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Title: Stories and pictures for Little Troublesome
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077903/00001
 Material Information
Title: Stories and pictures for Little Troublesome
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh ( Publisher )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Griffith, Farran and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh
E.P. Dutton and Co.
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: [1890?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1890   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements for Griffith, Farran & Co. precede text and on back endpapers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077903
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237906
notis - ALH8399
oclc - 174964964

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Half Title 1
        Half Title 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
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        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Advertising
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text



















STORIES AND PICTURES FOR LITTLE
TROUBLESOME

t4












Uniform with this Volume in Size and Style.
Price Sixpence each, in Cloth Boards. Chromo on the side.
PAPA'S PRETTY GIFT BOOK.
MAMMA'S PRETTY GIFT BOOK.
STORIES FOR PLAY TIME.
THE CHRISTMAS GIFT BOOK.
THE PRIZE PICTURE BOOK.
BRIGHT PICTURE PAGES.
MY LITTLE BOY'S STORY BOOK.
WHAT SANTA CLAUS GAVE ME.
TINY STORIES FOR TINY BOYS.
LITTLE TOMMY'S STORY BOOK.
LITTLE BOY BLUE'S PICTURE BOOK.
NEDDY'S PICTURE STORY BOOK.
BIRDIE'S SCRAP BOOK.
WEE WEE STORIES FOR WEE WEE GIRLS.
MY OWN STORY BOOK.
BRIGHT PICTURES FOR ROGUISH EYES.
STORIES AND PICTURES FOR LITTLE TROUBLESOME.
NELLIE'S PICTURE STORIES.
MAY'S LITTLE STORY BOOK.
LITTLE TROT-ABOUT'S PICTURE STORIES.
STORIES FOR LITTLE CURLY LOCKS.
DAISY'S PICTURE ALBUM.
PRETTY PET'S GIFT BOOK.
GIPSY'S FAVOURITE COMPANION.

LONDON: GRIFFITH, FARRAN & CO.
E. P. DUTTON AND CO., NEW YORK.







STORIES AND PICTURES



FOR



LITTLE TROUBLESOME


LONDON
GRIFFITH, FARRAN, OKEDEN & WELSH
(Successors to Newbery & Harris)
WEST CORNER OF ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD
E. P. DUTTON AND CO., NEW YORK















































[ The rights of Translalion and of Reproduction are reserved.]








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ell
i.
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LITTLE Elsie was a German girl, and lived
in a German house with her two aunts. She
is just now recovering from a long illness,
and the quiet of her pretty home is very
pleasant to her. But soon she will be well
and strong again, and this quiet life will
be exchanged for one of romps and lively
games.


I'




- 1*





















MARIANNE had a young brother Alfred, not
two years old, and she would amuse him like
a kind elder sister. When the big dog
Jowlerjumped on the chairs and frightened
everybody in the house, and her elder brother
was romping roughly with him,' Marianne
prevented little Alfred from crying; she talked
to him so soothingly, that he lost his fear.
She forgot herself in trying to please her
baby-brother, as a good sister should.















S I;





1 r II
-'~ ~- ~ ;13
K i~ l



JOLE'SGIE















".i^c^-~- ^ ^ ---~^:l-. .

How good Fanny was to her old grandfather!
She was the comfort of his days, he had no
wife left him now, and but for Fanny he
would have been very lonely. It made
him feel young again to be with his dear
grand-daughter, who would read to him
whenever he wished it; or she would sit and
listen to him while the little ones were out
at play with the pet goat.
You must not think she did not love play,
but she loved to comfort her aged grand-
father, and did not mind losing some pleasure
in order to make his heart glad.
























FANNY AND HER GRANDFATHER,


!'" 'I:




















INTO the midst of a very poor cottage a
young lady rushed, terrified, saying she was
pursued by a bull; and she fainted as soon
as she got indoors.
The labourer, who was at supper, kindly
went to see what he could do; but when
he got outside he could see no bull, but an
old cow, which it appears had merely frisked
a little in running to join its companion in
the lane. Then the young lady felt ashamed
that she had been so alarmed for a trifle.


































MARIETTA had a rabbit given her. She will
take care that it never wants food or fresh oats.



















WHO would, have thought that Rose and,
Ronald should have been such foolish children
as to go off on an expedition alone, and
lose their way ? A storm came on, and they
were but too glad to take shelter in an old
woman's cottage. There they thought of the
snug evenings at home with father and
mother and two other little sisters, and they
remembered, too, how alarmed their parents
would be about their absence. I do not
know what they would have done if Dame
Potter had not known the way to their
home, and gone back with them herself.
















































ROSE AND RONALD.






















//j


You see this sick man ? He has' sent for
the lady to confess and ask forgiveness for
something for which he is now very sorry.
Many years-ago he" stole away the lady's
little daughter, and she has sorrowed
the dear child all these long years.
repentance is better late than never, and
God accepts our repentance even when it is
slow in coining.


i








I-


THERE are few things more beautiful than a
le stag and a graceful doe amid woodland
Sery. They can be made very tame by
kindness, and will run up to you the moment
you appear. Thus kindness is as attractive
as unkindness is repulsive.













THE fishes live in quite another world to that
of the one we inhabit. They are at home in
their wonderful country, the ocean, and the
house of the shell-fish is its shell. The
bottom of the sea, in some places, is their
cemetery too, and in the course of thousands
of years they have strewn the floor of the
ocean with a thick layer of their empty shells.
They have no trouble with bricks and mortar,
for they are ready provided with a house.
And how many different kinds of houses there
are for these creatures! Think of this when
you pick up shells on the shore.










i I '


WE should have a tender feeling for the
wants of the poor, and for the aged who
cannot work for themselves. The Lord
accounts our love for them as love to Him-
self, and He tells us He does so. This lady
and gentleman have come a long way to see
the old man in the hospital, who was once in
their service, and whose faithfulness they
never forgot.
























WE may thank a kind Providence who has
cast our; lot far from the horrors of war.
Nadelka, the young girl you see here, was
not so fortunate.
Her country was invaded, and there were
miseries all around her, too great to describe;
but she did all she could to help the wounded,
although she was such a little girl. She is
giving drink to a poor man who has been
made prisoner.































TmS faithful black woman has travelled
through the Indian jungle in which tigers
and snakes abound, in order to place her
charge, a young English child, in safety.
and ~ 1 snake abond inodrt Lac e
charge a on nls lin afty


























WE think strange things in sleep. Harry
was over-tired one day, and so dreamed that
a tall lady in white came and sat beside him,
and put out her hand.
He had been reading a book called the
"White Lady," and had eaten a heavy supper,
and this, I suppose, made him dream as
he did.


T


































ALFRED was a naughty boy, or he would
L ," '























ALFRED was a naughty boy, or he would
not have amused himself by making Edith
unhappy by spoiling her doll.








/- 0 navigate a
r "- canoe re-
I- quires prac-
tice. These
people were
/ suddenly up-
/ -\ set,andfound

Struggling in

a i But the wife
clung to the
stump of a
Street, which is
called some-
times a snag, and caught hold of one child, then
another child clutched the tree, two boys sup-
ported themselves on the canoe which drifted
against the stump, the father caught the end
of a rope, and so by doing the little they
could, supported themselves till help came.
Always do the best you can see to do, and
you may hope that God will send you help.
















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THE WRECK OF THE CANOE.


r,






LITTLE Fay is a
4 dear little girl, and
dearly her nurse
loves her. She
/ runs aboutsomuch
all day, that at
S a night her tiny feet
grow quite tired,
and sometimes
she is carried up
/to bed.
When nurse
has laid her head
on her pillow, and
S said good-night,
she takes away the shoes to sew the buttons
on, which Fay often twists off. But nurse
does not mind what she does for her darling
little Fay; and Fay, too, is very kind to nurse.
Although she sometimes gives her a lot of
trouble, I do not think she means to do so.








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AGNES never forgot to say her prayers. To
begin the day without thinking first of God,
would have been very sad to her. A great
poet has said-
More things are wrought by prayer
Than this world dreams of."


























SUSIE was very ill, and would lie for hours
without speaking. Her good little sister
Nelly would stay for hours by her, and her
mother was always at hand to do whatever
she needed. When Susie got well, she
thanked God for so kindly taking care of
her, and was thankful to all her kind friends.












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A .1 -.


QUEEN ELIZABETH KNIGHTING 'SIR WALTER
RALEIGH.
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ATHIE was a poor little orphan who
had been left in charge of a good old
rector, who was much absorbed in his books.
It was New Year's Eve, and Kathleen
was in her favourite attitude in front of the
study fire. She had scarcely moved for more
than an hour. Oh, if he would only look
at me!" sighed poor little Kathie. Mr
Porter had taken very little notice of her for
some days past, and she was longing for his
love. A lump came in her throat, and tears
filled her eyes. How good he looks!" she
thought, "and mamma told me to love him;
oh, if he would only let me Will he never
turn over that horrid page!" Yes, at last
the page was finished and turned, a few notes
written on a manuscript by his side, but there
was no look for Kathie.
Presently, however, he laid down his work,.
and the rest of the evening was spent by the
two in pleasant and playful chat.



























4%. tr,


KATHLEEN AND THE RECTOR.





















IT is very difficult to find one's way in a
strange country, without roads or houses.
Even men on horseback have been lost in
such places. No wonder, that these three
children could not find their way home, for
they lived in Australia, and on the verge of
a great plain. They grew hungry, and sat
down to rest. Little Jack got up to gather
some berries for Mary, and they were after-
wards seen by a mounted cattle driver, who
took the children on his horse to their home.







































FOR many years old Mr Toogood had lost
some valuable papers. His grandchild, Effie,
was hunting for her ball in the lumber-room,
and discovered an old box, full of papers,
and, behold, there were the lost documents !


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ESSIE had come
r/ all by herself to
4.* 'i her grand-
Smother's, and
- (_ ; found that
J-i -v--: only the old
Housekeeper
S was at home.
But for all
s-,;> that Jessie
marched up
the great staircase as if she were a grown-up
visitor, while her little dog ran after her,
and gave orders like a grand lady. She
thought it very fine to behave like this, and
give herself the airs of somebody of im-
portance; but I can assure you that when
the old housekeeper told the other servants
they laughed heartily. Grown-up folks, as
well as little folks, are laughed at if they
are vain.

















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PROUD JESSIE.







"~/ USIE loved daisies, and
they are flowers any girl,
may well love. One
night her
mother heard
a noise in
.. Susie's room,
S' and hastening
towards it she
saw her little girl going downstairs, carrying
a lamp in her hand.
Her mother followed softly, wondering
what Susie could be going to do. She
walked outside the house door, though it
was dark, and all along the garden, till
she got into the road, near which stood a.
ruin.
There Susie knelt down to pick daisies,
and then her mother discovered that Susie
was walking in her sleep.
















































SUSIE'S SLEEP WALK.







j ..:1^'" i'



1,1,








THESE two little girls are come to ask cook
for some sugar. They do not want it all for
themselves, they will give some to the two
horses, who love sugar.
Cook is making a pudding, and, good-
naturedly, leaves off stirring it in order to
please her little friends.
Presently they ran away quite happy,
thanking cook.
You see that even good-nature can cause
much happiness to a child.





























POOR little Nelly had lost her mother, and
her father was gone to seek work in the
country, so she set off to find him! She
walked till her shoes got into holes, so that
she could,.hardly get over the ground.








tI, I"








WHAT a funny little couple, They thought
they would marry each other when they grew
up, and they went right away into the woods
to live as man and wife, but the funny little
boy soon grew cross with the tiny girl be-
cause she would not play marbles; and
she grew angry because he did not like her
doll.
And so she hung her hat on the branch
of a tree and went to sleep, while the funny
little boy sulked; till nurse came to look for
both, and took them home, telling them they
were silly children, as indeed they were.

























i ~1' III 1


THIS is the little girl Nelly we heard of just
now, who walked so far to find her father.
When the lady, for whom he worked, heard
of Nelly, she came to see her, and brought
her little girl to make friends with her.







ESSIEand
Janet were
Listening
with much
interest to
the story of
etwo or-
phans, who
went to
London to
make their
fortune.
One was a
little boy,
the other his big sister, and owing to the
kind assistance of a friend they met on their
journey they were enabled to get on most
successfully in London. The children thought
they would always be kind to friendless
people after hearing this touching tale. And
they were right in feeling so.




















II






































THE TWO ORPHANS TRAVELLING TO LONDON.


I \























HERE is the River Thames, and the long line
of buildings on its shores, great part of which
are the Houses of Parliament. They cost a
great deal of money to build, and look beauti-
ful on a summer evening, reflected in the
water. Big Ben is the large clock which
strikes from one of the towers. It can be
heard over a great part of London.























- -L


JOSEPH MERTON had walked a long way, and
was very tired when he stopped at a pretty
-cottage to ask for some water. The young
girl who came to the door uttered a cry of
joy, and so did Joseph, for here was the house
he had been trying to find; the young girl
was his only sister. He had come to his
journey's end at last, most happily.
i1






i i i DO not supposeyou
I'. 9 have ever travelled
so far, in your whole
e o life, as the young
Girl who bears the
funny name of
Kwei, you see
kneeling beside the
sickman. All herlife
Shad been spent in
Sn travelling; she had
Been from Japan to
the United States to be educated, and had
travelled from place to place there.
And now she was going all the way from
Japan to England, and she knew that she
might never see her dear old friend again.
But she also knew that he was in the hands
of God, who would take care of him, whether
she were with him in Japan, or far, away in
England.

























*1/A


KWVEI AND HER SICK FRIEND.


i :
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ii r I I; .r

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SOME children were in a field among the
flowers, swallows chasing flies above their
heads. They were running after butterflies,
and Johnny thought he could catch one in his
cap. But you know that butterflies have wings
and can fly away, whereas Johnny had rather
stout legs, so the butterfly got away from
him; and I am very glad of it, for it would
not have done Johnny any good to catch the
butterfly, which wanted to enjoy its life as
much as Johnny.
There was surely room enough in the
world for both Johnny and the butterfly, and
it is cruel and wanton to catch these creatures
just for the sake of killing them. Some birds
live upon butterflies.























SEE what great distress this father and mother
feel. Their children wandered out this morn-
ing, and have never returned home. All at
once the dog raises his head and barks
joyously, for he hears the children's step.
Then all the sorrow is changed to joy.
So God grieves for us when we wander from
Him into sin, and welcomes us like a kind
father when we return to Him.







4.


THIS lady is looking through a field-glass
to see things a long way off. She is on a
steamboat, and as it is fine weather, she is on
deck with her father. Far away she catches
sight of the French coast, and of a little boat
which has just been overturned. In all haste
they make for the spot, just in time to save
the drowning sailors.






U P iiIZIL -I k
IE1rI


SEE how attentively these dear little folks are
listening to their father, who delights to take
them on his knee, and tell them some good
story. He is telling them the story of
Joseph and his brethren, and they resolve
that they will never be jealous or cruel, like
Joseph's brothers, but kind and forgiving,
like Joseph himself.























THE children had been told they must be,
very quiet, as their old aunt would never get
well if she was awakened out of the sleep
into which she had fallen. And so they
went out into the garden, and played very
quietly, and the elder ones would not let the
little ones shout. The doctor praised them
so much when he came that evening, and
told them their aunt would now get well.
































JACK was such a little boy, that he would
often have got hurt, or even killed if it had
not been for his sister Nelly. One day she
pulled him out of the road just in time to save
him from being run over by a waggon.


111 :1
























their brother, that they could not manage to

side, and soon fell asleep. Then a man came

thought he would steal their hats. But at
that moment a cart came rattling along;
they awoke, the thief slunk away, and the
kind man in the cart took the little ones
home.




















EDINBURGH, the capital of Scotland, is a very
charming town. It stands on a cluster of
hills, about a mile and a half from the sea.
The castle, towering on the height above the
town, was built first, there is no doubt, and
the houses gradually clustered round about
it. The picture above is a view of the old
city more than a hundred years ago. The
castle still presents the same appearance, but
the streets are much enlarged and beautified,
and the whole city is much extended and
improved.







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Thirty volumes, well illustrated, small 8vo, clearly printed on good paper, and
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Among the Brigands. By C. E. BOWEN.
Amy's Wish: A Fairy Tale. By Mr G. TYLER.
Cat and Dog; or, Puss and the Captain.
Children of the Parsonage. By the Author of "Gerty and May."
Children's Picnic (The). By E. MARRYAT NORRIS.
Christian Elliott; or, Mrs Danver's Prize. By L..N. COMYN.
Claudine; or, Humility the Basis of all the Virtues.
Crib and Fly: the Story of Two Terriers.
Daughter of a Genius (The). By Mrs HOFLAND.
Discontented Children (The). By M. and E. KIBnY.
Ellen, the Teacher. By Mrs HOFLAND.
Esksdale Herd Boy (The). By LADY STODDART.
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Grandmamma's Relies. By C. E. BOWEN.
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Hero of Brittany (The); or, The Story of Bertrand du Guescliu.
History of the Robins (The). By Mrs TRIMMER.
Hofer, the Tyrolese. By the Author of William Tell."
Holiday Tales. By FLORENCE WILFORD.
Holidays among the Mountains. By M. BETHAI EDWARDS.
Johnny Miller. By FELIX WEISS.
Julia Maitland. By M. and E. KIRBY.
Life and Perambulations of a Mouse (The).
Memoir of Bob, the Spotted Terrier.
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Never Wrong; or, The Young Disputant; and It was only In Fun.
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Paul Howard's Captivity. By E. MARRYAT NORRIS.
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Theodore; or the Crusaders. By Mrs BOrLAND.
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Every Inch a King. By Mrs WORTHINGTON BLISS.
Family Feats. By Mrs R. BRAY,
Fearless Frank. By MARY M GELLIE.
A Gem of an Aunt. By Mr ELLIE (M. E.< B.)
Gerty and May. By the Author of Our White Violet."
Grandfather. By E. C. PHILLIPS.
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Good in Everything. By Mrs BARWELL.
Granny's Wonderful Chair. By B. F. BROWNE.
Happy Holidays. By EMMA DAVENPORT.
Happy Home. By LADY LUSHINGTON
The Heroic Wife. By W. H. G. KINGSTON.
SHelen in Switzerland. By LADY LUSHINGION.
Holidays Abroad; or, Right at Last. By EMMA DAVENPORT.
Lucy's Campaign. By M. & C. LEE.
Lost in the Jungle. By AUGUSTA MARRYAT.
Louisa Broadhurst. By A. MILNER.
w My Grandmother's Budget. By Mrs BRODERIP.
Our Birthdays. By EmMA DAVENPORT.
Our Home in the Marshland. By E. L. F.
Parted. By N. D'ANVERS.
Pictures of Girl Life. By C. A. HOWELL.
School Days in Paris. By M. S. LE JEUNE.
Starlight Stories. By FANNY LABLACHE.
Sunnyland Stories. By the Author of "St OlaveE."
Talent and Tatters.
Tittle-Tattle: and other Stories for Children.
Vicar of Wakefield (The).
Willie's Victory.

: RIFFITH, FArIRAN & Co., ST PAUL'S CHURCHYARD, LoNDON.


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