• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Hush a bye baby
 Three men in a tub
 Dickory, dickory, dock
 Baa, baa, black sheep
 Benjamin, James, and John
 Ride a cock horse, and cross...
 The fiddle stick and the dancing...
 One, two, buckle my shoe
 The crooked man
 Old King Cole
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Sayings and doings in fairyland, or, Old friends with new faces
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077901/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sayings and doings in fairyland, or, Old friends with new faces
Alternate Title: Old friends with new faces
Physical Description: 279, 9 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Sinclair, D. S. ( Dorothy )
Hardy, Paul, fl. 1886-1899 ( Illustrator )
Jarrold and Sons
Publisher: Jarrold and Sons
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1890
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Magic -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Fantasy literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by D.S. Sinclair.
General Note: Caption title printed in red and black.
General Note: "By Dorothy Sinclair with numerous illustrations by Paul Hardy" -- cover.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note: Library's copy imperfect: all after p. 278 lacking.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077901
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237555
notis - ALH8043
oclc - 15467511

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Frontispiece
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    List of Illustrations
        Page ix
        Page x
    Hush a bye baby
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Three men in a tub
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
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        Page 58
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        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Dickory, dickory, dock
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
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        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Baa, baa, black sheep
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
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        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Benjamin, James, and John
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
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        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Ride a cock horse, and cross patch
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
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        Page 176
    The fiddle stick and the dancing shoe
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
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        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
    One, two, buckle my shoe
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
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        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
    The crooked man
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
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        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
    Old King Cole
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
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        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
    Advertising
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text





















SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.



*












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Seepage 109.


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SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN


FAIRYLAND;
oR,

OLD FRIENDS WITH NEW FACES.


BY D. S. SINCLAIR,
Author of "Sugar Plumsfor Chddren," The Fairy Prince and the Goblin,"
The Enchanted Princess," &c., &c., &'c.

















(onbon:
JARROLD AND SONS, 3, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS.
[All rights reserved.]
1890.
















CONTENTS.



---0--


HUSH A BYE BABY


THREE MEN IN A TUB ...


DICKORY, DICKORY DOCK ..


BAA, BAA, BLACK SHEEP ...


BENJAMIN, JAMES, AND JOHN ...


RIDE A COCK HORSE, AND CROSS PATCH


THE FIDDLE STICK AND THE DANCING SHOE


ONE TWO, BUCKLE MY SHOE


THE CROOKED MAN ...


OLD KING COLE ...


Pagt

II


38


64


... I64






... 147


... 177


200


... 223


252













LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.




Page
"BAA, BAA, BLACK SHEEP, HAVE YOU ANY WOOL?" Frontispiece
THE OLD ENCHANTER COMING OVER THE BROOK ... 15
ON, ON THEY RAN, AND THE GREAT TREES SWAYED AND
SHOOK ON EVERY SIDE ... ... ... 23
A VERY OLD WOMAN, BENT NEARLY DOUBLE ... ... 27
HE STOOD STILL TO SEE WHAT WOULD HAPPEN ... 35
"CAN YOU FIGHT?" ASKED THE KING ... ... 47
LOOKING FROM HIS LOFTIEST WINDOW ... ... 53
AND A GOOD TOSS OVER THE BOWLING GREEN ... 61
"I REALLY THINK MY HAIR IS VERY PRETTY"... ... 66
"WHAT IS YOUR NAME, MY CHILD?" ASKED THE QUEEN 71
LINDA WAS ABOUT TO REFUSE HIS OFFER SCORNFULLY ... 78
THE GRIEF OF THE GOOD WOODCUTTER AND HIS WIFE ... 90
ETHELINDA REFUSED TO LISTEN TO HIS SUIT ... ... 93
HE FOUND HIMSELF SURROUNDED BY A NUMBER OF
ANGRY-LOOKING MEN ... ... ... 100
VISITED BY EVERY SPECIES OF ELF, WITCH, AND GOBLIN... 107
SURROUNDED ON ALL SIDES BY BOWING COURTIERS ... 129
"WHO ARE YOU, MY. FRIENDS?" ASKED HE ... ... 132
THE PEOPLE WERE ALMOST WILD WITH DELIGHT ... 143
ALL THE DOCTORS IN THE KINGDOM WERE SUMMONED ... 153
SHE SAW HER LOVER ADVANCING TO MEET HER ... 157
HE ATTEMPTED TO SEIZE THE LOAF OF BREAD ... 166










x LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Page
THE PRINCESS FINDS HERSELF LYING ON THE SOFT GRASS
IN THE SHRUBBERY ... ... ... ... 175
IAY AFTER DAY THEY TRUDGED BACKWARDS AND FORWARDS 181
IN THE GLOOMIEST DEPTHS OF THE FOREST THERE DWELT
A WITCH ... ... ... ... ... 183
ONE OF THE MEN SUDDENLY TRIPPED OVER A LOG OF WOOD 192
HIS WIVES GREETED HIM WITH A NOISY WELCOME ... 198
OFF THEY STARTED, ARMED WITH A VERY BIG BASKET ... 204
GOOD DAME PARTLETT ... ... ... ... 206
"FIFTEEN! SIXTEEN! MAIDS IN THE KITCHEN ... ... 215
THE GUESTS ARRIVING ... ... ... ... 217
THE GAY YOUNG BARBER ... ... ... ... 225
HE TRIED HIS BEST TO WISH FOR THE THINGS WHICH SHE
DESIRED ... ... ... ..... 232
THROWING COMBS, BRUSHES, BASINS, AND RAZORS AT DICK,
DROVE HIM FROM THE SHOP ... ... ... 241
AT THE END OF THE FIELD IN WHICH HE THEN WAS, STOOD
A STILE ... ... ... ... ... 244
YE CROOKED MILE ... ... ... ... 249
THE KING STANDING ON THE BALCONY AND ENJOYING THE
MUSIC ... ... ... ... ... 257
"I AM TWANKY TWANKS .. ... ... ... 2 63
HE CLAPPED HIS HANDS AND SHOUTED "HURRAH!" ... 270
THE HUGE CREATURE SEEMED TO BE DARTING DOWN
DIRECTLY UPON THEM ... ... 27
































'LC/ NCE upon a time there lived a good
L"."^i huntsman, who had a wife he loved
very dearly, and two children-a girl of ten, and a
little baby boy. They were so happy, this humble
family; all day long the father went out hunting,







12 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

and at night he would come home laden with food
for his household. There he always found a
cheerful fire awaiting him, and a welcome that was
warmer still.
Now a few miles off there dwelt an envious, cruel
enchanter, who ground his teeth with rage every
time he passed the huntsman's cottage. He hated
to see people contented, and longed for an oppor-
tunity of making them miserable.
As for them, they did not understand his evil
nature, and only regarded him as a poor, harmless
old man, for whom they had always a pleasant smile
and a kindly look.
But, alas! one day the huntsman's wife fell ill,
and she could no longer attend to her duties, so
Gretchen, the daughter, had to be so busy, washing,
scrubbing the.floors, and attending to baby, that she
had no time for play, and this hard work she did not
at all like. I do not mean that she was a naughty
girl;- and indeed, she loved her mother devotedly,
and was grieved to the heart at her illness. But it
was so dull to be obliged to stay in the house all







HUSH A BYE, BABY!


day long, and little brother was often cross and
fretful now that mother could not nurse and pet him
as she had always done.
So Gretchen's cheeks grew pale, and her eyes
heavy; and at last the poor invalid noticed this, and
said to her,
Now, little daughter, when father comes home
to dinner he shall carry baby in his cradle down into
the meadow by the brook, and you can run about
there all the afternoon, and pick buttercups and
daisies to make the house look gay."
"But how will you manage alone, mother,
dear? "
Oh, I will try to go to sleep, and then I can do
very well without my little help until tea time."
So after dinner away to the meadow went
Gretchen and baby, both happy at being in the
fresh air and sunshine again. Father put the cradle
down in a safe place, and kissing the children, went
off to his hunting as usual. He must work harder,
and.walk farther than ever, now that his wife was
ill, for she needed good food and medicine, and so







14 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

he must shoot plenty of hares and rabbits to sell in
the market.
Hardly was he out of sight when Gretchen saw
the old enchanter coming over the brook, across the
stepping-stones.
"Good day!" said she; and "Good day, my
pretty maid!" answered he. "How is it that you
are nurse this bright afternoon ?"
"Oh, mother is very ill, you know, so I have to
do all the work, and cannot get out much; and I
was very glad to come down here and mind baby,
instead of staying indoors."
"Dear me And do you really do all the work?
What a good little girl you must be But I think
it is very unkind of your father to make you do so
much."
"Oh, no, indeed! Father is never unkind. He
cannot help it, for he is obliged to be out all day
long."
But he should get a servant to wait upon you."
"A servant!" And Gretchen laughed merrily.
" Why, where is the money to come from do you





































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RUSH A BYE, BABY


think? Besides, I am happy enough now that we
are here in the sunshine, and I can pick as many
flowers as I like."
Just then baby began to cry, so she rocked the
cradle with her foot; but he would not be quiet, and
she was obliged to take him up and walk about with
him. He was a heavy child, and her little arms
were not very strong; so she soon got dreadfully
tired, and presently the enchanter said,
I have just thought of a capital plan to rest you,
my child. Look, I have some strong rope in my
pocket. Suppose we tie the cradle to one of the
branches' of the. tree over yonder, and this soft
breeze will rock it so gently backwards and forwards
that baby will be sure to go to sleep."
"Oh, but I am afraid! Do you think it will be
safe ?"
"Safe! Yes, indeed. You don't suppose I
would wish to hurt the child! See here, I will
fasten the cradle quite firmly, and then you can put
him in or not just as you like."
So the cunning man made it all secure, and
.B







18 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

showed Gretchen how it would swing very gently
from side to side, and then pointed out how low the
tree was, so that there could not be any danger;
and at last she put the child in. She could climb to
it quite easily, for the branch was not many feet
above the ground, and strange to say, the little
screamer became quiet instantly. Whether he liked
the look of the green leaves above him, or whether
the enchanter cast a spell around him, I cannot say;
but certain it is that his cries ceased.
I wonder if mother will be vexed with me for
putting him there," said she.
"No, of course not. Besides, you need not tell
her."
"Oh, but I must. I always tell her everything."
"Well, do as you please; but if you think you are
likely to get scolded, you had better take baby down
again."
Gretchen thought of her aching arms, and decided
to leave him where he was.
Soon afterwards the enchanter went away. He
had done enough mischief for one afternoon, and
was careful only to proceed by degrees.







HUSH A B YE, BABY /


The little maiden, left alone, thought how kind he
had been to her, and what a relief it was to be able
to run about without the heavy child in her arms,
and then she began thinking,
Suppose mother says I have been naughty, and
must not put baby up there again. Then what
would be the use of coming here? I cannot pick
flowers while I am nursing him; and oh, dear! I
don't think I will tell after all."
And she did not; so you see she was already
beginning to be deceitful.
When it was time to go home, she first took baby
from the cradle, and laid him carefully on the grass.
Next she untied the cradle, and left it for father to
bring home at night; but she hid the cord in a hole
in the bank.
Mother was delighted to see baby looking so
well. You are a good child, Gretchen," said she ;
"and you must go to the meadow every day while
the fine weather lasts, so as to bring back the roses
to your cheeks."
Next day the enchanter came again; and the first







20 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

question he asked was, what Gretchen's mother had
said when she was told that the baby had been put
into the tree.
I-I-I did not tell her," stammered the child,
hanging down her head.
"Ah, that was very sensible of you. Now that
she is ill it is much better not to disturb her, and
you have done nothing wrong, you know."
Gretchen did not feel quite so sure about that.
Nevertheless, baby was hoisted up again, and was
as good as gold all the afternoon.
It really was quite extraordinary how such an old
man could know such a number of nice games. He
could play at anything, and seemed to enjoy himself
quite as much as the child; but he was very fond of
getting away to the other side of the meadow, and
Gretchen every now and then discovered that she
had strayed much too far from baby brother. Then
she was seized with a fit of penitence for having
forgotten him, and would take him out of the cradle
and kiss and fondle him, till he began to cry again,
and she was only too glad to put him back.







HUSH A BYE, BABY! 21

The next day she did not pick him up at all,
when once he was safely deposited in the tree, and
several times she strayed, even through the gate
into the next field. But the enchanter always said
to her, Well, you know it cannot matter, for he is
quite safe up there, and much happier and quieter
than if you were nursing him."
Then the artful man showed her how much better
the flowers were that grew just inside the neigh-
bouring wood; and Gretchen thought to herself how
pleased mother would be with the gay colours, and
so she wandered about until she was quite a mile
from the meadow. But on discovering how far she
had come, she turned back in a great hurry, and
never stopped running until she had satisfied herself
that baby was safe and sound.
The enchanter looked after her, chuckling softly,
Ha, ha, my pretty maiden! I shall soon have
the pleasure of seeing your happy home made
miserable."
In this way a whole week passed by, and
Gretchen grew daily more careless, and never even







22 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

thought now of telling mother what she did in the
afternoons.
And one day, when they were in the wood, the
enchanter said to her,
"Would you not like to see all the wonderful
things which I have in my house ?"
But I thought you were very poor?" cried she.
"Ha, ha, my dear! That is what people think
and say of me. However, I will show you how
wrong they are, if you will come with me."
But it is so far away, and I dare not leave little
brother for so long. Suppose father should come
back ?"
Why, don't you see we are more than half way
there already, and it is a pity to turn now. We
have nearly all the afternoon before us."
And at last the silly child consented-then who
so glad as the cruel enchanter, for he knew that a
terrible thunderstorm was coming, and he hoped
that Baby would be killed.
But the good huntsman had also noticed how
black and threatening the sky looked and, though







HUSH A BYE, BABY!


many miles away, was now returning as fast as
possible to warn his children.
Gretchen and her companion soon reached the


Pi
" On, on they ran, and the great trees swayed and shook on every side."-Page 24.

little house, and she was quite amazed at the num-
ber of beautiful things which she saw on every side.


^'/,







24 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

The time passed very quickly, and she had forgotten
all about her neglected duties when suddenly she
was startled by hearing a terrific peal of thunder.
"Oh, my Baby, my dear little brother! What
will become of him ?" cried she. "What a wicked,
wicked girl I am." And in headlong haste she
rushed from the house and ran through the wood,
the enchanter close behind her, for if mischief had
befallen the child he would like to be there to see it.
On, on they ran, and the great trees swayed and
shook on every side. The wind howled among the
branches, and ever and anon the dense blackness
was turned into most brilliant light by the blinding
flashes which seemed to dart hither and thither as
if alive.
At last they were close to the meadow. There
was the cradle still safe where they had left it; but
just then came another dreadful flash of lightning,
and with a crash down came the branch, cradle and
all.
Gretchen stopped short in horror. She did not
dare to go on, for she felt sure that baby must be







HUSH A BYE, BABY!


killed. Judge of her astonishment when her com-
panion burst into a loud fit of laughter, and cried
out,
Oh, this is joy indeed! Now they will never
be happy any more!"
The poor father had just entered the meadow
from the opposite side, and had also seen the
accident. He rushed forward, but even as he ran,
noticed that the old man suddenly vanished, and in
his place he beheld a large white rabbit, which
darted off and was instantly hidden in a hole. The
fact is he was afraid to face the huntsman, and had
therefore made use of his magic arts to transform
himself into this shape.
Baby was not dead, but he was very, very badly
hurt, and Gretchen and her father were nearly
distracted with sorrow and fear as they thought
what effect the sad news would have upon the
invalid at home. The little girl confessed all her
wickedness, and though her parents forgave her,
she felt that they could never trust her again as
they had done. Everything was tried that could







26 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

be thought of to cure the baby, but he grew worse
instead of better, and the doctors said he would
surely die; and the poor mother was hardly likely
to survive him, for grief had made her so weak that
she seemed more like a shadow than a living
woman. And every day the huntsman was obliged
to start out early and stay late, but now Gretchen
never went many yards from the cottage door.
Several times she saw the old enchanter's evil
face peering at her from a distance, and always he
looked full of wicked delight. Once or twice when
he was not visible she caught sight of a white rabbit
and, remembering what her father had said, shud-
dered as she thought this was most likely her former
companion.
One day she was drawing water from the well;
her eyes were red with weeping and her heart felt
heavy as lead. Suddenly she heard someone asking
her for a drink of water, and looking up saw a very
old woman bent nearly double. She at once gave
the water, and then asked the stranger to come into
the cottage and rest awhile, for shE looked footsore
and weary.







HUSH A BYE, BABY


As they were going up the garden path, the
woman asked,
"Why are you so sad, little maiden ?"
"Alas, my dear baby brother is dying, and all


V


through my fault, and I am afraid mother will die
too of grief."
"Well, well, cheer up, my dear. I am very


r~u, 17;VIC
DIM 21% E ck







28 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

clever at all sorts of doctoring, and can perhaps
cure them both."
Gretchen's heart gave a bound of delight.
"Oh, if only you could do that, I would willingly
be your slave all the days of my life."
"Well, I keep you to that promise. If I cure
them you must come away with me as my servant.
Does not the prospect frighten you ?"
"I will come gladly," answered Gretchen bravely;
"for I feel that nothing I can do will ever make up
for all I have made my dear ones suffer."
By this time they had reached the cottage door,
and Gretchen's mother was rather surprised to see
the strange visitor, who, however, soon made herself
quite at home. She felt the invalid's pulse and
passed her hand several times over her face, then
said,
I can cure you at once, but only on one con-
dition, and that your daughter knows."
But when the mother heard what it was, she cried
out that Gretchen should not leave her, and that
she could not do without her.







HUSH A BYE, BABY!


"Besides, my little daughter," said she, "surely
you would not like to go away from home ?"
The child's tears fell fast, but she answered
firmly,
"Yes, I want to go, for then you will be well."
But suppose you are unhappy."
"I will not mind, indeed I will not mind. Oh,
mother pray let me go !"
"Well, we must wait until father comes home,"
said the poor woman with a heavy sigh; "and
thank you all the same," she went on, turning to the
stranger. I feel sure you mean kindly, but oh I
don't know what to say."
"Never mind, I will hope to take the little girl
with me, and you need not fear that I shall treat
her ill."
When the huntsman came home he was as
troubled as his wife had been. It would be happi-
ness indeed to see her well and strong again, but
then how could he bear to part from his little
Gretchen? So he asked the visitor if she would
want to keep her always, and if they would never be
able to see her.







30 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

"Once every month she shall come back to you
for a few hours," answered the woman. "And I
promise you that I will take good care of her."
And so with heavy hearts the parents at last
consented to give her up. No sooner had they
done so than the stranger took a small packet from
her pocket, and mixing a pinch of the powder which
it contained with some water, gave it to the invalid
to drink. Instantly all pain left her, and she sat
up well and strong.
"And now my baby boy, my baby !" cried she.
The old woman took the child gently out of its
cradle, and carefully examined it.
"I can cure his pain for the present," she said,
"but you only," turning to the father, "can restore
the use of his limbs."
I! Oh, pray tell me how."
"You must shoot a white rabbit and wrap the
baby in its skin, and he will thengecome quite
strong again."
"A white rabbit?" echoed the huntsman thought-
fully. "Can that be the wicked creature who so
misled my poor Gretchen? "







HUSH A BYE, BABY I


"Yes, it is he. He is a vile enchanter and
deserves the worst evil that can befall him. Now,
little maiden, are you ready? We must be getting
on our way.
There was a sad farewell, but at last the child
tore herself from her parents' arms, and started off
with her new friend. They walked on steadily for
about a mile, and then the old woman, stopping
short, gave a peculiar whistle.
Instantly an enormous eagle came flying towards
them, and Gretchen saw that he was harnessed to a
beautiful little carriage, which shone like gold in the
rays of the setting sun.
On turning to her companion she found that the
old witch-like creature had disappeared, and in her
stead there stood a lovely glittering fairy.
Dear child," said she, "you are coming with me
to my palace on the top of yonder mountain. You
need not be surprised nor alarmed at my sudden
transformation. I did but put on these tattered
garments to try your affection for your parents, but
now you see me in my true form. Say, do you like







32 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

the prospect of coming with me better than you did
before ?"
Gretchen was so overcome with admiration that
she could hardly find words to express herself; but
we may be sure that her heart felt considerably
lighter, and she stepped into the car by the side of
the fairy, wishing only that her mother could know
what had happened.
The first month passed away very pleasantly;
she learnt to spin, and sew, and do a hundred useful
things; and oh, how glad she felt when the day
came for her visit home.
You may imagine how the good huntsman and
his wife stared when they beheld their daughter
enter the cottage, accompanied by her fairy friend
in all her dazzling beauty, and how delighted they
were when they discovered how much the child
had improved. They overwhelmed the fairy with
thanks, but she stopped them by asking about the
baby.
"Alas, madam," answered the huntsman, "I have
not yet been able to kill that wicked white rabbit.







HUSH A BYE, BABY


Often and often have I seen him in the distance,
but before I can get near enough to fire, he dis-
appears.
"Ah, well, I suppose I must help you again.
Here, take this cap, and next time you go a-hunting,
put it on. You will then be invisible, and the
enchanter will be clever indeed if he escape your
deadly aim."
The man took the present with many thanks,
and the fairy and Gretchen soon departed. This
time the hearts of the parents felt light as air, for
they knew that their little daughter was happy.
And so she certainly was; nevertheless, she
longed for the time when she might return home,
and one day her friend said to her,
"Dear child, I am very pleased with your con-
duct, and if you go on improving as you have done,
I will let you stay with your mother altogether the
next time you go. But I shall be sorry to part with
you, so I shall be a frequent visitor at the cottage."
Gretchen thanked her warmly, and you may be
sure that she tried harder than ever to do her best







34 SA4 INGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

to please the fairy. During this second month she
learnt all sorts of dairy work-churning, making
butter, cheese, and curds and whey, &c., and she
joyfully thought how pleased mother would be at
the progress she had made.
Meanwhile the huntsman had gone out day after
day, and yet had never once seen the white rabbit
again. But one evening he found that he had
strayed farther away than usual, and twilight had
come while he was still miles from home. So he
tried to take a short cut across the wood, but in so
doing lost his way, and wandered about, vainly
seeking a path, until the moon rose.
Suddenly he heard a patter, patter, rush, rush of
soft footsteps, which seemed to come from all direc-
tions at once. He looked round, and saw number-
less rabbits of all colours gathering together in a
sort of circle, and apparently waiting for something
or somebody. He stood still to see what would
happen, and presently to his joy beheld the white
rabbit, the wicked enchanter, approaching. Though
he longed to fire at once, he thought he would first







HUSH A BYE, BABY


hear what this meeting was about. Little did the
malicious creatures think that he was so close at


He stood still to see whdt would happen."-Page 34.

hand, and fervently did he thank the kind fairy in
his heart for her magic gift.







36 SAY INGS. AND DOINGS IN FAIR YLAND.

In a moment the enchanter spoke-
I have called you all together, my friends," said
he, "to consult how we can thwart the fairy Aquila.
You know that she has done her utmost to ruin my
plans for making the huntsman's family unhappy,
and we must really think of some fresh scheme.
Bah! It makes me furious to see these good folks
go smiling about their work as if nothing had
happened! However, they will never be able to
cure that baby of theirs, for I will take care to keep
my skin safe on my own back."
All the rabbits clapped their paws, and shrivelled
up their whiskers in token of applause, when POP !
BANG!" Over rolled their leader, dead, on the
grass.
Instantly the whole company disappeared, and the
huntsman found that he was only a few hundred
yards from his own cottage gate. He picked up the
body of the white rabbit, and skinned it as he went
along; then, running joyfully in, cried to his wife,
"At last our dear child shall be cured! See
here Our cruel enemy is dead !"







HUSH A BYE, BABY


In less time than it takes to tell it, baby was taken
out of the cradle, and wrapped in the skin; and
instantly he began to kick his little legs about, and
double his tiny fists, as he had never done since
his terrible fall.
Oh, how joyful were the parents then, and the
more so as they remembered that next day their
daughter would come home again. And when the
morrow came we may imagine their delight on
hearing that she was not to leave them any more.
Then the kind fairy bestowed many good and
useful gifts upon both the children; and promising
to be their friend so long as they behaved well, bade
them all farewell, leaving them once again the
happiest family in all the countryside.







4 R 0 1)


"Rub-a-dub, dub Three men in a tub;
The Butcher, the Baker, the Candlestick maker.
An apple for the King,
And a pear for the Queen;
And a good toss over the bowling green."


POOR man had three sons, George,
William, and John, and as he had not a
single penny to give them when they
grew up, he sent them into the great world to seek
their fortunes.
Now, as was the usual occurrence in those days,
the brothers had not gone many miles upon their
way when they came to a place where four roads







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


met. George took the one to the right hand,
William that to the left, while John marched straight
forward, looking neither east nor west.
The three agreed on parting, to meet again at
that precise spot at the end of seven years, which is
a very long time, but not too long to learn a trade
thoroughly, and each lad had made up his mind
that whatever he found to do he would do
thoroughly.
George marched on all that day and the next,
and by evening had reached the outskirts of a town.
Here he saw a man driving some cows and pigs
before him, but as the cows wanted to go one way,
and the porkers were filled with a sturdy determi-
nation to go the other, the poor man had no easy
task. George offered his assistance, which was
accepted with many thanks, and before they had
gone far, he had told his new companion all about
his poverty, and his wish to learn some honest trade
by which he could earn money to send home to his
old father.
"Why," said the man, "you are just the very lad







40 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

I want. I am a butcher, and have a fine large shop
down in the town yonder. Say, will you come to
me?"
George did not much like the idea at first. He
had never killed any living creature, and shuddered
at the thought of slaughtering bullocks and sheep,
but after some consideration he decided to try his
hand at the trade. If he did not like it any better
after a little while, he could but try something else,
and would be no worse off than he was now.
Besides he had taken a great fancy to the master
butcher; so after settling what wages he was to
receive, he began his new work at once.
William had not been quite so lucky. Three
whole days passed by without his meeting anyone
who could assist him, and he was getting tired and
very hungry.
But on the morning of the fourth day he arrived
at a large town. The first shop he came to was a
baker's, and the poor lad could not help gazing
longingly in at the crisp tempting loaves just hot
from the oven, and which lay on the counter in
inviting rows as if saying, Come eat us, do !"







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


Just at that moment the baker came to the door,
and gazed earnestly up and down the street.
"Where is that lazy, good-for-nothing lad of
mine ?" he muttered angrily. If only I could get
another, I wouldn't keep him a minute! Here are
all the customers waiting for their bread, and no
one to carry it round to them! I'd go myself, but
I aren't leave the shop. Hallo! What d' you
want?"
This he said to William, who had advanced as if
to speak.
"Oh, if you please, sir, I heard you saying that
you wanted a lad, and I thought perhaps you would
take me."
"That I will, and glad to do it. There's not a
boy to be had in the place, for they've all gone off
soldiering."
So William turned baker, and a very good baker
he was, so good indeed, that his master was always
thanking his lucky stars for having sent such a lad
to him.
And now we must see what John had been doing.







42 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

He walked and walked and walked for a whole
week, and then came to a town, which, although
night was far advanced, was a perfect blaze of light.
Candles shone in every pane of every window, and
made all things as visible as at noonday.
John was nearly fainting with hunger, and
addressing the first person he met, begged for a
morsel of bread.
"How can a strong lad like you dare to beg,"
answered the stranger, "when there is any amount
of work to be had for the asking? Here am
I searching high and low for more people to
help me make candlesticks but no one can I
find."
John jumped with joy.
"Oh, if you will only take me, sir, I shall be
glad. But pray will you tell me the meaning of all
this lighting up."
"Why, where have you come from?" cried the
other. Don't you know that this is Jubilee Town,
and that we have an illumination every night, which
is very good for trade, for we burn no end of







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


candles, and wear out millions of candlesticks every
year. I am a candlestick maker, and I have just
received an order for three thousand, which must
be ready next week, so you see that if you come to
me you will have to work hard."
"That I shall be only too pleased to do,"
answered John, "if you will first give me something
to eat."
Well, his new master fed him, lodged him, and
gave him good wages; so when the seven years
were nearly at an end, he said good-bye to Jubilee
Town, and turned his face homewards, bearing with
him a gift which the kind candlestick maker insisted
on his taking.
This was a tiny wax candle in a golden candle-
stick.
"With this in your hand you cannot lose your
way in the darkest night," said his master. "The
candle will never burn away; but you must remem-
ber that it will show no light unless set in its own
candlestick. Farewell!"
John thanked him heartily and went his way.







44 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

At the four cross roads he met his brothers, who
had also gifts to show, which they had received
from their masters. The butcher had a knife which
would cut through any substance, hard or soft, thick
or thin, fluid or solid, and the baker joyfully ex-
hibited a loaf which would never grow less, however
much of it might be eaten.
"So long as we all keep together," said he, "we
need never die of starvation, and if we do our duty
we shall soon make our fortunes."
They found their old father hale and hearty, and
full of delight at once more beholding his tall,
handsome sons; but of course they could not remain
long at home idle, so behold them- once more upon
their travels.
This time they took the fourth road, which led
them right past their own cottage door. They
journeyed for some days in company, and at last
came to a fine large town, in the middle of which
stood the king's palace. The three brothers
marched boldly up the steps, and knocked at the
gate, and because they had good clothes upon their







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


backs, and plenty of loose coins in their pockets,
they soon gained an entrance.
Now it happened most fortunately for them that
the king's chief butcher had just died, and that the
baker had been dismissed for putting alum into the
royal .bread, so his majesty at once decided to
engage the two elder brothers. Poor John looked
very disconsolate at finding there was no place for
him; but the queen coming in took a great fancy
to his appearance, and immediately created him
"Knight of the Candlestick" to herself.
They soon settled down to their new duties, and
at the end of a year sent for their old father to live
near them.
Things went on very happily for some time after
that, when lo! one day the powerful king of a
neighboring country took offence because King
Angelo and Queen Angelina had forgotten to send
a letter to wish him many happy returns of his
birthday. He vowed that such an insult could not
be forgiven, and he declared war upon the spot.
SKing Angelo was not at all frightened; indeed







46 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

he was rather amused, for he knew that he had
more and better soldiers than his neighbour, King
Tyranno, and he prepared for battle accordingly.
In the first few fights he always gained the
victory, and Tyranno was beginning to wish he had
not been so easily offended, when circumstances
suddenly changed.
One day a terrific knocking was heard at Tyran-
no's gate, and when the porter went to open it, he
fainted away with fright. There stood an enormous
giant with only one eye, but as if to make up for
the want of the other, he had a mouth large enough
for an oven, and when he spoke, displayed a set of
teeth which looked like ninepins.
"I want to see the king!" he thundered; then
observing the poor porter's prostrate form gave it
a great kick, and calmly walked into the palace.
On all sides the servants and courtiers fled at his
approach, so he marched on and on until he came to
his majesty's throne room.
The king turned pale, his teeth chattered, and his
limbs shook beneath him, in fact he was too fright-
ened to move or speak.







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


"I am come," said the giant, "to offer you my
services against your enemy, King Angelo."
At these words Tyranno began to pluck up
courage, and faintly murmured,


It is very
fight?"
"Fight! I


good of you, I am sure. Can you


should think I can! And not only







48 SA YJNG. AND .DOINGS IN F1AIRYLAND.

that, but I eat up all my enemies afterwards." And
the ogre clashed his huge jaws together with a
horrible sound.
But why do you come to me," asked Tyranno,
"instead of going to King Angelo?"
"Angelo! Oh! he is too good for me. I only
help wicked, bad-tempered people like yourself."
Now the king did not at all approve of being
called wicked and bad tempered; but this time he
was obliged to bear the insult in patience, for he did
not dare to say a word to offend the ogre, so he
merely smiled and observed,
It is very fortunate for me then that I am not
good, or I should not have the benefit of your help."
"Oh, very fortunate! Yes, very fortunate indeed,"
growled the giant. Now when are you going to
begin ?"
Begin what ? To fight, do you mean? "
Yes, of course. What else could I mean ?"
"The army is in the field at this moment, and if
you will allow me to send notice of your coming,
they will put themselves under your leadership at
once."






THREE MEN IN A TUB.


And now the fortune of war was indeed turned.
Poor King Angelo began to lose his soldiers by
hundreds and thousands, and besides those who
were killed in battle, the giant carried many more
away with him to cook and eat at his leisure.
But soon they found out something which helped
them a great deal against their terrible enemy. I
have already told you that he had but one eye, and
he was so shortsighted with this one that he could
hardly see anything at all. So Angelo's soldiers
would sometimes put caps and jackets on logs of
wood, and the stupid ogre would carry these logs
away, and never discover that they were not real
men until he tried to eat them.
But when he found out his mistake, he got so
enraged, that without waiting to kill any enemies,
he would snatch up the first people he could find,
who were, of course, Tyranno's subjects, and gobble
them up for his supper.
And now the wicked king began to think that
perhaps after all he was not quite so lucky as he
had imagined. Still he would not give in, but
carried on the war with greater vigour than ever.







50 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIR LAND.

So Angelo's court grew sadder and sadder. One
after another of the nobles was killed, and soon
there would be no captains to lead the soldiers into
battle. Nor was this the worst; the fields were
barren and desolate, for all the men were away at
the wars, so there was no one to plant corn, to dig,
and to reap.
But now our friend William, the baker, came
forward with his magic loaf, and fed -the starving
people. The king was filled with gratitude, and at
once made him a knight. Then he and his two
brothers begged leave to join the army, for they
longed to help to rid the country of their dreadful
enemy.
So King Angelo made George standard-bearer,
John trumpeter, and William drummer, and away
they marched, looking handsomer than ever.
Now the ogre was very fond of attacking his
enemies by night. He and his soldiers would
quietly creep up in the darkness, and then, making
a sudden rush, capture and kill hundreds of them.
But to his dismay he now found that was im-







THREE MEN IN A TUB


possible. Every night John placed his magic candle
in its golden stand, and the whole camp became
light as day. No chance then for a foe to come up
unperceived, and the giant gnashed his teeth with
rage to think how he was being outwitted.
Still, by day he caused great destruction among
King Angelo's troops, and his majesty at last issued
a proclamation that whosoever could kill him should
be allowed to marry one of the three lovely prin-
cesses, the most beautiful maidens in the world.
At this grand news the hearts of the three
brothers were filled with eagerness, for each would
have given all the world to be the king's son-in-law.
They performed such wonderful feats of bravery
in the field that everywhere the enemy fell before
them, and the ogre himself was several times forced
to flee.
George, with his magic knife, made every en-
deavour to kill the horrid foe, and one day chopped
off three fingers of his left hand, not being tall
enough to reach his heart.
The giant now swore to be revenged upon them







52 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

all, and offered a thousand gold pieces to the man
who would bring them, dead or alive.
Now the baker, who had been dismissed from his
post before William's arrival, had never forgiven
his successor, and as he too was with the army,
considered that this would be a good opportunity to
get rid of his rival, and enrich himself at the same
time.
He happened to know that the three brothers
retired to a neighboring wood every day for a mid-
day nap, as their constant watchfulness throughout
the night made them weary. He accordingly con-
trived to let the ogre know that he would deliver
them up to his soldiers at a certain hour during the
next afternoon.
In the morning there was another fierce battle,
but the ogre did not show his face at all. He
stayed at home, chuckling to himself, as he thought
of the rare prisoners he would have that day, and
he almost forgot the pain of his wounded hand as
he planned the tortures he would make them suffer.
Tarantara! Tarantara!" He could hear John's





























































Looking from his loftiest window he discovered that his troops were running
away."- -Page 53.







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


trumpet sounding merrily in the fray. Rub-a-dub
dub Rub-a-dub dub !" What a drummer William
was, to be sure. He could tell the sound of his
drum among hundreds.
"Ha, ha! my young man," thought he, "you
will drum a different tune ere nightfall! I will pay
you all out for the loss of my fingers "
Presently he heard a noise of hurrying footsteps;
and looking from his loftiest window, discovered
that his troops were running away in the wildest
confusion.
"So much the better," muttered the ogre.
"Those three young upstarts will think that we
have had enough for one day, and never dream that
danger is so near."
When the news of the victory reached King
Angelo, le was so delighted that he proposed to the
few courtiers he had still around him that they
should all repair to the bowling-green for a good
game. It was his majesty's favourite sport, and in
times of peace never a day passed without his
enjoying it.







56 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

But while he was thus occupied, little did he
think of what was happening to his faithful three.
George, William, and John, thoroughly tired out
with the exertions of the morning, soon after dinner
went off as usual to the neighboring wood, which,
unfortunately for them, was out of sight of their own
camp. Now was the traitor's chance! He waited
till he thought the brothers would be fast asleep;
and then, collecting the enemy's soldiers, who were
close at hand, bound the brave youths hand and
foot, and carried them off to the ogre's house.
George had not time to draw his knife-in fact,
before he was thoroughly awake, he was a captive.
The giant's delight knew no bounds. He
danced, he capered, he sang, until the noise could
be heard at Tyranno's castle, more than five miles
off.
The wicked king was terrified. Had his dreadful
ally gone mad ? He now wished that he had never
seen him, and bitterly did he repent of his ill-
temper. If only the ogre could be got rid of,"
thought he, I would forfeit half my kingdom."







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


Meanwhile, the man who had betrayed the three
brothers stood waiting for his reward. For a long
time the monster did not notice him, but at last
angrily demanded what he was doing there.
"The thousand gold pieces, if you please," said
he.
"Thousand fiddlesticks !" stormed the ogre.
" Take that, and that, and that, for daring to come
here spying and prying." And as he spoke, he
gave the wretched traitor such a shower of blows
that he very soon fell to the ground lifeless.
So he did not get much reward for his treachery.
And now the giant turned his attention to the
brothers, who had not spoken one word. William's
drum was still fastened round him, but the trumpet
had been dropped in their struggles.
"Wait a while! Wait a while! muttered the
ogre. I have not thought of good-enough tortures
yet. Oh, what a fine supper you will make-such
plump youths as you are Here, perhaps, you will
be trying to escape, for my eye is not very good,
and I cannot keep watch while I am thinking."






58 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIR YLAND.

So saying, he bundled them all head foremost
into a huge wooden tub, which stood in a corner of
the room. In so doing, he loosened the ropes with
which they were bound, and George delightedly felt
in his pocket for the magic knife, with which he at
once cut all the knots.
"Now," whispered he to his brothers, we cannot
climb out of this prison, for it is too high; but I can
cut a hole through the side with my knife." And
he began softly drawing the blade backwards and
forwards.
"What is that noise?" thundered the ogre.
"What are you doing ?"
"It will never do for him to find out that: so you
must beat your drum, William, very loud, and then
he will not hear my scraping."
So the drummer began, "Rub-a-dub dub!
Rub-a-dub dub."
"What! Your hands are free, are they?" cried
the ogre. Never mind. I like to hear that drum,
for then I know you are there." And he gave
himself up to his pleasant thoughts again.







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


And soon George had made a hole big enough to
peep through. Presently he saw the ogre take up
a rosy-cheeked apple which lay on the table, and
give it a shake. Instantly a shower of gold pieces
fell from it. Another shake, and another shower,
till the table was covered with money. Then the
monster gave a loud shout, and a servant came
running in.
"Here, take a handful of this gold," said his
master, "and buy everything nice you can think of
to stuff these fat young birds for my supper; and
mind, make haste, or it will be the worse for you!"
The man departed, and in a few more minutes
the ogre began to snore. He was fast asleep, and
no amount of drumming would awaken him.
What luck to be sure Soon the hole was big
enough to creep through, and George, William, and
John stood safe upon the floor. Seizing the trusty
knife, George plunged it straight into the monster's
heart, and he fell dead instantly. Then William
seized the apple, and John a pear, which lay near;
and in frantic haste they rushed from the house.







60 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

As they were going out, they encountered King
Tyranno.
"What is the matter, and who are you?" cried
he.
"The ogre is dead! they answered; and before
they had time to speak another word, the king flung
his arms around them, and embraced them heartily.
Hurrah!" he cried. Hurrah!" and tossed his
crown up in the air as high as he could for joy.
" Tell King Angelo that I forgive him for forgetting
my birthday, and that we will be the best of friends
from this day forward."
Our three youths were delighted to be the bearers
of such happy news, and peace was proclaimed that
very day.
William presented the apple to King Angelo,
saying that it would make up to him for the money
he had lost during the wars. And John, on bended
knee, presented the pear to the queen, though
confessing that he did not know if it possessed any
magic power.
At first she hardly dared to shake it; for having







THREE MEN IN A TUB.


come from such a wicked creature as the ogre, she
feared lest it might be harmful; but, at length,
summoning up her courage, she gave a gentle shake,
and as she shook, what do you think occurred?
Why, all the soldiers who had been killed during
the wars came to life again, one after another,
although the ogre had cooked and eaten them; and
I think you will agree with me that this was the
most wonderful thing that had happened.
Then what rejoicing there was; what ringing of
bells, and firing of cannons! Of course his majesty
must have a game with his bowls; but, dear me! he
could not bowl straight for joy; the bowls went
hither and thither all over the green; so he was
obliged to give it up.
And the very next week there was a grand
wedding-indeed, I ought to say, three-for George
married the eldest princess, William the second, and
John the third; and I have it on the very best
authority that they all lived happily ever afterwards.

























Dickory, Dickory, Dock; the mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one-and down she ran.
Dickory, Dickory, Dock !"
"'Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat, where have you been?'
'I've been to London to visit the Queen?'
'Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat, what did you there?'
'I frightened a little mouse under her chair.' "

HERE was once upon a time a little
cottage maiden, whose life was happy
as the day was long. In the bright
summer days she ran about hither and thither,
chasing the bright butterflies, imitating the joyous
songs of the merry birds, or playing with the







DICKOR Y, DICKOR Y DOCK.


lambkins in the fields. Her little bare feet were
brown and hard, her hands were red and rough;
for the sun and the dust, the wind and the storm,
the mud and the stones, all had their share in fitting
her for the work which she would one day have to
do.
That is to say, when she grew up-when she
grew up to be a woman like mother, who toiled, and
spun, and washed, and scrubbed; strong, happy,
and healthy, rich, because she was altogether
contented.
And so, too, was our little maiden, until the day
on which this story begins.
She had washed her face and hands in the brook,
which ran gurgling by their cottage garden, and was
now gazing at her own reflection in a little still pool,
which had formed between some great stones.
I really think my hair is very pretty," said she
to herself. It looks like gold, now that the sun is
shining upon it; and my eyes too, are so bright,
and my cheeks so rosy. It is a pity there is no one
to see me but father and mother."







66 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIR LAND.


I really think my hair is very pretty."-Page 65.

Was it a voice which answered her, or was it
only the wind softly whispering through the glowing
rose bushes which overhung the stream ?


- I -







DICKORY, DICKORY DOCK.


No-yes,-it was a real voice, and the voice came
from the image in the water.
It is true, dear child, that you are lovely, and
why should such beauty be wasted? If only you
could live in the big town yonder, lovers would flock
around you; and who knows but that the prince
himself would fall a victim to your charms ?"
"Ah! What do you say?" cried the girl,
clasping her hands in an ecstasy of delight? "Oh
how splendid that would be Tell me-ah do tell
me--how I can get to the town?"
But no answer came; and though she lingered
for more than an hour, not another word was heard,
and soon the wind arose, and disturbed the
reflection, so that its outline became all indistinct
and ugly,
"Ah, that is not my face now that I see," thought
Linda, shuddering. I cannot be hideous like that.
I will stay no more, but go home to my mother, and
forget the silly dream which I have had."
But she did not forget, and the next day she
came again to the still pool. Again the lovely







68 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

image was there, and the maiden gazed until she
became entranced with her own beauty. She hardly
expected to hear another speech; and certainly it
was not necessary, for she was too thoroughly
convinced of her attractions to need a further
revelation.
And from that day forward her behaviour
altogether changed. From being obedient, helpful,
and gentle, she became unruly, idle, and bad-
tempered. If her mother wanted her assistance in
brushing, dusting, or scrubbing, she would say
scornfully, I hate soiling my hands, and tiring
myself;" and haughtily tossing her head, would
walk away in disdain.
Soon she insisted on having shoes and stockings
to wear. "You know, mother," said she, "the
people who come through the forest from the town
do not have bare feet, and why should I ?"
"Alas, my child, where is the money to come
from to buy such things? Your father and I work
hard from morning till night, and we have always
gone barefoot. It is good enough for poor folks
like us."







DICKORY, DICKORY DOCK.


"But I do not intend always to be poor,"
exclaimed Linda.
Hey-day, child! Where are the riches coming
from ? You won't work even, and you can't get
money if you do nothing for it."
I want to go and live in the town, mother; and
then some rich man will marry me."
"Heaven forbid that you should leave this
cottage, my darling. How could you live in the
great town with no father and mother to take care
of you ? Drive all such silly thoughts from your
mind, and be our own dear child once more."
But Linda only sulked and fretted, and at every
opportunity would wander down to the pool, and
give herself up to vain thoughts.
Now it happened that one day, when she was
seated in her usual place, she heard the sound of a
hunting horn, and soon the king and queen came
riding past.
Linda jumped up; and parting the bushes with
her hands, gazed from between them at the gay
throng. Just then the queen happened to look







70 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

round, and catching sight of the maiden, said to the
king,
See, what a lovely child Call her hither, and
let us speak to her."
So the king beckoned, and Linda advanced,
blushing rosy red with pleasure and excitement.
"What is your name, my child?" asked the
queen, "and where do you live ?"
My name is Linda, your majesty. I live in the
cottage over yonder," and as she spoke she made a
gesture of disgust.
The good queen fancied that she did not look
happy, so she said,
"Are you well treated, little Linda, and is your
home all that you can wish ?"
"Oh, no, madam! I hate the place, and wish
I might never see it again."
Poor little one!" said her majesty. No doubt
she has a harsh stepmother, or perhaps a father who
is cruel to her. Is this so, dear child ? "
"Yes," answered Linda, boldly, for her heart
beat high with the hope that the kind queen would







DICKORY, DICKOR Y DOCK.


take her away. "Yes, they are very cruel to
me."
"Ah!" exclaimed the king, who had not before
spoken. "I will not allow harshness to children in
my kingdom; so we will go to yonder cottage, and
punish these people as they deserve. My huntsman
shall whip them thoroughly with his long lash, and
so teach them better manners."
"Ah, no, sire! I entreat you!" cried Linda,
throwing herself upon her knees. "Do not have
them beaten, or I shall suffer for it afterwards still
more heavily. Take me away with you! Oh,
madam, I pray you save me from this life!"
The wicked girl put on such a look of terror that
their majesties believed her tale; and because their
hearts were full of pity, they granted her desire, and
carried her away, seated in front of the king.
As they passed the cottage door, the mother,
looking from her window, saw Linda; and, rushing
out, implored them to stop, and give her back her
child. But no one heeded her, only Linda cried
bitterly; and the poor woman, seeing this, of course







74 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

imagined that her daughter was being taken away
by force, and her grief redoubled.
When the husband came home at night, and
learnt what had happened, he was filled with rage
and sorrow. What right has any monarch to treat
the meanest of his subjects in such a dreadful way ? "
cried he. "I will go to the palace myself, and
demand the release of my child;" and accordingly
the next day he set off.
Meanwhile, Linda was congratulating herself on
having so far succeeded in gaining her desires.
Here she was, actually at the king's court, and the
mirrors on all sides told her that her own face was
by far the loveliest there.
She did not repent of her falsehoods; but, on the
contrary, was quite pleased at the clever way in
which she had deceived the king and queen.
Judge, then, of her surprise and dismay when she
was informed that an old countryman wished to see
her; and on going down found her father footsore
and weary, having walked many miles to recover
his beloved child.







DICKORY, DICKORY DOCK.


He was overcome with joy at beholding her, and
rushed forward to embrace her; but she tossed her
head, and haughtily enquired why he had come.
"Why, to take you home again, dear child!
Your mother and I have been half wild with grief
at losing you; but I felt sure that his majesty would
never be so cruel as to keep you a prisoner against
your will."
"Indeed, I am not here against my will, and
never will I return to your miserable hut."
The poor man was astounded at her words. I
know that our cottage is humble," said he. But
you are our own child, and must surely love us well
enough to prefer living in the forest to being here
amongst strangers. Have we not always treated
you kindly, your mother and I, and did we not
always give you of our best ? "
Just at that moment Linda saw one of the
courtiers approaching; so remembering her false-
hoods of the day before,-she began to sob violently,
as if greatly alarmed, and to cry out, "Oh, save me
from this man, who wants to take me back again to







76 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

my miserable home, where they treated me so
cruelly !"
The father could hardly believe his ears, and
thought she must have gone mad; but he had not
a moment's time for consideration. The gentleman
happened to be the prince himself, who, shouting to
the guards, ordered them to turn the poor wood-
cutter out of the palace, and give him a sound
beating, in order to teach him never to come there
again.
And yet cruel Linda never uttered a word to save
him from this treatment. No; she was only too
pleased to think that the prince himself should take
her part, and the words which she had heard by the
brook-side came again into her mind.
"I will live to be queen yet," thought she, "and
then how could I own this woodman for my
father?"
But as for the prince, he never even cared to look
if the maiden was beautiful, or ugly as a witch. He
was betrothed to the fair daughter of a neighboring
king, and loved her truly and faithfully, and soon







DICKORY, DICKORY DOCK.


their wedding would take place; but of all this Linda
knew nothing.
A few days passed, and the queen sent for her.
" My child," said she, "you must not be brought up
to a life of idleness, for of course you have not been
accustomed to it. You shall be one of the maids,
and learn to sweep and dust the rooms in our palace,
and thus you will soon earn an honest livelihood for
yourself."
Linda ground her teeth with rage, but was, of
course, obliged to conceal her feelings. Was it for
this that she -had left her quiet, peaceful home, and
forsaken her parents ? She had thought that with
her beauty she would at least have been made a
lady-in-waiting, and now to be only a common
housemaid "Never mind," thought she, "I shall
still be able to see the prince, and I have no doubt
he will fall in love with me."
Days passed by, and naturally this result did not
come to pass; but the chief butler saw how lovely
the new maid was, and soon asked her to be his
wife.







78 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

Linda was about to refuse his offer scornfully,
when suddenly she thought that she might, perhaps,
be able to make him useful to her plans; so she



I '














'///






"Linda was about to refuse his offer scornfully."

promised to think the matter over, saying she did
not love him yet, but that it was possible she might







DICKORY, DICKORY DOCK.


learn to do so in time; and with this the poor man
was forced to be content.
One day Linda was sweeping and dusting a room
in one of the turrets, when she noticed a large
mirror in front of her. The image which was
reflected in it smiled, and appeared to direct her to
look round the walls. This she did; but could see
nothing except an old worm-eaten bookcase, con-
taining a few musty volumes. She took down one
of these, and discovered that it was on the Art of
Magic." She read a few pages with eager eyes;
and as she looked again at the reflection, she was
sure that it nodded and smiled.
She had no fear of being disturbed, for this far
room was never used, and in fact she could not
imagine why she had been sent here to clean.
She read on and on, learning by heart many of
the spells and charms which the wicked book con-
tained, and soon she thought she would take a look
at another volume. This was on the art of prepar-
ing poisons and love philtres, and again her eyes
gleamed with delight. Now indeed she could make







80 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

the butler useful, for she would prepare a love
potion, and make him put it into the prince's wine,
and then she would be sure of becoming his bride.
When at last she went downstairs she found the
household in a state of commotion, and on enquiring
the reason was told that the prince's bride was
coming earlier than had been expected, namely, in
three days' time.
Now Linda's wicked heart was filled with rage
and envy. It was the first news she had received
of his royal highness's betrothal, and she vowed
vengeance on the bride. Instead of the love philtre,
she made up her mind to prepare a most deadly
poison, and to administer it to the princess. So
she shut herself up in the turret room, and studied
the two books for hours.
Then at midnight, when all the household was
asleep, she crept softly out of doors to collect the
noxious herbs which she needed for her deadly
draught.
She was approaching the churchyard gate after
having gathered what she required, when she







DICKORY, DICKORY DOCK.


became aware of a figure which followed close
behind her. She was so terrified that she prepared
to flee, when a voice cried, Stay !"
She turned, and the figure spoke again-
"Why have you come hither on this evil errand?
I beseech you, maiden, give up your ambitious
desires, and return to your afflicted parents who will
still forgive your sins."
"How do you know that my errand is evil ?"
enquired Linda. "I did but gather herbs to cure
a toothache. What right have you to question
me ?".
I am the fairy of the wood in which your child-
hood's days were passed, and because I esteem the
good woodman so highly, I would fain save and bring
back his misguided daughter. Say, will you return
now before it be too late ?"
"No, indeed," cried Linda scornfully. "How
could I live in that dreary wood again ?"
The fairy sighed deeply.
"I cannot compel you against your will," she
said. "But, oh, I beseech you, repent of your
wicked purpose."







82 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

"I tell you again, I have no wicked design,"
answered Linda in anger. "Leave me, I beg of
you, and trouble me no more."
At these words the figure disappeared, and the
maiden re-entered the palace unperceived.
The next day and the next she gave up to the
study of transformations, and was delighted to find
that by aid of the book on magic, she was able to
change herself into any tiny animal she chose to
represent.
And then the day arrived on which the bride was
to come. A grand feast was prepared, and all the
wedding guests were assembled. The prince went
hither and hither among them, his eyes beaming
with joy, and his heart full of love; and every time
the wicked maid caught sight of him, she thought
within herself,
"Your happiness will be but short, my Prince!"
She had persuaded the butler to administer the
poison, telling him that it was a love charm, and he,
poor man, being blinded by her beauty, believed
every word that her false lips uttered.







DICKOR Y, DICKORY DOCK. 83

The hours went on, the bride had arrived, and
all were seated at the feast. Linda could not rest,
for her anxiety to see the poison take effect gave
her no peace. Of course she could not appear in
the banqueting hall in her own form, so she changed
herself into a mouse, and crept in through a chink
in the door. Here she crouched against the wain-
scot, well out of everybody's sight, and gazed with
envy and hatred at the bride's lovely face.
At last she saw the butler approach with the
poisoned wine, which she had told him must be
carefully kept by itself in one particular bottle. He
attempted to fill the princess's glass, but no liquid
appeared. Again and again he made the attempt,
but still with no result. The man became deadly
pale, trembling as if with fright, and suddenly the
bottle fell from his shaking hands, and was shivered
to pieces on the floor.
The king turned angrily round and reproved the
butler for his clumsiness, and during the disturbance
Linda did not notice a large and handsome cat
which had caught sight of her, and was crouching







84 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

ready for a spring. With a squeak of alarm she
rushed across the room, and hid herself under the
queen's chair, closely followed by puss. One of the
ladies in waiting had seen her, however, and shrieked
out in wild alarm,
"A mouse A mouse It is under her majesty's
chair!"
"Well, let the cat kill it," laughed the king, as
the queen hurriedly rose, but the gentle bride cried
out,
"Oh no, pray do not let any creature be killed on
this happy day. Let the poor thing escape."
At her first words the prince seized the cat, and
in spite of its struggles would not let it catch its
prey; so for this once the mouse was saved, and
darted from the room in an agony of terror.
It was long ere she recovered her presence of
mind sufficiently to resume her own form, and after
having done so she sat in her room quaking with
fear.
Suddenly she became aware that she was not
alone. The figure which had followed her through
the churchyard was again beside her.







DICKOR Y, DICKOR Y DOCK.


Linda," said the voice, "will you now give up
your evil ways ?"
I do not know what you mean," she replied.
"Do not add falsehoods to your other wickedness.
You have this day felt the fear of death yourself.
Say, do you still purpose dooming the innocent
bride to a cruel fate ?"
"What are you saying?" cried the girl in terror.
"Do you intend to betray me ?"
"Alas, although I am a fairy, I know not what
to do. I love your good parents so well that I
cannot make up my mind to have you punished as
you deserve. Therefore I have come to give you
one more chance. Promise that you will not harm
the princess, and I will leave you at once; but if
you do not give me this promise, I will straightway
go to the king and tell him all."
Linda flung herself upon her knees before the
fairy.
"I promise! I promise!" she cried. "And oh,
pray do not betray me!"
For your parents' sake, you shall still have time
to repent. Farewell!"







86 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

The instant the fairy had disappeared the maiden
began forming fresh schemes of revenge. She had
no idea of keeping the vow that she had just made,
and was more than ever determined that no wedding
should take place on the morrow. Her heart was
so hardened by vanity and ambition that she gave
no thought to anyone but herself.
Now she stole softly upstairs to the bride's room,
and hid a long sharp knife in the folds of the bed
curtain.
"Ha! ha! my beautiful princess," laughed she.
"The poison has failed, but this weapon shall do
its work well."
She was in and out of the room in less time than
it takes to tell it, for she feared lest any of the other
maids might find her there, and she knew she had
no business at all in that part of the palace.
"At midnight when all are sleeping, I will come
back again," thought she.
The hours dragged slowly by, but night came at
last, and she crept.softly upstairs, thinking how soon
her rival would be dead. But when she came near







DICKOR Y, DICKORY DOCK.


the bride's room she found that three strong men
were lying across the entrance, and though they
were fast asleep, it would be impossible to get to the
door without disturbing them.
"I shall be obliged to transform myself again,"
thought she, and soon she was once more a tiny
mouse. She found a crack large enough to creep
through, and in an instant was in the room.
A strange sound attracted her attention. It
seemed to proceed from the opposite wall.
"Dick, Dock! Dick, Dock! Dick, Dock!" it
said, and Linda for a moment felt inclined to run
away. But gathering courage she advanced, and
saw what looked like a long narrow box standing up
on end.. The lid was partly open, and peeping in
she perceived a flat iron plate swinging backwards
and forwards-at the end of a thick wire.
Of course you will at once guess that this was a
clock; but such a thing had never been seen in that
part of the world before, and it was a present to the
bride from a neighboring queen. No wonder then
that Linda stared; but soon she made up her mind







88 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIR LAND.

that it was not alive, so prepared to accomplish her
cruel errand. She crept towards the bed on which
lay the beautiful princess, who had only that very
day saved the life of the wicked creature who was
now beside her, but in whose mind no spark of
gratitude could find a place.
"When you are dead, I may be queen," thought
Linda. ." I will waste no more time."
At that instant she caught sight of a pair of bright
eyes glaring at her from the foot of the bed. It was
the cat again, looking still larger and more ferocious
in the light of the moon which streamed in through
the window.
Without a second's pause the mouse rushed
towards the clock, and darted inside the case. She
clung to the chains and mounted up, up to the
wheels and machinery above. The opening was not
wide enough for the cat to follow, but it scratched
at the heavy door trying to force it wider, and
Linda felt half dead with fear. What could she do?
Here, in this small space, she could not resume her
human shape, and bitterly she blamed her folly for
having wasted so much time.







DICKORY, DICKOR Y DOCK.


While still pondering how to escape, there came
a sudden "Whirr, whirr-rr-rr," which sounded in
her terrified ears as though her place of refuge was
shivering to pieces, and then in a deep tone the
clock struck "One!"
The noise, so unexpected and so strange, alarmed
the mouse to such an extent that she rushed down
straight into the jaws of her enemy, the cat, which
with one grip shook the life out of her wicked body.
At the same moment the princess awoke, to
behold the face of her fairy godmother looking down
upon her.
"What is the matter ?" she cried.
"Nothing now, my darling. Sleep on and to-
morrow you shall know all."
And the next day before the assembled court the
fairy related how she had twice taken the form of
a cat, and thus saved her beloved godchild from her
only enemy; and when the king and queen heard of
the wickedness of the girl whom they had befriended,
they were filled with horror and amazement.
We may imagine the grief of the good woodcutter
and his wife on hearing of their daughter's fate, but








90 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIR YLAND.

the royal family did their utmost to make up to
them for all they had suffered, and after many years
they again began to feel some happiness in life.


-ft
J~8i~~i~


f4


"The grief of the good woodcutter and his wife."-Page 89.


The two fairies were always their friends, and they
grew rich and prospered, beloved by all who knew
them.

















"'Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?'
'Yes, sir, yes, sir;
Three bags full.
One for my master, one for my dame,
One for the little boy that cries in the lane."'

NCE upon a time the younger brother of
a king was beloved by a wicked en-
chantress; but he would have nothing to
say to her, for he wished to marry the fair Ethelinda,
daughter of the powerful Baron Schrecken.
But, alas for his hopes! The king also loved the
beautiful maiden, and one day announced in open
court that he purposed asking her to be his wife.
The courtiers were delighted, and loud and long
were the acclamations which greeted the joyful news
of his majesty's choice having fallen upon so worthy
a lady. But his brother hastened from the scene,
full of feelings of hatred and revenge.







92 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIR LAND.

Suddenly he bethought himself that the king had
not yet made his proposal. Why should he not be
beforehand, and go straight to Ethelinda now ? Of
course if she once knew that she could be queen,
there would be no chance for him. No, he had no
kingdom to offer; and though he really loved the
damsel, yet he had not sufficient trust in her to
believe that she could refuse a crown, unless he
could obtain her promise before she knew of the
high fortune which might be hers.
So away he went, to lay himself and his
inheritance at the lady's feet. He was handsome,
and had a sufficiently good opinion of himself.
Certainly the king could not be compared to him in
point of good looks, besides which, he was several
years older than our young gallant.
Judge, then, of his mortification when Ethelinda
refused to listen to his suit. He was beside himself
with rage; and, jumping to his feet, exclaimed,
"Ha! you think you are going to be queen, so
scorn my poor rank."
The maiden blushed a rosy red, but said, gently,







BAA, BAA, BLACK SHEEP.


" Indeed, prince, you are mistaken; the king has
never spoken a word of love to me."
But if he did, you would accept him. Is it not
so ?"


_.- \ -/ /
Ethelinda refused to listen to his suit "-Page 93.

"It is cruel to ask me such a question, and it
would be presumption in me to lift my eyes to his
majesty."






94 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

"And yet you spurn his majesty's brother!"
thundered the prince. Away with your false
tales! I know that even now you are cherishing
hopes of ascending the throne. Vain hopes; for I
swear you shall never be queen !" And so saying,
he rushed from her in a fury, nor did he slacken
his speed until he found himself in the midst of a
gloomy wood. Here he threw himself down under
a tree, and gave way to dreadful thoughts of hatred
and revenge.
Presently he heard a voice accosting him; and
looking up, beheld the enchantress, beautiful as the
sun in all its splendour.
Noble prince," said she, in a soft and winning
voice, "your feelings do you credit, and the maiden
who has scorned your offered love, deserves condign
punishment. Say, shall I kill her? "
No, not that cried the prince, starting back in
horror.
"But only think," continued the temptress, "how
soon she will. be queen, and how then she will tell
your brother of your behaviour just now. Will you






BAA, BAA, BLACK SHEEP.


not be doomed to banishment, at least, for having
dared to woo the haughty dame?"
"'Tis true; but still I cannot commit murder.
Can you not think of some other means of
punishment ? "
"Yes, I have them at hand; but first you must
promise to make me your bride, if I thus aid you
in your revenge.
But I love Ethelinda," stammered the prince.
"Weak boy!" cried the enchantress, scornfully.
" Do you still love her who has despised you ? Go,
then, to your fate, and live only to be made the butt
of her ridicule."
No, no; I love her no longer. Only help me
to be revenged !"
But, first, your promise."
The prince looked at the beautiful woman before
him; and as he gazed, he seemed to forget his
former love, and think only of her. I promise,"
said he.
"Then take this powder," answered the en-
chantress. "Watch your opportunity; sprinkle a






96 SA YINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

pinch of it upon the fair lady. If it do but touch
her hair, or the tip of one of her fingers, she will at
once lose her beauty, and you will be revenged upon
both her and your brother."
But my brother has done me no wrong."
"What? Has he not taken your bride? But
grieve not for that. I will make up to you for her
loss."
Prince Roland took the packet; and after a little
more conversation, he and his companion separated.
During the next few days he had no opportunity
of accomplishing his evil design. Many times he
half repented when in the king's presence; but the
sight of Ethelinda was enough to rouse all his evil
thoughts into life again. And yet she was so
gentle, so courteous to all, that everyone had a good
word for her.
She had accepted the king's offer, not because she
coveted the crown, but because she truly loved the
monarch, though she had never dreamt that he
would condescend to woo her.
The wedding was to take place in three days, and
still the prince had done nothing.







BAA, BAA, BLACK SHEEP.


And at last the ceremony was over; and the king
was leading his bride to the throne, when, Roland,
stepping forward unperceived, threw a pinch of the
powder upon the new queen's hand.
In an instant the white flesh shrivelled, and turned
yellow; the fingers became lean and skinny; the
rosy hue fled from her cheeks, and her golden hair
was white as snow. Her teeth disappeared from
the gums, and in their stead were seen one or two
ugly fangs.
All the courtiers gazed with horror at the
dreadful transformation, and the king cried aloud in
dismay. As for the bride herself, she exclaimed,
" Ah I am ill; I cannot walk !" and tottered to a
seat, as if she were an infirm crone of ninety
winters.
Roland felt as if turned to stone. There was a
moment's terrible silence; then arose a shout of
"She is a witch! She is a witch! She must be
burnt! "
Ethelinda's poor father, Baron Schrecken, covered
his face with his hands, and burst into tears; but
G







98 SAYINGS AND DOINGS IN FAIRYLAND.

not one word did he say in defence of his child, for
he, too, feared that this was the truth.
The wretched bride rose from her seat, and threw
herself on her knees before the king.
"Ah my husband," cried she, in a voice cracked
and piping as if with age, "What have I done that
you all look upon me so? Have pity, and let me
know the worst!"
Still the king spoke not; but one of the court
ladies, advancing, held up a small mirror before the
new queen. She gave one glance, then shrieked
and fainted.
Roland could bear it no longer. All his evil
thoughts had disappeared, and he was filled with
anguish at the sight of the misery he had inflicted.
He came forward with slow and faltering step, and
in presence of the whole court, confessed his guilt.
The king, usually so mild and gentle, scarcely
heard him to the end. "Seize him, my guards," he
cried, "and put him to the torture. What punish-
ment can be too great for such a crime ? "
The guards advanced instantly, only too ready to




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