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Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077473/00583
 Material Information
Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
Alternate Title: Government gazette
St. Vincent government gazette
Physical Description: v. : ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Saint Vincent
Publisher: G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Kingstown, St. Vincent
Kingstown St. Vincent
Publication Date: September 5, 1961
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Gazettes -- Periodicals -- Saint Vincent   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
legislation   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines -- Saint Vincent
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1, no. 1 (1868)-v. 112, no. 48 (Tues., 23 Oct. 1979)
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 111, no. 1 (Tues., 3 Jan. 1978); title from caption.
General Note: Supplements which accompany some numbers contain extraordinary issues, ordinances, statutory rules of order, etc.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077473
Volume ID: VID00583
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 19844741
lccn - sn 89018505
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Government gazette

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
    Statutory Rules and Orders No. 14: The Marketing Board (Registration of Potato Growers) Rules, 1961
        Page A-33
        Page A-34
        Page A-35
        Page A-36
    Statutory Rules and Orders No. 15: The Animals (Diseases and Importation) Control (Amendment) Regulations, 1961
        Page A-37
        Page A-38
    Supplement to Gazette: The Report of the Director of Audit of Trinidad and Tobago on the Accounts of the Board of the Commissioners of Currency, British Caribbean Territories (Eastern Group) for the year ended 31st December, 1960
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
    Supplement to Gazette: The Annual Report on the Treatment of Offenders for the year 1959
        Page C-i
        Page C-ii
        Page C-iii
        Page C-iv
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
        Page C-5
        Page C-6
        Page C-7
        Page C-8
    Supplement to Gazette: The Annual Report of the Registrar of Co-operative Societies for the year 1960
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
        Page D-3
        Page D-4
        Page D-5
        Page D-6
        Page D-7
        Page D-8
Full Text



h!^-. i



A
i4












SAINT VINCENT


GOVERNMENT GAZETTE

public hed b g!uthoritg.


VOL. 94.1 SAINT VINCENT. TUESDAY. 5 SEPTEMBER, 1961. [No. 44.


GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

No. 296.
IN THE MATTER OF THE LAND ACQUISITION ORDINANCE 1946
(No. 22 of 1946)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE ACQUISITION by the Administrator in Council
of a certain parcel of land at Sans Souci in the Parish of Charlotte for a
public purpose.

NOTICE OF ACQUISITION.

WHEREAS it is elnarted by eliol0n 3 of the Land Acquisition Ordinance
1946 (No. 22 of 1946) that if the Administrator in Council considers that any
land should be acquired for ta Iublic pilurpse he may cause a declaration to that
effect to be made.
AND WHEREAS it was considered by the Administrator in Council that the
undermentioned parcel of land should be acquired for a public purpose, to wit,
the erection of a school building.
AND WHEREAS by declaration published in the CaGu.itte on the 17th and
24th days of November, 1959, it was declared that the said parcel of land at
Sans Souci in the Parish of Charlotte the property of Alban Gonsalves measur-
ing 23,067 sq. ft. in area and bounded on the north and west by remaining lands
of Alban Gonsalves, on the east by a road reserve and onj the south by a 15 foot
right of way was required for a public purpose and should vest absolutely in the
Crown upon the Second Publication of the said Declaration to that effect in the
Gazette:
AND WHEREAS it was further declared and notified that a plan of the said
land bearing the number C3/45 and prepared by Clifford Williams Licensed
Land Surveyor was lodged for inspection at all reasonable iholurs at the TInds
and Surveys Department of Kingstown in the Colony of St. Vincent on the
19th day of October, 1959.






X

a .7a s












276 SAINT VINCEAKI ITUES LFuA, V SEPTEMBER, 1961.-(No. 44.)


Now THIS IS To REQflaE.all persons interestedt.ta-t-nder to the Authorised
Officer at the said Lanids 'ed -Surveys Departmenit within thirty days of the
issue of this notice a statement in writing signed by-them or their Attorneys or
Agents setting forth the amounts and full particulars of their claim for com-
pensation in respect of their interest in the land here-in-before described dis-
tinguishing the amounts under separate heads and showing how the amount
-l-i:,d ui;dvr each hcad ih; calc"tT!td.

Dated at Kingstown this 28th day of August, 1961.

H. R. WASON,
Authorized Officer.

No. 230.
HURRICANE NOTICE.

It is hereby notified fu, s lunicai ifiormaLiun that in the event of a hurricane
threatening or approaching the Island, the following warnings will be given:-


CAUTIONARY
KINGSTOWN (1) A red flag with a black rec-,
tangular centre will be flown
on Police Ieadquarters.

(2) Loud Speaker and Radio
announcements.

(3) Three saluting guns will be
fired.

RURAL AREAS (1) A red flag with a black rec-
tangular centre will be flown
from Police Stations.

(2) Loud Speaker and Radio
announcements.
18th July, 1961.
(421.)


No. 293.
VACANT POSTS.

GENERAL CLERK, ST. VINCENT
MARKETING BOARD.

Applications are invited for appoint-
ment to the vacant post of General Clerk,
St. Vincent Marketing Board under
Colonial Development and Welfare
Scheme No. D 4411.


TAKE COVER
(1) Two red flags with black
rectangular centres one
above the other will be
flown on Police Headquar-
ters.
(2) Church Bells will ring for
5 minutes.

(3) The Siren will blow for 5
minutes.

(1) Two red flags with black
rectangular centres will be
flown from Police Stations.

(2) Church Bells will ring for
5 minutes.


testimonials, should reach the Chief
Secretary, Government Office, Kings-
town, St. Vincent not later than 16th
September, 1961.
29th August, 1961.
(DW. 5/44(c))


No. 297.
BEQUIA DISTRICT COUNCIL.


The post is non-pensionable and the
appointment in the first instance will VACANT POST OF CLERK.
be made on a temporary basis, carry-
ing salary in the scale $960 X $84- Applications are invited for the post
$2,592 per annum. The point of entry of Clerk, Bequia District Council,
into the scale will depend on qualifica- Bequia.
tions and experience. The post is non-pensionable and
The officer will be under the direct salary is in the scale $892.80X86.40--
supervision of the Marketing Officer wh o $4,12 X $100.80-4i-854.40. Appoint-
is Manager of the Statutory Marketing ment may be made at any point in this
Board. He will be expected to have scale depending on experience and
a working knowledge of accounts, to qualifications.
assist the Accountant of the Marketing Applications should reach the Chair-
Board and to perform such other duties man, Bequia District Council,.by 15th
as may be required by the Marketing September, 1961. Further particular
Oftfer. may be obtained from the Chairmas,
Applications stating qualifications leqia District Council, Beqwli
and experience, and accompanied by two 5th September, 1f61.













S41NT -VINCENT,-TUjLSDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER, -1961.--4Ne--44.) 217.


No. 294.
ST. VINCENT COTTON GROWER'S
ASSOCIATION.

NOTICE.

TTbh following infnrym0tion is put for-
ward for the benefit of growers who
may be inclined to plant cotton this
season.
Government is taking active steps to
have the Ginnery rebuilt and negotia-
tions towards this end are progressing
satisfactorily.
The price realized last year was
$1.28 per lb. white lint as against $1.14
the year before. The negotiated price
was $1.21 but in the end a price of $1.28
was paid. The spinners have so far
offered $1.24 per lb. white lint for the
1961/62 crop.
THE GOVERNMENT THROUGH
ITS MINISTiRY F TRADE AND
PRODUCTION HAS DECIDED TO
PAY AN ADVANCE OF 24 CENTS
PER LB. FOR WHITE SEED
COTTON AND 2 CENTS PER LB.
FOR STAINS FOR THE COMING
1961/62 CROP. SHOULD A BETTER
PRICE THAN $1.24 PER LB. BE,
OBTAINED THEN GROWERS WILL
RECEIVE THE BENEFIT AS
USUAL IN THE FORM OF A
BONUS.-
The decision as to whether to -plant
or not must rest with growers them-
selves. Cotton is a very useful siup-
plementary cash crop which small
growers will do well to continue culti-
vating. Lt is surely less of a risk than
sweet potatoes at this time of the year.
In view of rising costs all round
growers should take pains to choose
their sites carefully, avoiding wilt in-
fected, too shallow or too shady areas
as cotton will not do well on these.
They should avoid interplanting the
cotton with too much corn and sweet
potatoes since these rob the cotton of
plant food and water. Good cultiva-
tion, eaiy and adequate fertilization
and good care make all the difference
between suceess and failure.
Properly cultivated cotton can still
be remunerattve at current prices those
who can and will grow it well are ad-
vised to continue.
29th August, 1961.

No. 298.
LEGISLATION.

The following documents are pub-
lished with this issue of the Gazette.
S.i. & O. No. 14.-The Marketing
Board (nRegistration of Potato
xowersa) Rules, 1961.I
(T, aD ).-


S.R. & 0. No. 15.-The Animals
(Diseases and Importation) Control
(Amendment) Regulations, 1961.
(T.P. 296).
5th September, 1961.

No. 299.
SUPPLEMENTS TO GAZETTE.

The Report of the Director of Audit
of Trinidad and Tobago on the Accounts
of the Board of the Commissioners of
Currency, British Caribbean Territories
(Eastern Group) for the year ended
31st December, 1960, is published with
this issue of the Gazette.
5th September, 1961.

No. 300.
The Annual Report on the Treatment
of Offenders for the year 1959 is pub-
lished with this issue of the Gazette.
5th September, 1961.

No. 301.
The Annual Report of the Registrar
of Co-operative Societies for the year
1960 is published with this issue of the
Gazette.
By Command,
E. A. BRATHWAITE,
Chief Secretary.
GOVERNMENT OFFICE,
5th September, 1961.


DEPARTMENTAL AND OTHER
NOTICES.

EDUCATION NOTICES.

TERM III, 1961.

GRAMMAR SCHOOL.

Term III, 1961, will be opened on
Monday, 11th September, 1961, at
10.30 a.m.
U. G. CRICK,
Headmaster.
29th August, 1961.

GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL.

The Girls' High Sdmool will re-open
for the Third Term on September 11th,
1961, at 10.30 a.m.
SB. M. HEDDLE,
th Headmistress.
29th August, 1961.













278 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER, 1961.--(No. 44.)


NOTICE,

UNDER THE LIQUOR LICENCES ORDINANCE, NO.. 11 OF 1948.

It is notified for general information that the quarterly Liquor Licensing
Session will be held in the undermentionedl parishes for the purpose of hearing
applications from new applicants in their respective parishes, for the granting
of certificates in accordance with the provisions of the Liquor Licences Ordi-
nance, No. 11 of 1948, at the times and places stated hereunder:-
Parish Time and Place of Session.
St. George & St. Andrew .. At the Court House, Kingstown, on
Wednesday, 13th September, 1961, at
9.30 a.m.
Charlotte .. At the Court House, Georgetown, on
Friday, 22nd September, 1961, at
9.30 a.m.
St. Patrick .. At the Court House, Barrouallie, on
Monday, 11th September, 1961, at
9.30 a.m.
St. David .. At the Court House, Chateaubelair, on
Monday, 25th September, 1961, at
9.30 a.m. :
Grenadines (Bequia) .. At the Court House, Port Elizabeth, on
Friday, 8th September, 1961, at
9.30 a.m.
Notice of intention to oppose the grant of any Certificate stating in
general terms the grounds of the opposition, must be served upen the applicant
and upon the Magistrate, not later than seven days before the day fixed for the
holding of the Licensing Session.
L. G. E. K. LEWIS,
Magistrate.

PARTICULARS OF APPLICANTS FOR NEW CERTIFICATES AND
TRANSFERS.


Parish Names of Applicants


St. George & Alston Thomas
St. Andrew
Geraldine Barrow

Bertram DeRoche

Vinolia David

Vincent George

Henry T. Bramble

Albert B. Campbell

Selwyn Barker

Leroy Commissiong

Ronald Llewellyn

Dennis DaSilva

Melita Sutherland

Clifford Rose
*Joseph Browne
*Sydney Sutherland


STransfer.


Occupation


Shopkeeper

Seamstress

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Clerk

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper
Shopkeeper
Shopkeeper


Residence Situation of
Premises

Buccament Buccament
Bay Bay
Cane Garden Kingstown

Richmond Hill Richmond Hill

Freeland Freeland

Enhams Enhams

Fountain Fountain

Richmond Hill Richmond Hill

Clare Valley Clare Valley

Kingstown Kingstown

Sion Hill Sion Hill

Kingstown Kingstown

Kingstown Kingstown

Belmont Belmont
Camden Park Camden Park
Kingstown Middle Street
__K__ ingstown














SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER, 1961.-(No. 44.) 279


PARTICULARS OF APPLICANTS FOR NEW CERTIFICATES
AND TRANSFRS.- (Contd.)


Parish Name of Applicant


arlotte ..I Sarah John

David Hadley


Mavis John


Occu


pati evidence Situation of
nation Residene Premises


Shopkeeper Lowmans Wd.

Shopkeeper Georgetown

Shopkeeper Georgetown


i Lowmans Wd.

Georgetown

Georgetown


Benedict Frederick Proprietor


St. David



Grenadines
(Bequia)


Leila Goddard

Carol Regisford

Benjamin Peters

Charles Griffith

George Rex Fraser

Edwin Layne

Olga Gilbert

Enos Francois

*Walter Samuel

Richard Bynoe

Ross Lulley


Transfers


Magistrate's Chambers,
Court House,
St. Vincent
16th August, 1961.


NOTICE.

KINGSTOWN BOARD.


Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper
Ier
Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Merchant

Hotel Pro-
prietress
Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper

Business-
man


Lowmans Wd. Lowmans Wd.

Chester Cottag.' Chester Cottage

Bridgetown Bridgetown

Biabou Biabou

Chester Cottagt Chester Cottage

Georgetown Georgetown

Kingstown Georgetown


Mesopotamia

Barrouallie

Rose Hall

Paget Farm

Friendship


Mesopotamia

Barrouallie

Rose Hall

Paget Farm

Friendship


L. G. E. K. LEWIS,
Magistrate.


3. No candidate shall be av
scholarship who obtains less t
third of the maximum number
in each subject and less than on


A competitive examination for the the total marks in the examine
award of two scholarships tenable at the 4. Candidates will be exas
St. Vincent Grammar School and two English, including Reading, Ar
tenable at the Girls' High School will and will be given an InL lligen
be held at the Richmond Hill Govern- 5 scholarships are awa
ment School on Friday, 7th October, a period of five years, prove
1961, beginning at 9.00 a.m. Scholar's attendance, conduct
2. Each candidate must:- gress as shown by the term re]
(a) have been less than 12 years considered satisfactory.
of age on 31st July, 1961; 6. Applications, accompar
(b) be a native of the island or Birth or Baptismal certifical
children of natives; reach the office of the Kingstow
(c) have been residing in Kings- Paul's Lot, not later than 11.3(
town or within half a mile Wednesday, 13th September, 1
of the boundaries thereof
during the three years pre- V. G. daSIL
vious to 31st July, 1961;
(d) be a pupil of a private or
public school in the island; Offie of the Kingstown Board,
(e) produce a certificate of good I Paul's Lot,
behaviour from the Head Kingstown.
Teacher of such school. I5th September, 1961,


yarded a
han one
of marks
e half of
tion.
gained in
ithmetic,
tc Tlst.
rded for
ided the
and pro-
ports are

lied by
tes must
n Board,
0 a.m. on
1961.

iVA,
Warden.


U h


- I` --














280 SAI-NT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 5 SEPTEMBER, 1961.-(No. 44.)


ReGIaTRATION OF MARRIAGES

Under ,Ahe Marriage Ordinance Cap. 151

NOTICE is hereby given that quite it
number of the marriages solemnized by
the Midisters or Heads of the various
denominations or religions have not been
registered at the Registry Department
as required by section 32 of the above
mentioned Ordinance.
All persons concerned are hereby ad-
vised to verify that their marriages have
been registered and avoid the conse-
quences which must inevitably follow
where such marriages are not registered.

Dated tiis 24th day of August, 1961.

By Order,

H. M. SQUIRES,
Registrar General of Marriages.


PURpU NOTMA.

Notice is hereby given that, Mr.
Aaron Jones of Union Island of the
Parish of the Grenadines, of the Terri-
tory Saint Vincent, intends to apply
to the Judge in Chambers, for an Order,
that the Marriage of his Parents,
SARAH JONES (n6e Robinson) and
JOHN JONES, both of Union Island
aforesaid, may be registered in the
Registry of the Supreme Court; the
said Marriage was Solemnized on the
20th day of July, 1918, at Saint
Matthias Church, Union Island, afore-
said.

Dated the 21st day of August, 1961.

EMMIANUEL F. ADANS,
Solicitor for Aaron Jones.

NOTIr.

CENTRAL HOUSING AND PLANNING
AUTHORITY.

Persons who have purchased Build-
ing Lots on the Montrose and pasent
Cottage Housing Schemes, and whose
accounts are in arrears, are hereby
notified, that all arrears must be paid
on or before the 30th September, 1961,
otherwise lots will be repossessed in ac-
cordance with the terms of the Schemes.

B. R. NEEHALL,
Executive Officer and Secretary.
29th August, 1961.


POLICE NOTEZE.

NO PARKING BETWEEN SIGNS

It is promulgated for the information
of all concerned that "NO PARKING
BETWEEN SIGNS" were recently
erected at the following places:-
(a) Sion Hill
(b) Long Wall
2. Drivers of motor vehicles are to
pay strict attention to these signs.

S. A. ANDERSON,
Chief of Police.
15th August, 1961.


SAINT VINCENT.

IN THE KINGSTOWN MAGIS-
TRATE'S COURT FIRST DISTRICT
CIVIL JURISDICTION


SUIT NO. 156/61

BETWEEN:

JOHN BUTLER-Plaintiff
and
MAY ALLEN-Defendant.


The undermentioned goods and chat-
tels, property of the above named de-
fendant, levied upon by virtue of a
Writ of Seizure and Sale issued in the
above suit, will be put up for sale by
Public Auction at the Court House,
Kingstown, on Saturday the 9th Sep-
tember 1961, at 1 p.m.

That is:


1
4
1
1

3
3
2
2
1


Folding Screen with cloth
sitting chairs
bucket
puL Spuun
coal pot
spoons
forks
knives
pots
wagonet


Dated this 19th day of August 1961.


L. G. E. K.

Chambers,
Court House,
Kingstown.


LEWIS,
Magistrate.


PUNTED BT TH tqOVUERpR- PRINTER AT I.*. GOVERI MCNT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.
[Price 30 cents.]








SAINT VINCENT.

STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS, ,
IZ i
1961, No. 14. .


MARKETING BOARD (REGISTRATION OF\
POTATO GROWERS) RULES.


(Gazetted 5th September, 1961).


1. Short title. These Rules may be cited as the Marketing Board (Regis-
tration of Potato Growers) Rules, 1961.

2. Board to keep register of growers. The Marketing Board shall keep
or cause to be kept a register of growers in a bound register with numbered
pages and shall issue to each registered grower a numbered registration card
which shall be produced by the grower when called upon so to do by any
officer of the Board.
3. Qualified growers to be registered. Every person being a sweet
potato grower in the territory, and not being an infant, who is the owner or
occupier of land on which there is a cultivation of not less than 800 square feet
of sweet potato vines, holes or plants, shall on application to the Board be
entitled to be registered as a grower on the Register of Growers, and the
Board on being satisfied that such person is qualified as aforesaid shall
cause him to be so registered.
4. Application for registration. The initial application for registration
shall be made in the Form I in the Schedule to these Rules. Thereafter in
respect of each successive new planting or replanting of sweet potatoes every
registered grower shall submit to the Board within 60 days from the date of
such planting or replanting and in the Form II of the said Schedule, such
information as is required to keep his registration up to date.
If any registered grower fails to submit such information to the Board in
respect of any new or replanted area of sweet potatoes, the Board shall not
be obliged to purchase any sweet potatoes from such new or replanted area
and the grower's name may be removed from the Register of Growers.
5. Notice to grower requiring proof of qualification. If the Board at
any time receives information that a registered grower has died or ceased to
have the qualification which would have entitled him to be registered as
aforesaid, they may send by ordinary post a notice in writing addressed to
f ,2

r3.








him at his last known place of abode, or to his personal representatives, as
the case may be, informing him or them that his or their name will be removed.
from the Register of Growers unless within a time to be specified in such
notice proof shall be given to the satisfaction of the Board that such grower
or his personal representatives continue to be so qualified; and in the case
of death of such grower the names of his personal representatives shall be
substituted for his name on the Register of Growers; and in the case of failure
to satisfy the Board as to his qualifications, the Board shall forthwith cause
such grower's name to be removed from the Register of Growers.

6. Not more than one grower to be registered in respect of same land.
Not more than one grower shall be registered in respect of the same lot, piece
or parcel of land:
Provided that the personal representatives of the estate of a deceased
grower may be registered in their joint names in respect of the land forming
part of the said estate.

7. Penalty. Any person who contravenes or fails to comply with any of
the provisions of these Rules shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine
not exceeding twenty-five dollars.



SCHEDULE
Form I.
ST. VINCENT MARKETING BOARD

REGISTRATION OF SWEET POTATO GROWERS

Form to be filled out by every sweet potato Grower.
R registration N o: .................. ........................
G ro w er 's N a m e ..........................................................................................................................................................................
P ostal A ddress........................................... .................................... ..................... .....................
Name of Property...........................................................
L o cality of P ro p erty ...........................................................................................................................................................
T erm s of T en an cy (if an y ).............................................................................................. .........................................

T total area g e of P rop erty .........................................................................................................................................
A create planted in sw eet potatoes.............................................................................. ................................
Parties other than the grower having an interest in the cultivation
(N am e an d A d d ress) .. .....................................................................................................................................


..........................................................I........ .............................................
............................... ....................................................................... ........










Nature and Extent of Such Interest..


Owner of Land......................... ..................
A address ........................ s.............................. ........


Grower's Signature.
D ate.............
Witnessed by................
T t


To be filled out if the

Signed by Mark on his


Grower cannot write.

behalf by ..............................
D ate..................
Witnessed by.....................
Ttoen


N.B. Cultivation Particulars at the back of this form must be filled ia by Grower.


Cultivation Particulars of Sweet Potato Field(s).


Field No. or Name



1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.


Date of
Planting


Name(s) of
vine(s)
planted


Acreage/Area


............................................................................................................
................................................................. .......... ............................ ...


......................................................... ..............................


.............................


"a .. ............................................................................


.............. .......... ................. ............... .............
............................... .......o. .........o. ...............................


...................................................................................... .


i


I


I







36

SCHEDULE
Form II.
Form to be filled in by Registered Sweet Potato Growers Within 60 days
of each new planting or replanting.

Registration No: ..........................................

G row er's N a m e.......................................... .. . ................................................. .. .................................................
N a m e o f P ro p erty ...............................................................................................................................................................
L o c a lity .............................................................................................................................................................................................
A creage/A rea planted ................................................. ................................................... .............
D ate of P lantin g......................................................................... ................................
Name of Vine(s) planted............................................................................................................

G row her's Signature...................................................... ..........................

D a te ......................................................................................................



Made by the Marketing Board under Section 21 of the Marketing Board
Ordinance, 1959 (No. 4 of 1959) this 14th day of July, 1961.

HUGH S. McCONNIE,
Chairman of the Board.

V. P. SMART,
Member of the Board.



Approved by the Administrator-in-Council under Section 21 of the Mar-
keting Board Ordinance, 1959, this 29th day of August, 1961.

WINSTON B. D. JACOBS,
Clerk of Executive Council.
(T.P. 291).


PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.


[ Price 16 cents. 1


1961.









SAINT VINCENT.

STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS,

1961, No. 15.


ANIMALS (DISEASES AND IMPORTATION) CONTROL
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS.


(Gazetter ith September, 1961).


1. Short Titli. These Regulations may be cited as the Animals (Diseases
and Importation) Counrol (Amendicnt) Regulations, 1961, and shall be read
as une with the Animals (Diseases and Importation) Control Regulations,
1956 (S.R. & 0. 1956, No. 25) hereinafter referred to as the principal Regula-
tions.

2. Regulation 2 of principal Regulations Amended. Regulation 2 of the
principal Regulations is hereby amended by adding the words "from the
coastal region of British Guiana and" immediately after the word "and"
occurring at the end of si'b-paragraplh ta) of paragraph (1) thereof.


Made by the Administrator in Council under section 14 of the Animals
(Diseases and Importation) Ordinance, 1954 (No. 27 of 1954) this 18th day
of August, 1961.

WINSTON B. D. JACOBS,
Clerk of Executive Council.
(T.P. 296).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.
[ Price 4 cents. ]
1061.





8'73-7^
/5 s













REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF AUDIT OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
ON THE ACCOUNTS OF THE BOARD OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF
CURRENCY, BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES (EASTERN
GROUP) FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1960.

CURRENCY ORDINANCE CHAPTER 35, No. 2, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO:
The Currency Ordinance Chapter 35, No. 2 was repealed and replaced by
Ordinance No. 15 of 1959 with effect from 1st April, 1960.. Similar amendments
were enacted by the other participating Governments.

CURRENCY FUND:
2. The excess of $4,765,210.60 held in the liquid portion of the Currency
Fund at 31st December, 1959 and referred to in paragraph 4 of my report for
the year 1959 was approved by the Secretary of State on 19th May, 1960.

BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES (EASTERN GROUP) CURRENCY SURPLUS)
ACCOUNT:
3. The balance of $2.516.425.87 standing, to the credit of this account
includes the amount of $69,529.86 payable to participating Governments in
respect of the year 1959 and the sum of $2,446,896.01 to be shared in actordance
'with the scale set out in paragraph 5 (2) of the Agreement. It is understood
that allocations of this amount have not yet been made as the Board, acting
under the proviso to paragraph 5 (2) of the Agreement is considering an amend-
ment to the scale.

CASH AND SECURITIES WITH CROWN AGENTS:
4. A Statement of cash and securities held by t!hL Crown Agents on behalf
of the Board at 31st December, 1960, has been s'en, but the certificate of the
Comptroller and Auditor General has not yet been received.

SECURITIES IN RESPECT OF LOANS TO GOVERNMENTS PARTICIPATING IN THE
CURRENCY AGREEMENT:
5. The figure of $9,847,050 representing the Nominal value of securities
in respect of loans to Governments participating in the Currency Agreement is
shown as the Market value.

AUDITED STATEMENTS FROM PARTICIPATING TERRITORIES:
6. Audited statements of the currency transactions during the year 1960
have not been received from St. Kitts and British Guiana. Verification of these
transactions, however, has been made from Vault Book Returns received from
these Territories by the Executive Commissioner in Trinidad.

VERIFICATION OF ABSTRACTS:
7. The verification of abstracts prepared by participating Governments
under paragraph 7 (3) of the Agreement has not been carried out at least once
a quarter by a Board of Survey in accordance with paragraph 7 (6) in Grenada,
St. Kitts and St. Lucia.

BOABDs OF SURVEY:
8. All Boards of Survey were unable to comply with Regulation 10 (4) of
the Currency (Coin) Regulations 1955 as reported at paragraph 8 of my report
for the year 1958 and paragraph 6 of my report for the year 1959.
M. LEE SING,
Ag. Director of Audit.
14th July, 1961.




















'%


I i














MEMORANDUM ON REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF AUDIT ON ACCOUNTS
OF THE BOARD FOR THE YEAR 1960.

BOARDS OF SURVEY:
Paragraphs 7 and 8-As stated in my memorandum on the Report of the
Director of Audit on the Accounts of the Board for the year 1959, a Board of
Survey is appointed by the Governor of each Territory to survey stocks of
currency held by the British Caribbean Currency Board in the Territory, and
thus the Board of Survey acts quite independently of the Currency Board.
A copy of the Report of the Director of Audit is submitted to th:- Government
of each participating Territory and the Government of any Territory at which
the requirements of the Currency (Notes) Regulations and the Currency (Coin)
Regulations, dealing with Boards of Survey, have not been complied with, is
requested to ensure that the Board of Survey complies with the Regulations
when effecting future surveys.

The attention of the Administrators of Grenada and St. Lucia has been
drawn to the comments of the Director of Audit in paragraph 7; with a request
that steps be taken to ensure that an ordinary survey is held in each quarter of
a year and in addition a surprise survey each year. The Financial Secretary of
St. Kitts has already expressed regret for the omission to effect a survey in the
third quarter of 1960 and has stated that "steps have been taken to impress
upon newly appointed members of the Board of Survey the necessity for
regularity in the performance of their duties."

The Currency (Coin) Regulations require that the seals of the Royal Mint
on each container be inspected by the Board at each Survey. In some of the
Leeward and Windward Islands where Barclays Bank D.C.O. acts as Agent of
the Board, it is not always practicable to inspect all of the seals owing to limited
space. The containers are however in the soic custody of the Bank and the
Bank has undertaken to deliver the containers with the seals intact. Stocks of
coin held in those Islands are diminishing as Ihe exchange operation nears
completion and it should soon be practicable for the seals of the Royal Mint on
each container to be inspected at each survey in all the Islands. At Trinidad
where the main stock of coins is held it would be a lengthy and costly exercise
involving the unpacking and repacking of the entire contents of the coin vault
for inspection of all of the seals. Boards of Survey in consequence inspect a
varying percentage of the seals at each survey and the percentage inspected is
stated in the report on the Survey.

L. SPENCE,
Executive Commissioner,
British Caribbean Currency Board.

Treasury Building,
Trinidad.
18th July, 1961.









ACCOUNTS OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF CURRENCY, BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES
(EASTERN GROUP) FOR THE YEAR 1960.

INCOME ACCOUNT.


$
To: Personal Emoluments .. 172,169.88
Rental of Vaults .. 2,146.00
Rental of Offices .. 4,856.60
Rental of Incinerators .. 240.00
Incidentals including electricity .. 2,898.60
Telephones .. 264.38
Postage and Telegrams-Headquarters .. 613.34
Furniture and Equipment-Area .. 862.09
Printing and Stationery-Headquarters 2,517 7.65
Supplies of Notes .. 73,214.32
Intercolonial transfer of notes and coins .. 8,265.91
Audit of Accounts .. 1,490.00
Travelling and Subsistence expenses-Commissioners 1,350.47
Agency Fees-Barclays Bank D.C.O. .. 6,240.00
Bicycle Allowance-Messengers .. 59.90
Supplies of coins .. 73,620.67
Repatriation of U.K coins .. 2,741.14
Provident Fund-Board's contribution .. 5,584.40
Extraordinary Expenditure-Electric Hoist and Re-
moving Cancelling Machines .. 887.17

Transferred to Currency Fund (Article 4 (2) (c) of
Currency Agreement)
Transferred to Currency Surplus Account (Article 4
(3) of Currency Agreement)


$

















360,082.52


992,987.22

2,448,896.01

$3,799,965.75


$


By: Dividends on securities held by the Crown Agents on
behalf of Currency Fund
Interest on deposits in Crown Agents Joint Consoli-
dated Fund on behalf of Currency Fund
Interest on deposits in Crown Agents Joint Consoli-
dated Fund on behalf or Inpome Account
Dividends from Loc;l Loans
Commission on notes issued for sterling
Conmmissiot on notes redeemed for sterling
Commission on coins issued for sterling
Sundries


2,943,372.54

550,000.36

86,689.06
117,483.66
57,667.351
43,736.86
956.14
59.62


$3,799,965.75



















CURRENCY FUND.


To: Currency notes redeemed for sterling
Coins burnt at British Guiana and redeemed
Loss on Securities repaid
Loss on sale of Securities
Depreciation in value of securities
Balance at 31st December, 1960


$ 0
9,997,000.00
150.00
3,900.00
166,939.02
3,584,037.80
.100,291,709.60


$114,043,736.42


$ 0
By: Balance at 1st January, 1960 .. 96,515,485.30
Currency notes issued for sterling .. 15,378,000.00
Coins issued for sterling .. 254,965.00
Coins issued in exchange .. 44,910.00
Gain on Securities repaid .. 936.46
Gain on Securities sold .. 31,287.98
Appreciation in value of securities .. 825,124.46
Transferred from Income A/C (Article 4 (2) (c) of Currency
Agreement) 992,987.22
Amount transferred from Currency Surplus A/C being
amount short transferred at 31st December from Income
Account .. 40.00

$114,043,736.42











CURRENCY SURPLUS ACCOUNT


To: Payments to:-
Government of:
Trinidad and Tobago
British Guiana
Barbados

Leeward Isands
Antigua
St. Kitts
Montserrat

Windward Islands
Grenada
St. Vincent
St. Lucia
Dominica


S1,062,260.80
482,845.84
193,138.32


34,764.90
56,435.22
11,588.30


28,970.76
19,149.82
38,299.62
17,382.44


Amount transferred to Currency Fund, being
amount over transferred from Income A/C at
31st December, 1959

Balance at 31st December 1960 for distribution to
the Governments participating in the Currency
Agreement-vide article 5 (2)


1,944,8


2,516,4

$4,461,3


By:












36. 02


4'. 00



425.87

301.89


Balance at 1st January, 1960

Amount transferred from Income Account (Article
4 (3) of Currency Agreement)


$ 0
2,014,405.88


2,446,896.01


$4,461,301.89










ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AT 31ST DECEMBER, 1960.


$


Currency Fund
Currency Surplus Account
Provident Fund
Amounts advanced for payments on behalf of Board by:-
Governments of Antigua
Barbados
Dominica
Trinidad and Tobago
St. Kitts-Nevis
St. Lucia
Unpaid labourer's wages


.100,291,709.60
2,516.425.87
27,932.64

6..74.
3,969.63
22.)50
45.39
25.87
41.89
9.86



$102,840,189.99


Securities held by Crown Agents (Nominal Value) ($88,283,754.52)
On deposit in Crown Agents Joint Consolidated Fund
Inter Territorial Loans Debentures held at Headquarters of the
Board
Cash on deposit with Crown Agents
Cash on deposit in Barclays Bank D.C.O. Current Account
United Kingdom coins in Coinimiiion,.rs Vaults awaiting ship-
ment for redemption
United Kingdom coins shipped to Crown Ageils not yet redeemed
Receipts on behalf of Board due from
Governments of: British Guiana
Grenada
St. Vincent


*79,616,152.52
13,289,452.50

9,853,050.00
2,940.29;
15,687 7

12,000. 00
44,904.00

5,329.98
375.01
297.75


$102,840,189.99


Barclays Bank D.C.O deposit for issue of notes and coins pending
payment of sterling in London


5,020,500.00


*Market Vnlue nt 31st Deacmber 960O.

Market value at 31st December of Securities lodged by Barclays
Bank D.C.O. with Crown Agents for Oversea Governments and
Administrations .. $5,020,500.00


AUDIT CERTIFICATE


L. SPENCE,
Executive Commissioner,
British Caribbeanz Currency Board.


The above AccountM have been examined in accordance with Article 7 of the 1st Schedule to the Currency Ordinance No. 15--1959 (Trinidad and Tobago)
I have obtained all the information and explanations that I have required, and I certify as a result of this Aulit, that in my opinion the Accounts are correct, subject
to the observations contained in the attached Report.
M. LEE SING,
14th July, 1961. Ag. Director of Audit.


- LAImrrIIEs


ASSETS


$ *







PROVIDENT FUND

INCOME ACCOUNT.


To: Interest distributed
Employees' contributions
Board's contributions
Reserve Account


262.72
525.16
72.68

$860.50


By: Interest from deposits in Crown Agents Joint Consoli-
dated Fund
Interest on Government of Trinidad and Tobago 61/~'o
Debentures 1976-81


CAPITAL ACCOUNT.


Paymens made to employees on resignation
Transferred to Reserve Account on resignation of employees
Balance at 31st December, 1960:
Employees' Account 8,115.85
Board's Account 16,171.85


$
1,383.71
2,821.37


24,287.70


Balance at 1st January, 1960:
Employees' Account
Board's Account

Employees' contributions
Board's contributions


Interest accrued on:
Employees' contributions
Board's contributions


470.56

390.00

$860.56


$

6,447.97
12,883.66

2,788.87
5,584.40


$


19,331.63


8,373.27


262.72
525.16


787.88


I --


$28,492.78


$28,492.78













PROVIDENT FU1Ni

RESERVE ACCOUNT.


Grant to Messenger at the Trinidad Currency Ccntre for replacing
Bicycle stolen from Treasury Building
Balance at 31st December, 1960


$ 0

124.08
3,644.94


$3,769.02


Balance at 1st January, 1960
Transferred from Board's Account on resignation of em-
ployees
Interest accrued


ASSETS AND LIABIMTIES AT 31ST DECEMBER, 1960.


LIABILIES


Employees' contributions
Board's contributions
Reserve Account


$
8,115.85
16,171.85
3,644.94

$27,932.64


ASSETS


On deposit in Crown Agents Joint Consolidated Fund
Trinidad and Tobago 61/~% Debentures hold by the Board..


Headquarters,
British Caribbean Currency Board,
Trinidad.
24th April, 1961.


L. SPENCE,
Executive Commissioner,
British Caribbean Currency Board.


$
874.97

2,821.37
72.68

$3,769.02


$ 0
21,932.64
6,000.00


$27,932.64


--- ~~---


-~----`

















ST. VINCENT

(THE WEST INDIES)


ANNUAL REPORT




ON




THE TREATMENT OF OFFENDERS


FOR THE YEAR



1959


PaNTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.
1961.















Report on the Treatment of Offenders for the year 1959.



INDEX
Page.
I.-PRISONS.


1. General Review ...

2. Staff ...... ..... ......

3. Buildings .....

4. Population ....

5. Sentences .

6. Recidivism

7. Female Prisoners

8. Prisoners on Remand

9. Classification .

10. Spiritual Welfare and Education

11. Health and Diet

12. Lunatics

13. Labour

14. Extra Mural

15. Inspection and Visits ......

16. Discipline ...... ...... ......

17. Escape .

18. Executions....

19. Remission of Sentences ...... ....

20. After care ......... ......

21. Expenditure and Revenue

II.-APPENDICES.

APPENpIX I. Statistical Report

APPENDIX II. Corporal Punishment


APPENDIX m. Revenue, Prison Industries


..... .... ... 7


APPENDIX IV. Prison Medical Officer's Report-1959 ......


...


.... .. .

..... ...

...... ...


.... .... ...


... 8















Report on the Treatment of Offenders for the year 1959.



1. GENERAL REVIEW.

The estimated population of Saint Vincent and its dependencies as at 31st
December, 1959, was 83,500. The daily average Prison population for 1959 was
84, or slightly over one per cent of the population figure.
There was a rise in the daily average Prison population of 9.24 over the figure
recorded in 1958 which was not an alarming increase and does not mean that
crime is on the increase. A very high percentage of admissions is usually
unconvicted persons and Section 8 of this report outlines this Class of inmate
who is sent here chiefly for safe custody. In 1958 there were 368 admissions of
this Class as against 839 admissions for the period under review which has
affected the daily average Prison population figure:

During the year under review 14 male prisoners continued to live on the
Ottley Hall Prison Farm under a Senior and a Junior Prison Officer. The Prison
Farm was run as an open insiiiLuon, there are no walls or fences surrounding
the area and no enforcement of rigid regulations as exist at the main Prison in
Kingstown. Because also of the variety of daily chores there much is done under
indirect supervision and self trust. Sporting competition between teams of the
main Prison and the Farm is encouraged and cricket is a weekly feature of
rivalry between both teams.
Because of the lack of living space and staff it was not possible to increase
the number of inmates resident on the Farm but it is hoped eventually to send
the majority of our suitable first offenders there. There are no trade facilities
on the Prison Farm. A
The Ottley Hall Prison Farm continued to provide employment for at least
60 per cent of the prison labour force while the remainder were engaged in the
various trades at the main Prison.
Two meetings of the Prisons Visiting Committee were held during the Year.
Mr. RI Terrel, Principal in the Social Services Department of the Colonial Office
visited the Prisons on 20th March. Discussions, particularly on social service
Matters affecting this Department were held, after which the out prisons were
visited. Mr. Terrel was very helpful in the solving of many outstanding problems.

2. STAFF.
The number of 1st and 2nd Class posts was increased during 1959. The post
of Matron was regraded from 3rd to 2nd Class.

ITereunder is a comparative list showing the 1958 position and the change
which was effected in Grade from 1st January, 1959:-
1958. 1959.
Superintendent of Prisons ...... 1 1
Senior Staff Officer ..... 1 1
Chief Officer ...... 1 1
1st Class Officers ...... 4 8
2nd ...... 4 8
3rd ,, ...... 15 9

Matron (Female Prison) now
2nd Class Grade .... 1 1
Assistant Matron 3rd Class Grade 1 1

Mr. F. O. Mason was confirmed in the post of Senior Staff Officer on comple-
tion of a one year probationery period which expired on 31st January.

One 2nd Class and one 3rd Class Officer resigned during the year and were
replaced by candidates from the waiting list of applicants.

One Officer who was on suspension at the beginning of 1959, as a result of'
charges of a serious nature preferred against him was reinstated after he was
given a serious caution. Coincidentally, at the end of the year there was also one
OIEffer suspended from the Prison Service as a result of an indictable offence*
with which he was cfrarged lih tHe Supreme Court.















Other reports against Prison Officers, which were dealt with Departmentally,
were:-
Giving extra diet to an inmate without authority ...... 1
Disobeying an order given by a senior Officer 1
Gross Disrespect _. 1
Reporting late for duty ._ 1
Improperly dressed on duty ...... 1
Shaving while on duty 1

8


Penalties Imposed were:-
Reprimanded ... 5
Severely reprimanded ..... 1
Deprivation of 2 Increments 1
Extra duty ..... 1

8


3. BUILDINGS.
Minor repairs when necessary were done to the Prison Buildings by the Public
Works Department.

4. POPULATION.
(a) Daily average Prison population for last 5 years:-
1955 1956 1957 1958 1959
Male Prisoners ...... 113.55 115.53 88.83 71.29 79.35
Female ,, 3.48 4.69 4.06 4.47 4.65

117.03 120.22 92.89 75.76 84.00


(b) Prisoners Convicted Prisoners on Remand Total
M F M F
1955 316 43 417 12 833
1956 296 44 495 6 841
1957 237 32 428 11 708
1958 199 28 358 10 595
1959 178 20 626 13 837

During the year admissions totalled 837 as against 595 in 1958. 639 of these
admissions were unconvicted persons awaiting trial, awaiting sentence, awaiting
deportation, on remand and for mental observation.

The following were admissions from the Supreme Courts:-
(a) Murder .. 1
(b) House-breaking and Larceny ...... 6
(c) Buggery ..... 2
(d) Receiving ...... 4
(e) Forgery ...... 2

15


In the case of Murder listed above, the accused was found to be insane and
consequently placed in the Mental Institution. The remaining 14 received
sentences ranging between 6 months and 5 Years.

There were 183 admissions from the Magisterial Courts with sentences rang-
ing from 7 days to 6 months for offences of Indecent language, assault, wounding,
being drunk and disorderly, and petty larceny.

On January 1st the Prison population was 76 males and 3 females-79, and
on 31st December the amount was 73 males, 2 females totalling 75.

On the 8th August the population stood at 98 males and 4 females-102. This
was the highest number in custody during the year.













3

5. SENTENCES.
See appendix I.

6. RECIDIVISM.
Recidvisits formed the majority of the Prison population during 1959. There
were 96 of this category as against 60 first offenders.

7. FEMALE PRISONERS.
The daily average number of Women in custody was 4.65 as against 4.47 in
1958.

Thirty three females were admitted in 1959. Of this total one was sent
from the Criminal Assizes with a four year sentence imposed after conviction
for an offence of forgery. All other admissions were from the Magisterial Courts,
of which ten were given the option to pay a fine while nine were sent to prison
without this alternative..
The occupations of the female inmates were Sewing, Cleaning and Scrubbing
the Prison Compound.

8. PRISONERS ON REMAND.

The fi-,re of 639 persons admitted for safe Custrdy in Appendix I represents
persons awaiting trial, awaiting sentence, awaiting deportation, awaiting hearing
at this Magisterial Court and for observation. The daily average of this category
was 12.66 as against 8.99 in the previous year.

The cause for such a high igu're in persons admitted for safe custody results
chiefly from persons received on remand to await hearing at the Magistrate
Court. This class is always admitted on a warrant signed by a Magistrate for
a period up to seven days. At the expiration of the given period the person is
discharged and handed over to the Police when his matter is either dealt with,
and in which case he can either be sentenced to serve imprisonment with or
without the option of a fine, discharged, or placed on a bond for tr:al, or be
granted bail. When this matter is not dealt with one way or another, the person
is brought back to custody to a future date, with a newv signed authority hi which
case he is taken in as a new admission- for the period.

". CLASSIFICATION.
The position has not changed for a number of years in so far as classification
is concerned. The Prison population remained reasonably low during the period
under review which.,has helped to make separation of certain classes of inmate
less of a problem.
10. SPIRITUAL WELFARE AND EDUCATION.
Religious services are held at the Prison on Sundays by various Religious
bodies and these services were at all time well attended by their respective
followers. One inmate was baptized in the Catholic faith and there were others
receiving instructions for Holy Communion.

Classes in First-Aid and English Language were started in the early part of
the year by Mrs. J. B. Broomes M.B.E. Unfortunately Mrs. Broomes was trans-
ferred to the Island of Trinidad and consequently these classes had to be dis-
continued. The usual Educational classes under a Prison Officer continued
throughout the year and progress and attendances have been quite satisfactory.

11. HEALTH AND DIET.
354 Inmates reported sick during. 1959 and of 'this amount only three were
hospitalized.

In 1957 there were certain slight changes made to the prisoners diet which
incurred no extra cost and made certain meals more palatable. In order to
make further Improvements it would be necessary to provide more funds for the
purpose. This matter is receiving attention.

12. LUNATICS.
One Inmate was found to be insane and consequently transferred to the
Mental Hospital.

13. LABOUR.
The main source of employment was agriculture on the Ottley Hall Prison
Farm.














The stone quarry and Stone-Crushing Plant v-.;rks of the Prnons were run
by the Public Works Department i;roughcut the yea-. This project '.as made
over to that Department in order to assist with meeting a demand for crushed
stones. Although this was a big source of revenue the decision was welec-me as
it was becoming increasingly difficult to fill the labour requirements of the Prison
Farm. the other minor industries as well as the stone works with a low prevailing
prison population.
The making of concrete blocks was geared down as a result of outside compe-
tition. The outside market is producing a very inferior block (poor quality) of
the same size and cheaper in price. Stepping down our price would be dis-
advantageous.
The other labour functions of Shoemaking: Tailoring, Carpentry and Masonry
continued in its usual way.
14. EXTRA MURAL.
No Extra Mural cases in 1959.
15. INSPECTIONS AND VISITS.
During the year there were Officiai visits to the Department by the Minister
of Social Services, t.ie Prison Visiting Justice, The Visiting Committee, Mr. R.
Terrel of the Colonial Office, Mr. P. H. Jennings of the Overseas Audit Depart-
ment, Mr. E. L. Hanlow, the Chief Fire Officer Tnnidad and Tobago and Bishop
Justin Fields of the R..C. Church.
There was one Meeting of the Prison V_'si. ng Ccmmnittee but members made
individual visits during the year.
16. DISCIPLINE.
There were 127 offences by prisoners against Prison discipline. These were
in the majority for being found with prohibited articles and for disobeying
orders. All were dealt with by the Superintendent.
17. ESCAPES.
No escapes or attempts were made during the year.
18. EXECUTIONS.
No executions in 1959.
19. REMISSION OF SENTENCES.
Remission of sentence remained a third of sentence served for any period
exceeding one month.
20. AFER-CARE.
Persons for discharge were interviewed by the Superintendent of Prisons for
the purpose of discussing ways and means of assisting with their rehabilitation.
Assistance in obtaining employment, and help with tools clothing etc. were given
according to the merits of the case.
21. EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.
(a) Expenditure:
Emolments to Staff ...... ...... ...... $36,692.34
Maintenance to Prisons .... .... ..... ... 18,402.34
Materials for Prison Industries .... ...... ..... 9,788.81
Maintenance of Stone Crusher ...... .... 7,150.42
Operation of Fibre Mill ...... ..... ...... ...... -
Operation of Prison Farm ...... ...... ...... ...... 1,953.54

73,987.45

(b) Revenue:
Fibre Industries ...... .... ...... .... ...... $ -
Other Prison Industries ...... ...... ..... ...... 16,340.11
Stone Crushing Plant ...... ...... ...... ...... 1,866.05
Ottley Hall Prison Farm ...... ...... ..... ...... 2,559.00.
Prison Fines ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... 262.30

21,927.46

Value of Stock at 1. 1. 59. $2,180.84
Value of Stock as at 31. 12. 59. 1,637.79 543.05

$20,484.41

Appendix II shows the Revenue made from the Items of Prison Industries and
the estimated savings to Government Departments on prices charged.
(c) The average cost of feeding one prisoner for the year $160.04.
(d) The cost of maintenance of one prisoner throughout the year under
review was $654.70.

CECIL A. ELLIS,
Superintendent of Prisons.
















APPENDIX I


STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE KINGSTOWN PRISON FOR THE YEAR 1959.


Name and Nature of
Prison.


Common gaol


Men

Women ...






Tutal


$0
,^s,

E3
aE
*0
li



ziz


... 804


1 i 1

- 10





1 71


.1i
'0 o.,
0.0 C


tLm
0a ~
.0~ a -
c '~
'a 0E
z E


126


126 198,


C~-S.
Offenses of those committed for
Religions Bodies.
Race.
0


CC
a;
.02



C CC


~ C5


198 88


178 81


.0;
C.-i



It"
~c
I--S


52

8





60


Number of
Previous
Convictions.


Length of Sentences.


W
ID

;.0
03 0 Ai
C-4
0 .a
a c
S *5 c
"' ? a
00 0 .,,1


2 17


ss s
*- *eA


- a =
E3-c
to
sf2 E-s


- to


55 ~- 1 -40


Age Group.


Offences of those committed for
purpose of Imprisonment.


I 0

(0 01


amo


5 53 56


t C C..
- I .
Q -/, C
1.~


2 ---


C

U
a

0


1 46


Religions Bodies.
..10




C" 0 I o


46 74 U 3803


Race.




00
- g0

.1- w~
I-C
C 1.
C i3


198


198 -


I~C
I
a
c
Ic
jb9
Cj
O
C
d
u
ir"

'3


84.


79.35

4.65





84.


" i .' .


52.85 1.12


56.34 1.12 -


0

3 I


I -0



zE
U-.-
'^' O52
'i-5. o-
CUl i
a-s2 a


Remarks


1__ __


/_i_


I I I


I II t p M I


- ___ 1----1----1---1---- 1-- I i-- i--- 1------1----1-- I------ 1-- -1--1---1--1--1--1-- 1---1----'---1----1----1----1 ------~-- --1---- ~-~----1----1----1----1-- --1----1----1----1


- --


56.34












6

APPENDIX II.



Number of Cases of Corporal Punishment Administered during 1959.
(a) Sentence at the Court administered at the Prisons .... Nil
(b) For Prison Offences (Adults only) ...... ...... .. ..... Nil
(c) Comparative figures:-

1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

By sentence of a Court .- Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil
For Prison Offences ._ Nil Nil Nil Nil Nil














APPENDIX III.
APPENDIX III.


Industries.


Prison Bakery
Boots repairing
Concrete Block-making
Coffins
Tailoring ...........
Miscellaneous Items .....


.. $13,912.97
.256.32
-. .. 769.00
S..685.45
... ... ..121.20
...... ...... 595.17


Fibre Industry ...... -
Stone Crushing Plant ...- ... -. 1,866.05 $ 1,866.05

18,206.16


Difference between stock B/F from 1958
as at 31. 12. 6. ....


and on hand


Ottley Hall Prison Farm.


Sale of Live Stock
Sale of Vegetables
Sale of Milk


$2,559.00 $ 2,559.00

20,222.11


Savings to Government Department.
Baking 25% Discount
Boots repairing 25% Discount ......
Coffins 5% ..... -.
Tailoring 50%
Free Tailoring of Prison Clothing ..

Grand Total


$16,340.11


543.05

17,663.11


$3,478.22
64.08
342.72
60.60
252.00


$ 4,197.62

24,419.73













8

APPENDIX: IV.

PRISON MEDICAL OFFICER'S REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1959.



Health of Inmates.
The general state of health of the inmates was good :throughout the year.
The Prison is situated within the limits of District 1, and the Medical Officer 1
who resides within the District functions as Prison Medical Officer. A trained
Male Nurse is included in the Staff, but most cases requiring, nursing for any
appreciable period are hospitalized at the Colonial Hospital.

Diet.
The diet scale is fairly good and contains all of the Dietary essentials. There
were no changes made in the diet since last Report.

Sanitation.
The Sanitary condition of the Prison is on the whole good.

Deaths.
There were no deaths during the year.

Hospitalisation.
Three prisoners, one of which was a female, were hospitalized during the
year, remaining for a total of 10 days. The female was a maternity case, she
delivered while in Hospital. Number of days in hospital for female prisoner: 5.
Percentage of daily average in Hospital to daily average of Prison popula-
tion:-.04.

Venereal Diseases.
Five cases of syphilis and four cases of Gonorrhoea were treated during the
year. Penicillin therapy was employed in all cases.


K. J. E. McMILLAN,
Prison Medical Officer.














SAINT VINCENT.

Annual Report of the Registrar of Co-operative Societies
for the year ended 31st December, 1960.


INTRODUCTION:

December 31, 1960, marks two and a half years since the establishment
of the Co-operative Division. The Division continues to be a section of the
Department of Agriculture but the Registrar is solely responsible for the
direction and control of the co-operative programme carried out by the
Division.

2. Up to the 31st March 1960, the Division was financed by funds made
available to the St. Vincent Government from Colonial Development and
Welfare Grant. Since April 1960, however, the financial operations of the
Division have been borne by the Government from funds provided under the
local budget.
3. The year under review, whilst it cannot be described as one of spec-
tacular growth and achievement in the island's co-operative development, may
however, be regarded as a year in which some further progress has been made.

While it is also true to say that there is the need for greater co-operative
effort on the part of the majority of the people, nevertheless there is a growing
consciousness among certain groups of the benefits and service which associa-
tion in a co-operative society can bring them.

4. During the year the Division continued the programme of the previ-
ous period in carrying out Co-operative Education and Training among
members of established societies in an effort to develop leaders to undertake
the duties of management, secretarial work and book-keeping. Some success
was achieved but it was noticeable that in several cases the training was
nullified by the fact that those who were given training either migrated to
the United Kingdom or left the district to take up residence in another area.

5. A great deal of time was therefore spent in getting others to fill the
breach and in repeating the training. The duties of inspection and super-
vision therefore had to be stepped up in order to get the societies to maintain
their records in a proper manner and to keep their accounts up to date.

6. In spite of this, however, two fishermen' societies were organised and
attention was directed towards the promotion of four new groups namely,
the workers of the Mt. Bentinck sugar factory, the Primary School Teachers
and the farmers in the Vermont and Mesopotamia areas.

PART 1-GENERAL PROGRESS

7. During the year only 2 new primary societies were registered bring-
ing the total to 14 at the 31st December. Membership rose from 1102 to 1298
and shares and deposits were increased by $6,630. The total assets amounted
to $45,113.

8. The following table shows the types of societies in existence at 31st
December 1960, with their membership. share capital. dep-.;it and reserve
funds.














Classification


No. Membership


$ $
Thrift and Credit
(a) Credit Union ...... 7
(b) Other ...... 1 8 1,063 28,210 1,649

Marketing ...... 2 99 2,159 1,214
Fishermen ..... 4 136 811 143
I] i
S14 1,298 31,180 3,006

Staff:
9. On the 1st January 19W0, 31-. T. M. Saunders, formerly a Grade I
Head Teacher joined the staff after undergoing a six months course in Co-
operation in Puerto Rico. The Field staff now stands at two.

10. At the end of the year the staff of the Division was as follows:-
1 Registrar of Co-operative Societies
1 Co-operative Field Officer
1 Assistant Co-operative Field Officer
1 Temporary Clerical Assistant.

11. The cost of the Division for 1960 was $15,764.24 allocated as follows:


Personal
Emoluments


(a) C.D. & W. Grant (Jan. to Mar.)
(b) Govt. of St. Vincent
(Apr. to Dee.)


Other
Charges


$ $
2,697.60 1,213.31

S10,404.00 1,449.32

13,101.60 2,662.64


$10,404 includes $950.40 amount paid in 1961 in respect of salaries revision as from
1st April 1960.

Audit and Supervision Fund:
12. Two societies whose operations during the year were regarded as
favourable were requested in accordance with the Co-operative Societies
Regulations to make contributions to the Audit and Supervision Fund. Con-
tributions made amounted to $35.00.
PART II-THRIFT AND CREDIT

13. The number of Thrift and Credit Societies remained at 8 at the end
of the year. These societies are designed to meet the needs of the wage earner
and the small agriculturalists. The emphasis is on thrift and short-term
loans are granted for provident and productive purposes. Of these societies,
7 are Credit Unions based on the North American pattern with withdrawable
share capital and one with shares which are transferable but which may be
withdrawn at maturity.

14. During the year the total membership increased from 946 to 1063
and shares from $21,126 to $28,210. Deposits by members stood at $1,249 at
the end of the year. Loans outstanding at the beginning of the year
amounted to $14,458 and the amount granted during the year was $21,307.
At 31st December, the loans outstanding totalled $22,663 of which $10,393
was overdue.


Shares &
Deposits


Reserve
Funds.


___












PART III-THRIFT


15: There are no societies registered under the Co-operative Societies
Ordinance which are solely engaged in thrift. Of the two unregistered school
savings groups which were in existence at the beginning of the year, one did
not survive due to lack of interest following upon the transfer of the teachers
who were nurturing the group. The other located at the Kingstown
Methodist School had savings amounting to $120.00 at the end of the year.

PART IV-CENTRAL FINANCE
16. There is no registered Co-operative Central Bank in St. Vincent.
The Government, however, continued to make loans to registered fishermen's
co-operative societies for the purchase of fishing gears, boats and engines. At
the 31st December, loans owing to Government by registered fishermen's
societies amounted to $5,170.

PART V-CONSUMER SOCIETIES
17. There are no registered Consumer Societies and no real attempt has
yet been made to organize such societies. There are a number of small shop-
keepers who along with the larger shops seem to be catering satisfactorily to
the local needs in consumer good.i. The failure of the Civil Service Con-
sumer's Society some years ago is still fresh in the minds of many and has
tended to dampen enthusiasm in the consumer type of society.

PART VI-PRODUCERS, MARKETING AND PROCESSING SOCIETIES
18. No new registrations of Producers, Marketing and Processing
societies took place during the year. Attempts were made at organising a
poultry group and some response was observed in the early meetings. The
group, however, has not shown much interest since then.

19. The number of these societies remained at 2. The Rose Hall Arrow-
root Co-operative Society Limited, located in the North Leeward District of
the island, was the first processing and marketing society registered in Novem-
ber 1958. This society which has a membership of 74 and a share capital of
$1,880 is serving a most useful purpose not only to members but also to all
growers of arrowroot in the area, the majority of whom process their roots
at the Co-operatively owned factory. The selling of members' starch collec-
tively to the St. Vincent Co-operative Arrowroot Association which is the
central pool through which the starch is exported abroad is still to be under-
taken by the society. At present this is done individually by the members.
20. During the crop year 1959/60, 78,G44 lbs of starch were processed by
this co-operative on behalf of growers, the sales of which amounted to $13,359.

21. The Biabou Arrowroot Co-operative Society Limited which is located
in the South Windward area, continued to have the roots of members
processed at a government operated factory at Biabou. Government has
been negotiating for the purchase of this factory with the intention of handing
it over to the Co-operative as soon as the purchase price is settled. The total
quantity of arrowroot starch processed at the factory during crop year
1959/60 was (approximately) 514,875 lbs. valued at $85,707.

PART VII-OTHER SOCIETIES
Craftmen's Societies:
22. There are no craftmen's societies. There are, however, some handi-
craft groups organised by the Education Department. These groups make a
variety of straw goods out of screw pine, sisal, coconut straw and whist. The
finished product is sold by the groups as well as the Education Department.

Women's Societies.
23. There is no society whose membership is confined only to women.
Memebrship in all societies is open to both sexes.

Fishermen's Societies:
24. The number of these societies increased from 2 to 4. At the 31st
December membership totalled 136 and share capital $810.70. The activities
of their members are at present confined to the purchasing of fishing requisites
and the mechanisation of some of their boats.













25. The services of a Fisheries Oiffcer who i:; attached to the Department
of Agriculture are, now available to the.fishermen and he h*s been assisting
members in the processing of loan applications for marine engines.

26. Three of these Fishermen's Societies are located in the Grenadines
which are dependencies of St. Vincent; one is located in Bequia, another in
Canouan and a third in Uniop Island. The fourth, Barrouallie, is the only
society on the mainland and was the first to be registered. The members of
this society are engaged principally in fishing for the black fish and 'sperm
whale. This society received a great setback when the Government Coiton
Ginnery which was the chief buyer of its sperm whale oil was burnt dow-n in
November, 1959. The Division has been trying to find other avenues for the
disposal of the oil.
27. At the 31st December, loans owing to Government by these societies
were as follows:

Amount
Society Date of Loan Amount Loaned mo
Outstanding

Irronallie ...... 1957 21,/ yrs $2000 $ 170
Bequia ...... 1959 5 yrs $5000 $5000


PART VIII-CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION AND PROPAGANDA

28. In the field of Co-operative Education the Division was very active
and carried through a programme of disseminating co-operative information
among members of existing societies, newly organised groups and the general
public by means of training sessions, discussion groups, lctireE, films, radio,
press, pamphlets and posters.

Staff Conferences:
29. Two staff conferences were held in February and October. At the
conference in Feburary, opportunity was taken to review the pfrogramme of
work of the Division as well as to give some preliminary training to the field
officers relative to their promotional, inspectoral and supervisory duties. The
conference in Octobcr dealt with problems encountered in the field.

Visits:
30. Visits were paid to St. Vincent by Mr. R. C. Gates, F.A.O. Agricul-
tural Co-operT.live Expert on assignment to the Caribbean Commission and
Mr. Peter A. Rcachh. ;-iuior Co-operative Officer, Trinidad and Tobago Govern-
ment, on sc'-ondi ment to the Caribbean Commission, from the 10th to the 17th
May and again in Octobher from the 3rd to the 4th.

31. D-rling the May visit a programme of training was carried out
among mcnmber; and officers of the various societies. Subjects dealt with
included, the Meaning of Co-operation, Co-operative Principles and Practice,
Co-operative Buying and Marketing, the Credit Union and the Borrower,
Management of a Credit Union.

32. Mr. A. A. IBalicy, Field Representative of the West Indian Confed-
eration of Credit Societies also visited the territory and gave a series. of talks
on Credit Union and CUna Mutual Insurance benefits. Discussion- were also
held with Credit Union members.

International Co-operative Day and Credit Union Day:
33. International Co-operative Day and International Credit Union Day
celebrations were held in July and October respectively. The celebrations
which took the form of a rally, church service and addresses, were well
attended by Co-operators from several parts of the territory as well a, many
interested persons. These celebrations are becoming very popular among
Co-operators in St. Vincent and are helping te serve a two-fold purpose of
bringing them together and propogandising the Co-operative Movement.












PART IX-MISCELLANEOUS

Audit and Supervision:

34. Audits of all registered societies for the year 1959 have been com-
pleted. The Registrar continued to perform such audits. A review of this
phase of the Division's activity will have to be made as it is apparent that the
auditing of societies has made great demands on the time of the Registrar to
the detriment of his other duties. The inspection and supervisory services of
the Division have assisted societies in maintaining proper records and
accounts. Continuous inspection and supervision is, however, necessary if the
results so far achieved are not to be lost. Frequent inspections of all
societies were carried out during the year.

Arbitrations:

35. Twenty nine (29) disputes ranging over 3 societies were referred to
arbitration during the year. These disputes involved loans owing and over-
due by members to their societies. Awards totalling $1,856 were made in
respect of 14 disputes. Of these awards, 2 were executed by the Court.
There were no appeals in any of the cases. The arbitrators included an
Officer of a Credit Union, a Barrister at Law and a prominent citizen of the
Community.

Registrations and Liquidations:

36. The following two (2) societies were registered during the year:
Union Island Fishermen's Co-operative Society Limited,
Canouan Fishermen's Co-operative Society Limited.
There were no liquidations.

International Conferences and Seminars:

37. The Third Meeting on Co-operatives in the Caribbean area was held
in Grenada from the 5th to the 12th July and this Government was represented
by the Hon. H. A. Haynes, Minister for Trade and Production under whose
portfolio Co-operatives fall. Mr. V. P. Smart, Registrar of Co-operative
Societies, also attended as adviser.

38. At that meeting it was recommended, among other things, that a
Caribbean Co-operative Technical Advisory Committee for the countries of
the area served by the Caribbean Commission be established.

39. The Registrar also attended the First Meeting of the Caribbean Co-
operative Technical Advisory Committee held in Antigua from the 26th to the
27th October and the International Credit Union Seminar from the 28th to the
31st October which also took place in Antigua.

40. These conferences, apart from formulating and recommending co-
operative programmes and action for the Caribbean area provided much
information from discussions of the operations and problems of co-operative
organizations in other territories.

British Council/Co-operative Union Scholarship:

41. St. Vincent was one of the three territories to which the offer of an
award to a member or employee of a co-operative society for a scholarship to
study consumer co-operativ\ at the Co-operaiive College, Loughborougn,
England, was made during the year for the 1961/62 session. The other two
territories named were North Bornco and Kenya. The candidate from Kenya
was successful.

Conclusion:

42. It was not possible during the year to accomplish all that was
planned. Much attention was directed to the supervision and consolidation
of the registered societies and this has resulted in better management prac-
tices and greater cohesion of membership in some instances.










6r
43. The use of propaganda ,media ha s greatly assisted in the movement
making an impact on the people.

44. A great need exists for leaders who are willing to shoulder responsi-
bilities.and help to bring about a healthy, co-operative atmosphbrei.

4,,. ]My thanks are, due to the. staff of the Division and those depat*S
.gn. of-Glyennment -whose. invaluable help and co-operation! during, the y;e
have greatly assisted the work of the Division.
46. Attached to this report is an appendix showing the assets aandt
liabilities of societies as at 31st December, 1960.


V. P. SMABW,
Registrar of Co-operative Societies,
Saint Vincenti
11th July, 1961.










STATEMENT SHOWING THE FINANCIAL POSITION OF CO-OPERATIVE SOCIETIES AS AT 31ST DECEMBER 1960


Assets


No. of Cash Fixed Other
Societies Type of Societies Membership Balances Loans Assets Assets Net Deficit 'Total Assets

$ C $ $ $ $ $
2 Marketing ...... 99 1,173.92 6,056.24 7,230.16
4 Fishermen's ... 136 5,336.38 457.43 67.33 897.34 72.80 6,831.28
7 Credit Union 647 2,429.68 9,989.96 150.37 831.50 175.11 13,576.62
1 Thrift and Credit ..... 416 3,994.65 12,672.62 807.45 17,474.72

14 1,298 12,934.63 23,120.01 7,081.39 1,728.84 247.91 45,112.78



Liabilities

Other
Statutory Reserves
No. of Type of Societies Share Deposits Reserve and Sundry Net Surplus Other Total
Societies Capital Fund Undist. Creditors Liabilities Liabilities
Surplus

$ $ $ $ $ $ i $ $ $
2 Marketing 2,159.34 1,195.07 3,742.36 133.39 7,230.16
4 Fishermen's .._ 810.70 108.02 218.72 523.84 5,170.00 6,831.28
7 Credit Union 11,038.01 850.33 403.86 942.73 51.00 288.31 2.38 13,576.62
1 Thrift and Credit ...... 15,923.23 398.38 393.03 184.79 547.94 27.35 17,474.72
29912 ,4.1 209.8 5086 7.4 96.4 5197 5127


1 29,931.28


5,088.60


574.84


45,112.78


1,248.71


2,099.98


969.64


5,199.73




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