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Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077473/00425
 Material Information
Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
Alternate Title: Government gazette
St. Vincent government gazette
Physical Description: v. : ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Saint Vincent
Publisher: G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Kingstown, St. Vincent
Kingstown St. Vincent
Publication Date: March 10, 1959
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Gazettes -- Periodicals -- Saint Vincent   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
legislation   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines -- Saint Vincent
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1, no. 1 (1868)-v. 112, no. 48 (Tues., 23 Oct. 1979)
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 111, no. 1 (Tues., 3 Jan. 1978); title from caption.
General Note: Supplements which accompany some numbers contain extraordinary issues, ordinances, statutory rules of order, etc.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077473
Volume ID: VID00425
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 19844741
lccn - sn 89018505
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Government gazette

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Supplement to Gazette: Minutes of the Meeting of the Legislative Council held on the 5th February, 1959
        Page A-7
        Page A-8
        Page A-9
        Page A-10
        Page A-11
        Page A-12
    Supplement to Gazette: The Report of the Principal Auditor, Windward Islands, on the Accounts of the Government Savings Bank, St. Vincent, for the year ended 31st December, 1957
        Page A-13
        Page A-14
        Page A-15
        Page A-16
    Supplement to Gazette: Legislative Council Proceedings and Debates (Hansard) in the second Session (1955-1956) held on 6th October, 1955
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page B-9
        Page B-10
        Page B-11
        Page B-12
        Page B-13
        Page B-14
        Page B-15
        Page B-16
        Page B-17
        Page B-18
        Page B-19
        Page B-20
        Page B-21
        Page B-22
        Page B-23
        Page B-24
Full Text




















SAINT VINCENT


GOVERNMENT GAZETTE

Subli.hed bD Authoritl.


VOL. 92.] SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, 1959. [No. 16.


GOVERNMENT NOTICES.

No. 93.
RETURN OF MEMBER ELECTED TO SERVE IN THE HOUSE
OF REPRESENTATIVES.

The return of a member elected to serve in the House of Representatives
for the Colony of Saint Vincent as a result of the Federal Bye-Election held
on Tuesday, 24th February, 1959, is published hereunder by the Supervisor
of Elections:-
Time of 1
Receipt of Date of Return. District. Name of Member Returned.
Return.1__ ____
9.00 a.m. 5th March, 1959. Colony of Saint Vincent. ROBERT MILTON CATO.

(C. 4/1957 (A).)
5th March, 1959.

No. 86.
IN THE MATTER OF THE LAND ACQUISITION ORDINANCE 1946
(No. 22 of 1946)
AND
IN THE MATTER OF THE ACQUISITION by the Governor in Council of
a certain parcel of land at Diamond in the Parish of Charlotte for a public
purpose.

DECLARATION OF ACQUISITION OF LAND.
(SECOND PUBLICATION.)
WHEREAS' it is enacted by Section 3 of the Land Acquisition Ordinance VO
1946 (No. 22 of 1946) that if the Governor in Council considers that any lal 4\
should be acquired for a public purpose he may cause a declaration to t
effect to be made.
25 MAY 1959






328.7298
S155S












96 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, 1959.-(No. 16.)


AND WHEREAS it is considered by the Governor in Council that the under-
mentioned parcel of land should be acquired for a public purpose, to wit, the
extension of the Public Cemetery serving Diamond Village:
Now IT Is HEREBY DECLARED by His Excellency the Governor acting in
accordance with the advice of the Executive Council of the Colony of Saint
Vincent that upon the Second Publication of this Declaration in the Gazette
all that parcel of land at Diamond in the Parish of Charlotte the property
of the Heirs of G. N. Allen measuring 21,758 square feet in area and bounded
on the North by the old Cemetery and lands of I. Dasent on the South and
West by the remaining lands of Heirs of G. N. Allen on the East by the New
Grounds/Diamond Village Public Road shall vest absolutely in the Crown:
AND IT Is HEREBY FURTHER DECLARED AND NOTIFIED that a plan bearing
the Number C3/10 showing the above mentioned parcel of land has been pre-
pared by W. E. Falby, Licensed Land Surveyor and lodged on the 13th day
of January, 1958, at the Lands and Surveys Department of Kingstown in the
said Colony and can be inspected at all reasonable hours at the said Department.
Dated at Kingstown this 25th day of February, 1959.

F. GILBERT THOMAS,
Clerk of Executive Council.


No. 95.


APPOINTMENTS.


With reference to government Notice
No. 257 of the 28th May, 1957, and
consequent upon the death of Mr.
WILLIAM LATCHMAN, Mr. H. C. JAMES,
retired School Teacher, has been ap-
pointed Collecting Officer for the Magis-
trate's Court at Colonarie with effect
from 1st March, 1959.
10th March, 1959.
(J. 9/1951.)

No. 96.
CADET CORPS, ST. VINCENT GRAMMAR
SCHOOL.

Mr. K. R. V. JOHN as Second Lieu-
tenant with effect from 6th March, 1959.
10th March, 1959.
(E. 806/1935 II.)

No. 97.
CONFIRMATION.

With reference to Government Notice
No. 95 of 19th February, 1958, Mr.
GEORGE JAMES has been confirmed in the
post of Compositor, Government Print-
ing Office, with effect from 1st January,
1958.
10th March, 1958.
(P.F. 905.)

No. 98.
PRE-RESIGNATION LEAVE.

Mr. TREVOR PAYNTER, Class III Clerk,
General Clerical Service, 61 days' vaca-
tion leave with effect from 3rd January,
1959, prior to resignation from the Ser-
vice.
10th March, 1959.
(P.F. 809.)


No. 99.
VACATION LEAVE.

Mr. C. S. DAISY, Senior Clerk, Gov-
ernment Office, has been granted 286
days vacation leave with effect from 9th
March, 1959.
10th March, 1959.
(P.F. 540.)


No. 100.
AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT
TRADE COMMISSIONER.

With reference to Gazette Notice
No. 59 of 3rd February, 1959 it is noti-
fied for general information that the
district of Mr. T. B. CONNOLLY, Austra-
lian Government Trade Commissioner
at Port-of-Spain, with jurisdiction in
the West Indies and British Guiana, has
been extended to include British Hon-
duras.
10th March, 1959.
(T. 19/1951.)



No. 101.
NORWEGIAN CONSULAR REPRE-
SENTATION.

It is notified for general information
that the Norwegian Government has
now made formal notification of the
elevation of the Norwegian Consulate
at Port-of-Spain to the status of a Con-
sulate-General, and of the promotion of
Mr. MATHIAS JOHANNESSEN OREN, for-
merly Honorary Consul, to Honorary
Consul-General with jurisdiction includ-
ing the Federation of the West Indies.
10th March, 1959.
(R- 1/1948 II.)













SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, 1959.-(No. 16.)


No. 102.
VACANT POSTS.

HEADMISTRESS, GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL.

Applications are invited from suitably
qualified persons for appointment to the
post of Headmistress, Girls' High
School, St. Vincent, particulars of
which are as follows:--
Appointment: The post is pension-
able but the appointment may be on
contract if desired. The appointment
carries with it the liability to transfer
to any post of equivalent status within
the Windward Islands. The Officer will
be subject to the Colonial Regulations
and local General Orders for the time
being in force in so far as they are ap-
plicable.
Salary: The salary of the post is in
the scale $3,840 x $120-$4,560 (800
x 25-950) plus a 20% pensionable
addition per annum. The point of entry
into the salary scale will be determined
according to the qualifications and ex-
perience of the candidate.
Qualifications: Applicants should
possess a Degree of a University within
the British Commonwealth, and must
have had experience of teaching in a
Secondary School.
Quarters: Quarters are not provided.
Passage: Free first class passage to
St. Vincent will be provided for the offi-
cer on first appointment.
Leave and Leave Passages: Vacation
leave on full pay will be granted in
accordance with local General Orders.
Leave passage will be provided in ac-
cordance with local regulations
Medical Attention: Free Medical at-
tention and medicines are not provided.
Taxation: All Government Officers
are liable to taxation imposed by local
legislation.
Applications giving full particulars,
qualifications and experience and ac-
companied by two testimonials (which
will not be returned) should be ad-
dressed to the Chief Secretary, Wind-
ward Islands, Governor's Office, Gren-
ada, and must reach him not later than
31st March, 1959.
10th March, 1959.

No. 103.
ASSISTANT MISTRESS (GRADUATE),
GIRL'S HIGH SCHOOL.

Applications are invited for appoint-
ment to two vacant posts of Assistant
Mistress (Graduate), Girls' High
School, St. Vincent.


Salary: The School is a Government
Institution. The salary of the posts
which are pensionable is in the scale
$2,016 x $96-$2,880 x $120-$3,600
(420 x20-600x 25--750) plus a
20% pensionable addition per annum.
Qualifications: Candidates should
possess a Degree of a University within
the British Commonwealth, and must be
able to teach at least one of the follow-
ing subjects: English, Mathematics or
History to Higher School Certficate
standard, or Commercial Subjects to
School Certificate level.
Further particulars regarding the
appointment may be obtained from the
Chief Secretary, Windward Islands,
Grenada, to whom applications giving
full particulars, qualifications and ex-
perience, and accompanied by three
testimonials (which will not be re-
turned) should be addressed to reach
him not later than 31st March, 1959.
10th March, 1959.

No. 104.
POST OF ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC
WORKS, GRENADA.

Applications are invited for appoint-
ment to the above-named post. The par-
ticulars are as follows:-
Qualificatiouss Candidates should
have either
(a) A University Degree in Civil
Engineering recognized by the
Institution of Civil Engineers, or
(b) Passed Parts I and II Finals of
the Institutions of Civil Engin-
eers or obtained a recognized
diploma.
Salary: The salary is at the rate of
$3,600 per annum in the scale $3,600
rising by annual increments of $120 to
$4,800 per annum plus a pay addition
of 20% of salary. Point of entry will
be determined by qualifications and
experience.
Allowances: A transport allowance
is payable at the current rate of $732
per annum and the officer will be re-
quired to keep a car for the perform-
ance of his duties. The Government will
if necessary grant interest-free loan for
purchase of car.
Quarters: Quarters are not pro-
vided.
Duties: The officer will be required
to assist the Director of Public Works
and deputise for him when required to
do so. lie will also be required to carry
out all types of Public Works and such
other duties as may from time to time
be required by the Director of Public
Works.













98 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, 1959.-(No. 16.)


Further details may be obtained at
Government Office, St. Vincent.
Applications should be addressed to
the Secretary, Public Service Commis-
sion, St. George's, Grenada, to reach
him not later than 27th March, 1959.
10th March, 1959.

No. 105.
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT, BRITISH GUIANA.

Vacancies for Physiotherapists
(Female).

Applications are invited for appoint-
ment as Physiotherapists (Female),
Medical Department, British Guiana.
2. Appointment and Salary: On
contract for two or three years with
salary on the scale $3,048-$3,840 per
annum commencing salary commensu-
rate with qualifications and/or experi-
ence: a gratuity of 221/2% of salary will
be paid in respect of each completed
period of three months' satisfactory
resident service, either at six-monthly
intervals during the period of contract,
or in a single lump sum on the conclu-
sion of leave earned. If the gratuity is
paid at six-monthly intervals, earned
vacation leave would not count for
gratuity purposes, but if paid in a sin-
gle lump sum on conclusion of the en-
gagement, leave would earn gratuity.
3. Duties: Attending patients re-
ferred by Specialists, Government Medi-
cal Officers, and Registered Medical
Practitioners and administering the
necessary treatment in the specialised
branches of physiotherapy, such as
massages, medical gymnastics and elec-
tro-therapy.
4. Qualifications: Membership of
the Chartered Society of Physiothera-
pists (M.C.S.P.).
5. General Information: Appoint-
ment will be subject to medical fitness
and to Colonial Regulations, General
Orders, Stores Regulations, Financial
Regulations, and other local regula-
tions in force from time to time in so
far as they are applicable. A candidate
in the West Indies, if successful, would
be provided with passages to British
Guiana and back to the country from
which she was recruited, on satisfactory
completion of her contract. Quarters
are not provided.
6. Applications stating name in full,
date and year of birth, educational and
professional qualifications and experi-
ence, and accompanied by at least two
recent testimonials should be addressed
to the Secretary, Public Service Com-
mission, General Post Office Building,


Georgetown, British Guiana, for deliv-
ery not later than 17th March, 1959.
7. Further details of the duties etc.
may be obtained on request from the
Chief Establishment Officer, Public
Buildings, Georgetown, British Guiana.
10th March, 1959.

No. 106.
LEGISLATION.

The Right Honourable the Secretary
of State for the Colonies has notified
that Her Majesty the QUEEN will not
be advised to exercise her power of dis-
allowance in respect of the following
Ordinance of this Government:-
No. 18 of 1958.-An Ordinance to
make provision for enforcement in
the Colony of Judgements given in
Foreign Countries which accord
reciprocal treatment to Judge-
ments given in Saint Vincent, for
facilitating the enforcement in For-
eign Countries of Judgements given
in Saint Vincent, and for other pur-
poses in connection with the mat-
ters aforesaid.
(J. 14/1951.)
10th March, 1959.

No. 107.
SUPPLEMENTS TO GAZETTE.

Copies of Minutes of the Meeting of
the Legislative Council held on the 5th
February, 1959, which may be seen at
Government Office, the Kingstown Li-
brary and at all Revenue Offices, are
published with this issue of the Gazette.
10th March, 1959.

No. 108.
The Report of the Principal Auditor,
Windward Islands, on the Accounts of
the Government Savings Bank, St. Vin-
cent, for the year ended 31st December,
1957, is published with this issue of the
Gazette.
10th March, 1959.

No. 109.
Copies of the Legislative Council
Proceedings and Debates (Hansard) in
the second Session (1955-1956) held on
6th October, 1955, which may be seen at
the Government Office, Kingstown
Library, and at all Revenue Offices and
District Post Offices are published with
this issue of the Gazette.
By Order,
F. G. THOMAS,
Acting Government Secretary.
GOVERNMENT OFFICE,
10th March, 1959.













SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, 1959.-(No. 16.)


DEPARTMENTAL AND
OTHER NOTICES.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
ST. VINCENT.

COCOA INDUSTRY DEVELOP-
MENT SCHEME.

DISTRIBUTION OF ROOTED CUTTINGS OF
SELECTED STRAINS OF TRINIDAD AND
GRENADA CACAO FOR PLANTING
IN 1959.

It is estimated that there will be about
40,000 rooted cacao cuttings available
to plant about 80-100 acres in 1959.
2. Persons desirous of obtaining
rooted cacao cuttings from the cacao
stations, should apply on the forms pro-
vided for that purpose entitled:
"Application Form for Rooted
Cacao Cuttings Propagated for Dis-
tribution by the Cocoa Industry De-
velopment Scheme of St. Vincent."
3. Application forms are obtainable
at the Head Office, Department of Agri-
culture, Kingstown, or from any of the
District Agricultural Officers.
4. Application forms should be for-
warded to the Superintendent of Agri-
culture, Department of Agriculture,
Kingstown, on or before 16th April,
1959.
5. Applications for Rooted Cacao
Cuttings received after the 16th April
will neither be acknowledged nor con-
sidered.
6. A charge of five (5) cents per
plant will be made plus transportation
at fifty (50) cents per mile for a truck
load of plants delivered to a point as
near as possible to the site at which
they are to be planted. Payment must
be made at Head Office, Agricultural
Department, before the cuttings will be
supplied. Estates will be expected to
arrange their own transport.
7. N.B. The conditions under which
rooted cacao cuttings will be issued are
as follows:-
(i) The area selected by an appli-
cant will be inspected by an authorised
officer, as soon as possible after the re-
ceipt of the application for the purpose
of determining the suitability of the
site in regard to altitude, soil type, wind
protection and other ecological and en-
environmental conditions. The appli-
cant will then be notified whether or not
the area is approved for planting cocoa.
(ii) If for stated good reasons the
area is declared to be unsuitable for
planting cacao clones, no allocation of
plants will be made to the applicant.


(iii) If the area is declared suit-
able, an authorised officer will inform
the applicant what minimum action is
required of him by the Department of
Agriculture in regard to provision of
overhead shade, ground shade, wind-
breaks, soil conservation measures, soil
preparation etc. The Agricultural De-
partment will render all necessary ad-
vice and guidance in this connection.
(iv) The minimum area for which
plants will be issued will be that which
will contain fifty (50) rooted cuttings
planted at a spacing of 12 ft. x 12 ft.
in a single block, the equivalent of one-
sixth (1/6) of an acre.
(v) The area to be planted will be
re-inspected by an authorised officer im-
mediately before the proposed date of
delivery of the plants in order to ascer-
tain whether all conditions have been
satisfactorily fulfilled, and whether the
area is in a suitable state of preparation
for planting.
(vi) Authorised officers of the De-
partment of Agriculture will make pe-
riodical inspections of the planted areas
as often as may be considered necessary
for the purpose of observing field con-
ditions, the development of the young
plants, and advising growers on the care
and management of the young plants.
8. Applicants are advised to take ad-
vantage of the information and guidance
freely offered by their Agricultural
Officers, thereby ensuring that they start
off correctly on the road to revival of our
Cocoa Industry.

HUGH S. McCONNIE,
Superintendent of Agriculture.
19th February, 1959.


NOTICE

By the Authority of the Kingstown
Board Ordinance, Chapter 209
(Revised Edition).

The Magistrate of the First District
will hold a special session at the Court
House, Kingstown, on Friday the 20th
day of March, 1959, at 1.30 p.m. for the
purpose of hearing any appeals of which
due notice shall have been given against
assessments published in the assessment
list for 1959.
C. E. A. RAWLE,
Magistrate, District I.

Magistrate's Office,
Kingstown,
19th February, 1959.













100 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, 1959.-(No. 16.)



NOTICE,

S-..i tNDER THE LIQUOR LICENCES ORDINANCE, NO. 11 OF 1948.

It is hereby notified for general information that the Quarterly Liquor Licen-
:sing.-Session will be held in the undermentioned Parishes for the purpose of
hearing applications from applicants in their respective parishes for the granting
of .Certificates in accordance -with;the provisions of the Liquor Licences Ordin-
nance; No. 11 of 1948, at the times and places .stated hereunder:-
e Parish. Time and Place of Session.
.' St. George & St. Andrew ...... At the Court House, Kingstown, on Fri-
day the 20th day! of March, 1959 at
: 2.00 -p.m.
-. Charlotte ...... At the Court House, Georgetown, on Fri-
: day the 13th day of March, 1959 at
9.15 a.m.
St. Patrick .... At the Court House, Barrouallie, on
S~ "-- . M' .,.Monday the 9th day of March, 1959 at
i -9 .9.15 a.m.
s .St. paYvi., At the Court House, Chateaubelair, on
.,; Monday the 23rd day of March, 1959
Sat 9.15 a.m.
':The Grenadines iBequla ...... t the Court House, Port Elizabeth. on
t: Wdnsday the 4th day of MLa rch, 1959
at 10.00 a.m.
(Union Island) ...... At the Court House, Clifton, on Monday
: ' : the 23rd day of March, 1959 at 10.00

-",;j: "Notices of intention to oppose the grant of any Certificate, stating in general
-terms the grounds of the opposition, inmut be served upon the applicant and upon
-the iMagistrate not later than seven days before the day. fixed for the holding
-f o kihe'Licensing Session.'
's 'it r- o r.Z.. C. E. A: RAWLE,
[ '.,r ,: i : M agistrate.

PAR F~TiULARS !OB APPLICANTS FOR NEW CERTIFICATES AND TRANSFERS.


4"Parish 'ame,.s 'of Applidants Occupation Residence
Ke fflf/o a


St. George &.,Rupert Jack
St. Abdrew IEdinund' lMcDenald
SBottlers (St. ')- Ltd.

Olga ;iyndh:,
Henry George
SConrad McGuire
Cornelius Browne

Charlotte' ....Felix Liverpool
Henry Browne
Claude Dickson
Feltori Husbands
Boysie Lavia
Martin Marks
Alban Pereira

St. Patrick Nathaniel Blugh*

St. David Bertram McKenzie


Grenadines
(Bequia)
Grenadines
(Union Is.)


Anna Phillips

Pentlan Selby


'I
Shopkeeper Questelles
do. Stubbs
Merchants Kingstown

Shopkeeper Green Hill
db. i i .Stubbs i '', ,;
do0 :, Lowmans Hill
Proprietor, : Dauphne


Shopkeeper -
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.
do.

Shopkeeper

Shopkeeper


Shopkeeper

Merchant


Georgetown
Langley Park
Mt. Bentinck
Park Hill:
Sandy Bay
Park Hill
South Rivers

SBarrouallie

Chateaubelair


O'car

Ashton


Situation of
Pie6mises

Questelles
Upper Stubbs
Granby & James
Str., K'town
Green Hill
Upper :Stubbs
Lowmans Hill
Dauphne

Grand Sable
Langley Park
Mt. Bentinck
Biabou
Sandy Bay
Park Hill
South Rivers

Barrouallie

Chateaubelair


O'car

Ashton


C. E. A. RAWLE,
Magistrate.


Magistrate's Office,
Kingstown.
19th February, 1959.


* Transfer.













SAINT, YINQCENTT UESDIAY, 10;.MARCH, 1959.-(No/:16.)


LOCAL AUTHORITIES.

The following persons have been
elected as Chairmen of the eight Local
Authorities for the year ending 31st
December, 1959:-
"Thie'le equia District C'oiu..-il-
Mr. Sydney McIntosh
-The Georgetown Town Board-
'.."Rev. Eri. St. Clair Clarke
The Calliaqua Town, Board-
Mr. Gegrge P. Dougan
The ,Layou Town Board-
Ir. ipRalph Walker.
The Barroulie Town Board-
Mr. Conrad Francis
The Chateaubelair Town Board-
Hon. S. E. Slater
The Marriaqua Village Council-
Hon. Levi Calvert Latham.
The Troumaca Village Council-
Mr. Mautiford Providence.

J: V. ALVES,
Local Government .Officer.
27th February, 1959.


:INCOME TAX NOTICE; ': .

To the General Public.

Every person concerned, not being a
Government Officer, is'hereby reminded
that the latest date for the submission
of Income Tax Returns for assessment
in the year 1959 is the'311st March, and
that failure to give nAtice pf charge-
ability is an offence' against the Income
Tax Ordinaince, rendering the person
concerned liable to a fine not exceeding
SEVEN HUNDRED, AND FIFTY
DOLLARS. .
2. Every person w ose income accru-
ing in, derived from the Colony or else-
where and' nihther received in the
Colony or h ot for the' preceding year,
exceeded the statutory limit of $500.00
is required to submit a return in the
prescribed form notwithstanding that
on account of approved deductions no
tax may eventually be chargeable, and
particular attention is directed to the
fact that the term "income" is deemed
to include not only money but also al-
lowances in kind.
3. Efforts are being made to send
blank forms to such persons. It is to be
clearly understood, however, that the
Income Tax Department is under no
obligation to send a return form to any-
one and that a person is not exonerated
from the statutory liability of making
a return even though a form may not


have been received from the Department.
Forms may be obtained, on application,
at the Revenue Offices at Georgetown,
Barrouallie, Bequia and Union Island,
or in any other district from the Police
Station situate therein, or from the In-
come Tax Department, Kingstown,
where any person requiring informa-
tion in connection therewith is invited to
enquire.
4. The form correctly completed,
should be accompanied by all necessary
supporting statements. Specimens of
the form of account required from small
traders and from occupiers or cultiva-
tors of land will be supplied on request.

F. E. WILLIAMS,
Inland Revenue Officer.
hTla n'd Revenue Department,
; Kingstown, .
*3rd .February, 1959.


SAINT VINCENT

IN THE FIRST DISTRICT MAGIS-
TRATE'S -COURT-KINGSTOWN
S:. IV-IL JURISDICTION,.
.' iA.D.1:1958 .

Suit N ,.4171958 '

BETWEEN


VIVIAN BONADIE


AGATHA GILL


Plaintiff


Defendant.

Notice.is hereby given that on Satur-
day 'the 21st day of March, 1959,
i?, i,,i the hours of 12.00 noon and
3.00 p.m., there will be put up for sale
at the Court Hol-is ini Kingstown the
undermentioned goods and chattels the
property of the above-named defendant,
Agatha Gill, levied upon by virtue of a
writ of seizure 'and sale issued in the
above suit:
One House-the sides boarded, and
the roof covered with shingles and
galvanised iron-situated at Low-
man's Hill.

D. A. SALES,
Bailiff.

Magistrate's Office,
Kingstown,
Saint Vincent.
27th February, 1959.




















102 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, 1959.-(No. 16.)


SAINT VINCENT

IN THE FIRST DISTRICT MAGIS-
TRATE'S COURT-KINGSTOWN
CIVIL JURISDICTION
A.D. 1958

Suit No. 31/1958.

BETWEEN


VINCENT VEIRA

AND


Plaintiff


VINCENT CUMBERBATCH
Defendant.

Notice is hereby given that on Satur-
day the 21st day of March, 1959,
between the hours of 12.00 noon and
3.00 p.m., there will be put up for sale
at the Court House in Kingstown the
undermentioned goods and chattels the
property of the above-named defendant,
Vincent Cumberbatch, levied upon by
virtue of a writ of seizure and sale
issued in the above suit:

One House-the sides boarded, and
the roof covered with galvanised iron
-situated at Paul Over.

D. A. SALES,
Bailiff.

Magistrate's Office,
Kingstown,
Saint Vincent.
24th February, 1959.


TREASURY NOTICE.

The attention of the Public is invited
to Section 12 of the St. Vincent Savings
Bank Rules made on 1st May, 1936,
which reads as follows:-
"12. Every depositor shall once in
each year, in the month of February,


forward his pass book to the Manager
for examination and comparison with
the books of the Office, and for entry of
any interest due to the 31st December
previous. If any depositor fails to send
in his pass book as herein directed the
Colonial Treasurer may without further
formality forthwith direct that except
the withdrawal of the whole amount no
further transactions shall be allowed in
respect of the account."
Every depositor who has so far not
forwarded his pass book to the Treasury
is required to do so as soon as possible.
I. D. B. CHARLES,
Accountant General.
Treasury Dept.,
Kingstown,
St. Vincent, W.I.
6th February, 1959.


NOTICE.

The attention of the general public is
drawn to the fact that it is a breach of
the relative Ordinances if licences are
not paid. Persons defaulting are liable
to be prosecuted.


The Police
carrying out
licences:-
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.


Department is at present
a check on the following

Bicycles.
Boatmen.
Boats.
Carts.
Dogs.
Drivers' Permit
Firearms
Horses.
Motor Vehicles.
Mules.
Porters.
Radios.
Weights & Measures.


A. J. DaSILVA,
Acting Inland Revenue Officer.
28th February, 1959.


PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER, AT


THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,


KINGSTOW
N, ST. VINCENT.


'Price 24 cts.i










MINUTES OF THE MEETING OF LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL HELD AT
THE COUNCIL CHAMBER, KINGSTOWN, ON THURSDAY,
5TH FEBRUARY, 1959, AT 10.00 A.M.

PRESENT.
His Honour E. A. BRATHWAITE, Acting Administrator, President,
The Honourable B. F. DIAS, Crown Attorney,
B. R. THOMAS, Financial Secretary,
S A. C. CYRUS, First Nominated Member,
E. T. JOSHUA, Member for Central Windward, Minister for
Trade and Production,
E. S. CAMPBELL, Member for Kingstown, Minister for Com-
munications and Works,
S H. A. HAYNES, Member for St. George, Minister for Social
Services.
S. E. SLATER, Member for North Leeward,
C. L. TANNIS, Member for the Grenadines,
,, H. F. YOUNG, Member for South Leeward,
L. C. LATHAM, Member for South Windward,
A. B. DOSSANTOS, Second Nominated Member,
Mrs. I. I. JOSHUA, Member for North Windward.
A. C. HADLEY, Third Nominated Member.


1. PRAYERS.
The President opened the Meeting with the reading of prayers.

2. MINUTES.
Minutes of the Meetings held on 30th December, 1958 and 23rd January,
1959, copies of which were previously circulated were taken as read and were
confirmed.
3. ANNOUNCEMENT.
The President made the following announcement:
Honourable Members will observe that the three motions of which
the Honourable Member for the Grenadines gave notice at the last meeting
of this Council have not been included in the orders of the day.
The first motion reads as follows:-
1. BE IT RESOLVED that Government release the four years back
pay to Estate Workers as was promised by the Minister for Trade
and Production.
This motion is not clear. If its purpose is that Government should
release public funds it offends against rule 54 (1). If it refers to workers










on private estates it would be impossible to implement it if it is passed.
I therefore could not allow this motion to be included on the agenda.

The second motion reads as follows:-
BE IT RESOLVED that Government provide a sum of $100,000
to give loans to persons in the Grenadines who are desirous of building
tanks to provide water for their families.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that arrangements be made for these
loans to be repaid in equal sums over a period of 20 years.
This motion offends rule 54 (1) and its inclusion on the agenda
is not approved.

The third motion reads as follows:-
BE IT RESOLVED that Government cease to hold up duty free
importation of sail cloth contrary to the existing laws of St. Vincent.
This motion is not clear. It appears to infer that it is the practice
of Government "to hold up the duty free importation of sail cloth"
(whatever that means). Under the Customs Duties (Amendment No. 2)
Ordinance, 1952, the Collector of Customs may in his discretion allow
the duty free entry of sail cloth which he is satisfied is imported for the
purpose of making sails. It has been the practice of the Collector of
Customs to allow sail cloth to enter free of duty.
I am therefore not prepared to allow this motion to be included on
the agenda.
There has been one instance, however, in which there has been a delay
in dealing with an importation of sail cloth and I now call on the Hon-
ourable Financial Secretary to announce the circumstances for the infor-
mation of Honourable Members.

The Honourable Financial Secretary then made the following announce-
ment:-
Mr. President, Honourable Members, an application was received for
~1ip imnnnor+ini of ,il oloth fro of duty. Owing to an unfortunate
misunderstanding, the Collector of Customs referred it to me for sub-
mission to Executive Council for consideration. It was duly submitted
to Council. May I just point out that this was not necessary and there
was therefore an unfortunate delay in agreeing to the request. I would
like to express the apologies of the Department of Customs and my own
Office with an assurance that it would not happen again.

The President informed the House that the Honourable Minister for
Social Services wished to make an announcement concerning his interest as
a shareholder in the M.V. "Madinina", the agents of which were about to
enter into a contract with Government.

The Honourable Minister for Social Services then made the following
announcement:











Mr. President, Honourable Members, I have the honour to announce
to this Council that presently I am a shareholder in the M.V. "Madinina"
the agents of which are about to enter into a contract with Government
for the conveyance of mails to the Grenadines.

The Honourable Minister for Communications and Works, seconded by
the Honourable Member for North Leeward, moved that the Honourable
Milniuilci for Social Service bUe exempted II';;~ vacating his seat.

The Honourable Members for the Grenadines and South Leeward pro-
tested against the introduction and debate of the motion by the Honourable
Minister for Communications and Works at this stage, without the suspension
of Standing Rules and Orders of the Legislative Council.

The President sought the advice of the Honourable Crown Attorney
before ruling in the matter. Certain members continued speaking after the
President requested them to take their seats and while the President remn.-ined
standing.
The President drew the attention of the House to the conduct of the
Honourable Member for South Leeward who continued to disobey the Presi-
dent's ruling. The President then named the Honourable Member for South
Leeward.

The Honourable Minister for Trade and Production, seconded by the
Honourable Member for North Windward, moved "that the Member for
South Leeward be suspended from this Honourable House for his conduct."
The Motion was put to the vote and carried 10-2 without debate.
The President then called on the Member for South Leeward to leave
the precincts of the building. The Member for South Leeward failed to leave
and the President adjourned the meeting for five minutes to permit the Hon-
ourable Member for South Leeward to leave.
Council resumed at 10.20 a.m.
All Vembhers with the exepntion of the MTmhpbr fr So+rth Tiprnr rl w>na
present.
The Honourable Minister for Trade and Production seconded by the
Honourable Member for North Leeward moved that the Standing Rules and
Orders be suspended to permit the motion made by the Honourable Minister
for Communications and Works to be debated.
The Motion was put to the House and carried without debate. -
At this stage the Honourable Member for the Grenadines said that he
wished to protest against the exclusion from the agenda of three motions of
which he had given notice at the previous meeting.

The President informed the Honourable Member for the Grenadines that
if he wished to protest lie should do so at ihe proper lime and in the appro-
priate manner.











The Honourable Member for the Grenadines persisted in questioning the
President's action in the course of which he made certain remarks which the
President considered disrespectful and out of order.
The President drew the attention of the House to the conduct of the
Honourable Member for the Grenadines, and named him.
The Honourable Minister for Communications and Works seconded by
the Honourable Minister for Social Services moved that the Honourable Mem-
ber for the Grenadines "be suspended from further attendance of this sitting
of the House in order that the House may continue its business."
The Motion was put to the vote and carried 8-nil with 3 abstentions.
The Honourable Member for the Grenadines then left the Council
Chamber.
The Honourable Minister for Communications and Works then moved
that the Honourable Minister for Social Services be exempted from vacating
his seat. The Motion was put to the vote and carried 10-nil with one
abstention.
4. NOTICES OF MOTIONS.
There were no notices of Motions.

5. NOTICES OF QUESTIONS.
The Honourable Third Nominated Member gave notice of the following
Questions:
1. Will the Minister for Communications and Works please investi-
gate why air mail letters posted in St. Vincent for the United Kingdom
are held up in Trinidad for several days before proceeding to the United
Kingdom?
2. Will the Minister please endeavour to have this situation remedied
as soon as possible?

6. PETITIONS.
No Petitions were presented.
7. PAPERS.
No Papers were laid.

8. QUESTIONS.
The Honourable Minister for Trade and Production informed the Honour-
able Second Nominated Member that he would reply to the Questions standing
in his name on the Order Paper at the next meeting of the Council.
The Honourable Minister for Communications and Works told the House
that the replies to be given by him to the Questions standing on the Order
Paper in the name of the Honourable Member for the Grenadines who was
now absent would be forwarded to him in writing, and that copies would be
circulated to members.












9. BILs.
SECOND AND THID READINGS:
The following Bill was read a second time:
The Customs Duties (Amendment No. 2) Bill.
In Committee of the whole House, the following amendment was made:
Clause 1. Delete "No. 2" appearing in brackets in line 2 after the word
"Amendment".
The Bill was then read a third time and passed.
The Mental Health Bill was read a second and third time and passed with
minor amendments of typographical errors.
10. ADJOURNMENT.
On the Motion for Adjournment the following Members spoke on the
subjects as indicated hereunder:-
The Honourable Member for South Windward:
Intimidation and dismissal of road-workers by the Honourable Minister
for Trade and Production.
Naming of Honourable Member for the Grenadines.
After certain remarks were made by the Honourable Member for South
Windward concerning the President, the attention of the House was directed
to his conduct and the President proceeded to name the Member for South
Windward.
The Member for South Windward left the Chamber immediately.
The Honourable Minister for Trade and Production then spoke on the
subject of certain false statements concerning the Government made by cer-
tain Honourable Members.
The Meeting adjourned sine die at 11.57 a.m.

E. A. BRATHWAITE,
President.

Confirmed this 5th day of March, 1959.


A. F. GILES,
President.












REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL AUDITOR, WINDWARD ISLANDS, ON THE
ACCOUNTS OF THE GOVERNMENT SAVINGS BANK, ST. VINCENT,
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1957.



The accounts of the Government Savings Bank, St. Vincent, for the year
ended 31st December, 1957, have been examined in accordance with Section 12 of
the Savings Bank Ordinance (No. 1 of 1956).

RECONCILIATION OF DEPOSITORS' BALANCES.
2. The total of the balances on the individual depositors' accounts at 31st
December, 1957 exceeded the balance on Main Ledger account by $20.05. Adjust-
ment was effected within the year by the transfer of the unexplained difference
of $20.05 to a suspense account.

BALANCE SHEET.
3. Suspense Account. The balance of $86.14 on the Suspense Account repre-
sents an accumulation of unexplained errors in the accounts. The question of its
clearance is the subject of correspondence' with the Accountant General.

4. As a result of errors in the calculation of interest the liability Depositors,
$706,375.56 and the Asset, Accumulated Deficit, $103,249.35 are each understated by
$18.52.

5. The cash balance of $87,811.47 exceeds by $63,811.47 the sum of $24,000
which in accordance with Savings Bank Rule No. 25 (a), shall be kept in hand
for the general purposes of the bank.


T. BYRNE,
Principal Auditor, Windward Islands.
21st January, 1959.












































ST. VINCENT SAVINGS BANK
ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 1957.

AUDIT CERTIFICATE.

The attached Statement has been examined in accordance with Section 12
of the Savings Bank Ordinance (No. 1 of 1936), and with the General Instructions
and Rules of the Overseas Audit Department. I have obtained all the information
and explanations that I have required and I certify, as a result of this audit,
that in my opinion the statement is correct, subject to the observations contained
in my report dated the 21st January, 1959.

T. BYRNE,
Principal Auditor, Windward Islands.
21st January, 1959.









ST. VINCENT.


SAVINGS BANK 1957.


Revenue and Expenditure Account for the year ended 31st December, 1957.

Expenditure $ c. Peventue

To interest paid to Depositors on By interest on Investments ...
closed accounts ... 244 49
By fees on issue of duplicate Deposit
To interest capitalised and credited Books ...
to sundry Depositors' accounts
on 31.12.57 ... 16,158 33

To payment to Treasury in respect
of services rendered ... 1,500 00

To balance carried to Deficit
Account ... 4,084 96

21,987 78


$ c.

21,982 98


4 80









21,987 78


Account of Deposits and Withdrawals for the year ended 31st December, 1957

Deposits $ c. ii Withd awals $ c.

To balance at credit of Depositois By wit hdrawals ... 307,349 55
on 1.1.57 ... 668,802 85
By balance at credit of Depositors ...
To deposits received ... 328,743 88 on 31.12.57 706,375 56

To interest credited to Depositors ... 16,158 33

To Suspense Account ... 20 05

1,013,725 1 1,013,725 11


Investment Adjustment Account


Dr.

To Depreciation of investments


$ c. Cr.

...17,683 04 By adjustment of errors in 1956
Revaluation of Investments
By Deficit Account

17.683 04


Deficit Account


Dr. $ c.

To Accumulated Deficit at 1.1.57 ... 89,653 67

To Investment Adjustment Account 17,680 64 I



107,334 31


Cr.

By Revenue and Expenditure Account

By Accumulated Deficit ai 31.12.57


Suspense Account.


S $ c.
To Cash-Management Expenses
for 1956 ... 1,500 00
To Account of Deposits and With-
drawals for the vear ended
31.12.57 ... 20 05
To Cash-Incorrect Charga adjust-
ed in 1958 ... 10 00

1,530 05


By Balance on 1.1.57


By Balance on 31.12.57


9 c.


2 40
17,680 64

17,683 04


$ c.

4.084 96

103,249 35


107.334 31


$ c.
1,443 91


86 14


S 1,530 05



































Balance Sheet as on 31st December, 1957


A ssets

Casu in hand

Investment at Market Value

Snispanse Account

Accumulated Deficit


$ c.

... 87,,11 47

... 515,228 60

... 86 14

... 103,249 35

706,375 56


Note: There is a contingent liability amounting to $3,738.12 in respect of the outstanding aggregate of amounts
paid in past years from Colony Revenues to meet deficits on the Revenue and Expenditure Accounts.



Examined,


T. BYRNE,
Principal Auditor Wd. Islands.


I. D. B. CHARLES,
.Accountant General.

Treasury Chambers,
St. Vincent, W.I.
18th December, 1958.


Liabilities


Depositors


$ c.

...; 706,37T 56


706,375 56









HANSARD.

PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES IN THE SECOND SESSION (1955-1956)
OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL, COLONY OF ST. VINCENT,
BRITISH WEST INDIES.


Thursday, 6th October, 1955


The Honourable Legislative Council met at 10 o'clock this morning.

PRAYERS
[MR. PRESIDENT in the Chair]
His Honour A. F. GILES, Administrator.

PRESENT:


The Honourable B. F. DIAS, Acting Crown Attorney,
P. R. ELLIS, Colonial Treasurer, .
SE. A. C. HUGHES, First Nominated Member,
S .R. E. BAYNES, Member for Kingstown,
J. A. BAYNES, Member for St. George,
G. H. CHARLES, Member for Central Windward,
E. T. JOSHUA, Member for North Windward,
S S. E. SLATER, Member for North Leeward,.
C. L. TANNIS, Member for Grenadines (arrived
H. F. YOUNG, Member for South Leeward,
S L. C. LATHAM, Member for South Windward,
A. B. C. DOSSANTOS, Third Nominated Member.
ABSENT:
The Honourable A. C. CYRUS, Second Nominated Member.


MINUTES
The Minutes of the Sitting held on
4th August, 1955, copies of which were
circulated, were taken as read and were
confirmed.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
MR. PRESInENT: I have two announce-
ments to make. The first is on the sub-
ject of gratuity to Ex-Servicemen of the
first World War.
Honourable Members I beg to refer to
a Motion which was passed by this
House on the 7th of July, 1955, regarding
the payment of gratuity to Ex-Service-
men. I have now been directed by His
Excellency the Governor to inform Hon-


at 10.00 a.m.)


ourable Members that careful inquiries
were made into the matter when repre-
sentations were first received in 1953, but
the War Office after due investigation
then intimated that the claims submit-
ted could not be admitted. His Excel-
lency therefore considers that in the
absence of any fresh evidence in sup-
port of these claims, no useful purpose
would be served in re-sub-mitting the
matter.
The second announcement is in respect
of the new Income Tax Ordinance.
Honourable Members will recall that
at a Meeting of this Council on the 15th
of July last year a new Income Tax
Ordinance was passed which provided
among other things for a general re-


1st Sitting









duction of rates, but especially so in the
higher brackets, and the granting of
more generous allowances. Due to the
grant-aided status of St. Vincent and the
fact that the Ordinance sought osten-
sibly to reduce revenue, His Excellency
the Governor had to refer it to the Sec-
retary of State before he could give his
assent. There have been long arguments
with the Secretary of State who has only
recently signified his willingness to agree
to the Ordinance, but with amendments,
which are as follows:-
First, British Subject Allowance and
other limits of earned income relief both
to be four hundred and eighty dollars
and not five hundred as provided in the
Ordinance.
-Second, where in the second schedule
the Ordinance provides for three brackets
of five thousand dollars at the rate of
fifty, sixty and sixty-five cents, the Sec-
retary of State proposes two brackets of
two thousand five hundred at fifty and
sixty cents, and one bracket at the re-
mainder of chargeable income at sixty-
five cents. It will be recalled that
Finance Committee agreed to these
changes to rates at its meeting of 8th of
March this year.
Third-as regards allowance. The
Secretary of State is prepared to agree to
a flat rate allowance of two hundred dol-
lars for a child with no further conces-
sions for education and with a minimum
of wife allowance to three hundred dol-
lars. It is clear that the Secretary of
State is at present unlikely to go beyond
these concessions and Executive Council
has advised that they should be accepted
without prejudice to a renewal of our
efforts to obtain implementation of the
further proposals contained in the Ordin-
ance.
In the circumstances, I would like Hon-
ourable Members to consider amend-
ments to the Ordinance on a future day
which I suggest should be at the Novem-
ber Meeting of Council, as provided
under Rule 48 of the Standing Rules and
Orders. A full and detailed statement of
the original proposals as compared with


the proposed amendments will be circu-
lated to Honourable Members before the
next Meeting of Council. It will not now
be possible to introduce any amended
Income Tax Legislation for 1955, but
subject to agreement being reached on
the proposed amendments introduction
on the 1st January 1956 will be possible.

NOTICES OF MOTIONS
MR. PRESIDENT: Are there any Notices
of motions?
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members, I beg to give notice
of the following motion:-
BE IT RESOLVED that a message of deep
sympathy be sent to the Governments
and peoples of Barbados, Grenada and
British Honduras in their distress occas-
ioned by the recent hurricane during the
day and night of 22nd and 28th Septem-
ber, 1955, respectively, and that the
people of the St. Vincent Southern Gren-
adines be assured of this Council's sym-
pathy in their suffering caused by the
said hurricane and vigilant concern for
the measures to be taken for their relief
and comfort.
AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that a
copy of this Resolution be forwarded to
the Secretary of State through His Excei-
lency the Governor.
Mr. President, I give notice that at the
proper time I shall be asking you, Sir,
and the members of Council to dispense
with notice of this motion so that it
could be debated and passed today.
HON. CROWN ATTORNEY: Mr. President,
Honourable Members; I have the honour
to give notice of a motion to be moved
by me at the next Meeting of this Hon-
ourable House. This motion reads as
follows:-
WHEREAS there formerly existed in
the Colonies of the British Caribbean a
Regiment known as the West Indian
Regiment; and
WHEREAS this Council has already de-
clared itself in favour of a Federation
of the said Colonies; and









WHEREAS in conformity with the fuller
share of responsibility implicit in such
a Federation it is desirable that the said
colonies should share more actively in
matters of local defence and the main-
tenance of law and order within the
region; and
WHEREAS it has been proposed that
the West Indian Regiment be re-
established.
BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED as follows:-
This Council approves of the re-
establishment of a West Indian
Regiment; and agrees
That the said Regiment be raised
under the, authority of an Act
of Parliament;
And that this colony's annual con-
tribution to the maintenance of
the said Regiment be not less
than one percent of the colony's
revenue;
And that the said Regiment be ad-
ministered by the War Office on
behalf of the Governments of the
British Caribbean.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I hereby give
notice of the following motions:
1. WHEREAS, according to rumors cir-
culating it is understood that it is the
intention of St. Vincent to construct a
runway at Arnos Vale so that a feeder
airline service could be established be-
tween the territories that are not at the
moment being served by B.W.I. Overseas
Airways;
AND WHEREAS taking a long term view
of Aeronautical development, such a
service to an island such as St. Vincent
with plans for Tourist and other Agri-
cultural developments, would not only
serve to prevent the progress of the
island, but could also be regarded as a
waste of money;
BE IT RESOLVED that before finality is
reached on the matter, Government
should approach it constitutionally, and
explore all possible avenues that may
lead to the satisfactory establishment of


a suitable runway, that will link St.
Vincent with the Commercial Airlines of
the World;
AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that if
St. Vincent considers itself incompetent
to deal with the matter, that the techni-
cal services of the technical branch of the
U.N. organisation be sought for their
advice and guidance.
Mr. President, at a later stage I shall
ask for permission to have the Standing
Rules and Orders suspended in order to
debate these motions.
2. WHEREAS Section 58 of the Statu-
tory Rules and Orders of the Legislative
Council was amended to permit mem-
bers of the said Legislative Council to
rise and speak on matters only of public
interest;
AND WHIEREAS the proposed amendment
to the present Constitution of the Wind-
ward Islands has made no provision for
an opposition in the Legislative Council;
BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that Section
58 (which now reads 61) be further
amended to permit members of the Legis-
lature to rise and talk on any matter or
to oppose any decision taken by Govern-
ment which they may consider was not
in the best interest of the community.

PAPERS LAID
MR. PRESIDENT: I call upon the Hon-
ourable Crown Attorney to lay the Papers
mentioned in the Schedule.
HON. CROWN ATTORNEY: Mr. President,
Honourable Members, I have the honour
to lay on the Council Table:-
Council Paper No. 27 of 1955: The
Medical Report for the year 1953.
Council Paper No. 28 of 1955: Gov-
ernment and Assisted Primary
Schools (Amendment) Regula-
tions, 1955.
Council Paper No. 29 of 1955: Trav-
elling and Subsistence Allowances
(Amendment) Regulations, 1955.
Council Paper No. 30 of 1955 Tele-
communications (Amendment)
Rules, 1955.









Council Paper No. 31 of 1955: The
Consular Conventions (United
States of Mexico) Order, 1955.
Council Paper No. 32 of 1955: The
Dangerous Drugs (Application)
Order, 1955.
Council Paper No. 33 of 1955: Report
of the Committee appointed to
consider the recommendations of
the Commission of Enquiry into
the loss of Schooner Eugenia A.

MOTIONS
MR. PRESIDENT: As there are no ques-
tions, I call upon the Honourable Member
for North Windward to move the motion
standing in his name. %
HON. E. T. JOSHUA: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: WHEREAS we are
led to believe that local Government
established under Ordinance No. 10 of
1951 appears to give wider powers in the
affairs of the people and a means of
preparing them to appreciate what demo-
cratic government ought to be;
AND WHEREAS Section 9 of Ordinance
No. 17 of 1951 was repealed and replaced
by Ordinance No. 6 of 1955, and Section
6 thereof tends to nulify the said Section
9 of the Principal Ordinance and does
not clarify the number of members to be
nominated by the Government;
AND WHEREAS it is the belief among
Colonial peoples that sufficient scope is
intended to be given to them in manag-
ing their affairs;
AND WHEREAS it is clearly seen that
the Government or the Governor in
Council could nominate a majority accor-
ding to Section 6 of Ordinance No. 6 of
1955 if they so will it over the elected
majority which is specifically defined by
Section 10 of the Principal Ordinance;
BE IT RESOLVED that in the Ordinance
created for local Government in this
Colony that a definite ruling be placed
as regards the number of members to
be nominated for purpose of this Ordin-
ance and that a clear definition be placed
on the number of nominated members.


Mr. President, I have accepted an
amendment for this resolve that it might
be clearly and quickly expedited and
passed by this House this morning. The
Crown Attorney and myself after consul-
tation, agreed to an amendment of this
resolve. It will now read-"Be It Resol-
ved that section 10 of the Ordinance be
amended to provide that the majority
of the Members of the Local Authority
be elected."
Mr. President, Honourable Members,
the extent to which this debate would
be projected today is waived by the
amendment. It is clear that we in this
part of the Empire have also had our
share of Constitutional advancement.
Our advancement brought us to the
threshold of Ministerial Government.
It has also brought us to the threshold
of entering a West Indian Federation
with a view and an aim towards West
Indian Nationhood.
When I perceive that soon all the
towns, small towns included, would have
councils-local councils-it is necessary
that we also keep our eyes on how those
councils would be built up. When this
Ordinance No. 17 of 1951 was proposed,
local Government had a broader outlook.
But nevertheless the Section that relates
to appointment of members to the coun-
cils had the same status or the same
compliment as the ordinary board-
when I say ordinary board I mean the
board which we were formerly. That
was still good, because it told us clearly
and plainly that four members will be
elected and two will be nominated.
We gathered from the amendment,
which we seek to examine here today
that the local authority constituted
under this Ordinance shall consist of
such number of members not being more
than nine, as the Governor in Council
shall determine. Of course, we thought
that an amendment would have dis-
covered that it was time that we had
a wholly elected council, even in this
House. It is time that we get rid of the
nominated members. But to my great
surprise I have been seeing that in the
very centre of our strivings and efforts to









manage our own affairs there is this
perpetual feeling that we are not ripe
to govern our own affairs and therefore
the Governor or the Colonial Office
must choose representatives to balance
a council. That is a shame, that you
offer democratically that the polls
should be open to appoint members to
a council and then you turn back and
say that as soon as we give you eight
members or twelve you then turn back
and say well we want six or seven nomi-
nated members to contradict what you
do. I feel that that is not democracy
at all.
The question now arises as to whether
we are going to have a wholly elected
council or whether we will have now,
four members elected and two nominated
as the old council had it. I am not
interested in who are members of these
councils. I am not interested in who the
Government nominates, but what I am
interested in is to tell the people in this
enlightened age, that we mean to give
you full powers to manage your own
affairs and to show you that that is our
honest-to-God intention. We have amen-
ded your constitution-Prime Ministers
and what not. But still in your Ordin-
ance you have meandered an amend-
ment. As soon as you find that the
council will have men there who will
carry out the intention of the people you
find there that the Chairman has a
casting vote to nullify whatever he did
not agree with.
In these colonies the nominated mem-
bers have the idea that when a nomi-
nated member is appointed that he is
appointed there to oppose the will of
the people and it would seem to be true.
That should not be because we are talk-
ing here, gentlemen, of advanced con-
stitutions. We had the idea right here
recently in the Kingstown Board, in the
town of Kingstown-that the amount
of trouble, the amount of motions moved
here without results as far as I can see,
and we have now to even rectify that.
None of us are such fools or are so un-
conscious of democracy here that we
cannot see that if you have a one-sided


list of electors you have not got de-
mocracy but a form of dictatorship which
you perpetuate when you have only one
set of men called to elect members to
the local councils. All those things I
see, and sometimes I wonder whether
I must resign from this House or whether
at some future time I would see even
the shadow of democracy in my country.
Of course, in making this amendment
to my motion I must say that there is
no need for any long debate. My friend
the Crown Attorney here has made it
clear. The portion of this Ordinance
included herein was amended telling us
that the local authority constituted
under this Ordinance shall consist of
such number of members not being more
than nine, as the Governor in Council
shall determine. It is settled here that
four shall be elected, then you have
five remaining. We see that three can
be nominated. What is to prevent the
Governor in Council from nominating
all five? Nothing at all. Therefore,
gentlemen, let us see that Section 10 of
the Ordinance be amended to provide
that the majority of the members of the
local authority be elected.
MR. PRESIDENT: I think before we go
any further I should ask the House
whether there is any opposition to allow-
ing the Honourable Member who has
moved his motion, to moving it as
amended.
HON. CROWN ATTORNEY: Mr. Presi-
dent, Honourable Members, I have the
honour to second this motion ably moved
by the Honourable Member for North
Windward. I must say first of all that
this anomaly -occurred through an over-
sight. It was never intended by Gov-
ernment to swamp the Board or Local
Authorities. The original Ordinance
read as follows:-"Section 9. A local
authority constituted under this Ordin-
ance shall consist of six members of
whom three shall form a corum." Six
members were laid down in that original
Ordinance. Then Section 10 says-"Mem-
bers of a local authority may be either
a board elected in accordance with the









provisions of electing or part elected and
part nominated by the Governor provi-
ded that at least four of the number of
the members constituted under the lo-
cal authority shall be elected." But this
is an understanding that there will be
six members of whom four, being the
majority would be elected and two only
would be nominated.
Now, Section 9 of the Ordinance has
been amended to read-"A local author-
ity constituted under this Ordinance
shall consist of such number of members
not being more than nine as the Govern-
or in Council shall determine." That
Section was amended while Section 10
remained the same providing for at
least four. So that as it stands four
would be elected, if there were nine mem-
bers on the board and five could be
nominated. There is no intention of
Government to swamp the board there-
fore it is necessary and Section 10
should have been amended, but it was
not amended through an oversight.
But it was the intention of Government
to amend Section 10.
Honourable Members, I do not think
that this motion would be opposed by
any one here. It is necessary and Gov-
ernment quite agrees with it, so I second
the motion and I ask that it be passed
with that amendment.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members, I have not risen
to oppose this motion, but to make a
very slight observation on the consequen-
ces of the motion. Now, we go through
these Ordinances making various amend-
ments as time goes by, but as I have
said before, this is a Legislative Council
-there is no library, there is nothing
set up at all that may guide you in
amending any ordinance or legislation
passed here. I am asking again that
in amending any ordinance that the
ordinance itself be brought here and
the details of it be gone into so that
when they are amended we will have
the amendment read with the ordinance
itself, and then you will not have these
things repeated time and time and time
again.


HON. J. A. BAY1IES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members, I rise merely to
give an observation while I express my
determination to support this motion.
I have noticed that this motion this
morning has brought a happening in
this House today that has never hap-
pened during the five years I have been
representing the people of St. George.
In this House it has always been that a
motion may be seconded by an elected
member of the House or occasionally
by a nominated member, but it has been
clearly seen all through these years that
the Honourable Crown Attorney has
always been there, not as a member of
this House, but as a representative of
Government to see that things are run
according to law. This morning we
have had a precedent where the Crown
Attorney has jumped to second a motion
ably moved by the Honourable Member
for North Windward. It goes to show
that in our governmental arrangements
the actual instrument that guides this
council-it has like a mason, a few
stones put in there without mortar and
no sooner does the first shower of rain
fall than those stones fall from their
places and you discover that something
is wrong.
I feel that as the mover said these
things encourage a certain amount of
dictatorship, and if we must have the
possibility of dictatorship in the local
Councils you must have a bigger portion
of dictatorship in this Legislative Council
Chamber, so that you would have one
governing all the others.
I hope that in future that Honourable
Crown Attorney will see to it-will see
it fit to support more of the worthwhile
motions that come here in the interest
of the people of St. Vincent, rather than
representing Government only.
HON. C. L. TANNIS: Mi?. President,
Honourable Members, speaking on this
motion I would agree with the Honoura-
ble Crown Attorney in pointing out that
I do not think it was anyone's intention
to have a whole board nominated or to
'have the greater number of members









nominated on any board, for that matter,
as the mover seems to think.
This motion here as we can see seems
to suggest that any nominated member
must oppose the elected members on any
concern, but that is not at all so. When
members are nominated to serve on dis-
trict councils and other local boards,
they are not put there merely to oppose
the elected members. That is not the
intention, I am sure. After all there
must be some nominated element in
these boards, but it is not the intention
to swamp the board, as the Crown At-
torney said, with nominated members.
HON. H. F'. YOUNG: Mr. President
I am not here to oppose this motion
but I would like to' make a point. I have
served on these boards for some time
and I would agree that there is a lot
of advantage in having many nominated
members on these small boards, because
it is not always that some of these elec-
ted members understand what is required
of them. Many of them do not really
understand how Government is run.
They do not understand about the Esti-
mates and things of the kind and some-
times they are almost a hindrance rather
than a help. So I would not wholly
agree with the idea that nominated mem-
bers are only appointed to oppose,
because sometimes they just have to
oppose the members that are elected.
Let us look at things honestly. The
issue is always bigger.
HON. E. T. JOSHUA: Mr. President,
Honourable Members, I would have no
cause to speak again on this motion
except to comment on the remarks made
by some Honourable Members here.
Of course, it would appear that as far
as the member for South Leeward is
concerned the issue is always bigger. I
am surprised sometimes when I hear
members who are supposed to be repre-
senting the wills of the people-when I
hear the things that they stand up and
say, when very often they themselves
complain when they see things happen-
ing out of the blue.
The Honourable Member for the Grena-
dines said it was not Government's in-


tention to have a wholly nominated
board or a majority of nominated mem-
bers on the board. I am not saying in
this motion that that was the intention.
Nevertheless, this certain Section of the
Ordinance was not amended and any-
thing could happen if it is left as it is,
so let us clear up any doubt now.
MR. PRESIDENT: There is a motion
before the House. Those in favour of
the motion moved by the Member for
North Windward? The motion is there-
fore carried.
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: Mr. President,
under the provisions of Rule 25 of the
Standing Rules and Orders I seek your
consent to dispense with notice with
respect to the motion which I moved
this morning, and subject to your consent
and the consent of the House I would
like to move it today. It is necessary
for it to be moved today because of its
nature.
MR. PRESIDENT: Is there any opposition
to the waiving of the Rules for this
motion?
The Honourable Members have given
their consent and I give mine.
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: I am grateful.
Mr. President, Hondurable Members,
I beg to move the following motion:-
BE IT RESOLVED that a message of deep
sympathy be sent to the Government
and peoples of Barbados, Grenada and
British Honduras in their' distress oc-
casioned by the recent hurricane during
the day and night of 22nd and 28th
September, 1955 respectively, and that
the people of the St. Vincent Southern
Grenadines be assured of this Council's
sympathy in their suffering caused by
the said hurricane and vigilant concern
for the measures to be taken for their
relief and comfort;
AND BE IT FURTI-ER RESOLVED that a
copy of this Resolution be forwarded to
the Secretary of State through His Excel-
lency the Governor.
Mr. President, Honourable Members,
this to my mind, is a mere formality-
a mere recording of this Council's sym-









pathy to the inhabitants of Barbados
and to the people and Governments of
British Honduras who were victims of
hurricane Janet, from whose depredation
we were so narrowly spared ourselves.
The circumstances and misery, the de-
predation and suffering of the victims
are too recent and are too well known
to us to need any examination here today.
Surprising to say that the Government
of St. Vincent in common with the Gov-
ernments of neighboring territories
have responded magnificiently to the
needs of our suffering brothers. Not
only the Government but the people of
St. Vincent of all walks of life, rich or
poor, have given us all, I think, great
cause for pride in their unselfish response
to the urgent needs of their fellowmen.
Perhaps, in our particular case this
was inspired by gratitude-gratitude for
the fact that while we who had been
warned were spared, those who did not
have warning became victims. But
whether it is for gratitude or whether it
is merely the self-sacrafice or good feel-
ing of one West Indian for another, the
fact remains that our people have re-
sponded well-in many instances without
thought of payment or reward for their
assistance, and it now remains merely
for us as the Legislative Council of this
colony, to place on record that sympathy
for those Governments and people which
I am sure we all feel, and I ask Honour-
able Members that this motion be passed
by acclamation.
HON. E. T. JOSHUA: Mr. President,
Honourable Members of this Honourable
House, I rise to second a motion so ably
moved by the First Nominated Member.
I believe it is an appropriate duty con-
ferred upon me as the Senior Member
of this Council elected by the wills of
the people that I should rise and second
this motion.
The question was, that the whole
Caribbean area in the Windwards was
exposed to a devastating hurricane
between the nights and days 22nd to
28th of September, and I rise on behalf
of the people of this colony to show their
sympathy in a dreadful storm that took


the lives of a number of persons in
Barbados, Grenada and Carriacou, and
has destroyed their properties beyond re-
pair or beyond recall. We have been
saved by God's mercy to show them our
sympathy and now officially, we have
assembled here in Council to put on re-
cord what we have actually done in
practice.
Mr. President, I do believe that there
is a strong feeling of brotherhood that
binds together the Windwards-Grenada
,St. Lucia, Dominica and St. Vincent and
the Grenadines. I do believe that an
injury to one would be an injury to all,
but I notice that Trinidad, Jamaica and
others have played also a wonderful part
in the scheme of things to relieve the
people of the stress and strain which they
are at present undergoing.
Honourable gentlemen, I believe that
everyone of us here is in deepest sym-
pathy with the distressed islands and
nothing should be left undone to further
quick relief to the people, especially
those in the St. Vincent Grenadines.
I am one with the mover of such a noble
motion, that he believes this is just a
formality to put on record-it is more
than a formality to put it on record.
I know that we are all in sympathy with
what has happened, therefore I whole-
heartedly endorse all that the mover
said and second the motion.
MR. PRESIDENT: Does the Honourable
Mover wish to exercise his right to reply?
Those in favour of the motion? The
motion is carried unanimously.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Honourable Presi-
dent, Honourable Members, under Rule
25 of the Standing Rules and Orders of
the Legislative Council, I would seek
the President's permission and that of
the House for the introduction of a
motion to suspend the Standing Rules
and Orders in order to debate the first
motion of which I gave notice this
morning.
MR. PRESIDENT: Honourable Members,
before I ask for your permission for this
rule to be waived, I should like to put
on record my own views. First of all that









there would be obvious advantages in
giving notice of this motion so that a
large number of facts and figures and
technical arguments could be made avail-
able to the Honourable Mover who is a
member of the Executive Council, and
to those who would be taking part in the
debate, so that in coming to its decision
Council could be fully informed. As it
is, without notices, Government mem-
bers-the members of the Executive
Council would not have these facts at
their finger-tips.
I would ask you to bear that in mind
first. If the Honourable Mover, before
I put the question of the suspension of
of Standing Orders to Council, has any-
thing to say to explain why it is partic-
ularly required to waive the advantage
of having these facts available, I think
he should say it.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Now, my reason
for it is this-first of all Council was
prorogued for some time and according
to the rules of prorogation Council should
have met this morning not to debate
anything or to do any business here to-
day. Now, according to the Standing
Rules and Orders of the Legislative Coun-
cil, it is necessary that eight clear days
notice be given before Council could de-
bate any business. Because of the pro-
rogation it was not possible for eight
clear days to be given, but as other
business is being done here at this
Meeting and as I feel that this is a
matter of extreme urgency and should
be of great concern to this Government,
I feel it should be debated today.
MR. PRESIdENT: Is there any opposi-
tion to the Honourable Member's request
for the suspension of the Standing Rules
and Orders to allow this motion to be
debated today?
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: Mr. President,
with due respect, it appears to me that
what the Honourable Member is saying
is that this meeting is badly summoned.
That there should be no business des-
patched today and Government has been
all wrong. Therefore that means that
he is justified in being wrong as two
wrongs may make a right. That is a


very nice argument, but forgetting that
technical aspect of it, let me see, from
my own particular reaction-.
The motion of which notice was given
by the Honourable Member this morning
with regard to the airplane strip, is a
matter of extreme importance and a
matter on which I would hesitate to enter
on any debate, without being in posses-
sion of all the facts which I could lay
my hands on. Had it been a matter
where bull-dozers were about to start
operations at Arnos Vale tomorrow or
the next day or within a week's time, I
would say yes, by all means, it is a mat-
ter of extreme urgency. But in the cir-
cumstances one can see, surely, that
there is no harm in awaiting more in-
formation on the subject of this airstrip
at Arnos Vale. One can visualise..................
HION. E. T. JOSHUA: Mr. President............
MR. PRESIDENT: IS there a point of
order?
HON. E. T. JOSHUA: Is the Honourable
Member speaking on the motion?
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: I do not know
whether the Honourable Member heard
but I heard the President ask whether
there was any opposition to the request
for the suspension of the Standing Rules
and Orders............
HON. E. T. JOSHUA: But you seem to
be opposing the motion............
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: I am not
opposing any motion. That motion is not
yet before the House. I am speaking on
the question of suspension of the Stan-
ding Rules and Orders to allow this
motion to be debated today. I have no
objection whatever to the Honourable
Member's motion. He may have a new
idea for a better site for an airport.
But I feel, personally that for me to come
and debate or pretend to debate a motion
so far-reaching and of such great im-
portance-I think I would be doing my-
self a great injustice and I believe other
Honourable Members would be doing
themselves great injustice to attempt
to embark on a debate of this sort
without first providing themselves with
the necessary facts and figures,









HOON. E. T. JOSHUA: I cannot under-
stand, Mr. President, why we are so cal-
lous and indifferent about an airstrip
which is so important to us here. This
here is over and above a matter of ur-
gency. It is like water that is boiling
and even though the fire is removed the
temperature is still so high that the
water still boils. Perhaps this is the
case with the question of an airstrip.
I do not know, Sir, but I think that the
facts of this thing are fully well known,
since we have been talking about an
airstrip for so long. We should be doubly
glad to know that a motion is brought
here on that question and more than
that, we do not have much on the Order
Paper today.
HON. J. A. BAYNES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I feel that while
I clearly understand the explanation
given by the first Nominated Member, I
would say this-that his mere attempt-
ing to give his reason why the matter
should not be debated has thrown me
completely in confusion. Because he has
actually started to debate the motion
which, perhaps because of his position as
a Member of the Executive Council, gives
him a knowledge of what is happening
in this Government, of which I believe
Members who are not Members of Execu-
tive Council have absolutely no know-
ledge. I believe the Members of Execu-
tive Council on the elected side of this
House can see that, and the rest of us,
for years and years we have been preach-
ing airstrip.
We have discussed that in Finance
Committee, but we know absolutely no-
thing further, and I am determined to
know what is what now. The balance
of the information can come later.
MR. PRESIDENT: Honourable Members,
I think we have got expressed opinions
on both sides which should enable Hon-
ourable Members to decide whether or
not their permission should be given.
I would just like to say one thing in
connection with the remarks of the Hon-
ourable Member who has just spoken
and that is that my particular reasons


for suggesting that we should debate it
at the next Meeting were that more in-
formation should be given and would be
able to be given to Members of the
Housue who are not Members of Execu-
tive Council at a future date, because it
would not be got ready to be available
now.
Now, those Members who agree that
Standing Rules and Orders should be
suspended to allow this motion to be
debated? Those who agree that Stand-
ing Rules and Orders should be suspend-
ed and the motion debated now?
Those against?
We will now allow this motion to be
debated. I give my consent and call
upon the Honourable Mover.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Mr. President, Hon-
ourable Members: Now, first of all, I
do not want any members of this House
who has opposed this motion to feel that

HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: On a point of
Order. The Honourable Member has not
yet moved his motion how could someone
oppose it.
MR. PRESIDENT: That is quite all right.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: I do not think
that I am out of order. I do not want
any Member of this House to attempt
to debate this motion if he feels he does
not have sufficient facts on the subjects
to do so. I have collected certain facts
and on those I will put forward this
motion.
I feel that St. Vincent has always, in
the past, embarked upon schemes which
to my mind, they did not make certain
calculations for. Then, within a few
years those schemes have fallen through.
The motion reads:
WHEReAS, according to rumours circu-
lating it is understood that it is the
intention of St. Vincent to construct a
runway at Arnos Vale so that a feeder
airline service could be established be-
tween the territories that are not at the
moment being served by B.WI, Overseas
Airways;









AND WHEREAS, taking a long term view
of Aeronautical development, such a ser-
vice to an island such as St. Vincent with
plans for Tourist and other Agricultural
developments, would not only serve to
prevent the progress of the island, but
could also be regarded as a waste of
money;
BE IT RESOLVED that before finality is
reached on the matter, Government
should approach it constitutionally, and
explore all possible avenues that may
lead to the satisfactory establishment
of a suitable runway, that will link St.
Vincent with the Commercial Airlines of
the World.
AND BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that if St.
Vincent considers itself incompetent to
deal with the matter, that the technical
services of the technical branch of the
U.N. Organisation be sought for their
advice and guidance.
Now, this is not intended to frighten
anybody, and as I have said in the begin-
ning, I have collected certain facts on
the subject. Now, first of all, you are
thinking in terms of getting a feeder ser-
vice at Arnos Vale. That is rumoured,
and if that is true I feel that this Gov-
ernment should give all due considera-
tion to this matter before deciding to lay
down such an airstrip. We know that
some time ago a field was erected at
Diamond and a couple years afterwards
it was regarded as not being very suit-
able for the type of service then existing.
We know also that we have started
several schemes which just do not work
after a few years and it proves that we
do not give enough consideration albng
the right lines before embarking on these
things. And so I feel that Government
should take all due care and considera-
tion to the factors involved before taking
such a step.
Now, you are'talking about putting a
runway at Arnos Vale. Well, when you
talk about a runway-I feel that you
would need a type of service connecting
St. Vincent and the smaller islands of the
region with the big commercial airlines.
In other words you need a service with
a plane that will link all these islands


around-Grenada with St. Vincent and
St. Vincent with Barbados and go from
Barbados to St. Lucia and from St.
Lucia to the other islands and so on.
Well, if that service were to run say
three times a week, you could see that it
would be quite profitable because it
would attract more people and you would
be able to take more passengers and for
longer -trips. Within the past nine
months one thousand nine hundred and
twenty persons came in by the Grumman
Goose into St. Vincent and out-you had
one thousand two hundred and twenty-
two persons. In addition to that you
had ninety-nine charters in that period.
Taking that as a basis, according to those
figures regarding the number of passen-
gers now carried to and from St. Vincent
by the Goose, and the number that would
be or could be carried if you made ac-
commodation for a direct connection
with the other islands around-if you put
those figures down on paper you would
see that any service that is set up as a
feeder service is not going to serve this
island at all, and from the start you will
be out of step because naturally people
will prefer to keep on the direct airlines
rather than get off and use a feeder ser-
vice, than have the uncertainty of get-
ting out again.
Now, when we sit down here and de-
cide we want an air service without get-
ting familiar with the factors involved
-we go ahead and get the service and
when it is eventually completed we have
all sorts of regrets. We see our faults
but more often than not in these cases
things have gone too far to be remedied.
And while we are here I would say this
-it is nobody's intention to criticise, but
we should all be interested in the de-
velopment and progress of St. Vincent
and point out these things when we see
them.
I suppose we all realise that most of
the people who come here on the Grum-
man Goose are people who come on busi-
ness and who therefore are more or less
compelled to come. There are scores of
other persons who would like to come to
St. Vincent, but because of the difficul-
ties of getting in and out of St. Vincent









they would not even attempt to come.
That is due directly to the fact that you
do not have proper air facilities.
You must remember that if you have
a feeder service you will not be able to
compete with the other islands who have
more up to date facilities. You will be
handi-capped from the start. You will
be at a disadvantage if you have a feeder
service while the islands around are con-
nected directly to the bigger airlines.
And you really should not let that
happen.
Gentlemen, those are some of the facts
which we have to face and as I say this
motion is not intended to criticise any-
body, but just to point out that Govern-
ment should give very serious considera-
tion to these factors. I feel that this
motion is quite clear, If St. Vincent
feels that it is incompetent to deal with
the matter, then we should seek advice
and assistance from outside.
HON. J. A. BAYNES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I rise to support
this motion because I have for the long-
est while, as a member of this House-I
am not a Member of Excutive Council-
I have been confused and on many occa-
sions had to acquire light from public
opinion on the street, in connection with
air transport for our island of St.
Vincent.
But I must congratulate the mover of
the motion, because this motion has
brought to light this morning one of the
vital enemies of St. Vincent's progress.
Not only is it that this thing prevents us
from going forward on the subject of
aeronautics, but an excuse is made every
time a proposal is made and a scheme is
put into effect some ten years after. It
takes from five to ten years before it is
being implemented, and as a conse-
quence when you implement what you
said ten years ago you would find that
that is ten years behind the march of
time. That is exactly our position in
aeronautics, and I believe it is so in
every field of endeavour that would lead
St. Vincent to progress.
I have noticed at St. Lucia they are
faced with the same block and aeronau-


tics in St. Lucia- the arrangements of
improving the airport to make it fully
international is the great concern of the
legislators and the people of St. Lucia.
They are now embarking there on the
possibility of cutting through the hill at
Vigie, so that the entrance to St. Lucia's
airport would be free of the present haz-
ard that is complained of. I can quite
see that perhaps the mover as a Member
of the Executive Council, shared the
views of the Executive Council with re-
gard to a feeder service, but now he has
been outside and had a little bit of light
he has seen the necessity that we should
endeavour to keep abreast of the march
of time.
We, in St. Vincent, as I before said,-
this is not our only problem. We have
lots of them like this-but we think of
an idea, prepare a scheme and before
you have the chance to implement it five
years have passed. Ten years have pass-
ed. And in the eyes of intelligent people
we are made to look very foolish. That
is because we have always been endeav-
ouring to make progress behind the
march of time. I hope there would be
more light on this subject from Govern-
ment, because as a Member of this House
and elected by the people-sometimes
when I am confronted with questions by
people of certain intelligence in my area,
I must say I am like a blind man to the
whole set up, and I can only hear from
rumour on the street, what is happening.
I do believe that there might be secrets
in Executive Council, but I do not be-
lieve those secrets are so important that
during discussions Members of this House
who are not Members of Executive Coun-
cil could not offer ideas that would be
beneficial to the implementation of such
schemes.
Mr. President, this motion, I think has
its usefulness, and I hope that should
this motion pass, we would be permitted
to have light on the subject. I am not
determined to offer any criticisms what-
ever until I actually know more of the
schemes and intentions of this Govern-
ment for the implementation of improv-
ed air transport in St. Vincent.









HON. E. T. JOSHUA: Mr. President,
Members of Council: The last note of
the Honourable Member for St. George
was that he does not intend to offer any
criticism regarding air transport by this
Government. I shall take up exactly
where he has ended.
As far back as 1953, questions were
asked concerning air transport and I
believe if we follow the sequence accord-
ing to what the First Nominated Member
said, we will see that now this matter is
no longer a matter of urgency as far as
this Government is concerned. But lis-
tening to the debate of the Member for
St. George and the mover of the motion
it would appear-only appear-it is not
a fact or an accusation-that somebody
is playing ball with the best public inter-
ests of this country, because a matter of
an air transport service so vitally neces-
sary in this Colony started and rumours
started going about saying that air
pockets developed at Diamond. Now we
are hearing rumours that Diamond is in
fact a good airport hence the agents of
the big airlines are using eveiy possible
means that they could use to humbug
the best possible interest of the people
in these Caribbean lands. St. Vincent
included.
In 1953 it took me eighteen hours from
Scotland, New Foundland, Bermuda, Bar-
bados to Trinidad. But it took me
eleven days to get out of Trinidad to
come to St. Vincent. That is a thorough
disgrace in the eyes of civilization.
I have heard a discussion here involv-
ing Honourable Members who are also
Members of the Executive Council, and
I was thoroughly amazed at their con-
fusion, for not one of them appears to
to know what is happening in connection
with air transport service. This motion
tells me that, and the fact that the First
Nominated Member would rather not
have the motion debated at all if possi-
ble, so that the other men would get
some information. Well, that could tell
that if two men who in their policy-form-
ing body could have no idea whatsoever,
even at this ninth hour, as to what plans
are being made for an air service for


their country, well then what do you
expect? I have reacted the point where
any man with intellig nce would begin to
feel he should resign from this House.
An air transport service for St. Vincent
is something that even the most callous,
even the most indiffei ent, event the most
foolish would be ready and most willing
to hold any discussion on in the form of
motions-anything to help with an air
line. Not because he cannot travel
or will not travel or could not travel.
But I would like to see communications
made possible between the civilized
world and my country. Nothing would
keep a country so backward as when it
is cut off from the rest of the world-no
communication. And of course even the
most backward country can be made for-
ward if steps are taken in the right
direction.
But it is true that some fell p.an is
always there to counteract schemes and
the only people who can enlighten us are
Members of the Executive Council. And
of course if they are ignorant of what
the Government intends to do, if they are
ignorant of the facts of proposals for
an airfield for this country, well then,
what are we to do as Members of this
House who are responsible to the people
as representatives? That is the Govern-
ment policy-forming body that Members
of this House have gone to. Well if they
are in confusion and do not even know
about things as important to the coun-
try's welfare as an airport. We can only
hope that some time to come we may
have an airport service here.
I do not know how many more motions
would be moved here and how many
more speeches would be made here be-
fore an airport service is established
properly to link this colony with other
colonies of the area. I feel we should
stop this foolish policy and resign man-
fully from this House. Let other men
come in here to do the job to be done.
That is the case as I see it.
HON. L. C. LATHAM: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: My reason for sup-
porting the motion for the suspension








of Standing Rules and Orders is that I
will always feel that the question of
getting an airport for St. Vincent is a
matter of urgency as long as we have
not got one.
We all know that communication be-
tween these smaller islands around is
not so good and especially for St. Vin-
cent. You always hear visitors say when
they come to St. Vincent, they had so
much trouble to get a passage to come in
and now they have come in they cannot
get out.
We had a good enough airport there
at Diamond. All of a sudden you heard
rumor going around about air pockets.
I do not know where the rumor came
from. Now there is another rumor going
around that an airport is to be put
down at Arnos Vale and nobody seems
to know whether there is any truth in
the matter or not.
It is a long time now we have been
talking and talking about airport facili-
ties here, and I should think that it is
high time now that something definite
be done about it., The Honourable
Mover of this motion is a Member of
Executive Council and maybe he knows
there is something up why he brought
this motion here. But now I do not
know whether I should support this
motion or not. I do not know what to
do, so I just have to wait and see what
happens.
HON. G. H. CHARLES: Mr. Chairman,
Honourable Members: Speaking on this
motion I must say that I was challenged.
Now, I heard the mover of this motion
mention something about a feeder line.
I wish to make myself quite clear in this
House-let us go down to brass tacks as
reasonable thinking human beings,-in
my humble, opinion I believe a motion
like this, if a Member of the Legislative
Council had brought a motion here
based on a rumor it would not affect
me in the least. But when a Member
of the Executive Council like myself-
when I hear a brother Councillor, one
who is a Member of the policy-forming
body of Government put a motion like


this before this House based on a rumor,
I do not know what else to expect.
Now I am saying this because I was
attacked. The Honourable Seconder of
this motion plainly said that he is not
on the Executive Council, I also gather
from the Honourable Member for South
Windward that it seems that something
is being hidden from certain members
of Council. Well, I am saying with all
sincerity of purpose that I personally
know what was discussed in Executive
Council and this to me is definitely
strange. I cannot understand it.
I have listened to the arguments in
the Honourable Mover's motion very
well and in my opinion it would seem
that he has something on his mind that
he would like to tell us around this
House. Probably he has gathered some
important information somewhere or the
other, but he is just afraid to mention it.
I really do not know what else to say
because this is a motion that in truth
and in fact touches a question that is
very important to this island-that may
start us on the road to a proper air ser-
vice, and I do not want anyone to go
out and say that Charles did not support
it.
I do believe that it was the honest
intention of the mover to give us some
light on the subject. I do not know
where he got his information from but
I would suggest he must have got it
from some official quarters, and I say
as a responsible citizen of this com-
munity he should put the cards on the
table and tell us that such and such is
the case. But I do not see how I can
support a motion based on rumor, as a
Member of the Executive Council. If I do
a thing like that I would be just be-
littling my intelligence.
I think it might have been better if
we had waited and had some informa-
tion on this subject circulated to us, be-
cause I do not think it could serve any
useful purpose to bring a motion-an
important motion like this at this time.
It seems as if the Honourable Mover has
got some important information, maybe
from official quarters, and I think he
should have given us some more light









on it. But bringing this motion here--
as I said if it had come from a Member
of the Legislaltive Council who is not
a Member of the Executive Council I
would probably symphatise, but for a
Member of the Executive Council to
bring a motion here based on rumor,
well, I definitely cannot support that.
HON. H. F. YOUNGs Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I would agree
with the Mover that we do need an air
service here, but it appears to me that
the one that rumor says they are going
to get is not the one that he wants. He
would like to have something more ex-
pensive. But sitting here and hearing
the comments of the various speakers,
I can see that everyone agrees that we
do need an air service no matter whether
it is at Arnos Vale, Diamond or any
where else. The big point is that we
need an air service, and I would say that
instead of getting a feeder service we
should try to get a direct line.
Members should realise that it is not
to say that Government is not trying to
get a service. Government is trying to
get a service, but what I would like to
find out, as a part of this Government
is, would Government embark on such
a scheme without bringing it to the
Legislature for discussion and some pos-
sible advice? Without our knowledge?
Again as a Member of the Executive
Council I would say since pilots say the
hills around the possible sites for air-
ports create air pockets which can be
quite dangerous, I would only say no
new runway without technical advice
and assistance, lest we waste more money
as we have been doing in the past.
Gentlemen, I think the Resolve has
not told us anything really, but there
seems to be some facts hidden somewhere
and I do not know what to do so I shall
sit down again.
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: In the Year of
Our Lord one thousand nine hundred
and forty-five-ten years ago, the Dia-
mond airfield was condemned. Ten or
twelve years ago Diamond airfield was
condemned. Whether you like it or


whether I like it or whether we do not
like it, and whatever suspicions we may
have as reasons for its condemnation,
the fact remains that the pilots would
not fly in there and Diamond has had
to be deserted.
For the last twelve years we have had
all sorts of experts come to St. Vincent
to look into the matter-technical ex-
perts, aeronautical experts, experts of
all kinds have come to look into the
matter of an airport. Twelve years af-
terwards we are still without an airport.
If Honourable Members would cast
their minds back to a time even before
they became Honourable Members, they
will remember that at one time the
Ratho Mill point was surveyed with the
intention of bulldozing that, building
concrete ramps into the sea on either
side, and using that as an airport.
Large white lines were drawn and the
gentlemen who suggested that particular
site suddenly left the Island and the
whole scheme had to be forgotten. We
have seen all sorts of experiments with
wind directions and all sorts of things.
All sorts of extraordinary gadgets were
put up all over the place. I am sure all
Honourable Members know of these
things. But now, after twelve years, we
are told that rumor says that we are go-
ing to put up an airport at Arnos Vale.
Now, gentlemen, let us understand this
clearly, here and now. I have no ob-
jection to anybody consulting anybody,
constitutionally or otherwise, as the
Honourable Member suggests, but how
much difference would it make whether
Government consulted the Members of
the Legislative Council or got another
expert? Do we want another expert?
Perhaps he would be more expert than
the other experts, but what useful pur-
pose is going to be served by sitting
around here and consulting these Mem-
bers now? Who is going to build this
airport? Whose money is going to build
the airport? As far as I understand we
do not have the money and therefore
I assume that whoever is furnishing the
money for the construction of this air-
port will furnish his own experts to ad-









vise on where that airport should be.
He alone will decide where that airport
is going to be.
After all these years I too, like the
mover, was hoping that at some not too
distant date we would have seen work
started on an airport. But, we cannot
make blood out of stone. Let us be
practical. Are we going to speed up the
setting up of an airport by consulting
Members of the Legislative Council or
by seeking the advice of the United Na-
tions Organisation when we do not know
where we are going to get the first dollar
to build an airport?
I too had hoped by now to see bull-
dozers and all the other necessary
equipment at work constructing an air-
port if even for a plane service for a
fourteen or sixteen passenger air craft.
At least that would be better than a six
passenger air craft. But half a loaf, in
my estimation is always better than no
loaf at all.
HON. C. L. TANNIS: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I am hoping to see
this motion withdrawn from this House
by the Mover. Of course, I must as-
sociate myself with the remarks made
the Honourable First Nominated Mem-
ber, and I hope by now the Honourable
Members who are not Members of the
Executive Council have a clear picture
in their minds that it was never the
intention of anyone to prevent an air
service from being set up in St. Vincent,
such as would tend toward the uplift-
ment and advancement of this I and.
The Honourable Mover knows most of
the facts about the air service of St.
Vincent and I thought that he should
have taken the suggestion of t'e Presi-
dent of the House to give longer notice
of the motion so that more information
on the matter could be passed to Memr
bers before such a motion was debated
in tlt House. But as the motion stands
I really could not support it. As far as
I can see there is nothing in thie Resolve
that would tend to urge the speeding
up of things towards getting a proper
airport for St. Vincent.


MR. PRESIDENT: If no other Honour-
able Member wishes to speak, does the
Honourable Member wish to avail him-
self of his right to reply?
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I am greatly sur-
prised to hear certain comments made
here regarding an air service for the
colony. I am here to represent the peo-
ple first of all and I am not satisfied to sit
dcvwn and see things stand in the way
of the development of those people.
And let me say this from now on, that
everything that is being done in St. Vin-
cent should be done constitutionally. I
particularly used that word in my motion
for many reasons.
Now, when St. Vincent wants an air
service or any service for that matter,
the Administration does the implemen-
tation, very often without the know-
ledge of either the Executive Council or
the Legislative Council and then when
the financial implications come to be
voted, then Members go all over the
country saying Government did this and
Government did that-doing things in
which we had no voice. It happens all
the time. And people outside are laugh-
ing at us because of the political babies
we have here around this Table. They
just laugh at us.
Now, I am just from............
MR. PRESIDENT: Is there a point of
order, Mr. Charles?
HON. G. H. CHARLES: I heard the Hon-
ourable Member say there are political
babies sitting around this Table. I
would like to know if he is included in
the number.
MR. PRESIDENT: There is no point of
order.
HoN. R. E. BAYNES: Now, the ques-
tion of the circulating rumors-I would
say this, that an air service for St. Vin-
cent has never been discussed with me
in the Executive Council at any Meeting.
The first indication I had was in St.
Lucia when I spoke with a certain mem-
ber who was close to the Government.
And since it is something that would









enable us to see marked progress in this
country I feel that it would be useful
that this House debate and discuss it here
and bring it out in the open.
What is most surprising to me here is
that Members who are supposed to be
representing the people would get up
here and oppose something that is for
the development of the people they rep-
resent. You really do not seem to rea-
lise the responsibility you have towards
the people who elect you here.
Now, you talk about Members of Exe-
cutive Council-I would say this, that a
number of the schemes which Govern-
ment have developed or things which
have been done here, I have heard of
them from outside before I was told in
the Executive Council. It is the same
in this case. Imagine being a Member
of the body which is supposed to control
the funds in St. Vincent and people out-
side of St. Vincent can tell you what is
happening in the St. Vincent Govern-
ment.
I happen to know that the Acting Ad-
ministrator went to B. G. in connection
with this matter but how many of us
around this Table know exactly what
decisions were arrived at there. And
you sit down here and tell me that you
are satisfied with these conditions? You
are being laughed at.
MR. PRESIDENT: Who is being laughed
at?
HON. R. E. BAYNES: The Members of
this Legislative Council-the elected
Members. And I would say that the St.
Vincent Government is not acting con-
stitutionally. We have no opposition in
this House, and the Administration has
the right to do whatever they do because
Members of this House seem to have for-
gotten that their chief aim here should
be to see to the best interest and the
development of the people they repre-
sent.
MR. PRESIDENT: There is a motion be-
fore the House moved by the Honourable


Member for Kingstown. Those in favour
of the motion?
Those against?
There are four votes in favour...... We
will have that again then.
Those in favour?
Five votes in favour of the motion
and four against. The motion is there-
fore carried.
As it is now after 12.15 I wonder
whether any Honourable Member would
move the adjournment.
HON. E. T. JOSHUA: I beg to move
that this Council Meeting be adjourned
now until 2.00 p.m.
HON. CROWN ATTORNEY: I beg to se-
cond the motion.
MR. PRESIDENT: Those in favour of
the motion moved by the Member for
North Windward?
The motion is carried.
Council is now adjourned and will re-
sume at 2 o'clock.

RESUMPTION-2 P.M.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Honourable Presi-
dent, Honourable Members, I have the
the honour to request the suspension of
the Standing Rules and Orders to permit
the second motion of which I gave notice
this morning to be debated now.
MR. PRESIDENT: Does the Honouurable
Member have a particular reason for
requesting the suspension of the Stan-
ding Rules and Orders in respect of this
motion?
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Mr. President,
as I said this morning, under the pro-
visions of Rule 25 or 45, I cannot rightly
remember which, but it is necessary that
so many days notice be given before a
motion could be debated in this House.
But, because of the prorogation of Coun-
cil, that notice which normally members
should have used or that period of time
which members normally used for
giving notice was not allowed before this
meeting. Even the business of the House








is not, from a constitutional point- does
not fall in line with that particular sec-
tion of the Standing Rules and Orders.
Normally, I would have allowed the
time required for notice, but under the
circumstances I think it should be de-
bated today.
MR. PRESIDENT: This motion, Mr.
Baynes, is the one dealing with?
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Dealing with a
certain Section of the Statutory Rules
I personally feel that as we are thinking
of advanced constitution we should take
note of the fact that the constitution did
not make provision for any opposition,
and I think that that is not in keeping
with good government.
MR. PRESIDENT: Honourable Members,
it is now for you to express your opinion
as to whether or not Standing Rules
and Orders should be suspended in this
case. The Honourable Mover has indi-
cated that he does not regard this as
of great urgency in debate, but that be-
cause there has been prorogation he
was not able to give notice before hand.
That is the reason, but I think that a
motion dealing with a constitutional
matter of fairly wide implications which
members would desire to think over
would be better served by being given
notice of and be thought of by members
during the month and be debated at
the next meeting. But if anybody
wishes to express an opinion before I
ask for members' feelings whether or
not we allow this motion to be debated
today he may do so.
HON. H. F. YOUNG: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: This seems to me
quite an urgent matter. I do not think
we need time at all. I think we could
discuss the matter now.
MR. PRESIDENT: Those in favour of
suuspending the Standing Rules and
Orders to allow this motion to be de-
bated? Allowed.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Honourable Presi-
dent, Honourable Members: First of all,
let me thank you for the privilege you
have given to me in allowing me to
debate this motion.


WHEREAS Section 58 of the Statutory
Rules and Orders of the Legislative
Council was amended to permit Members
of the said Legislative Council to rise
and speak on matters only of public
interest;
AND WHEREAS the proposed amendment
to the present Constitution of the Wind-
ward Islands has made no provision for
an opposition in the Legislative Council;
BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that Section
58 (which now reads 61) be further
amended to permit members of the
Legislature to rise and talk on any
matter or to oppose any decision taken
by Government which they may consi-
der was not in the best interest of the
community.
Now, we are on the threshold of the
ministerial form of Government and
while we have not got the type of ma-
chinery set up here that would serve the
best interest of this community, yet I
feel that except certain minor changes
are done we will not be able to look for-
ward to certain advancements that other
countries enjoy.
Under the ministerial form of Gov-
ernment that we all know, there is, in
the majority of cases, an elected ma-
jority in the House who form the Gov-
ernment. Then in addition there is a
full opposition side in the House in order
to oppose certain views of the Govern-
ment-not that it is intended to oppose,
in the true sense of the word, the pro-
gress of the country, but such opposition
as is being carried out in those countries.
But there are certain matters or certain
points which could always be brought
out by an opposition, and which because
of that tends to promote what we call
good government.
If we do not have a healthy opposition
here we can expect that we are not going
to have the best form of government
that we should like to have under a pro-
posed new constitution. For that par-
ticular reason I feel that it is quite ap-
propriate to have-or I might say, to see
to it that allowance is made for it.
Now, do not misunderstand me, because









sometimes the people who are responsi-
ble for implementing certain proposals
do so with the best intentions, but as I
say, if you do not want to have a con-
stitutional opposing group whose busi-
ness it is to keep a sharp eye on the Gov-
ernment side, things will be one-sided.
It stands for progress, and while I ap-
preciate the fact that many members
here would not like to oppose certain
government proposals, members would
soon realise that this is a form of gov-
ernment that we, at some time, would
have to acquire and the earlier, the
better. So Mr. President, I am asking
that this particular Section be amended
to give effect to some form of opposition
here that wguld tend to promote good
government in St. Vincent.
HoN.E. T. JOSHUA: Honourable Presi-
dent, Honourable Members, I rise to se-
cond the motion and I believe I will give
my debate on it now.
The Standing Rules and Orders by
which this House is governed underwent
certain changes. Some of those chan-
ges I -plan to comment on now. Those
changes have shown as I warned this
morning, that something is missing
where advanced constitution is concerned
in democratic government. Here we
have now-an Honourable Member has
moved that although this very Rule was
amended it is only amended to give more
time and relevance to issues deemed by
the President of Council, to be a matter
of public interest. We have heard Presi-
dents, in this House, sit in that Chair
and just tell us "it is not a matter of
urgency", and before you know he leaves
his chair and goes into the private room.
Well, I do not know, I sat in the House
of Commons and I have seen the Colonial
Secretary, who is Minister for Colonial
affairs, answer questions of honourable
members in such a fashion you would
see these men are really serving the peo-
ple.
The question of this opposition-the
opposition of which I believe the Hon-
ourable Mover speaks-is the opposition
that takes place in all parliaments that


are democratic, ranging from Westmin-
ster, the mother of parliaments. In
Westminster there is always a healthy
opposition. An opposition that comes
behind the Party in power. Of course,
we have seen our light on our dreary
Damascus political road. We now know
what a Party calls for. Any set of men
as a nominated element in the House,
or men who did not have a Party could
form the Opposition to express them-
selves.
The question is, I am glad that the
Honourable Mover of the motion has
brought such a motion here, because
apart from no instrument at all incor-
porated here, it is the pcSicy so far ,as
I see in moving pieces of this constitution
presently enjoyed to stamp out all op-
position here. We have seen sometimes
men, rising here to speak have been
ruled out of order whether they are out
of order or -not. That is what we have
seen here in times past. But I have
always acknowledged two things. One,
that changes will come whether we
want them or not, and two, men will
come and men will go, but this horse-
shoe table remains forever.
I am saying that at the adjourment of
this House-it is the will of the people
to have it expressed here how the Op-
position feels in debating, even at the
Adjournment, measures proposed or
statements -made in rebate on the Ad-
journment. But if the Standing Rules
and Orders remain the same-if they
remain as they are, it means that only
a certain issue of some urgent nature
can safely be debated here and nothing
more.
Hence I am one in seconding this mo-
tion to have as much democracy in my
country as possible because the first
place where it should exist is in this
Honourable House.
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: I should be
grateful, Mr. President, to find out in
connection with this amendment whether
it means that Members would be entitled
to speak on any subject whether urgent
or not or any length of time or if it is









proposed that he should speak on any
subject for a stated length of time?
MR. PRESIDENT: I took it that the Hon-
ourable Member was moving that it could
be any subject for a determined length
of time. Was I right?
HON. R. E. BA'YNES: Quite right.
MR. PRESIDENT: Does any other Hon-
ourable Member wish to speak on this
motion? Does the Honourable Mover
wish to exercise his right?
There is a motion before the House.
Those in favour of the motion moved by
the Honourable Member for Kingstown?
Those against?
The motion is carried.

BILLS
The following Bills were introduced
and read a first time:
The Roads Bill.
The Public Health (Amendment) Bill.
The Prevention of Crime (Offensive
Weapon) Bill.
The Hydro-Electric (Amendment)
Bill.
The Currency (Amendment) Bill.
The Summary Conviction (Praedial
Larceny) Bill.
The President presented a Certificate
of Urgency to permit the Currency
(Amendment) Bill to be taken through
all the stages at the Meeting. The Bill
was then read a second time.
In Committee of the whole House the
Bill was amended as follows:
Clause 1: Sub-clause (2) was amen-
ded to read: "This Ordinance shall be
deemed to have come into operation on
the first day bf October, 1955".
The Bill was next read a third time
and passed.
ADJOURNMENT
MR. PRESIDENT: I now call upon the
Honourable Crown Attorney to move the
adjournment of the House.


HON. CROWN ATTORNEY: I have the
honour to move that this House be ad-
journed sine die.
HON. L. C. LATHAM: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I rise here to
speak on a matter of urgency. Time and
time again I have been to different
sittings of the Magistrates Courts to
hear cases or so, and I must say, Mr.
President, that I am very surprised at
the behaviour of the Magistrates. I think
it is very unseemly and a great shame
that we should have Magistrates here
that behave in such a manner............
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: On a point of
order Mr. President............
MR. PRESIDENT: Point of Order.
HON. E. A. C. HUGHES: I believe the
Honourable Member for South Windward
should know that under a Section of the
Standing Rules and Orders the conduct
of persons engaged in the administration
of justice cannot be discussed in Council
unless on a substantive motion.
HON. L. C. LATHAM: But, Mr. President,
I am speaking on a matter of urgency
here. These things should be brought
to the notice of this House. These
things should not go on like that. I do
not know if the other Honourable Mem-
bers know how people going to these
Courts are insulted by Magistrates, but
I know because I have received such
treatment from them quite recently and
I do not think it is right. People
should not be receiving that kind of
treatment at all. They seem to think
that because they are Magistrates they
can talk to everybody as they like.............
MR. PRESIDENT: I think, Mr. Latham,
I must interrupt you. You may not
realise the nature of the protest which
you are wishing to make under your
right to raise a matter of public interest.
But I would remind you of Rule 26 Sub-
Section 3 which counted off various
officers including other persons engaged
in the administration of justice the con-
duct of whom shall not be raised except
on a substantive motion. So it would









be improper for us to continue to con-
sider your protest.
HON. C. L. TANNIS: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: We in the South-
ern Grenadines have just been visited
by a very serious hurricane. We must of
course, give thanks to this Government
and all the organizations concerned for
their very great help. But you would
realise that the recent second touch that
the Southern Grenadines had experien-
ced within the last two years-a large
number of persons who had been touched
the last time have been touched again,
and we are well aware of the situation
of the Southern Grenadines and their
economical position. I would like this
Government to give as far as possible
substantial assistance to the people of
the Southern Grenadines in their re-
building programme.
It must also be borne in mind that we
will be faced with a serious problem as
far as our food supplies are concerned.
Most of our crops which had not yet
come to full perfection have been des-
troyed. This is October and as far as I
can see the position would be very ser-
ious as far as food is concerned within
the next nine or ten months. The peo-
ple are making every effort to rebuild
as far as possible, but this will take some
time because in many cases the loses
were quite heavy.
It is my duty to ask this Government
to take a very serious view of the position
in the Southern Grenadines. The people
are relying on you for support and help
with the rebuilding of homes and the
economic structure generally, of the
Southern Grenadines.
HON. E. T. JOSHUA: Mr. President,
Honourable Members: I rise to debate
on the adjournment, and in so doing, if
this Honourable House finds me beside
myself, then it is for you to consider
why that is so.
In season and out of season the ques-
tion of the unsatisfactory state of affairs
on estates north of the dry river has
peen raised and brought to the notice
of those who should take action. The
Administration, the Administrator, the


Labour Commissioner and all parties
concerned have had their attention
drawn to conditions that exist in these
parts time and time again. A person rep-
resenting people-whatever hopes, what-
ever ambitions, whatever desires he has
-it is impossible that he can call him-
self an elected representative of the
people, when every single act on behalf
of the people who contribute more taxes
to the country than anywhere else in
the island-when all petitions, requests,
demands etc. on behalf of the people
are being treated as if they were tales
told by an idiot full of sound and fury
signifying nothing. In the last report
that was made to the Labour Commis-
sioner, and a copy of that report was
passed to the Administrator, I thought
that the Labour Commissioner duly ap-
pointed and drawing a salary from the
tax-payers of this country, would have
known that it is not the poor men-little
shop-keepers and the rest who have been
treating and continue to treat humans
in this country as if they were entirely
without any protection whatsoever by
any Labour Commissioner or any la-
bour officers, but the big estate owners
and estate proprietors.
I fail to see or to understand why re-
presentations are ignored when made
on behalf of people who can hardly get
a living by the work they do at all, and
that is the reign of terror that is going
on in this country.
Now we are hearing that a Commis-
sion, duly appointed by the Governor
and Commander in Chief over the Wind-
ward Islands, has been delayed-put off.
I think, gentlemen, I think we are going
too far in tampering with those people's
consciences and reasons. Some may be
inclined to take me lightly, but now it
is vital needs that I an voicing here. I
have done sufficiently much in that
whole region and in this island to pre-
sent these people's hardships to those
concerned-to have that type of condi-
tion that exists on estates in the North
Windward area brought to their notice
for attention-in season and out of
season,jquit nothing is done. Commis-









sions are appointed to go into these ques-
tions of wages and the rest and before
Commission could sit, something is bound
to turn up to delay them. We find men
in this country-men who I thought
would have been assisting this Govern-
ment and the workers in general, we find
those men treating the workers of this
country as if they were not human.
That is not right at all.
Reports were made to a Labour Com-
missioner, but it is just as cheap you do
not appoint any Labour Cammissioner,
because I do not see what effect it has.
For when it comes to estate proprietors,
there is nothing you can do to make it
quite clear to them that these workers
in the country are creatures not only
of the island but of God. I do not know
what it is again to do to attract this
Government to the facts of what is hap-
pening in this country. You allow things
to go on like that. Well, what are you
asking these people there to do? What
are you asking them to do under such
circumstances?
What is the use, gentlemen, of making
complaints to Labour Commissioner,
Administrator or the officer administer-
ing the Government when estate pro-
prietors continue to use their powers
ruthlessly on the people? What is the
use if nothing is done? As an elected
representative of the people-the work-
ing masses of this country, I must say,
Mr. President, that I am very dissatis-
fied that this Commission has again
been delayed, or the conditions under
which these poor people work and live
are simply appalling and something
needs to be done.
The question is still looming in my
mind regarding the Summary Convic-
tion (Praedial Larceny) Bill. I heard
the Crown Attorney to say that the
committee which was appointed could
not come off. I do not now if it is the
same reason for which the Honourable
Member for Kingstown asked for the
suspension of Standing Rules and Or-
ders, but what I do know is that we
should be very careful in dealing with
these Bills not to rush through them.


We know very well that many of them
cause unpleasant repercussions and have
to be brought back time and again for
amendments.
I am very apprehensive about these
types of Bills, and I feel therefore that
a committee should be again appointed
before that Bill is brought to the House,
and I hope that the same thing would
not be done that is always done here.
Because it would seem that all you have
to do here is to delay a matter and when
you have delayed it, forget it.
HON. J. A. BAYNES: Mr. President, I
rise on a matter which-to me is not only
a matter of urgency, but I believe that
the time to attack it is now. I happen
to know and I believe that every mem-
of this House is aware that in our Esti-
mates for 1955, there was a sum there
for the construction of a bridge at
Gomea. This matter-I have taken it
up with the Acting Administrator Mr.
Kelsick, and I have also taken it up with
Mr. Smith the Superintendent of Works.
Perhaps in their way they have outlined
the reasons why the Gomea bridge has
not been started to satisfy themselves.
But to me, not only is their outline un-
satisfactory, but foolish.
It has always been in St. Vincent, the
idea that the Public Works Department
should do all the construction. I believe
that the Public Works men are no more
builders than the builders we have at
our disposal in St. Vincent, and when
these jobs are there to be done, I feel
that they should be given out by con-
tract. Because not only does contract
work step up the efficiency of a country,
but it also assists Government and big
undertaking contractors to keep cutting
down the cost as the output goes up.
Those things are not practised here and
perhaps the Public Works and other
members of this Government might have
more advanced knowledge of construc-
tion work than I have, but I still hope
that at this moment every effort is being
made to prevent that sum from lapsing
into next year, because it has been there
for two years.











At present we have a sum which the
Superintendent claims can barely con-
struct a bridge if built on a given scale,
but still nothing is done to start the
work on it. And I have heard from ru-
mour that is was expressed by Mr. Kel-
sick that it was not the intention of the
Administration that this bridge be built
this year. I heard that about three
months ago. I went to him on the issue
and he said the accusation was false.
I believe that such an issue that con-
cerns people, especially the people I re-
present, is bigger than any Administra
tion and I bring this matter here today
because I do not believe in taking these
matters lying down. I feel that if you
have a sum of money voted for any con-
struction work and Public Works has
too much on its hands or is incapable
of taking on the job, then the only
answer is that it be given to contractors.
We all know, who sit around this
Table, that up to 1940 your Public Works
was not half as big as it is now-it was
hardly bigger than any of the garages
we see around town. In those days St.
Vincent was at a stand still. We had
hardly .any construction work. Today
we are expecting the Public Works to
take on all the responsibilities and those
that it cannot tackle promptly are just
pushed aside. That as I see it is a waste
of time-a waste of money, because those
are the things which prevent us acquir-
ing more money than we do get. Some
of the money we get we cannot spend
because we are waiting on a given De-
partment to have all these jobs done.
I ask, Sir, that this matter be gone into
and that I actually have something defi-
nite from it.
HON. R. E. BAYNES: Mr. President,
onourable Members: I rise here on a
matter which I consider to be urgent
and in the interest of the people.
Now, when the Banana Association was
formed, one of the things that became
obvious was the need for better roads
in the Banana areas. There is no doubt
that the Banana Industry is a growing
one. People are planting more and


more bananas, and more and more stems
are being shipped every ten days or so.
But I feel that we should make a better
effort to see to it that the road develop-
ment, especially in the banana areas are
in keeping with the development of the
banana industry. The people who
plant bananas find it extremely difficult
to get their bananas out from the lands
without damage being done to them,
all because there are no good roads to
enable them to get their produce out.
Several persons have come to me
during the past few days asking that
something be done to help them. As I
have said before the Banana Industry
is a growing concern. I believe we all
know that recent shipments have in-
creased considerably and I feel they
would continue to do so, but I should
really like to see something done about
the roads as soon as possible.
MR. PRESIDENT: Honourable Members,
if there are no other Honourable Mem-
bers wishing to speak on the adjourn-
ment, I have one or two points arising
out of the speeches which have been
made, myself.
The first is dealing with the remarks
made by the Honourable Member for the
South Windward as regards the conduct
of Magistrates. He would observe now
on turning to the Rules that he was out
of order in making these remarks not on
a substantive motion, and I would just
like to say this, that it is a very proper
and important rule that the conduct of
Judges or Magistrates should not be open-
ly questioned, suddenly and without
notice, and that equally very often, if
there is an argument between members
of the Public whether he is a member of
the Legislative Council or an ordinary
member of the Public, it may be possible
to satisfy that and to deal with the
matter in person later privately with the
Magistrate. If that is not possible it
is always the right of a citizen to carry
word or to communicate with the Hon-
ourable Puisne Judge, and if an Honour-
able Member as an Honourable Member,
felt that he had been wronged by a
Magistrate as an Honourable Member,



















then he could always come privately to
me and we could go into the matter.
The Honourable Member for North
Windward mentioned the postponement
of the Agricultural Wages Commission
and I am very sorry to see this has been
necessary because it is the second post-
ponment. His Excellency the Governor
is equally aware of the unfortunate na-
ture of a second delay and I am in com-
munication with him, and he is very
much aware of the opinion of the St.
Vincent Government that that Commis-
sion should meet as early as possible. It
is only because of the urgency of hurri-
cane relief in Grenada that he has con-
sented to feel it fair to hold the Com-
mission up because certain of the mem-
bers were doing urgent duties in hurri-
cane relief.
The question of the Gomea Bridge-the
Honourable Member for St. George's has
been away from St. Vincent for some
time and I am sorry that I have not
had occasion to tell him more about the
present situation there. As he knows
there were under that vote three bridges
-Edinboro, Gomea and Ferret, and Gov-
ernment decided that for this year it
would be best to get on with the Ferret
Bridge for the reason that there was not
sufficient funds for Gomea to be com-


pleted this year and also it was late in
the year. But Gomea Bridge was not
forgotten. I regret also to say that
Ferret Bridge-we have also had to
stop the construction there which had
only just begun because of the urgent
needs in the Southern Grenadines.
The question of the Southern Grena-
dines-I am very glad indeed that the
Honourable Member for the Grenadines
raised the matter. It had already been
mentioned in the motion moved by the
senior appointed member. I was very
glad too for the appeal broadcast over
the B.B.C. by the Secretary of State for
the Colonies in asking for money for
voluntary relief for the various com-
munities. And I am sure that Govern-
ment will see that the Grenadines re-
ceive all relief possible. When the time
comes for distribution to the communi-
ties that have been struck by the hurri-
cane, I am sure that the Grenadines
will get their fair share.
I am very glad to hear of the recent
increases in banana shipments men-
tioned by the Honourable Member for
Kingstown and I shall look into the mat-
ter of having the roads in the Banana
areas repaired or reconstructed as far as
possible.
The House stands adjourned.




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