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 Ordinance No. 31 of 1951: An Ordinance...
 Ordinance No. 32 of 1951: An Ordinance...
 Ordinance No. 33 of 1951: An Ordinance...
 Ordinance No. 34 of 1951: An Ordinance...
 Ordinance No. 35 of 1951: An Ordinance...
 The Administration Report on the...














Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077473/00110
 Material Information
Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
Alternate Title: Government gazette
St. Vincent government gazette
Physical Description: v. : ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Saint Vincent
Publisher: G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Kingstown, St. Vincent
Kingstown St. Vincent
Publication Date: December 31, 1951
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Gazettes -- Periodicals -- Saint Vincent   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
legislation   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines -- Saint Vincent
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1, no. 1 (1868)-v. 112, no. 48 (Tues., 23 Oct. 1979)
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 111, no. 1 (Tues., 3 Jan. 1978); title from caption.
General Note: Supplements which accompany some numbers contain extraordinary issues, ordinances, statutory rules of order, etc.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077473
Volume ID: VID00110
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 19844741
lccn - sn 89018505
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Government gazette

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 407
        Page 408
        Page 409
        Page 410
        Page 411
    Ordinance No. 31 of 1951: An Ordinance to amend the Immigration (Restriction) Ordinance, No. 2 of 1939
        Page A-241
        Page A-242
        Page A-243
        Page A-244
    Ordinance No. 32 of 1951: An Ordinance to amend the Police Ordinance, (No. 48 of 1947)
        Page A-245
        Page A-246
        Page A-247
        Page A-248
        Page A-249
        Page A-250
        Page A-251
        Page A-252
        Page A-253
        Page A-254
        Page A-255
        Page A-256
        Page A-257
        Page A-258
    Ordinance No. 33 of 1951: An Ordinance to amend the Trade Unions and Trade Disputes Ordinance, No. 3 of 1950
        Page A-259
        Page A-260
        Page A-261
        Page A-262
    Ordinance No. 34 of 1951: An Ordinance to provide for the service of the Colony for the year ending the thirty-first day of December One Thousand Nine Hundred and Fifty-Two
        Page A-263
        Page A-264
    Ordinance No. 35 of 1951: An Ordinance to sanction certain payments from the Public Treasury in excess of the sums granted by the Appropriation (1950) Ordinance, 1949, (No. 23 of 1949) for the year ended the 31st day of December, 1950
        Page A-265
        Page A-266
    The Administration Report on the Education Department for the year 1950
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
        Page B-7
        Page B-8
        Page B-9
        Page B-10
        Page B-11
        Page B-12
        Page B-13
        Page B-14
        Page B-15
        Page B-16
        Page B-17
        Page B-18
        Page B-19
        Page B-20
        Page B-21
Full Text








407






1" AR 288






SAIN'TI VINCENT!


GOVERNMENT GAZETTE

(EXTRAORDINARY.)

ahblisthe d b) Shuthorttg.


VOL. 84.] SAINT VINCEN'T, MONDAY, 31 DECEMBER, 1951. [No. 68.


GOVERNMENT NOTICES.


No. 627.
CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR GREETINGS.

The following telegrams containing Christmas and New Year messages have
been received by the Administrator and are published for general information :-
From the Minister of Transport-
"It is with great pleasure that I send seasonal Greetings to all helpers
in the Merchant Navy Club and hostels overseas and my best thanks for
their untiring effort to provide a welcome and recreation for seafarers.
To all officers and men of the Merchant Navy who are unable to be at
home and will be celebrating Christmas with their friends in clubs and
hostels overseas, I also send my greetings and best wishes for a successful
voyage.
I wish you all a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year."
From the Secretary of State for the Colonies-
"I wish to associate myself with the message from the Minister of
Transport and to send Greetings and good wishes for Christmas and the
New Year to all seamen in the Colonies. I also send greetings to all those
who are associated with the welfare merchant seamen."
From the Governor of the Win&ward Islands-
"We wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Peaceful New Year."
From the Administrator to the Governor-
St. Vincent wishes Your Excellency and Lady Arundell a Merry Xmas
and a Prosperous New Year."







3 0?, rs -d


cr/g ,jD^ L/'pb
















408 SAINT VINCEiNT, MONDAY, 31 DECEMBER, 1951.--(o. 68).


The Administrator acknowledges the receipt of Seasonal Greetings from th
following sources :-
U.S. Weather Bureau, Puerto Rico
Voice Publishing Co., St. Lucia
A. H. Williams, England
University College of the West Indies
Advocate Co., Ltd., Barbados
Director General of Civil Aviation & Staff, Barbados
Barclays Bank (D.C. & O.), St. Vincent
Civil Aviation Department, Trinidad
United Traders Ltd., Kingstown
International Aeradio Ltd., London
Regional Controller & Mrs. D. Anderson, C.D.C.
The Chief Secretary of the Windward Islands
Administrator, Grenada
Administrator, St. Lucia
Administrator, Dominica
Directors, Kolak Manufacturing Co. Ltd., London
Canada West Indies Magazine
British Council Representative, Barbados
Gordon, Grant, Trinidad
Branch Manager, B.W.I. Airways Ltd., Trinidad
Colonial Income Tax Office, London
The Governor of British Honduras
Geo. F. Huggins & Co. Ltd., Grenada
B.G. Airways Ltd., British Guiana
Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, England.
The Chief Justice, Windward & Leeward Islands


Seasonal Greetings have been sent by the Administrator to the follo'wiag:-
His Excellency the Governor of the Windward Islands & Lady Arundell
The Administrator of St. Lucia
The Administrator of Dominica
The Administrator of Grenada "
The Governor of British Honduras
Members of Executive and Legislative Councils
The Chief Justice, Windward & Leeward Islands
Heads of Government Departments
Messrs. John H. Hazell, Sons & Co. Ltd. (Directors & Staf)
Messrs. Corea'& Co. Ltd. (Directors & Staff)
Messrs. United Traders Ltd. (Directors & Staff)
Messrs. Baynes Brothers (Directors & Staff)
Gillespie & Company, New York, (Management & Staff)
American Tele. & Telegraph Co. N.Y. (Chief Statistician & Staff)
Cable & Wireless Ltd. (Local Manager & Staff)
Barclays Bank (D.C. & O.) St. Vincent (Manager & Staff)
The Advocate Co. Ltd. Barbados
The Principal Auditor, Windward Islands, Grenada
The Director General, Civil Aviation, Barbados
Dr. Taylor, Principal, University College, Jamaica
The Financial & Economic Adviser, Wd. Is., Grenada
The Executive Architect, St. Lucia
The Director ot Agriculture, Grenada
The. ErItiihi Council, Barbados
The American Consui, Trinidad
Messrs. Morningstar Nicol, Inc., New York
The Hon. A. R. Cools-Lartigue
The Hon. R. J. Manning
Messrs. Gordon, Grant & Co. Ltd., Trinidad
Vincentian Newspaper
Challenge Newspaper
Th, Chief Secretary of the Windward Islands
Messrs. B.W.I. Airways, Trinidad
Messrs. B.W.I. Airways, Barbados
Major A. J. Williams, Managing Director, B.G. Airways, Ltd., B.G.
Messrs. H. V. Whitchurch, Roseau, Dominica
Messrs. Barnard & Son, Castries, St. Lucia
George F. Huggins & Co. Ltd., Grenada
Com ptroiler for Development & Welfare in the West Indies, Barbados
Ti:h E're.tary Ceneral, Caribbean Commission, Trinidad
S. W. Hockey, F.L.A. Director, Eastern Caribbean Regional Library
The Executive Secretary, C.T.A. Trinidad .
31st December, 1951.















SAINT VINCENT, MONDAY, :1, DECEMBER, 1951.-(No. 68). 409


No. 628. No. 31 fi' 1931.-An Ordinance to
PROMOTION. niend the ] mnligration (Restric-
tion) Ordiinance, No. 2 of 1939.
Mr. H:. H. WILLIAMS, B.A., Senior (t. 43/1938).
Clerk, Government Office, has been pro- No. 32 olf 1951.-An Ordinance to
moted to a Principal Il rkship in Lie anmeind de Police Ordinance,
General Clerical Service o' the Colony (No. 18 of 1947).
wiLh effect froni 22nd1 Se tni l)Cei, 195 1. (J. 33/1945.
31st Decemb-r. 1951.5. -No. 33 of 1951.-An1 Ordinance to.
(P. F. 134). amend the Trade Unions and
-- Trade Disputes Ordinance, No. 3
No. 629. of 1950.
LEAVE NOTICE. ('. 10/1939(A)).
No. 34 of 1U51.-An Ordinance to
SICK LEAVE.. provide for the service of the
Colony for the year ending the
Mr'. A. L. SAMUEL. Acting Govrn- thirty-first day of December One
menc Secretary, hns been grant. 22 Thosa!id Nine Hundred and
days' sick-leave with effect froin 19t Fi' y- Two.
December, 1951. (F. 2011951).
S1st December. 1951. No. 35 of 1951.-An Ordinance to-
(P. F. 60). sanction certain payments from
(P. P 60i T1 -D .,i;


No. 630.
ACTING APPOINTMENT.

Mr. H. H. W1LLTAMS, Principal Clerk,
Government Office, as Goverinlmnt
Secretary with effect from 28th Decemo-
ber, 1951, and u until Ifurtiher ii(tice diri- "
the absence on sick l-avr of ) Mr. A.L.
SAMUEL, Acting Goverrnment Secriary.
31st December. 1951.
(P.F. 1:4)'.

No. 631.
!.C ( I S I.AT i,;t .

Tile under-mnentioni.-d Ordilnantces
whicli have been assented to by H[is
Excellency the Governor -are published
for general information with this issue
of the Glizette :-


Lu 1 (1. 1 ilIy iiLn excess of
the slums granted by the Appro-
prialion (1950) Ordinance, 1949,
(No. 23 of 1949) for the year
ended the 31st day of December,
1950.
(F. 20/1951).
31st Decembir, 1951.

No. (;32.
SUPPLEMENT TO GAZETTE.

The Adminisii.tration Report on the
Educialin I )Drp;irillmpint for te year 1950,
is lpblishcd with this issue of the
(Glzette.
lY (Commanad,
IIEN LY H. WILLIAMS,
A.cliiq, Gor'e riment Secretary.
GoVERNMIET OFFICE ,
3 lsu Dceinbher, 1951.


DEIPA!ITMENTAL AND.. OTHER NOTICES.


ST. VINCENT, B.W.I.
CONTROL NOTICE.

1B.W.T. T'ID.\.J)E IA1ERALISATION PLAN,

TOKEN IMPORTS SCHEME

With reference to Governmsnt. Press Announcement on the Token Imports
Scheme dated 3rd January 1951 under the B.W.I. Trade Liberalisation Plan and
with further reference to the notice dated 20th December 1951 announcing that
arrangements had been concluded for extending and amending the existing
scheme, the following are the amendments to take effect as from 1st January
1952 :-
(1) Licences will be issued up to 40% of the imports in the base period
(1946 to 1948) instead of 331/3% for items listed under Group 2.
(2) The following items have been added to the lists :














410 SAINT VINCENT, MONDAY, 31 DECEMBER, 1951.-(No. 68).


Ynder Group 1:
Peas-Split
Printed & lithographed matter including calenders, greeting
cards, etc., folders, carbon paper.
Tobacco-leaf.

Under Group 2 :
Coffee and imitations of, corn meal, jams, jellies and preserves,
rolled oats and oatmeal, spices, vegetable products not otherwise
provided including sausage binder, peanut butter, mayonnaise,
relishes, prepared mustard, sauces & catsup, pickles, tea, fruits
canned or preserved, fruit juices & fruit syrups including apple
juice, grape juice, cocoa powdered, coco' & chocolate preparations,
yeast, molasses & syrups.
Footwear of leather men's, trunks & valises, belts of leather,
gloves, mitts & mittens, boots, shoes and slippers.
Manufactures of rubber including tires and tubes, hose of
rubber, baby nipples, erasers and similar rubber goods.
Bicycles and parts, wire cable and rope, metal cabinets, soda
fountain of monel metal and dental alloys, chains of iron and steel,
clocks and parts, fans and ventilators (industrial), hardware
(builders), locks of iron & steel, bottling machinery, laundry
machinery, concrete machinery and paint spraying machinery,
motors (marine), pyrometers, foils aluminum, screws and washers
(brass), stoves gasolenee and oil) tacks of all kinds, valves (brass),
valves (iron), watches and parts, wire cloth (wire screen), of iron,
power tools, agricultural implements, manufacture of aluminum
(mouldings), manufactures of iron and steel (kerosene irons).
Battery charger, lamps (floor) (portable), electric light bulbs,
electric fences, conduits for electric fences, light fixtures and parts,
transformers and parts, wire and cable (copper) insulated, dynamos,
-generators and parts, electric motors and parts.
Beekeepers supplies, brooms and whisks (corn) films (photo),
gin, meters liquid, sand paper, wines, oilcloth, and lnoleum,
ammunition, candles, jewellery of all kinds.
Calcium compounds, insecticides, polish (stove), polish (boot
and shoe), baking powder, salt, other chemicals and allied products.
Cotton duck, cotton fabrics, cotton sock and stockings, cotton
clothing, artificial silk underwear, cordage and twine, blankets,
bedspreads, quilts, (cotton), corsets and girdles, brassieres, elastic
fabrics and stockingettes, hosiery (ladies) napkins (sanitary) and
surgical gauze, rope and cordage, underwear (cotton), khaki drill.

Dated this 24th day of December, 1951.


OPEN GENERAL EXPORT LICENCE.

Parsuant to Section 5 of the Imports
and Exports Control Rleigulations, 19:39,
the following exemption fro'n l,'.xwrL
Licence is hereby alprlriveld liy til
Controller of Sppl ies as suchl CoTpietelnt
Anthority :-

1. No Export Licetnce shall be noices-
sary for the exportation fironm the Colhil
of St. Vincent of any of the goods;ll n
animals specified n n ihe Srhiled.le
hereto:-
,'chedule.
Corn, Shelled or on the cob
Eschalots Potatoes
Cucumbers 'Pears


A. V. SPROTT,
Gentroller of Supplies.


CIh ri stophen e
Chive and lhynie
Cabbages
Yams
Tannias

D;isheen
Dry Peas
?annuts


Plantains
Li mnes
Fruits
Nutlmegs
Mace
Toniaitoes
Bananas
Pumpkins


) .-onkeys
Horscs
liRbbiis
Tnrkeys

Dated this 1. st day of December, 1951.

A. V. SPROTT,
('ovntriollrr of SJfipils.
Com,,cetent Auithorily.














SAINT VINCENT, MONDAY, 31 DECEMBER, 1951.-(No. 68) 411


CUSTOMS NOTICES. raised to the status of Small District
Post Offices as from 1st January, 1952.
The undermentioned Livestock have
been seized for a breach of Section 4 (1) G. ELFORD WILLIAMS,
of the Import and Export (Control) Colonial Postmaster.
Regulations 1939 as amended by Section General Post Office,
2 of the Import (Control) Regulations St. Vincent,
1940:- 18th December, 1951.


Three (3) Fowls.

The following goods have been seized
for a breach of Section 90 Cap. 183 of
the Laws of St. Vincent:-
One (1) bale Suitings.

V. D. ARCHER,
Collector of Customs.
CUSTOMS,
22nd December, 1951.


POST OFFICE NOTICE.

It is notified for general information
that the four District Sub-Post Offices
at Buccament, Lowmans(Wd.) Lowmans
Hill and Paget Farm, Bequia will be


ST. VINCENT CO-OPERATIVE
ARROWROOT ASSOCIATION.

VACANCY OF SEAT ON THE
ARROWROOT BOARD.

Owing to reasons of health. Mr. F. A.
CASSON has resigned from his seat on
the Arrowroot Board.
The vacant seat will be filled by
election by the delegates on Thursday
3rd January, 1952, ai 10.00 a.m. at the
office of the Association, Lot 4, Bay
Street, Kingstown.

C. V. BABER ISAACS,
Secretary.
29th December, 1951.


PRINTEDD BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.
[ Price 24 cents. 1




















SAINT VINCENT.


No. 31 of 1951.

I Assent,
[ L.. J R. D. H. ARUNDELL,
Governor.
81st Becember, 1951.
AN ORDINANCE to amend the Immigration (Restrlctlon>
Ordinance, No. 2 of 1939.


[ 31st December, 1951. 1
Enacted by the Legislature of St. Vincent.
1. This Ordinance may be cited as the Immigration
(Restriction) (Amendment) Ordinance, 1951, and shall be read
as one with the Immigration (Restriction) Ordinance (hereinafter
referred to as the principal Ordinance) and all amendments
thereto.
2. Subsection (1) of section 2 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by the addition thereto of the following definition
after the definition vessel" :-
"undesirable person" means a person who is or has been.
conducting himself so as to be dangerous to peace, good
order, good government or public morals."
3. Subsection (1) of section 4 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by the addition thereto of the following
subparagraph :-
(i) any undesirable person"
4. Section 7 of the principal Ordinance is hereby amended
by adding after the word "commencement" in the fifth line
thereof the words and in contravention ".

5. Section 10 of the principal Ordinance is hereby amended
by the addition thereto of the following subsection :-


Short title.

No. 2 of 1939.


Section 2(1)
of principal
Ordinance
amended.


Section 4(1)
of principal
Ordinance
amended.

Section 7 of
principal
Ordinance.
amended.








Immigration (Restriction) (Amendment).


Section 10 of
principal
Ordinance
amended.

Section 22 (1)
of principal
Ordinance
repealed and
Replaced.


(6) Any person who contravenes or fails or refuses to
comply with any of the provisions of subsections (1) to (4) of
this section when entering the Colony shall be deemed to be a
prohibited immigrant and may be dealt with as such."

8. Subsection (1) of section 22 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby repealed and replaced as follows :-
"Removal "22(1) If any person is held to be a pro-
Orders. hibited immigrant, then, subject to the provi-
sions of this Ordinance and the terms of any
permit granted thereunder, any Magistrate
mary, on the application of an immigration
officer order the immigrant to be removed from
the Colony and in the meantime to be de-
tained in custody : Provided that no applica-
tion for such order shall be entertained in the
case of a British subject (not being a person
xuho entered the Colony in contravention of
subsection (1) of section 10 or who, on enter-
ing the Colony, contravened or failed to comply
with subsections (2) or (3) of section 10) un-
less the application is made-
(a) if he entered the Colony in accordance
with a permit granted under section 9,
within two years after the date on
which such immigrant should have pre-
sented himself in person to the immi-
gration officer for examination;
(b) if he entered the Colony in accordance
with a permit granted under sections 8
or 18, within two years after the expiry
of such permit;
(c) in any case in which an appeal has been
made to .a Magistrate's Court or to the
Supreme Court, against a decision that
he is a prohibited immigrant, within
two years after the determination of
the appeal;
(d) if he entered the Colony in accordance
with a permit granted under section 17
pending decision of an immigration of-
ficer as to whether he is or is not a pro-
hibited immigrant, within two years
after the decision of the immigration
officer that he is a prohibited immi-
grant;
(e) in other cases, within two years of his
arrival in the Colony.


No. 31.


1951-






243

No. 31. Immigration (Restriction) (Amendment). 1951.


Passed the Legislative Council this 6th day of December 1951.

HEMRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
6R 43/1938)

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.

1951. [ Price 12 cents. ]


















SAINT VINCENT.

No. 32 of 1951.

I Assent,

[ L.S. ] R. D. H. ARUNDELL,
Governor.
31st December, 1951.

AN ORDINANCE to amend the Police Ordinance, (No. 48 of 1947).

[ 31st December, 1951. 1

Enacted by the Legislature of St. Vincent.


1. This Ordinance may be cited as the Police (Amendment)
Ordinance, 1951, and shall be read as one with the Police
Ordinance, 1947, (hereinafter referred to as the principal
Ordinance) and all amendments thereto.

2. Section 2 of the principal Ordinance is hereby amended-
(a) by substituting a comma for the full stop after the word
Ordinance in the definition Police Force and adding
after the said word, the words with the exception of
Rural Constables;"
(b) by adding the following definition after the definition
Supreme Court"-
"pay" includes good conduct pay, pay received as a
member of Kingstown Fire Brigade and the personal,
detective, house and lodging allowances (including
the estimated value of free quarters) which a non-
commissioned officer or constable is receiving at the
time when he ceases to be a. member of the Police
Force : Provided that the amount to be allowed for
house and lodging allowances shall not exceed one-
sixth of the pay of such non-commissionrd officer or
constable.


Short title.

No. 48 of 1947.


Section 2 of
principal
Ordinance
amended.





246


Police (Amendment).


Section 6 (2) of
principal
Ordinance
amended.

Section 15 (1)
of principal
Ordinance
amended.










-Section 24(1)
(i) of principal
Ordinance
amended.

Section 27 (b)
of principal
Ordinance
amended.

Section 31 of
principal
Ordinance
amended.






Section 36 of
principal
Ordinance
repealed.

Section 40 of
principal
Ordinance
repealed and
replaced.


3. Sub-section (2) of section 6 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by deleting the words "fifty pounds" and
substituting therefore the words "two hundred and forty dollars"
in the fifth line thereof.

4. Subsection (1) of section 15 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by the addition thereto of the following
paragraph after paragraph (h)-
(i) any loose, idle, or disorderly persons whom he shall find
in any way disturbing the peace, or causing public
annoyance, or whom he shall have reasonable cause to
suspect of having committed or being about to commit
any indictable offence or any petty misdemeanor or
breach of the peace, and all persons whom he shall find
between sunset and the hour of six o'clock in the morning
lying or loitering in any street, highway, yard, or other
place, and not giving a satisfactory account of
themselves."

5. Paragraph (i) of subsection (1) of section 24 of the
principal Ordinance is hereby amended by deleting the words
five pounds" therein and substituting therefore the words
twenty-four dollars ".

6. Paragraph (b) of section 27 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by deleting the word one pound" therein and
substituting therefore the words five dollars ".


7. Section 31 of the principal Ordinance is hereby amended
as follows :-
(a) by the insertion of the words Powers of Superintendent
in regard to serious offence by constable as the marginal
note thereto;
(b) by deleting the words twenty pounds" appearing in the
fourth and fifth lines of subsection (2) and substituting
therefore the words ninety-six dollars ".

8. Section 36 of the principal Ordinance is hereby repealed.




9. Section 40 of the principal Ordinance is hereby repealed
and replaced as follows :-


" Good conduct
pay and
badges


40. Every non-commissioned officer and
constable of the Police Force shall for continu-
ous good service be entitled to good conduct
badges and pay thereafter at such rates and


No. 32.


1951.












on such conditions as may be approved by the
Governor and published in the Police regula-
tions :
Provided always that a member of the Police
Force who has earned good conduct pay, on
subsequently becoming entitled to a higher
rate of such pay, shall not be entitled there-
after to both rates, but only to the higher rate
of pay.


10. The following sections shall be substituted for sections
43 to 49 inclusive of the principal Ordinance :-
"43. There shall be charged on and paid Pensions to
out of the general revenues of the Colony as be charged
hereinafter provided all such sums of money on revenues
as may from time to time be granted by way of of the Colony.
pension, gratuity, or other allowance in ac-
cordance with this Ordinance, to persons who
have been in the Police Force.
44. Subject to the provisions of this Ordin- Genstonf
ance every non-commissioned officer or con-
stable of the Police Force who has served in
the Police Force for ten years or upwards, may
be granted on his retirement a pension at the
rate of one-hundred and eighty-seven-hundred-
and-twentieths of his pay with an addition of
one-seven-hundred-and-twentieth for each com-
pleted month of service in excess of ten years.
Provided that no pension granted by virtue
of this section shall exceed two-thirds of the
average pay which shall include good conduct
pay, pay received as a member of Kingstown
Fire Brigade, personal, detective, house and
lodging allowance (including the estimated
value of free quarters) of such non-commis-
sioned officer or constable during the three
years immediately preceding his retirement.
45. No pension shall be granted- n Cas in which


(a) to any constable or non-commissioned
officer below the rank of sergeant who
has not attained the age of fifty years;
(b) to any Inspector, Sub-Inspector, Station
Sergeant or Sergeant who has not at-
tained the age of fifty-five years except
on medical evidence to the satisfaction
of the Governor in Council that such
non-commissioned officer or constable is
incapacitated by reason of some. infirm-


No. 48 of 1947.
Substitution of
new sections.


pensions may
be granted.


No. 32.


Police (Amendment).


1951.









Police (Amendment).


ity of mind or body for further service
in the Police Force and that such infirm-
ity is likely to be permanent.
Gratuities. 46. (1) When any non-commissioned officer or
constable shall have served ten years or more,
and shall retire from or otherwise leave the Po-
lice Force in circumstances that do not entitle
him to be granted a pension under this Ordin-
ance, the Governor in Council may, if his con-
duct while he served in the Police Force shall
have been such as, in the opinion of the Gov-
ernor in Council, to justify favourable consid-
eration, grant him such gratuity as the Coun-
cil shall think fit in the circumstances, but not
exceeding the amount of his pay for his last
completed year of service.
(2) Subject to the provisions of subsection
(4) of this section when a non-commissioned
officer or constable of the Police Force who is
not serving on probation, and who has served
in the Police Force of the Colony for not less
than five years dies while in the service of the
Colony it shall be lawful for the Governor in
Council to grant his legal personal representa-
tive a gratuity of an amount not exceeding one
year's pensionable emoluments.
(3) Any non-commissioned officer or con-
stable of the Police Force who has not com-
pleted ten years service in the Police Force
may be granted a gratuity at the rate of half
a month's pay for each complete six months of
service, provided that the Governor in Council
is satisfied upon medical evidence that such
non-commissioned officer or constable is inca-
pacitated by reason of some infirmity of mind
or body for further service in the Police Force,
and that such infirmity is likely to be perma-
nent, and provided also that the Superintend-
ent of Police certifies that such non-commis-
sioned officer or constable has discharged his
duties with such diligence and fidelity as to
justify the grant to him of a gratuity.
(4) When a non-commissioned officer or con-
stable of the Police Force dies as a result of
injuries received in the execution of his duty
the Governor in Council may at his discretion
grant to the personal representative of such
non-commissioned officer or constable a gratu-
ity of an amount to be at the discretion po the


'No. 32.


1951.









Police (Amendment).


Governor in Council but not exceeding two
years pensionable emoluments of such non-
commissioned officer or constable :
Provided that if a gratuity of an amount
equal to or exceeding one year's pensionable
emoluments of such non-commissioned officer
or constable is granted under the provisions of
this sub-section no gratuity shall be payable
under the provisions of sub-section (2) hereof.
47. When upon medical evidence the Gov-
ernor in Council is satisfied that a non-com-
missioned officer or constable of the Police
Force or a rural constable has been perma-
nently injured-
(a) in the actual discharge of his duty; and
(b) without his own default; and
(c) by some injury specifically attributable
to the nature of his duty;
and the retirement of such non-commissioned
officer or constable is thereby necessitated or
materially accelerated, the Governor in Coua-
cil may in addition to the pension, if any, re-
ceivable by such non-commissioned officer or
: constable under this Ordinance, grant to him-
such annual allowance as the Governor in
U Council shall think fit, but so that any allow-
ance hereby granted together with the pen-
sion awarded, shall not exceed two-thirds of
his pay, and in the case of a rural constable
may grant to him such yearly allowance, or re-
muneration as may be, proportionate to the ia-
jury received.
48. (1) Every non-commissioned officer or
constable of the Police Force who shall become
at the passing of this Ordinance, or who shall
hereafter become eligible for pension under
the provisions of this Ordinance, may elect to
take on his retirement a reduced pension and
gratuity in lieu of the pension provided for by
this Ordinance.
(2) Every non-commissioned officer or con-
stable of the Police Force who shall become at
the passing of this Ordinance eligible for pen-
sion shall notify the Governor of his election
within six: months of the commencement of
this Ordinance, and every non-commlasioned
officer or constable who may hereafter become


Allowance in
case of injury.


Right to take
reduced'
pension and
gratuity


No. 32.


S1951.









Police (Amendment).


Befinition of
reduced
pension and
gratuity.






Compulsory
retirement.


Pensions not
of right.






Pensions not
to be
assignable.


eligible, may notify the Governor of his elec-
tion at any time during the period in which he
is becoming eligible for pension and not later
than one month after the date when he shall
have so become eligible.
(3) An election once exercised shall be ir-
revocable.

48A. Reduced pension shall be a pension
equal to three-fourths of the amount of pen-
sion which would be payable under this Ordin-
ance, including any allowance granted under
section 47 of this Ordinance and a gratuity
shall be the amount which one-fourth of the
pension payable under this Ordinance includ-
ing such allowance when multiplied by .ten,
shall represent.

48B. (1) Every constable and non-commis-
sioned officer below the rank of Sergeant shall
retire from the Police Force on attaining the
age of fifty years.
(2) Every non-commissioned officer of the
rank of Sergeant and above shall retire from
the Police Force on attaining the age of fifty-
five years; but it shall be lawful for the Gov-
ernor to require such non-commissioned officer
to retire from the Police Force at any time af-
ter attaining the age of fifty years.
(3) The Governor may in his discretion ex-
tend the period of service of constables and
non-commissioned officers beyond the ages
hereinbefore mentioned.

480. No non-commissioned officer or con-
stable of the Police Force shall have an abso-
lute right to compensation for past service, or
to any pension, gratuity or other allowance
under this Ordinance, nor shall anything here-
in limit the right of the Crown to dismiss any
such non-commissioned officer or constable
without compensation.

48D. No pension granted under this Ordin-
ance shall be assignable or transferable or li-
able to be attached, sequestered, or levied
upon; for or'in respect of any debt or claim
whatsoever.


SNo. 32.


1951.





251


No. 32.


Police (Amendment).


48E. If any non-commissioned officer or con-
stable to whom a pension has been granted
under this Ordinance is convicted before any
court in His Majesty's dominions of any crime
or offence for which he is sentenced to death
or penal servitude or any term of imprison-
ment with hard labour exceeding twelve
months, and does not within two months after
such conviction receive His Majesty's free par-
don, then in every such case such pension shall
forthwith cease :
Provided always that in the case of a non-
commissioned officer or constable who after
conviction as above described, receives His
Majesty's free pardon at any time the Secre-
tary of State may or, if the non-commissioned
officer or constable is resident in the Colony,
the Governor in Council may, if he thinks fit,
restore the pension.

49. If any non-commissioned officer or con-
stable to whom a pension has been granted
under this Ordinance becomes a bankrupt,
then such pension shall forthwith cease : Pro-
vided always that in any case where a pension
ceases by reason of the bankruptcy of the pen-
sioner the Secretary of State may or, if such
pensioner is resident in the Colony, then the
Governor in Council, may from time to time
during the remainder of such pensioner's life,
or during such shorter period or periods, ei-
ther continuous or discontinuous, as the Secre-
tary of State or the Governor in Council shall
think fit, pay all or any part of the moneys to
which such pensioner would have been enti-
tled by way of pension had he not become a
bankrupt to, or apply the same for the main-
tenance and personal support or benefit of all
or any, exclusive of the other or others, of the
following persons, namely, such pensioner and
any wife, child, or children of his, in such pro-
portions and manner as the Secretary of State
or Governor in Council thinks proper."


1961.


Pension to
cease on
conviction.


Pension to
cease on
bankruptcy.


11. After section 50 of the principal Ordinance the following New sections
sections shall be inserted :- added to
principal
Ordinance.







Police (Amendm'ent).


Repeal and'
saving.
Sections 43 to
49 of principal
Ordinance.






Service prior
to transfer to
be taken into
account for
pension
purposes.


Part X of
principal
Ordinance
repealed and
replaced.


"50A. Sections 43 to 49 inclusive of the
principal Ordinance are hereby repealed:
Provided that these sections shall apply to ariy
non-commissioned officer or constable serving
in the Police Force at the date of commence-
ment of this Ordinance who notifies the Gov-
ernor in writing within six months after such
date- of his desire that the provisions of the
said sections shall apply to him,.in which case
they shall continue to apply accordingly.

50B. Where a non-commissioned officer or
constable who holds a pensionable appoint-
ment under this Ordinance has been trans-
ferred from the police service to other pension-
able employment under the Government of
the Colony,.. his service as such non-commis-
sioned officer or constable shall on his retire-
ment be taken into account in computing his
pension or gratuity :
Provided that the service in respect of which
a pension or gratuity may be granted shall
form one continuous period.


12. For Part X of the principal Ordinance the following Part
shall be substituted:-


"PART X.
SPECIAL RESERVE POLICE FORCE.


Establishment
of Special
Reserve Police
Force.


Superintendent
to command
Special
Reserve


52. There shall be established in the Colony
a supplemental body of police styled Special
Reserve Police (hereinafter referred to as the
" Special Reserve ") which may be called out
for service by the Superintendent-
(a) in any case of actual threatened inter-
nal disturbance or external aggression;
(b) in any case where additional police are
required for the preservation of good
order; and
(c) for purposes of drill and training for a
period not exceeding fourteen days in
any one year.

53. (1) Subject to the directions of the
Governor, the Superintendent shall have the
general command and superintendence of the
Special Reserve.


No. 32.


1951.










No. 32. Police (Amendment). 1951.


(2) The Special Reserve shall consist of such
officers and constables as the Superintendent
with the approval of the Governor may direct.
54. The Governor may appoint fit and
proper persons to be officers of the Special
Reserve.
55. Every male person who-
(a) is not less than eighteen years of age;
(b) is able-bodied; and
(c) is of good character,
may, upon making application in writing to
the Superintendent in that behalf, be ap-
pointed a constable of the Special Reserve.

56. (1) On the appointment of any person
to be a non-commissioned officer or constable
of the Special Reserve, the Superintendent
shall cause to be delivered to him a precept
authorising him to act as such.
(2) The precept shall be in the following
form :-
St. Vincent.


Appointment
of Officers.

Qualifications
for
appointment.





Precept of
appointment
and oath of
office.


Superintendent of Police, under and by virtue
of the power and authority in me vested, here-
by appoint you to be a of the
Special Reserve Police, and I do issue to you
this precept authorising you to act as such.


Dated this


day of


Superintendent of Police.
(3) Every person appointed to be an officer,
non-commissioned officer or constable of the
Special Reserve shall take and subscribe be-
fore an officer of the Police Force the follow-
ing oath of office:-
I
of
do swear that I will well and truly serve our
Sovereign Lord and King as a member of the
Special Reserve Police for the Colony of St.


No. 32.


Police (Amendment).


1951.











No. 32. Police (Amendment). 1q51.


Equipment.












Revocation of
appointment




Resignation.








Discipline
Authority
and pay.












Member of
Special
Reserve to
remain within
his district
when called out
for service.


57. Every member of the Special Reserve
shall be provided with a short manual describ-
ing the powers and duties of the Special Re-
serve, a badge a baton, and such clothing and
other equipment as may be approved by the
Superintendent. Such badge shall be evi-
dence of the office of any member of the Spe-
cial Reserve and shall in all cases be displayed
by every such member when exercising the du-
ties of his office. The cost of these articles of
clothing and equipment shall be defrayed from
such funds as may be provided by the Legisla-
tive Council.
57A. The appointment of any member of
the Special Reserve may be revoked at any
time-
(a) by the Governor in the case of officers;
(b) by the Superintendent in other cases.
57B. Any member of the Special Reserve
may, except when called out for service under
the provisions of the next succeeding section,
resign from the Special Reserve by giving to
the Governor, in the case of officers, and to
the Superintendent in other cases, one
month's notice in writing. Provided that the
Superintendent may, in any fit case, dispense
with such notice.
570. The provisions of sections 23 and 24 of
this Ordinance shall apply to every member of
the Special Reserve when called out to service,
and every such member during that period-
(a) shall have, exercise and enjoy the same
powers, authorities, advantages and im-
munities as a member of the Police
Force, and be liable to the same duties
and responsibilities; and
(b) shall be paid for his services from such
monies as may be provided by the Leg-
islative Council, at the same rate as a
member of the Police Force of equiva-
lent rank.
57D. No member of the Special Reserve
shall leave or absent himself from the district
in which he is stationed during any period in
which the Special Reserve are called out for
service, without the permission of the officer
in charge of the district.


.__-*-C-o- -~--^


Police (Amendment).


1951.


'No. 32.








Police (Amendment).


57E. Every member of the Special Reserve Surrender of
who resigns, or ceases to be a member thereof, equipment.
shall within one week of his ceasing to be a
member, return to the Superintendent his ba-
ton, badge and other equipment issued to him
or pay the value thereof.
57F. (1) Every member of the Special Re- Offence.
serve who-
(a) when called out for service, neglects or
refuses to serve, or neglects or refuses
to obey any lawful command; or
(b) contravenes the provisions of section
570 of this Ordinance,
shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine
not exceeding twenty-four dollars.
(2) Every member of the Special Reserve
who-


(a) improperly lends, sells, pledges or other-
wise disposes of or damages or spoils
any equipment issued to him at public
expense; or
(b) fails without lawful excuse to return
any equipment or pay the value thereof
as required by the provisions of section
57E of this Ordinance,
shall be liable on summary conviction to a fine
not exceeding twenty-four dollars.
(3) Every person who, during any period
in which the Special Reserve are called out for
duty, impersonates or in any way pretends to
be a member of the Special Reserve shall be
liable on. summary conviction to a fine not ex-
ceeding ninety-six dollars or to imprisonment
for three months.
(4) Every person who is found in possession
of any badge, baton, equipment or clothing
provided for the use of a member of the Spe-
cial Reserve, shall, in the absence of a reason-
able excuse, be liable on summary conviction
to a fine not exceeding forty-eight dollars.
58. (1) Where any member of the Special
Reserve through no fault of his own contracts
any illness, or sustains bodily injury while in
the actual discharge of his duties as such, he
shall be provided with medicines, medical com-
forts and medical attendance at the public ex-
pense on the written authority of the Superin-
tendent.


Illness,
bodily injury
and death.


No. 32.


1961.








Police (Amendment).


No. 21 of 1939.


Part XII of
principal
Ordinance
repealed and
replaced.


(2) Where any member of the Special Re-
serve sustains bodily injury in the circum-
stances specified in the preceding subsection,
and is permanently disabled (either totally or
partially) as a result thereof, the Governor in
Council may grant him a pension or gratuity,
the amount of which shall be subject to the ap-
proval of the Legislative Council.
(3) Where the aforesaid bodily injury re-
sults in death, the Governor in Council may
award to the dependants (including any ille-
gitimate children to whose support the de-
ceased was contributing) a pension or gratu-
ity, the amount of which shall be subject to
the approval of the Legislative Council.
(4) Members of the Special Reserve, while
acting as such, shall not be regarded as work-
men for the purposes of the Workmen's Com-
pensation Ordinance, or any Ordinance
amending or replacing the same."


13. For Part XII of the principal Ordinance the following
Part shall be substituted :-


Constitution of
Police Welfare
Association.


"PART XIL

POLICE WELFARE ASSOCIATION.
60. (1) For the purpose of enabling non-
commissioned officers and constables of the
Police Force to consider and bring to the no-
tice of the Superintendent and the Governor
all the matters affecting their general welfare
and efficiency, there shall be established in ac-
cordance with rules to be made by the Gov-
ernor an organisation to be called the Police
Welfare Association (hereinafter referred to
as "the Association") which shall act through
Boards and a Central Committee as provided
in the rules.
(2) With the exception of questions relating
to discipline or promotion representations may
be made by the Association on all matters
where a question of principle is involved.
(3) The Association shall be entirely inde-
pendent of and unassoclated with any body
outside the Police onbe.


No. 32.


1951.








No. 32. Police (Amendment). 1951.

61. Subject to the provisions of the preced- Prohibition of
mg section, it shall not be lawful for a member members of
of the Police Force to become or after the ex- Force
piration of one month from the passing of this becoming
Ordinance to be, a member of any trade union, members of
or of any association having for its objects, or Trade Unions.
one of its objects, to control or influence the
pay, pensions or conditions of service of the
Police Force; and any member of the Police
Force who contravenes this provision after
having been warned in writing, shall be dis-
qualified from continuing to be a member of
uhe Force, and shall be dismissed therefrom,
and in addition may forfeit all pension rights
to which he may have been eligible.


62. If any question arises whether any body
is a trade union or an association to which the
preceding section applies, the question shall be
determined by the Governor."


Decision by
Governor
regarding
trade union or
association.


14. Section 64 of the principal Ordinance is hereby amended
by deleting the words ten pounds" appearing in the fourteenth
and fifteenth lines thereof and substituting therefore the words
forty-eight dollars ".


Sectiea 64 of
principal
Ordinance
amended


Passed the Legislative Council this 6th day of December 1951.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Councl.
(J. 33/1945).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.


[ Price 52 cents.]


1051.



















SAINT VINCENT.

No. 33 of 1951.

I Assent,

R. D. H. ARUNDELL,


Governor.
31st December, 1951.

AN ORDINANCE to amend the Trade Unions and Trade Disputes
Ordinance, No. 3 of 1950.

[ 31st December, 1951. 1

Enacted by the Legislature of St. Vincent.


1. This Ordinance may be cited as the Trade Unions and
Trade Disputes (Amendment) Ordinance, 1951, and shall be read
as one with the Trade Unions and Trade Disputes Ordinance,
1950, (hereinafter referred to as the principal Ordinance ").

2. Section 2 of the principal Ordinance is hereby amended
by adding the following definition after paragraph (b) of the
proviso thereto :-
"prescribed means prescribed by Rules made under section 16
of this Ordinance.

3. Paragraph (3) of section 9 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by substituting the word or for the word "of"
in the last line thereof.


4. Section 12 of the principal Ordinance is hereby amended
as follows :-
(a) by deleting the words trade union appearing at the end
of subsection (2) thereof and substituting therefore the
word Registrar ";


Short title.

No. 3 of 1950


Section 2 of
principal
Ordinance
amended.


Section 9
(3) of principal
Ordinance
amended.

Section 12 of
principal
Ordinance
amended.


[ L.S. ]








Trade Unions and Trade Disputes (Amendment).


(b) by deleting the words "for and on behalf of the trade
union may sue him" appearing in the third and fourth
lines of subsection (4) thereof and substituting therefore
the words "of the trade union or the Registrar may sue
him for and on behalf of the trade union ".


8sctOen 13 of
principal
Ordinance
repealed and
replaced.


5. Section 13 of the principal Ordinance is hereby repealed
and replaced as follows :-


"Statement of
accounts
and audit
certificate,
&c., to be
transmitted to
the Registrar.


13. (1) The Treasurer of every trade union
(or such other officer as is designated in that
behalf by the rules of the trade union) shall,
on or before the first day of June in every year,
cause to be received by the Registrar-
(a) a statement in the prescribed form of
the revenue and expenditure of the
trade union during the year preceding
the date of such statement;
(b) a statement in the prescribed form of
the assets and liabilities of the trade
union at the date of the statement re-
quired by paragraph (a) of this section;
(c) an audit certificate in the prescribed
form by the person or persons appoint-
ed by the Registrar to the effect that
such statement of revenue and expendi-
ture and such statement of assets and
liabilities have each been audited by
such person or persons, as the case may
be, who have checked all accounts, re-
ceipts, vouchers and books of the trade'
union relating to transactions during
the year in respect of which the state-
ments are made up, and that such
statements are made up, and that such
statements have been found to be true
and correct;
(d) a return in the prescribed form showing
the number of members of the trade
union at the date of such statement;
and
(e) a return relating to the year immediate-
ly preceding the date of such statement,
showing-
(i) all new rules of the trade union and
all alterations to the existing rules
nai-de during the period; and


No. 33.


1951.









No. 33. Trade Unions and Trade Disputes (Amendmitk~. 1951.

(ii) all changes of officers of the trade
union during the period.
(2) In addition to the statements, certifi-
cates and returns required by the provisions
of subsection (1) of this section, the Registrar
may at any time by order in writing require
the treasurer.or any other officer of a trade
union to produce for his inspection the ac-
count books and subscription registers of such
trade union and to deliver to him by a date to
be specified in such order, detailed accounts of
the revenue, expenditure, assets, liabilities and
funds of the trade union in respect of any pe-
riod specified in such order, and any accounts
so rendered shall include such details and in-
formation, and be supported by such docu-
ments, as the Registirar in any case may re-
quire.
(3) Every member of a trade union shall be
entitled to receive, on application to the trea-
surer or secretary of the trade union, a copy of
all or any of the statements .and accounts, and
of the audit certificate, and returns provided
for by this section, without making any pay-
ment therefore.
(4) Every trade union which, and every offi-
cer of a trade union who, contravenes or fails
to comply with any of the provisions or re-
quirements of subsection (1) of this section,
or of an order of the Registrar under subsec-
tion (2) of this section, and every treasurer
and secretary of a trade union who fails to
comply with an application made under sub-
section (3) of this section, shall be liable on
summary conviction to a penalty not exceed-
ing twenty-five dollars.
(5) Upon a conviction for any offence under
the provisions of subsection (4) of this section,
the Magistrate for the district in which the
registered office of the trade union is situate
may order the offending trade union or any
specified officer thereof (whether or not such
officer has been convicted) to deliver to the
Registrar by a specified date (which shall not
be later than fourteen days from the date of
the order)-
(a) all or any of the statements, certificates,
end returns referred to in subsection









No. 33. Trade Wnions and Trade Disputes (Amendment).


(1) of this section, in cases where the
conviction relates to an offence in re-
spect of the provisions of such subsec-
tion;
(b) all or any of the accounts, including
such details, information and docu-
ments referred to in any order made by
the Registrar under subsection (2) of
this section, in cases where the convic-
tion relates to an offence in respect of a
failure to comply with any such order,
and any trade union which, and any of-
ficer of a trade union who, fails to com-
ply with such order, shall in respect of
such failure be liable on summary con-
viction to a penalty not exceeding ten
dollars in respect of each day or part of
a day during which such failure shall
have continued.
(6) Any person who wilfully makes or causes
to be made any false entry in, or any omission
from any of the statements, accounts, certifi-
cates or returns required by this section shall
be liable on summary conviction to a penalty
not exceeding two hundred and forty dollars.


Section 16(b)
of principal
Ordinance
amended.


6. Paragraph (b) of section 16 of the principal Ordinance is
hereby amended by deleting the semicolon appearing at the end
thereof and adding after the word "registry" the words and any
other forms which may be prescribed under this Ordinance."


Passed the Legislative Council this 6th day of December 1951.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
E. 10/1939 (A) ).


PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER, AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.


[ Price 16 cents. 1


1951.


1951.




















ST. VINCENT.

No. 34 of 1951.

I Assent,


[ L.S. 1


R. D. H. ARUNDELL,
Governor.


31st December, 1951.
AN ORDINANCE to provide for the service of the Colony for the
year ending the thirty-first day of December One Thousand
Nine Hundred and Fifty-Two.

[ 31st December, 1951. 1
Enacted by the Legislature of Saint Vincent.

1. This Ordinance may be cited as the Appropriation (1952) Short title.
Ordinance, 1951.


2. There shall be and is hereby granted to His Majesty the
King for the service of the Civil Government of this Colony for
the year ending the thirty-first day of December One Thousand
Nine Hundred and Fifty-two the sum of Two Million One Hundred
and sixteen thousand one hundred and forty-two dollars to be
paid during the said year and to be applied to the purposes and in
the manner expressed in the Schedule hereunto -annexed.


Grant of Supply
ior 1952.








264

No. 34. Appropriation. 1951.

SCHEDULE.

Head. Service. Amount.

$
1. GOVERNOR .. ...... ...... .... .... ...... 7,300
2. LEGISLATURE ...... .. ... ... ...... ...... ...... ..... 13,328
3. ADMINISTRATION ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... 66,502
4. AGRICULTURE ...... ..... ..... ...... .... ...... ...... 67,385
5. A U D IT ...... ...... ...... .... ...... ...... ...... ...... 12,905
6. CENTRAL HOUSING AUTHORITY ...... ...... ...... ...... 6,080
6A. CENTRAL ROAD AUTHORITY ...... ...... ...... ...... 136,622
6B. CENTRAL WATER AUTHORITY ...... ...... ...... ..... 16,598
7. CHARITABLE ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 18,860
8. COLONIAL DEVELOPMENT AND WELFARE ...... .... 27,272
9. EDUCATION ...... ..... ...... ...... ...... ... .. 294,857
10. ELECTRICITY AND REFRIGERATION ...... ...... .. 68,214
11. JUDICIAL ..... ......... ...... ..... ...... .... ...... 28,262
12. LABOUR ...... ...... ........ ..... ..... 8,522
13. LANDS & SURVEY .. ....... ..... ...... ...... .... 26,090
14. LEGAL ...... ... ..... ...... ...... ...... ...... 7,283
15. M EDICAL ...... ...... .. ..... ....... ...... ...... .. 369,656
16. MISCELLANEOUS ...... ... ...... ..... ...... .... 65,329
17. PENSIONS ... ....... .... ...... ...... ...... ...... 48,365
18. PO LICE ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... .... 140,794
19. PORT AND MARINE ...... ...... ...... .. ...... ...... 28,399
20. POST OFFICE ...... ........... ...... ...... ...... 47,154
21. PRISONS ...... ...... ...... ...... .. ...... ... 53,826
22. PUBLIC DEBT ...... ......... ...... ...... ...... 47,889
23. PUBLIC LIBRARY ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... 7,702
24. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT ...... ... ...... ...... 64,132
25. PUBLIC WORKS ANNUALLY RECURRENT ...... ...... 48,120
26. PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY ...... ...... ...... 41,596
28. SUBVENTIONS ...... ............ ...... ..... .... ... 46,527
29. SUPPLY CONTROL ..... .... ...... ...... ...... ...... 15,381
30. TELEPHONES ...... ............. ..... 26,529
31. TREASURY ...... ...... ... ...... ...... 78,751

TOTAL EXPENDITURE ...... ...... ... ...... 2,116,142


Passed the Legislative Council this 20th day of December, 1951.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
(F. 20/1951). Acting Clerk of Legislative Council,

PRINTED BY THE COVERNIMENT PRINTER, AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.


1951.


E Price 8 cents. ]
























It B. l. ARUNDELL,
Governor.


31st DecerMber, 19M1.


AN ORDINANCE to sanction certain payments from the Public
Treasury in excess of the sums granted by the Appropriation
(1950) Ordinance, 1949, (No. 23 of 1949) for the year ended
th, 31st day of December, 1950.

[ 31st December, 1951. 1

Enacted by the Legislature of Saint Vincent.


1. This Ordinance may be cited as the Supplementary
Appropriation (1950) Ordinance, 1951.

2. The sums set forth in the Schedule hereto amounting to
Two hundred and eighty-four thousand five hundred and eighteen
dollars and seventy-two cents and drawn from the Public Treasury
for the service of the year ended the thirty-first day of December,
one thousand nine hundred and fifty under the Warrant of the
Governor, in addition to the sums granted by the Appropriation
(1950) Ordinance, 1949, are hereby declared to have been lawfully
expended for the services mentioned in the said Schedule.


Short title.


Legalisation of
expenditure in
excess of
appropriation.

No. 23 of 1949.


SAINT VINCENT.

No. 35 of 1951.


I Assent,


[ L.S.









Supplementary Appropriation (1959)


SCHEDULE.


Head. Service.



1. Governor ...... ......
2. Legislature ......
6A. Central Read Authority ......
7. Charitable ............
10. Electricity ..... ............
12. Labour ...... .... .........
14. Legal ............
15. Medical
16. Miscellaneous
17. Pensions ...... ............
18. Police ...... ... ......
19. Port and Marine ...... .....
20. Post Office ............
21. P risons ...... ...... .... ...... ......
26. Public Works Annually Recurrent ......
26. Public Works Extraordinary ...... .....
27. Social Welfare ...... ......
27A. St. Vincent Grenadines ......
28. Subventions ...... .....


Amount.


. ...... 409-03
... ..... 3,932-66
.... ..... 43,300-45
.. 203-97
- 16,285-76
..- 5 556-54
- ...... 132-31
- ... 11,035-14
- .. 64,874-87
S 1,556-36
S 3,492-98
605-19
387-14
...... ..... 3,759-59
18,202-34
.. ...... 98,222-22
...... ...... 24 40
...... ...... 594-39
... ...... 6,943-38

$284,518-72


Passed the Legislative Council this 20th day of December, 1951.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(F. 20/1951).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER, AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
aINGSTSWN, ST. VINCENT.


[ Price 8 wents. ]


No. 35.


1@951.


1951.








SAINT VINCENT. :-

ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1951.

PART I.

HISTORICAL.
For an account of the development of Education prior to 1951 the reader is
referred to the Annual Reports for 1950 and 1949.
In 1951 the Teachers Training Scheme started experimentally in 1950 was
extended and consolidated.
The Anglican School in Bequia was replaced by a new building constructed of
"landcrete." The school was opened on the 26th June. A small school was
started in Clifton, Union Island. This school is held in the upper storey of the
building which houses the usual Government Offices-Revenue, Magistrate, etc.


PART II.

A. SUAlMMARY OF THE EXISTING EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM.

1. ADMINISTRATION.
The posts in the Education Department in 1951 other than those directly
connected with the staffing of schools were as follows :-
1. An Education Officer
2. An Inspector of Schools
3. An Organiser of Women's Work
4. A Handcraft Instructress
5. A Handcraft Instructor
6. Two Domestic Science Instructresses
7. A Physical Recreation Instructor
8. Three Supervising Teachers
9. Two Clerks
10. A Messenger.
The Education Officer is responsible for the administration of the educational
system of the Colony. The Primary Schools are inspected by the Inspector of
Schools.

2. ADVIsoRY BOARDS AND COMMI~TrvM .
The Board of Education in 1951 consists of' the Headmaster of the Grammar
School as Chairman and eleven other members, its function is to advise i-.L head
of the Administration on policy and also to assist in the framing of regulations.
The members of the Board include the Education Officer, Inspector of Schools,
Heads of the Government Secondary Schools, Clergymen, and a representative of
the St. Vincent Teachers' Association in addition to members of the general public

3. Ei7IARY SCHOOLS. '
The Primary Schools, 40 in number, are divided into Governimel.t Ichools and
Denominational Schools. Government Schools number 18. 'The Denominational







Schools are divided among three Denominations as follows :-Anglicans 9,
Methodists 11, Roman Catholics 2. In the Denominational or assisted primary
schools the teachers are employed by the several Committees of Management
subject to the approval of the Governor, but their salaries and pensions are paid
by Government, which also supplies grants for the upkeep of buildings and
equipment arid provides most of the furniture and all the books. Primary
education is free.
The school age is from 5 to 15. All the primary schools are co-educational.

4. STAFFING OF PRIMARY SCHOOLS.
The number of teachers provided in each school in any one year is determined
by the average attendance of the previous year as follows:-
Head Teacher 25 pupils
Certificated Assistant Teacher 50 "
Probationary Assistant Teacher 40
Student Teacher 25 "
Pupil Teacher 25

5. COMPULSORY EDUCATION.
Education is not compulsory. It would be impossible to enforce any such
regulation owing to lack of accommodation.

6. SECONDARY SCHOOLS.
There are two Government-controlled fee paying Secondary Schools one for
boys and one for girls. There is no Secondary School inspectorate. The two
schools are controlled by their heads within the framework of general directives
and policy.
A junior fee-paying school acts as a preparatory school for the two secondary
schools.
A private school, situated in Kingstown, which receives a, subsidy from
Government in the form of two teachers paid from Government funds, provides
education at a secondary level.

7. ADULT EDUCATION.
As undertaken by the Department consists mainly in work with Women's
Clubs and in the teaching of Handicrafts (Straw work) to groups of women who
come to various centres for that purpose.

8. TEACHER TRAINING.
In 1951 a systematic Teacher Training programme was put into operation for
the first time. This involved the attendance of pupil teachers and other
uncertificated teachers at centres in which they were given systematic instruction
in the subjects required for the pupil teacher and certificate examinations.

9. SCHOOL BUILDING.
Most of the schools require renovation or extension or rebuilding. The school
buildi;::; rogramnie has bceei delayed because of lack of funds.








B. COMMENTS ON POLICY AND CURRENT DEVELOPMENT.
In the 1950 Report mention was made of certain problems with which future
policy must be concerned. In 1951 systematic efforts were made to deal with the
second of these problems, namely-the continuance of the pupil teacher system
and the urgent need for better trained teachers. A Teacher Training Scheme was
evolved and put into operation. The Scheme is based on the creation of Teacher
Training Centres to which pupil teachers and other uncertificazed teachers go for
systematic instruction. Before the introduction of this scheme a pupil teacher
had to depend for instruction on his Mead Teacher. This instruction he received
-or was supposed to receive, for one hour each day after school hours. Latterly
he also received instruction from itinerant Supervising Teachers when one
happened to visit his school. The amount of instruction received was quite
inadequate. The chief aim of the new scheme is to provide more and better
instruction than has been provided in the past.
The scheme involves the reduction in number of pupil teacher grades from 5
to 3, and the reduction in number of pupil teacher examinations to 3. The chief
innovation is the creation of a Supernumerary Pupil Teacher grade. Supernunerary
or Grade I pupil teachers, recruited from ex-Standard 6 children, take over the
classes of the other pupil teachers-Grade II and Grade III-when these
individuals are away at the Centres to receive their training. Supernumeraries do
not go to the Centres they receive instruction frop..the Head Teachers. They are
recruited on a yearly basis. Grade II Pupil Teachers go to tLe Centres on two
days of each week. Grade III Pupil Teachers do the same. This means that all
pupil teachers are now part time teachers and each pupil teacher in Grade II or
Grade III receives 78 days systematic instruction per year. Since a pupil teacher
has only to work 5 days per week in a year of 39 weeks, or 195 days a year, it will be
seen that a considerable proportion of this time--' --is taken up in instruction.
At the Centres instruction is given in English Language, English Literature,
Arithmetic, Geography, History, Hygiene, Elementary Science (Biology), Teaching
Methods and Civics. Pupil Teachers are paid .as follows : Supernumerary $72.00
without Cost of Living Bonus, First Grade $72.00 with Cost of Living Bonus, Second
Grade $120.00 plus Cost of Living Bonus. Third Grade $168.00 plus Cost of Living
Bonus.
A Third Grade pupil teacher on passing the appropriate examination becomes
a Student Teacher. Student Teachers are full time teachers paid at the rate of
$240.00 per annum plus Cost of Living Bonus. In order to become a certificated
teacher, the Student Teacher has to sit the final examination for certification. This
examination consists of two parts,-Part I an examination in academic subjects at
School Certificate level and Part II an examination in professional subjects-
Teaching Methods and School Managemnent-and in certain additional subjects
such as Drawing, Woodwork, Domestic Science.
In addition to Student Teachers there are Probationary Assistant Teachers.
This group allows for the entry of ex-Secondary school students with School
Certificates or similar or higher qualifications into the Service. They enter at this
level and are paid at the rate of $360.0G per annum plus Cost of Living Bonus. The
possession of a School Certificate or similar qualification exempts the holder from
Part I of the final examination for certification. However, he is required to pass
Part II of this examination before he becomes a certificated teacher.
Student Teachers and Probationary Assistant Teachers attend at the Training
Centre on Saturday mornings for instruction. Weekly assignments of work are
set by a special Tutor, and this Tutor visits each Centre in turn and goes over the
corrected work with the students. In addition those teachers who live near enough







to KTing;:tc~. cv-l! ths:cl.-i.vc of the Evening Classes. The 'syllabuses in the
subj -cs rcqcuin:.tr for F'art I of the Final ExTc.ain.ltion are practically identical with
those set forE tlie current Overseas Cambridge School Certificate Examination.
The text books required are provided free to pupil teachers but Student and
Probationary Assistant Teachers are required to buy their own text books.
Courses for teachers in Domestic Science and Woodwork for Part II of the
Certificate Examination are given at the Craft Centre, Kingstown.
This training scheme will in future make it necessary for every teacher to
reach the standard of the Cambridge School Certificate in the subjects required
before certification.
In 1951 preliminary attention was given to the question of the reorganisation
of the work in the upper school-Standards 4 to 6, and to the introduction of a
standardized School Leaving Examination for all the Primary Schools.


PART III.
CHAPTER I-LEGISLATION AND ADMINISTRATION.
(1) THE BOARB OF EDUCATION.
The Board of Education met twice during tae year 1951. Among matters
discussed were the following :
(a) The operation of the new Teacher Training Scheme and the extension
of the Primary Sehool course;
(b) further proposals regarding the establishment of Evening Classes;
(c) continuation of the appointment of Official Visitors for the Government
Schools.

(2) LEGISLATION. /
During the year minor amendments were made to legislation regarding the
Secondary Schools, the Kingstown Preparatory School, the award of Scholarships
from the Primary to the Secondary Schools, the St. Vincent Island Scholarship. A
new Regulation defining the duties of Official Visitors to Schools was inserted in
the Regulations for Government and Assisted Primary Schools.
The Teachers' Pensions Ordinance was also amended to allow service prior to
a transfer to be taken into account for pension purposes.

(3) STAFF CHANGES.
Mr. C. V. D. Hadley, B.Se., Social Welfare Officer who had been seconded to act
Education Officer on the transfer of Mr. Thdobalds to Barbados was confirmed in
the post as from 9th January, 1950.

(4) VISITS.
Mr. J. L. Nicol, O.B.E. Educational Adviser, Development and Welfare
Organisation visited the Colony.

CHAPTER II-FINANCI.
(1) The total expenditure on Education in 1951 from Colony funds, controled
by the Education Department, amounted to $298,80.11 made up as follows :-








Personal Other' Total
Emoluments Charges

$ $ $ $ 4


Grammar School
Girls' High School
Intermediate School
Primary Schools
Secondary (General)
Higher Education

Total Expenditure


20,550-05
16,105-00
736-67
191,394-96


2,123-17
1,343-36
--
7,768-29
5,164-29
870noc


22,673-22
17,448-36
736-67
199,163-25
5,164-29
0 9*3n.o6


-- O, IU JOU o, IvO9Uv

228,786-68 25,108-47 253,895"15


(2) The Medical Department spent the sum of $2,667.48 and the Public Works
Department spent the sum of $19,568 from Colony funds in the service of Education.
(3) According to returns which were received from the three religious
denominations who own the Assisted Primary Schools the non-Government
expenditure in 1951 was $1,030.64.
(4) The amounts received for tuition fees were as under :-


Grammar School ...... ...... ......
Girls' High School ......
Kingstown Preparatory School......


...... $ 8,550-72
8,090-56
1,875-56


Total ...... ...... .. ...... ..... $18,516-84


(5) Expenditure under Colonial Development and Welfare
$8,848.09 distributed as follows :-
Administration : Education Staff ............ ......
Teacher Training ...... ... ......
Books and Equipment ............
Special Courses :
Refresher Course in Jamaica for Handicraft Instructress
Inspection Tour in Trinidad for Inspector of Schools......

'T total ...... ............ ...

(6) Per Capita Costs.
The cost to Government per pupil in average attendance was
respect of each pupil in the secondary schools $54.35.


Schemes was

$6,236-36
1,055-86
663-56

412-66
479-65

$8,848-09


$20.52, and in


CHAPTER III.-PRIMARY EDUCATION.
(1) SCHOOLS.
The number of Elementary Schools in 1951 was 40 classified into Government
Schools and Assisted Denominational Schools as follows :-
Government Schools 18
Anglican Schools 9
Methodist Schools 11
Roman Catholic Schools 2







The school age. extends from 5 to 15 years. Attendance is free but not
compulsory, all schools are co-educational. The number of children enrolled was
14,390. The average attendance was 9,612. Small private schools exist but the
Education Department exercises no control over them.
(2) STAFFING.
The number of teachers employed was 365. They consisted of :
Head Teachers 40
Certificated Assistant Teachers 54
cetifcated archers Probationary Assistants 24
Uncertificated Teachers Student 47
Pupil Teachers 200
In addition there were 3 Supervising Teachers, 1 Handicraft Instructor, 1 Physical
Recreation Instructor, 2 Domestic Science Teachers.
The minimum academic qualification for certification is the possession of the
Cambridge School Certificate or the candidate must have passed a local
examination considered to be of equivalent standard. In addition candidates
must pass a local examination in professional subjects.
The ratio of teachers in charge of classes to pupils in the elementary schools
is as follows :-
Head Teachers 25 pupils
Certificated Assistant Teachers 50
Uncertificated Teachers :
Probationary Assistants 40 "
Student Teachers 25 "
Pupil Teachers 25

(3) BUILDINGS.
All Government school buildings are maintained from Government funds. In
the Denominational schools the buildings are owned by the Denominations and
Government assists on a fifty-fifty basis with necessary repairs.
The majority of schools are grossly overcrowded and many are in urgent need
of repair and several in need of complete rebuilding. Early in 1951 a new school
to replace the existing Anglican School was built in Bequia. This was the only
school built in 1951.

WORE IN THE SCHOOLS.
The existing system in examining schools for the purpose of placing each
school in a grade of efficiency was discontinued in 1951. Instead an annual
examination in preparation for the introduction in 1952 of a, standardised School
Leaving Certificate Examination was introduced. This examination will take
place at the end of each year and on its results a school leaving certificate will be
issued to each successful candidate.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBITIONS.
Four scholarships to the Secondary Schools from the Primary Schools are
awarded annually. In addition an annual scholarship is awarded by the
Municipality of Kingstown, and at various periods the Religious Denominations,
local organizations and private individuals award scholarships tenable at the
Government Seeondary Schools:







ANDERSON.CUPS COMPETITION.
The competition took place as usual in 1951. Cups were won by -the
Georgetown Government, Kingstown Methodist, Biabou Methodist, Kingstown
Roman Catholic, Lowmans (Leeward) Anglican, Paget Farm Government and
Sandy Bay Anglican Schools.

CHAPTER IV.-SECONDARY EDUCATION.
There are two Government Secondary Schools, the Grammar School for boys
and the Girls' High School. 'Both schools enter candidates for the Cambridge
School Certificate and Higher School Certificate examinations.
The number of pupils enrolled in 1951 was as follows :-
Grammar School 218
Girls' High School 214
Considerable difficulty exists in obtaining graduates for staffing these schools. It
would be most beneficial if some uniformity in the salaries paid to the- Secondary
school masters of the Government-controlled schools throughout the Windwards
and the LDewards could be obtained.
Domestic Science is taught at the Girls' High School but no Science. The
Grammar School possesses a laboratory and Science is taught to Higher School
Certificate standard. The school possesses a Cadet Corps and a Scout Troop, and
the Girls' High School a Guide Company.

EXTERNAL EXAMINATIONS.
19 boys and 31 girls were entered by the two schools for the Cambridge School
Certificate examination in 1951 and 3 boys and 3 girls for the Higher School
Certificate examination.
The successes were as follows:-
Boys Girls

Cambridge School Certificate ... 17 18
Higher Sehool Certificate .. 2 3
PRIVATE SCHOOLS.
One Private school exists-The Intermediate School (formerly Immanuel
Institute) which is partly assisted by Government and which enters pupils for the
Cambridge School Certificate Examination.

CHAPTER V-TECHNICAL TRAINING.
Such technical training as takes place in the Colony is provided by various
Government Departments. There am no courses provided by the Bducation
Department.
The Department of Agriculture provides a two year residential course at. ts
experimental station at Camden Park. Twenty young men have been trained.
The scheme started in 1946 and is still in operation.
The course of training which lasts for two years is designed to give training in
those arts, crafts and elementary sciences which are necessary parts of the
equipment of an enlightened peasant farmer. Throughout the course emphasis is
laid upon manual and practical training as well as theoretical training in the
lecture room.








The Medical Department provides courses for Sanitary Inspectors, Dispeasers,
Hospital Nurses, Midwives, Public Health Nurses.
These are all trained locally for examinations leading to local certificates.
The Public Works Department trains Mechanical apprentices and Carpentry
apprentices.
The Electricity and Telephone Department keeps five (three Electricity and
two Telephone) apprentices in constant practical training in diesel engine
maintenance and operation, switch board attendance, house and line wiring and
telephony. While there is necessity for greater technical training, it has been
possible in this way to get a few fairly well trained boys into the industry.

CHAPTER VI-UNIVERSITY AND OTHER POST SECONDARY EDUCATION
INCLUDING OVERSEAS SCHOLARSHIPS.
The Island Scholarship. A scholarship is awarded triennially to the boy or
girl who comes first in the Higher School Certificate Examination to proceed to a
recognized British University for the purpose of becoming qualified in some
approved profession or occupation.
In 1951 the following scholarship winners were pursuing courses
Name Course University
R. H. Cox Medicine Glasgow
A. C. K. Antrobus Medicine University College of the
West Indies, Jamaica.

Other students are pursuing degree and other courses at Universities and
Colleges abroad. The various fields of study include Accountancy, Agriculture,
Nursing, Medicine, Science and Veterinary Surgery; these courses are being
financed by Colonial Development, Nuffield Foundation, and local funds.

CHAPTER VII-TRAINING OF TEACHERS.
No college exists for the training of teachers in St. Vincent or within the
Windward Islands, in consequence it has been the custom to send annually two
teachers for training to the Government Training College for Teachers in Trinidad.
Two teachers completed the two-year course in July, 1951. At present there are no
teachers from St. Vincent being trained at the College. This do"s not mean,
however, that the practice is being abandoned.

TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES.
As from 1951 Teachers' Certificates will be awarded on the results of the Final
Examination for Certification described earlier.
In 1951 ten persons passed --I local Teachers' Certificate examination.
The successes in the Pupil Teachers' and Student Teachers Examinations were
as under-
Supernumerary and Grade I Pupil Teachers ...... ...... 23
Grade II Pupil Teachers .... ...... ..... 19
Grade III Pupil Teachers ...... .......... 17
Student Teachers .. -








CHAPTER VIII-PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN SCHOOLS.
(1) ACCOMMODATION.
Conditions remain as described in the 1950 Report. There has been no
substantial improvement.
(2) PLAYING FIELDS.
In 1951 a playing field for the schools in Kingstown was acquired from
Government. Conditions in the rural areas remain the same however, most
schools lack adequate playing fields.
,(3) SEATING ACCOMMODATION AND DESKS.
Conditions remain much the same as in 1950. Schools lack adequate numbers
of desks and benches.
(4) GARDENS.
Work in School Gardens was stopped in 1951. It was ceasidered that the use
being made of these gardens served no educational purpose and the time formerly
spent on them was used to teach basic subjects such as English and Arithmetic.
(5) L1 VATORIES.
All the primary schools are provided with lavatories-mainly pit lavatories. In
the new schools bore-hole latrines are built while the new Richmond Hill School in
Kingstown has flush lavatories.
(6) NUTRITION SCHEMVIS.
In twelve schools on every school day a glass of skimmed milk and two food
yeast biscuits are supplied to each of a certain number of necessitous children.

CHAPTER IX-SOCIAL AND MORAL WELFARE.
(1) MORAL AND RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION.
Religious teaching forms a part of the curriculum in all Primary Schools. In
the Secondary Schools Scripture is taught in the lower forms and is a subject
which can be taken for the School Certificate Examination.
2) SCHOOL GAMES.
Organised games form a part of the routine of the Secondary Schools. Cricket,
Football, Netball and Tennis are played.
Organised competitions in cricket, football and netball between the Primary
Schools in Kingstown are also arranged.
(3) SCOUTS AND GUIDES.
Scouting is not a very active movement but Guiding is well organised and
vigorous. There are eleven Scout Troops and nine Girl Guide Companies. Two
Scout Troops and three Girl Guide Companies are associated with schools.

CHAPTER X-ADULT EDUCATION.
(1) UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES. EXTRA MURAL DEPARTMENT.
With the exception of a Drama Class which was :_toricd in July, no Extra-
Mural Classes were conducted in 1951.
Interest in Extra-Mural work in St. Vincent was however kept alive by several
lectures which were always well attended.








Professor Philip Sherlock, Vice-Principal of the University College of the West
Indies and Director of Extra-Mural Studies visited the island in March, and again
in December, and gave lectures on both occasions.
In March, Dr. Patrick Wilmore, a geo-physicist from the University of
Cambridge who had been sent out to St. Kitts to investigate the recent volcanic
disturbances in that island was paying a short visit to St. Vincent, and at the
request of Professor Sherlock he agreed to spe.k on Volcanoes and Earthquakes.
Dr. Wilmore's lecture was well received for it w .of special interest to St. Vincent
where there is a dormant volcano.
Another visitor was Dr. Aubrey Douglas-Smith, Resident Tutor for Barbados.
Two lectures one on Bernard Shaw and hi,; work and the other on International
Affairs since World War 1 were delivered by Mr. Douglas-Smith.
Mr. B. H. Easter, Resident Tutor for the Windward Islands also visited St.
Vincent during the year.

(2) EVENING CLASSES.
Evening Classes organised by the Department of Education were started in
October. In these classes students are prepared for the Cambridge School
Certificate Examination.

(3) BRITISH COUNCIL.
The usual distribution of magazines and periodicals received through the
courtesy of the British Council was continued.

(4) WOMEN'S GROUPS.
The Women's and Girls' Clubs have been working on successfttly in most of
the.areas.
There were many requests for the organisation of new groups and five of these
were formed chiefly on the Leeward Coast. At the end of 1951 there were 14 Clubs
and 6 Handcraft Centres.
The Annual Group Leaders Training Course was held from 13th-17th August
at the Houseeraft Centre, Kingstown. The Course was conducted by the Organiser
of Women's Activities assisted by the Housecraft and Handcraft Instructresses.
Thqattendance was increased from 25 in 1950 to 33 in 1951. Trainees deported
themselves admirably and were keenly interested in all of the classes.
The All-Island Women's Rally was held on 12th September, 1951, when over 150
women and girls made it possible to attend from all parts of the Island. The
Annual General Meeting was held at the Carnegie Hall from 9.00 a.m. to 12 noon
and this was followed by the Exhibition of Work from all groups and the Sports
Competition for the Spelman Challenge Cup which was held at the Richmond Hill
School and the Primary Schools Playing Field respectively.
There was a fine display of work at the Exhibition, which was patronised by
His Honour the Administrator and Mrs. Coutts who was then President of the
Federated Groups. Many prizes were awarded to members for work in the
following Sections :-Straw and Sisal Work, Embroidery, Crochet, Knitting
Hardanger, Soft Toys, Woolwork and Sewing of Plain and Decorated Garments.
Preserves, Pickles, Sweets, Cakes, Starches and other articles.
Sports-The various items were keenly contested and the Barrouallie Women's
Club won the Spalman Challenge Cup, a new Cup donated by Miss Norah Spelman.








Prizes were awarded for the best kept Minite Book, the best kept Treasurer's
Account Book and the best kept Thrift Group Account Book.
Handcraft Centres-The Layou Handcraft Sentre continued to work
satisfactorily and other Centres were opened at Kingstown, Chateaubelair,
Troumaca, New Grounds and Mesopotamia.
Education Department Handcraft Depot-This Depot has been functioning foe
the past two years and has proved a source of inspiration to workers who are able
to deposit their work here for sale or to get ready sale for same if up to standard.
$2,308.26 worth of articles made from local straws and sisal were purchased from
workers from all parts of the island of which $2,189.@7 were sold for the year 1951.
Associated Country Women of the World-Visitors-Amongst the many visitors
to the Groups were Miss Dora Ibberson the Social Welfare Adviser to the
Comptroller for Development and Welfare in the West Indies and Mrs. Jamieson,
both members of the Associated Country Women of the World, to which the groups
are affiliated. Both ladies gave talks to the members and referred to the Sixth
Trienniel Conference which was held .at Copenhagen, Denmark and at which Miss
Iberson represented the St. Vincent Federation of Women.


TABLE I.
Number of Institutions as at 31st December, 1951.


Classification of Institutions.


Post
Secondary.


Secondary
and Pest
Primary.


Primary.


Total.


Maintained from Colonial or
local Government Funds ... 2 40 42
Aided from Colonial or local
Government Funds .. 1 1
Maintained by Public Corpora-
tions, if an-y ... -.
All other Institutions ... -


Total ... 3 40 43










TABLE II.
Number of Courses.

Post Secondary. Secondary. Primary.
Classification of Insti- Teach Other Teacher Technical Teacher
tutios. General. Training. Profes- General. Training and Voca- General. Training Other
sional. Centres. tional. Centres. Voctional.
M F IMixed MIF I Mixed MF Mied M F Mixed M F Mixed M F Mixed

Maintained from Colo-
nial or Local Govern-
ment Fund .. 11 ----- 40---


Aided from Colonial
or Local Government
Funds ... -- 1--- -- -- -


Maintained by Pablic
Corporations, if any ... - -- -- -- -


All other Institutions ...- -- -- -- -


Total ... 1 --- 40 -- -
____ ____ ____ __ ___ __ - AI





TABLE III.

Number of Pupils Enrolled as at 31st December, 1951.


Secondary. Secondary. Primary. Total.
Total.

M F M F 1M F M I F

Maintained from Colo-
nial or Local Gov-
ernment Funds ...- 218 214 7,310 7,080 7,528 7,294 14,822
Aided from Colonial
or Local Govern-
ment Funds ... 74 31 74 31 1i
Maintained by Public
Corporations, if any -
AM other Institution -


Total ... 292 245 7,3100 7,080 7,6021 7,3251 14,927




















TABLE IV.

Number of Pupils analysed according to the type of course taken as at 31st December, 1951.


Po
Classification of Pupils
by Sex. General.


Male -


Female. -


Total ...


st Secondary. I


Teacher Other
Profes-
Training. sional.-
i sional.


Secondary.


Teacher
General. Training
Centres.


218


214


432


105 pupils from an Aided Secondary School have not been included above.


Technical
and Voca-
tional.


Primary.


Teacher
General. Training
Centres.


7,310


7,080


14,390


Other
Vocation,
al.


- -I----


--


Primary.











TABLE V (a).

Number of Pupils by School Years and Ages as at 31st December, 1951.


Year of School Course.


3


4


6


Total.


7 8 (and over)


F. MA. MF. FM. F. F. M. M. F. M.


Below 6 397 464 5 3
6- 7 490 477 339 345 13 5
7- 8 328 185 386 318 181 189 8 6 2 1
8- 9 -108 96 155 1G6 314 304 186 249 15 9 2 -
9-10 82 90 133 87 162 147 332 .309 161 186 19 12
10-11 70 58 67 66 81 98 158 139 261 289 158 167
11-12 54 58 65 5 75, 59. 91 102 136 134 174 218
12--13 50 43 24 2' 34 38 44 31 88 70 202 241
13-14 36 23 2 .. 17 18 25 23 22 47 32 42 47
14-15. 18 9 14 9 7 10 18 18 27 25 36 20
15-16 3 2 5 2 4 2 2 3 4 3 7 4


Total ...l636 1505 1222 1095 889 877 862 879 741 749 640 709
i


19
168
166
103
35
6


2 2
17 7 4
194 4 -7
196 163 156
80 314 277
42 278 232
6 57 51


F. IM.


402
842
905
780
889
821
767
771
612
433
88


F.

467
827
699
824
835
838
827
802
523
365
73


497 537 823


Ages.


2


F. M.


----' ''


_ -~-I - -^ --- -


7,080


729 7,310











TABLI V (a).
Number of Pupils by School Years and Ages as at 31st December, 1951.

Year of School Course.
Total.

Ages. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 (and over)
M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F.

Below 6 397 464 5 3! 402 467
G- 7 490 477 33) 345 1; 5 842 827
7- 8 328 185 386 318 181 189 8 6 2 9 805 699
8- 9 108 96 155 166 314 304 186 249 15 9 2 780 824
9-10 82 90 133 87 162 147 332 309 161 186 19 12 2 '- 2 889 835
10-11 70 58 67 66 81 98 158 139 261 289 158 167 19 17 7 4 821 838
11-12 54 58 65 55 75, 59.. 91 102 136 134 174 218 168 194 4 -7 767 827
12-13 50 43 24 2" 34 38 44 31 88 70 202 241 166 196 163 156 771 802
13-14 36 23 29 17 18 25 23 22 47 32 42 47 103 80 314 277 612 523
14--15 18 9 14 91 7 10 18 18 27 25 36 20 35 42 278 232 433 365
15-16 3 2 5 2 4 2 2 3 4 3 7 4 6 6 57 51 88 73


Toal ...1636 1505 122 1095 889 877 862 879 741 749 640 709 497 537 823 729 7,310 7,080
'\~~- ___ .__ *_ ____"___________________ __
















TABLE V (a) (Continued).

Number of pupils by School Years and Ages as at 31st December, 1951.

Year of School Course.

Ages. 1 2 3 4 5 6 More than 6. Total.

M. F. M. F. M. F. M, F. M. F. M. F. M. F. M. F.

Below 12 1 3 1 2 3
12---13 11 5 2 2 4 17 7
33-14 20 24 6 26 6 2 2 6 1 34 59
14--15 13 8 10 10 8 12 1 7 40 29
15-16 6 8 2 9 20 8t 10 9 14 6 1 1 46 48
16-17 2 2 7 3 3 1 11 20 5 8 1 4 31 36
17-18 1 7 3 9 12 2 4 18 20
18-19 13 6 9 1 1 20 10
19--.0 1 4 2 5 10 2


Total .. 3 32 27 28 32 38 25 29 42 45 30 32 9 10 218 214


s












TABLE VI.

Teachers Classified By Qualifications as at 31st December, 1951.


Primary Schools.


Secondary Schools.


Post Total.
Secondary


With University
Degree :
'`;rained
Untrained
Completed Second-
ary School Course:
Trained
UntraineJ
Not complticI Sec-
ondary School
CQurse:
Trained
Untrained ..


Maintained
from Colonial
or Local Gov-
ernment Funds.


143


Aided from Maintained
Colonial or All other from Colonial
Local Govern- Institutions. or Local Gov-
ment Funds. ernment Funds.


Fi


M


F


M




1
3


- 6


.!ilicd from
coloniall or
Local Govern-
ment Funds.


All other
Institutions.


I- '- I


I I





GENERLiAL TABLE VII.

Expenditure on Education.
..... -


Percentage of
Education
Expenditure to
Gross Expendi-
ture
(Heads I, II,
III only).


Head I. Expenditure on Education from Colonial Revenue
excluding expenditure shown under II-Y below ...

II, Expenditure on Education from Looal funds
(Local'Education Authorities, Municipalities, Dis-
tict Councils, Local Native Councils, Native Ad-
ministration, etc.):-
(a) From Funds raised locally ...
(b). Froni Funds granted by Central Govern-
ment excluding expenditure from Coloni-
al Revenue indicated under I above ...

III. Expenditure on Education from Special Develop-
ment Funds (as shown in Chapter II) and not
included under I above :-
(a) From Imperial Funds ...
(i) From Colonial Funds ..

IV. Expenditure on Education and Training by Gov-
ernment Departments other than Education De-
partment, excluding expenditure under I
above

V. Estimated Expenditure on Education by Voluntary
Agencies excluding Grants from Government
included under I above


1 ,031

jGrand Total ... $286,009


Total


5
... 253,895


Nil


Nil




$8,848
.,


96%















4%


22,235


-I-I I_


I




TABLE VII (a)

Classification of Expenditure showv under Head I in General Table VII.


S2
U)


S


S $
8,709 37,392


8,709 37,392


Primary
Schools.


186,248


Teacher
Training
School
Cou11rses.
Courses.


Other
Vocation-
:i School-]
Courses.
Courses.


,5 S
2,149 (1 Gi


604


Racial or
other
Classifi-
oation.


S S
5, 68 3:,063


5,668 3,06 3


ICapital or
Maintenance' Non-recur-
s ol Sclhori rent Expen-
B3oard and buildingss dii're on all
Lodging. i Furniture Buildings,
S i and Furniture
i Equipment. and
Equipment.

-- i S
5,650 -


-- 5,650


Other Ex-
penditure.


$4
4,352


- 4,352


TABLE VII (b)

Classification of Expenditure shown under Head III in General Table VII.


Teacher Other Adminis- Schola
Training i Vocation-I traction ships
Schools al Schoolsi inspection Overse
:a1ud :d and Office and
Courses. Comises. Equinmnent. Region
t I


,. 6
1,056 413


1,056


413


S
6,7.16


6,716


Capital or
i Maintenance Nom-recur-
Bod of School rent Expend-
Sas oal Buildings itnre on all
as i dn. Furniture Buildings,
l.din. and Furniture
Equipment. an d
Equipment.

6 $ $
61;;3 -


663 -


Adlministra-

Itlspction Oveea
and Oiiice an
equipment, Regio1nal.


Total.


253,895
253,895


253,895


R I
Racial or
other
Classifi-
cation.


Primary
Schools.


Total ...


Other
Expend-
iture.


Total.


$
8,848


8,848


186,248 2,149


------


i-


- ----- -~-~~~1--11


-










TABLE VII (c)

Classification of Expenditure shown under Head IV in General Table VII.


Teacher Other
Training Vocation-
Schools al Schools
and and
Courses. Courses.


$i $


Adminis-
tration
Inspection
and Office
Equipment.


S


Scholar-
ships
Overseas
and
Regional.


$


Board
and
Lodging


-


S, Capital or
Maintenance Nonrecur-
of School rentExpend-
Buildings iture on all
Furniture Buildings,
' and Furniture
SEquipment. and
i Equiqment.


$
6,840


6,840


12,728

12,728

12,728


Other
Expend- Total.
iture.




$ $
2,667 22,235


2,667 22,235


I i -1 ___________


TABLE VII (d)

Classification of Expenditure shown under Head V in General Table VII.


liacc:l 2: -
othtiler









1'otal ...


Teacher Other
S Trainingi Vocation-
.Pri or.- Schools al Schools
Schools. nd i Ta
Cor.d a(Courses.
Courses. Courses.


$


$
--
!i


Adinins-
tration
Inspection
and Officee
Equipment.


$
-


Scholar-
ships
Overseas
and
Regional.


$


Board
and
Lodging.


$


Maintenance Capital or
of School Non-recur-
Buildings rent Expend-i
Furniture iture on all
and Buildings,
Equipment. Furniture
(Primary and
Schools) Equipment.


$
1,031


$


1,3 1,031i-- L


Primary
Schools.


Si SC


Other
Expend-
iture.


$


Total.


$
1,031


-; I


__


1,0;31


1,031


- ll'~~w~


~-~


---------- ----


I


I


~"I ---~usr~


I




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