I
son, which I '-
is with the .' '
sheep." .
David a v'I i
came to '/
Saul, and IIi"1
stood be- ii,
fore him;A I,, V
and Saul (. -. I'I
made him i i-
hisarmour-
bearer. -r
So David
dwelt with
Saul. "And
it came to DAID PLAYING BEFORE SAUL.
it came to
pass that when the evil spirit was upon
Saul, that David took a harp, and played
with his hand: so Saul was refreshed,
and was well, and the evil spirit departed
from him." But afterwards Saul sought to
kill David, because he was jealous of him.






ELIJAH FED BY RAVENS.


s LIJAH the prophet lived nearly a
*,i thousand years before the birth of
Jesus Christ.
At that time a very wicked king and
queen reigned over the land of Israel.
Their names were Ahab and Jezebel.
Both turned from God to worship idols,
and provoked God to anger by their evil
ways.
Elijah was sent as God's prophet to
reprove Ahab, and to deliver to him the
message of God's judgment as follows:
"As the Lord God of Israel liveth, before
whom I stand, there shall not be dew nor
rain these years, but according to my
word."
Then to preserve him from the wrath of
the angry king and queen, God said to
Elijah, "Get thee hence, and turn thee
eastward, and hide thyself by the brook
Cherith, that is before Jordan. And it
shall be, that thou shalt drink of the






brook and : ,-' -
I have comn- -
manded the-' .' '
ravens to -
feed thee -'-
there." i f
Elijah
wentaccord- -:
ing to God's -
word, and .
dwelt by 1 I
the brook --
Cherith, and I '' 7-
the ravens
brought him i .. i .
bread and .- ." >
meat in the ELIJAH FED BY RAVENS.
morning,
and bread and meat in the evening; and
the water of the brook quenched his thirst.
But as no rain fell, the brook after a
time became dry, and God then spake to
Elijah again, and bade him go to a place
called Zarephath.






ELIJAH RAISING THE WIDOW'S
SON.

A GREAT famine came upon the land
through the absence of rain. God
provided for Elijah, and bade him to
dwell with a widow woman at Zarephath.
When Elijah reached the gate of the
city, the poor widow was gathering a few
sticks, with which to bake her last cake of
flour and oil for herself and son.
But Elijah told her to go and first make
him a little cake, then to make for herself
and son ; and assured her that neither the
flour nor oil should fail until the famine
was over.
Some time afterwards the woman's son
fell sick and died. Then his mother told
her trouble to Elijah, who carried the lad
up to his own chamber, and laid him upon
his bed. Then he prayed to God, to restore
the child's life. God heard Elijah's prayer,
and brought the little lad to life again;
and Elijah restored him to his mother.

































































ELIJAH RAISING THE WIDOW'S SON.






THE BRAVE HEBREW YOUTHS.

Y-EBUCHADNEZZAR, the King of
Babylon, besieged the city of Jeru-
salem, and among other spoil, took
captive certain of the princes of Judah.
These were to be taught the wisdom and
language of Chaldea, so that by-and-by
they might stand before the Babylonish
King.
To nourish them for the three years of
their studies, the king appointed them a
daily portion of his meat and wine; but
as this was also offered to the Chaldean
gods, four of the youths thus carried away
determined that they would not defile
themselves by taking it. Their names
were Daniel, Shadrach, Meshach, and
Abed-nego.
They prayed Nebuchadnezzar's steward,
to give them plain food to eat, and water
to drink, and to prove them for ten days,
and see whether they were not in all
respects as well as those that took -the






meat and a '
wine.
The ste- I
ward did V
so, and as I H ,
at the end -' -
of the ten .-"'-.- C ,i.. '.;L -
days they -- JY
were found
fairer and ,r ,
fatter than
those who -
had the -
meat and --
wine he n
continued
to give DANIEL REFUSING THE MEAT AND WINE.
them plain
food and water all through their time of
study.
At the end of the three years, when
they stood before the king, these four
youths were found ten times wiser than all
the magicians and astrologers of Babylon.







DANIEL IN THE LIONS' DEN.

ANIEL was made ruler over the
whole province of Babylon; and
Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed-nego
were appointed to high offices in the
state.
Some of the princes and presidents of
the kingdom were jealous of Daniel, and
sought his ruin. They knew that he
regularly prayed to God, so they went to
Darius, the king, and induced him to sign
a decree, that !- any one asked r petition
of any God or m.. i for thirty days, save of
the king, he should be cast into a den of
lions.
Daniel knew that the decree had been
signed, but he was not afraid. His only
fear was to sin against God. So he went
to his house, and kneeling upon his knees,
prayed to God three times a day as he
had done aforetime.







Then n
those prin-
ces and pre-
s i d e n t s
ent and ; ,, 4 J"
told the h L
king. Dari-
us was sorry
that he had -
signed the




set his heart
upon DANIEL IN THE LIONS' DEN.
upon deliv-
ering him. But the decree had to be
enforced, and Daniel was cast into the
den of lions.
The king passed a sleepless night, and
very early in the morning he arose and
went to the den. He looked in, and cried






with a sad voice, 0 Daniel, is thy God,
whom thou serves continually, able to
deliver thee from the lions ?"
Daniel had been kept in safety, for God
had sent His angel to close the lions' i-
mouths, and keep His servant safe from-
harm. He replied to the king, 0 king,
live for ever. My God hath shut the lions'
mouths, that they have not hurt me: for-
asmuch as before Him innocency was found
in me; and also before thee, 0 king, have
I done no hurt."
Then the king was exceedingly glad,
and commanded his servants to take
Daniel up out of the den, and to cast into
it the princes and presidents who had
conspired against Daniel, with all belong-
ing to them, who were quickly torn to
pieces by the savage beasts.






"I firmly believe that If the children were
well fed our workhouses, gaols and asylums
would soon be empty.
-Sir JOl. CGORST, M.P.
ONE CUP
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Uncle Joe's Old Coat. By Elea-
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Farthing Dips; or, What can I
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-- -




" I have never tasted Cocoa that I like so well."-
Sir CHAB. CAMERON, C.B., M.D.,
Ex-President of the Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland.




Sri
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