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Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077473/00039
 Material Information
Title: Saint Vincent government gazette
Alternate Title: Government gazette
St. Vincent government gazette
Physical Description: v. : ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Saint Vincent
Publisher: G.P.O.
Place of Publication: Kingstown, St. Vincent
Kingstown St. Vincent
Publication Date: December 12, 1950
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Gazettes -- Periodicals -- Saint Vincent   ( lcsh )
Genre: federal government publication   ( marcgt )
legislation   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines -- Saint Vincent
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1, no. 1 (1868)-v. 112, no. 48 (Tues., 23 Oct. 1979)
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 111, no. 1 (Tues., 3 Jan. 1978); title from caption.
General Note: Supplements which accompany some numbers contain extraordinary issues, ordinances, statutory rules of order, etc.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077473
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 19844741
lccn - sn 89018505
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Government gazette

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
    Accounts of the Colony for the period 1st January to 30th July, 1950
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 99: Diplomatic Privileges (International Refugee Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950
        Page B-189
        Page B-190
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 100: Diplomatic Privileges (United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950
        Page B-191
        Page B-192
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 101: Diplomatic Privileges (Food and Agriculture Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950
        Page B-193
        Page B-194
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 102: Diplomatic Privileges (World Health Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950
        Page B-195
        Page B-196
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 103: Diplomatic Privileges (International Civil Aviation Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950
        Page B-197
        Page B-198
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 104: Diplomatic Privileges (International Labour Organisation) (Amendment) )rder, 1950
        Page B-199
        Page B-200
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 105: Education (Kingstown Preparatory School) (Amendment) Regulations, 1950
        Page B-201
        Page B-202
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 106: Export Duties (Amendment No. 2) Order, 1950
        Page B-203
        Page B-204
    Statutory Rules and Orders, no. 107: Prices Control (Amendment No. 36) Notice, 1950
        Page B-205
        Page B-206
    Minutes of Special Meeting of the Legislative Council held on the 13th May, 1950
        Page C-29
        Page C-30
        Page C-31
        Page C-32
        Page C-33
        Page C-34
        Page C-35
        Page C-36
        Page C-37
        Page C-38
        Page C-39
        Page C-40
        Page C-41
Full Text























SAJ N'T r VINCGNT


GOVERNMENT


GAZETTE


VOL. 83.] SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950. [No. 63.


GOVERNMENT NOTICES. No. 595.
Miss FLORENCE M. LAKE, Senior
No. 592. Clerk, Agricultural Department, six
MENTAL HOSPITAL. months' vacation leave with effect from
125th November, 1950.
BOARD OF VISITORS. 12th December, 1950.


With reference to Government Notice
No. 417 of 29th August, 1950, Mr. G.
MARSHALL, Dispenser, Mental Hospital,
has been appointed Secretary to the
Board of Visitors for the Mental Hos-
pital.
12th December, 1950.
No. 593.
LEAVE NOTICES.
EXTENSION OF LEAVE.
With reference to Government Notice
No. 430 of 5th September, 1950, Mr.
IRA YOUNG, Mechanic and Linesman,
Power Station, four months' extension
of leave on half-pay, with effect from
3rd December, 1950.
12th l)ecember, 1950.
(P. F. 388).
No. 594.
VACATION LEAVE.
Mrs. DORTS J. ROBINSON. Junior
Clerk, Electricity and Telephone Dc-
partment, 9 weeks' vacation leave with
effect from 8bh December, 1950.
12th December, 1950.
(P. F. 2225).


(P. F. 476).


No. 596.
Mr. G. Rl. ROBINSON, Junior Clerk,
Public Works Department, 21 days'
sick leave to be followed by two. weeks'
vacation leave with effect from 25th
November, 1950.
12th December, 1950.
(P. F. 537).
No. 597.
LEGISLATION.
T h e following documents are pub-
lished with this issue of the Gazette:--
S.1h. & 0. No. 99.-The Diplomatic
Privileges (International Refugee
Organisation) (Amendment) Or-
der, 1950.
(A. 46/1948).
S.R. & O. No. 100.-The Diplomatic
Privileges (United Nations Educa-
tional, Scientific, and Cultural
Organisation) (Amendment) Or-
der, 1950.
(A. 4/1/1948).
S.R. & 0. No. 101.-The Diplomatic
Privileges (Food and Agriculture
Organisation) (A\mendment) Or
der, 1950.
(A. 46/1948).


,,Sh


~~lbLiNheB b~ ~utlrbrity,













SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63).


S.R. & 0. No. 102.-The Diplomatic tion was drawn to the widespread smug-
Privileges (World Health Organi- 'gling into the Colony of articles particu-
sation) (Amendment) Order, 1950. larly of liquor and cigarettes with the
(A. 46!1948). consequent loss to revenue of possibly
thousands of dollars.
S.R. & O. No, 103.-The Diplomatic The smuggling of livestock and local
Privileges (International Civil produce out of the mainland to the
Aviation Organisation) (Amend- Grenadines so as to evade export con-
ment) Order, 1950. trols in Kingstown has apparently also
(A. 46/1948). grown to large proportions.
At this particular time when the
S.R. & O. No. 104.-The Diplomatic Colony is experiencing great difficulty
Privileges (International Labour to balance its budget, this state of affairs
Organisation) (Amendment) Or- can hardly be permitted to continue
der, 1950.- without check. It has therefore been
(A. 46/1948). decided by Government to adopt in the
R. & 0. N. 10.-T E ion future stronger measures for the sup-
.R. & O. No. 105.-The Education pression of smuggling. Apart from the
ingstown Preparatory School) normal safeguards which will be
(Amendment) Regulations, 1950. strengthened, it is proposed to offer to
(F, 4/1949). anyone giving information leading to
S.R. & O. No. 106.-The Export the discovery of uncustomed goods 10%
Duties (Amendment No. 2 Order, of the proceeds of sale of the contraband
Duties (Amendment No. 2 Oder, after its confiscation. Such information
1950. can be communicated confidentially in
(J. 16/1948). writing or otherwise to the Superinten-
S. R. & 0. No. 107. -- The Prices dent of Police or to the Senior Customs
Control (Amendment No. 3 6 Officer, and the anonymity of persons
Notice, 1950. giving such information will be fully
respected.
(T. 20/1949). If such persons should by any chance
12th December, 1950. require the assistance and use of a Gov-
ernment launch and of Police and Cus-
toms Guards personnel to enable them
No. 598. -to follow up reasonably reliable clues
SUPPLEMENTS TO GAZETTE, leading to smuggling activity on the
beaches and coasts away from the
The Accounts of the Colony for the Kingstown wharf-front and in the
period 1st January to 30th July, 1950, Grenadines islets, they should apply
are published with this issue of the accordingly to either of the two Officers
Gazette. mentioned above who would of course
12th December, 1950. have to be satisfied with the bona fides
of such applications before releasing the
No. 599. launch and personnel.
Offenders against the laws relating to
Copies of minutes of special meeting smuggling of goods into and out of the
of the Legislative Council held on the Colony, and those who hold uncustomed
13th May, 1950, which may also be goods without having receipts establish-
seen at the Government Office, Kings- ing the payment of import duty on these
town Library, and at all Revenue Offices goods, are hereby warned that measures
and District Post Offices, are published against breaches of these laws will be
with this issue of the Gazette. made much more effective than they are
12th December, 1950, now.
W. F. COUTTS,
Administrator.
No. 574. 25th November, 1950.
SMUGGLING.

During the course of the various dis- By Command,
cussions which took place within recent
weeks at meetings both of the unofficial A. V. KING,
Committee appointed to consider ways Acting Government Secretary.
and means of raising additional revenue
and of the Finance Committee consider- GOVERNMENT OFFTCE.
ing the Colony's Budget for 19)51, alttn- 121h December, 1950.


370
1_--














SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63). 371


MEDICAL REGISTRATION NOTICE.

The under-mentioned persons have
this day been registered as Midwives:-
Medical Name. Residence.
District.

No. 1 Florence Etaul Kingstown
Jackson, Park

No. 1 'Agatha DeRoche Richmond
Hill

A. V. KING,
Acting Medical Registrar.

8th December, 1950.
(M. 4/1950).




DEPARTMENTAL AND
OTHER NOTICES.


DECLARATION OF ACQUISITION OF
LAND.


WHEREAS it is enacted by Section 3
of the Land Acquisition Ordinance,
1946, (No. 22 of 1946), that if the Gov-
ernor in Council considers that any
land should be acquired for a public
purpose, he may cause a declaration to
that effect to be made:
AND WHEREAS it is considered by the
Governor in Council that the under-
mentioned lands should be acquired for
a public purpose, that is to say, the
establishment of Water Supply Pipe
Line Routes for Kingstown and its
environs:
Now THEREFORE, IT IS HEREBY DE-
CLARED by the Governor acting with
and in accordance with the advice of the
Executive Council of the Colony of
Saint Vincent, that upon the Second
publication of this Declaration in the
Gazette, the undermentioned areas of
land owned by or-in the possession of
the respective persons set out in the
Schedule hereto, all situate in the
parish of St. George, shall be acquired
for the abovementioned purpose and
shall vest absolutely in the Crown.
AND IT IS HEREBY FURTHER DE-
CLARED AND NOTIFIED that the plan
showing the abovementioned tracts of
land has been drawn and prepared by
Mr. G. L. E. Barker, Crown Surveyor,
- and may be inspected at all reasonable
hours at the Surveys Office in the town
of Kingstown in the said Colony.


SCHEDULE.
Name A rea
Heirs of Edward Clarke 4,308 sq. ft.
Henry Little 2,256 ,,,
Rose Soleyn 1,236 ,, ,,
Julian Baynes 4,742 ,,,
Mildred Shearman (Mrs.) 2,910 ,,,,
John M. Richards 2,094 ,,,
Rudolph Antrobus 120 ,,,,
Marcus Woodley 744 ,,,,
Wilhelmina Nichols 318 ,, ,,
Gwendoline Salandy 288 ,,,
Estella Shalto 168 ,,,,
Wilhelmina Shearman 318 ,,,,
Sybil Gibson 2,562 ,,,
Vincent DaSilva 2,790 ,,
Dated at Kingstown this 24th day of
November, 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Executive Council.
(P. 12/1943).




DECLARATION OF ACQUISITION OF
LAND.

WHEREAS it is enacted by Section 3 of
the Land Acquisition Ordinance, 1946,
(No. 22 of 1946), that if the Governor in
Council considers that any land should
be acquired for a public purpose he may
cause a declaration to that effect to be
made:
AND WHEREAS it is considered by the
Governor in Council that the under-
mentioned lands should be acquired for
a public purpose, that is to say, the
establishment of a reserved area of land
adjacantto the erosion gulleys (common-
ly known as German Gutter") at Trou-
maka Village and its environs for anti-
erosion protection purposes :
Now THEREFORE IT IS HEREBY DE-
CLARED by the Governor acting with and
in accordance with the advice of the
Executive Council of the Colony of Saint
Vincent, that upon the Second publica-
tion of this Declaration in the Gazette,
the undlermentioned areas of land, owned
by or in the possession of the respective
persons set out in the Schedule hereto,
all situate in the parish of St. George,
shall be acquired for the abovementioned
purpose and shall vest absolutely in the
Crown :
AND IT IS HEREBY FURTHER DE-
CLARED AND NOTIFIED that the plan
showing the abovementioned tracts of
land has been drawn and prepared by
Mr. G. L. E. BARKER, Crown Surveyor,
and may be inspected at all reasonable
hours at the Surveys Office in the town
of Kingstown in the said Colony.














372 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63).


SCHEDULE.


NAam e.
Rose Layne
Hagar Lewis
Imore Baynes
Hubert Providence
Gustina Providence
Alfred Bentinck
Daisy Bentinck
Irene Hamilton
Leonard Providence


Joseph Byam
Theophilus Harry
Faith Akers
James Alexander
Clairmonte Anthony
William Anthony
Dated at Kingstown
November, 1950.


Area.
779 sq. ft.
2200 ,,,
981 ,, ,,
1575 ,,,
1000 ,,
263 ,,,
87 .,,
2178 .,
4356 ,,,


Ac. Rd. Pos.
4. 1. 10.
1. 0. 0.
0. 3. 3.7
2. 1. 1.4
0. 2. 39.
1. 0. 24.
this 24th day of


HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Olerk of Executive Council.
*(P. 3/1944).


TREASURY NOTICES.

The Treasury will be opened for the
transaction of business at 8 a.m. on the
29th and 30th December, instead of 9
a.m.
11th December, 1950.


PAYMENT OF PENSIONERS.

Notice is hereby given that local
pensioners will be paid on Friday the
29th December, 1950.
30th November, 1950.
(F. 83/1939).


NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS, MER-
CHANTS AND OTHERS HAVING
CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOV-
ERNMENT OF ST. VINCENT.

1. Notice is hereby given that Con-
tractors, Merchants, and all other per-
sons having claims against the Govern-
ment for articles supplied or services
performed are requested to submit their
accounts to the Department concerned
on or before the 15th December.
2. Failure to submit claims in due
time may result in such not being paid
within the current year.
3. All persons indebted to the Gov-
,ernment Departments are requested to


settle their accounts on or before the
31st December, 1950.
30th November, 1950.
(F. 83/1939).


ST. VINCENT.
LAND AND HOUSE TAX NOTICE.

By the authority of the Land and House
Tax Ordinance, Cap. 194 of the
Laws of St. Vincent.

It is hereby notified for general infor-
mation that all persons who are in
arrears of Land and House Tax are
advised to make full settlement before
the end of this year, as it is proposed to
levy on the properties of such persons
whose taxes for 1950 and previous years
remain unpaid, and to put these pro-
perties up for sale during the months
of January and February for the recov-
ery of the arrears of tax due.

BERNARD GIBBS,
Acting Colonial Treasurer.

Treasury Chambers,
Kingstown,
28th November, 1950.
(A. 47/1950).


CUSTOMS NOTICES.

The undermentioned Livestock have
been seized for a breach of section 4 (1)
of the Import and Export (Control)
Regulations, 1939, as amended by sec-
tion 2 of the Import and Export (Con-
trol) Regulations, 1940.
Five (5) Sheep
Two (2) Goats
Twenty-two (22) Fowls.
BERNARD GIBBS,
Acting Colonial Treasurer
rnd Compel)ent Autlor)ity.
Treasury,
4th December, 1950..


The undermentioned Livestock have
been seized for a breach of section 48
(2) Cap, 183.
One (1) Sheep
Seventeen (17) Fowls.

BERNARD GIBBS,
collector r of Customs (Acting).

CUSTOMS,
h December, 1950
11th December, 1950.















SAINI' V1NCSN'T, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63). 373


TREASURY NOTICE.

LAND AND HOUSE TAX NOTICE.

Notice is hereby given that the under-mentioned persons having become
defaulters under the Land and House Tax Ordinance" their properties having
been levied upon will be offered for Sale at 12 o'clock noon on Saturday the
16th December, 1950, at the Treasury for the recovery of Taxes due thereon.


TREASURY,
ST. VINCENT,
21st November, 1950.
Names


Richards, Maria Est. of

Huggins, Robert
Simmons, Isaacs
Samuel, Wilmoth
Edwards, Lisle
Farrell, Alexander
Williams, Luther Hrs. of
thomas, Elizabeth
France, Jane
Charles, Agatha
Springer, St.Clair
Jack, Alexander
Findlay, George A.
Lloyd, James
Kirby, Wilhelmenia
Francis, Walter
Campbell, James
Primus, Auslin
Jacobs, Horatio
Dodds, Robertha
Jeffery, Uriah
Lubby, Dora
Porter, Augusta
FyTfle, Adella
Samnel. Jonathan
Trumpet. Amos
Jordon, Joseph E.

Richlards, Florence
Collins, Blanche
l od lock, Aubrey


BERNARD GIBBS,
Colonial Treasurer (Acting).




Situation of Property Description of Property


... 4 acs. 3 rds. 39 pls.

S5 acs. 2 rds. 24 poles
... 4 acs. 1 rd. 33 pis.
... 3 acs. 3 rds. 39 pis.
... 2 acs. 0 rd. 12 pls.
... 5 acs. 0 rd. 12 pls.
... 1 House Spot
... 1 ao.
1 ac. 3 rds. 24 poles.
... I ac.
... 1 ac. 2 rds. 22 pls.
... 3 acs. 2 rds. 15 pls.
... 12 acs. 0 rd. 15 pIs.
1 House
... 1 House Spot
... 5 acs. 1 rd. 5 pls.
.. 5 acs.
5 acs.
3 acs. 2 rds. 35 pis.
... 4 acs. 2 ,, 9 ,,
... 1 House Spot
House Spot
1 ac.
... 2 acs.
... 1 ac.
-. acs. 0 rd. 7 pIs.
... 6 acs. 0 rd. 1.; pls.

.1 House Spot
...1 House
... 8 aes. 1 rd. 32 p1s.


DISTRICT III
... Maloney
DISTRICT IV
... Hermitage
... Grove
... Convent
... Lammies
... Sping
... do.
... Hermitage
... Rutland Vale
... do.
... do.
... Coull's Hill
... Nw Works
... Glebe
... Cocoa Village
... New Works
... Lam-mies
... Lammies
... Convent
do.
Spring
.. umlberland
... Spring
... ahautay
... Herlmitage
G.. ove
... Hermitage
DISTRICT V
.. Trouni ca
... o.
T.. Tascalney


CUSTOMS NOTICE.

Under Section 27 Cap. 183 Customs Ord., the undermentioned goods will
be sold by public auction on Wednesday 20th December, 1950, unless they are duly
cleared or re-warehoused.

GOODS BONDED IN NUMBER 1 WAREHOUSE


Date
Warehoused


Name of Ship


1947
February 5 Plato


April
-June
August


Consignee


J. H. Hazell Sons


13 Plato
17 Alcoa Cavalier
6 Plymouth Belle Corea & Co.


Marks, Quantity, and
Description of Goods


Baynes Bros.--2 c/s Cigar-
ettes
J.O.C. St. Lucia-1 ctn. Beer
E.E.S.-2 ctns. enamelware
1 c/s Sulph. Acid














374 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63).


Date
Warehoused


1948
November
December


Name of Ship


8 Gardenia W.
14 Lady Angela


Consignee


W. J. Abbott

D. H. Nichols


Marks, Quantity, and
Description of Goods

N.M.-1 pckge Mats
1 box Merchandise.


1949
February 14 Gardenia W J. H. Haz(
March 15 Can. Construc- Corea & C
tor
March 30 Douro J. H. Hazi
April 13 Plato

April 23 Makena


May 21 Interpretor

June 3 Lady Nelson


July 6 Alcoa Patriot
July 18 Alcoa Pilgrim
August 2 Ino



July 2 My Own
September 20 Nero
October 9 Gardenia W
9 Ino
9 Gardenia W

23 Nero


Corea & C


J. H. Haz


J. H. Haz
Weston I

J. H. Haz


ell Sons Hull-1 case labels
!o. Ltd. J.H.H.S. & Co.-1 c/s Xmas
cards
all Sons J.T.S.-2. ctns Beer
F.J.T.
Dominica-1 ctn. Beer.
Barclays Bank for S. O. Jack
-1 c/s Auto-Parts.
S.R.S.
27/948-1 c/s. Compressors
3o. Ltd. L.J.W.-6 C/s. Vinegar
3 c/s. Pickles
-3 c/s. Sauce
ell Sons T.H.-1 ctn. Milk
B.B.-4 c/s. Sheet metalware.
L.J.W.-2 c/s Pickles
P.H.V.-1 c/s. Tinned Butter
P.M.C.
Grade 27 Lub.-4 c/s. Lub. Oil.
1 pcl. Fire Extinguishers.
U.T.L.-1 loose Dover Stove
N.M.-1 box Engine parts.
:ell Sons W.J.A.-3 c/s. Tinned Butter
Lewis 1 Electric Motor
1 Electric Switch
sell Sons F.J.D. 54-1 crte. Earthen-
ware.


GOODS BONDED IN NUMBER 2 WAREHOUSE


October 28 Gloria Hen- Competent
rietta Authority


G. E. Barbados
N.M.-1 ctn. Chimney


1945
December

1946
March


1 Marcelle S.


6 William Wint
12 Belqueen


September 21 Cyril E. Smith

1947
January 15 Adviser


April
June


29 Lady Lecita
7 Benjamin A. -
Fisher


August 5 Alcoa Pioneer
September 5 Plymouth Belle

20 Lady Nelson


October 1 Alcoa Cavalier
December 12 Mildred Wal-
lace


1948
February


Amelia Clyne


J. H. Hazell Sons
Competent
Authority
Order of Shippers


J. H, Hazell Sons

Baynes Bros.
J. H. Hazell Sons



Corea & Co.


J. H. Hazell Sons
Competent
Authority


25 Alcoa Polaris John H. Hazell


Add-1 c/s. Clothing


R.SB.-1 Ctn. Canvas Shoes
J.H.H.S.-1 c/s Mineral Wa-
ters
E. Gibson 2 ctns. Toilet,
Preparations

S(10023)M 1 crte. Motor-
Wheel
N.M.-5 bags Black Pepper
CMSC
B.B. 1963/1-1 c/s Mantle
Type Radio Sets.
H. A. Coombs-2 C/s Paint
R.S.B. 50 R6474-1 Ctn. Glass-
ware
Corea & Co.
N/M-1 c/s. Sherry
Corea 9-1 ctn. Repair-Kit
D.Q. (5) 19/20 2 bales.
Oakum

Reliance Pharmacy for Rev.
F. Wain-1 c/s. Used cards.
for Charity














SAINT VINCENT TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63). 375



Date Name of Ship Consignee Marks, Quantity, and
Warehoused Description of Goods


- April 17 Belqueen
3 Wanderer

September 7 Alcoa Planter
14 Baralt


R3775-1 drum Merchandise
J.T.S. 4818-1 c/s. Aluminium
Cutlery
J.H.H.-9 ctns. Glassware.
J.H.H.S. 815/16-2 c/s Mer-
chandise
Corea & Co.
831 N/M-1 only loose Pipe,
E.G. 1/13-13 Bales Hemp
Rope.


GOODS BONDED IN NUMBER 2 WAREHOUSE (Contd.)
1944


17 At Last


November 10 Lady Joan


Order of Shippers
Compt. Authority
Digby Hadley
Corea & Co.


20 Alcoa Pennant John H. Hazell
23 At Last W. J. Abbott & Co.

7 Ino


June 1 Belqueen
August 11 Lady Rodney

31 Douro


August 31 Douro
September 9 Marcelle S
20 Explorer

June 18 Belqueen
11 Alcoa Polaris

October 18 Lady Rodney

March 12 Royal Rio
February 9 A: Mitchell
Palmer
August lj Flevo


O. D. Brisbane
Corea & Co.


Corea & Co. Ltd.
G. Williams
John H. Hazell

Order of Shippers
John H. Hazell

Corea & Co.

David A. King
John H. Hazell

John H. Hazell


G-1 Box Labels
SBIAK-1 Box Boot Polish
1 Pckge. Copra Bags.
Corea & Co.-1 pckge. Sta-
tionery.
W.J.A.-5 ctns. Canvas shoes
Add-2 Pkgs. Auto Parts.

G.A.A.-50 ctns. Pilsner Beer
J.H.H.S.-2 C/s. Wine
Add-1 pkg. Printed Matter
U.T.L.-1 c/s. Sloans Lini-
ment
G.V. 8150403-1 c/s. Masons
Trowels
B212-151-1 c/s Aluminium
Caps.
G. Forde-1 c/s. C.C. Beef
N/M-1 C/s. Tinned Butter
Add.-1 ctn. Merchandise
E.V.C.
2406-1 c/s. Iron Valves
E. Gibson-1 Cask Bay Rum,
Baynes Bros.-1 c/s. Book
Matches
J.H.H.S.-1 c/s. Advertising
materials
Add.-1 Bag Sugar
R.S.B.
1/14-14 Ctns. Glassware
J.Mc. 321-1 bale' Rayon
Piece Goods


N.B. The undermentioned packages will be sold on ab6vementioned date :


Marks
N/M

Louisa Westcott
J. F. Dixon
N/M
I,
n


Romuel Joseph
Mary Mofford
N/M

M. Andrew......Grenada
J. Bonadie
M. Hunte......Bequia
N/M
Agnes Clarke
N/M
Mona Morrison


Description and contents
1 Parcel bolt and nuts
1 Carton Shoes
1 Bath pan
2 Bath Pans
1 Basket Merchandise
1 Parcel Cloth
2 Trunks Merchandise
1 Parcel clothing
1 Grip
1 Box M/dse
1 Gear Lever
1 Agricultural Fork
1 Box M/dse
1 Box Auto parts
1 Box M/dse
1 Grip
1 Parcel M/dse
1 Old Stowe
1 Package M/dse


1949
March


,
"














376 SAI1T VINCEN'T, TUESDAY,


W. Henry......Grenada
Hamilton Jacques......St. Lucia
Clemeft King c/o D. King
N/M
W. D. Herbert
O. D. Brisbane & Son
S. G. DeFreitas
N/M

Bata Shoe Co.
N/M
Zillitter Bynoe
C. O. Hazell
N/M

G. Lobban
'H.M. Customs,
8th November, 1950


1 Carton M/dse
1 Basket M/dse
1 Tin M/dse
1 Package Bottles
1 Package M/dse
1 Package M/dse
2 Packages auto parts
1 Bottle Rum
1 Old Radiator
1 Package Posters
1 Package (2 head lamps)
1 Parcel M/dse
1 Package M/dse
1 Basket old shoes
3 Washing boards
1 Box M/dse.
BERNARD GIBBS,
Acting Collector of Customs.


EDUCATION NOTICES.

PUPIL TEACHERS' AND CERTIFICATE EXAMINATIONS, 1950.


Pupil Teachers.

FIRST YEAR :
Eastlyn Alexander
Harold -Cockburn
Peter DeRoche
Shirley Fraser
Minerva John
Gwendolyn McKenzie
Elmo Nanton
Clement Noel
SSigbert Ollivierre
Althea Osborne

:SECOND YEAR :
Rupert Bascombe
Errol Baynes
Fandolph Cottle
Charles Daniel
Alexander Lewis
Milton Samuel
Ormond Williams


THIRD YEAR :
Adeline Cambridge
Benjamin Edwards
Hilma Hadaway
Grafton Isaacs
Vivian James
Reuben Jeffers
John Thompson
Theophilus Wood


FOURTH YEAR :
Carol Campbell
James Daniel
Ishbelle Home


PASS LIST.



Union Island Government School
Byera Anglican School.
Canouan Government School
Byera Anglican School.
Kingstown Methodist School.
Union Island Government School.
Sandy Bay Anglican School.
Union Island Government School.
Paget Farm Government School.
Bequia Anglican School.


Evesham Methodist School.
Dicksons Methodist School.
Troumaca Government School.
Sandy Bay Anglican School.
Canouan Government School.
Spring Methodist School.
South Rivers Methodist School.


Kingstown Methodist School.
Chateaubelair Methodist School.
do. do. do.
Layou Government School.
Questelles Government School.
Buccament Government School.
Chateaubelair Methodist School.
Questelles Government'School.


Georgetown Government School.
Sandy Bay Anglican School.
Kingsto-fn Methodist School.


,CERTIFICATE (Local Examination).


Reuben Bailey
Louisa Brereton
Bertie Child
Elaine Crozier
Therese Cuffy


Marriaqua Government School.
Brighton Methodist School.
Georgetown Government School.
do. do. do.
Brighton Methodist School.


~
------ ----------


12 DECEMBERi. .1%0.-(-No. 63).














SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63), 377


CERTIFICATE (Local
"Inola Cupid
Gwenneth Findlay
Marcus Greaves
Yvonne Harry
Alban Henry
Leon Huggins
Fitz John
Viola Johnson
Horace Lewis
Durrant Liverpool
Rhona Llewellyn
Henry Morris
Walden Ryan
Admatha Sharpe
Germaine Stephens
Hetty Guy

Education Office.
8th December. 1950.


Examination) contd.
Questelles Government School.
Troumaca Government School.
Gomea Methodist School.
Kingstown Anglican School.
Georgetown Government School.
Marriaqua Government School.
Brighton Methodist School.
Colonarie Roman Catholic School.
Kingstown Roman Catholic School.
South Rivers Methodist School.
Kingstown Roman Catholic School
Chateaubelair Methodist School.
Colonarie Roman Catholic School.
Lowmans (Wd) Anglican School.
Buccament Government School.
Stubbs Government School.
JEMMOTT J. ANTROBUS,
for Acting Education Officer.


EXAMINATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS
AWARDED BY GOVERNMENT,
1950.

The following awards have been
made :-
To Grammar School:
Vibert Marshall, Layou Government
School.
Basil Williams, Kingstown Anglican
School.
.To Girls' High School:
Emma- Leonora Charles, Chateaube-
lair Methodist School.
Jeanette Ballantyne, Layou Govern-
ment School.

JEMMOTT J. ANTROBUS,
for Education Officer (Acting).
Education Office,
7th December, 1950.


MATRICULATION EXAMINATION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON-
JUNE 1951.

Candidates are reminded that the
Matriculation Examination of the Uni-
versity of London will be held for the
last time in June, 1951.
Candidates intending to sit for the
Matriculation Examination in June,
1951, must hand in to the Local Corres-
pondent, not later than the 25th Jan-
uary, 1951, their Birth Certificate, a list
of the subjects to be taken at the
examination, and a Treasury Receipt
showing the payment of the examina-
tion fee of $12.60.
S. C. CONNELL,
Local Correspondent.
KINGSTOWN,
15th November, 1950.


POST OF SURVEYOR, DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE, DOMINICA.

Applications are invited for the post
of Surveyor in the Department of Agri-
culture, Dominica. The appointment
is non pensionable and will be on a con-
tract basis for a period of five years.
Salary will be at the rate of $2,640 per
annum. In addition, travelling allow-
ance at the rate of $3.60 per day will be
paid. Car allowance at the rate of $216
per annum and 10 cents per mile will be
paid if the officer is required to keep a
car. A house is not provided.
Duties will consist mainly of survey
and demarcation of crown lands for
sale under a Land Settlement Scheme
and the laying out of contour works
under a Soil Conservation programme.
The post requires active responsible
persons capable of working on their
own.
Applications with details of qualifica-
tions accompanied by two recent testi-
monials should be addressed to the
Superintendent of Agriculture, Domi-
nica, B.W.I.,-
L. KONG,
Acting Agricultural
Superintendent.
2nd December, 1950.
(A. 15/1950).


MEDICAL NOTICES.

OPTHALMIC CLINICS.

NOTICE is hereby given that from
January 1st, 1951, these clinics will be
held at the Colonial Hospital (Bentinck
Lodge Annexe) Mondays and Wednes-
days instead of Tuesdays and Thursdays.
1st December, 1950.
(M. 34/1948).












378 SAINT VINCENT, TUESDAY, 12 DECEMBER, 1950.-(No. 63).


YELLOW FEVER CAMPAIGN.

An international effort is being made
to eradicate the Aedes Sgypti (mosqui-
to) the urban vector (carrier) of Yellow
Fever from the Western Hemisphere.
The first step in any such attempt is
to make a survey of the mosquito infes-
tation in the Colony.
Sanitary Inspectors are making a
house 'to :hcnse inspection throughout
the Island, aidi4 people are asked kinidly
to co-operate to make this survey a
success.
E.: D. B. CHARLES,
Senior Medical Officer.
6th December,' 1950.
(M. 9/1944).
GENERALL 'ORDER.

Bands, singing processions arid there
holiday gatherings will bepermitted in
the town of Kingstown and other towns
from Monday 18th Deemeber, 1950, to
Tuesday 2nd January, 1951, from 6 a.m.
to' 8 a.m. (Sundays excepted) except on
the following public holidays-Monday
and Tuesday 25th arid 26th'December,
1950, and Monday, and Tuesday 1st and
2nid January, 1951, when the time will
be from.6 a.m. to 6 p.m.
W. I. RANDOLPH,
Lieut- Colonel,
Superintendent t of Police.
5th December, 1950.


ANIMALS SENT 'TO CAMDEN PARK
EXPERIMENT STATION FOR
SERVICE.

It is notified for general information
that the Government Notice published
in the Official Gazette of 21st June,
1949, regarding maintenance charges
for animals sent to Camden Park Ex-
periment Station is hereby revoked.
2. In future,'no livestock of any des-
cription whatsoever sent for service, not
being the property of the Government,
will be permitted to be kept on the
Statiori after 4 p.m.
M. A. G. HANSCHELL,
Superintendent of Agri'tilture.
11-th November, 1950.
(B. 211947).
CONTROL NOTICES.

RETURN -OF STOCKS.
With reference to the Control Notice
dated 31st July 1950 it is hereby :noti-
fi'edthat the'r'eturn of stocks 'requested
to be submitted by all Traders, by 12
o'clock' noon"bon *the' 17th -day of each


month during the hurricane season is no
longer required.
2. The only return now required is
that called for under the Prices Control
Order (S.R. & O. 1947, No. 25), for the
return of stocks to be submitted to the
Controller of Supplies by 12 o'clock
noon on the 2nd day of each month, the
return to contain stocks of the articles
in Part B of the First Schedule or any
other article in respect of which -the
Controller of Supplies may by notice
require, held by Traders on the 1st day
of each month.
Dated this 2nd'day of -December,
1950.
(T. 30/1950):

EXPORTATION OF LIVESTOCK 'AND
FOWLS.

In exercise of the Powers conferred
on me by virtue of the Imperial Emer-
gency Powers (Defence) Act, 1939, and
with reference to Section 3, subsection
(4) of the Imports and Exports Control
Regulations, 1939.
TAKE NOTICE THAT:-
For the purposes of these' Regula-
tions the exportation from the
mainland of St. Vincent to the
Grenadines of -all livestock and
fowls shall be an exportation of
such livestock and fowls'from. the
Colony, and such exportation is
prohibited except under licence
from the Competent Authority.
Dated this 5th day of December,
1950.
A. V. SPROTT,
Competent Authority and
Controller of Supplies.


GOVERNMENT COTTON GINNERY
NOTICE.

DEODORISED OIL.

The Government Cotton Ginnery from
August, 191O, has been producing aand
selling Deodorised Refined Coconut Oil;
the ordinary Refined Coconut' Oilis no
longer sold.
The attention of all consumers is
drawn to the fact that Deodorised Coco-
nut Oil does not taste or smell of coconut
oil.
Any edible oil which tastes or smells
of coconut oil was not purchased at the
Government Cotton Ginnery and is not
Deodorised Oil.
V.'-G. ida SILVA,
-Manager, G. C. Ginnery.
24th November, 1950.


KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.


[ Price 12 cents. ]


PRINTED BY THE GOVERNIVNT N'PI['NfER AT THE GOVERNMENT 'PRINTING OFFICE,








SAINT VINCENT.
Comparative Statement of Revenue for the period 1st January to 31st July, 1950.


Heads of Revenue.


Estimate
for the
year
1950.


$
1. Import Duty ... 425,000
Warehouse Rent ... 5,000
2. Export Duty ... 125,000
3. Excise Duty on Rum ... 129,000
Excise Duty on Sugar...
4. Other Duties ... 70,900
5. Licences-Liquor ... 8,500
Motor-Vehicles ... 16,000
;Other ... 6,799
6. Taxes--
-ncome Tas .., 188,000
Land and House Tax ... 30,000
Other Taxes ... 3,900
7. Port and Harbour Dues-
Tonnage 9,000
Port ... 2,500
Landing Dues, Aircraft ... 600
8.' Fees of Court or Office ... 112,404
9. Post Office. ... 74,860
10. Electricity Telephone and Refrigeration ... 96,549
11. Rent of Government Property ... 4,550
Interest ... 12,812
12. Sales and Leases of Crown Lands ... 7,758
1,329,132
8.' Refunds of Loans from General Revenue ... 8,790
1,337,922
13. Colonial Development and Welfare Schemes 353,496
Total Revenue $ 1,691,418


_ ~


Actual Revenue Revenue for
for the period of same period of
the return. preceding year.

$ c. $ c.
289,522 59 270,222 65
2,053 29. 2,693 38
73,712 66 71,566 41
70,588 42 66,318 43
1,162 66 ... ...
48,476 47 49,107 48
6,793 76 6,393 85
8,851 64 8,995 32
6,227 26 5,022 38

10,967 27 14,674 17
4,986 39 3,703 '27
1,851 88 1,528 87

6,182 45 5,681 92
1,828 80 1,915 20
234 00 156 00
68,407 29 51,159 74
31,590 42 294,059 45
50,322 64 51,353 31
2,420 13 1,828 06
7,710 76 5,570 11
4,095 59 6,399 59
697,986 37 918,379 59
7,333 69 552 10
705,320 06 918,931 69
217,928 14 95,019 68
923,248 20 1,013,95] 37


Comparative Statement of Expenditure for the period 1st January to 31st July, 1950.


Estimate
for the
Heads of Expenditure. year
1950.

1. Governor ... 8,011
2. Legislature ... 5,860
3. Administration ... 41,754
4. Agriculture ... 59,481
5. Audit ... 8,574
6. Central Housing Authority ... 6,00
6A. Central Road Authority ... 98,22(
6B. Central Water Authority ... 13,22(
7. Charitable ... 15,836
9. Education ,.. 162,76(
10. Electricity ... 65,398
11. Judicial ... 22,72(
12. Labour ... 6,950
13. Lands and Survey ... 12,716
14. Legal ... 5,76(
15. Medical ... 242,448
16. Miscellaneous ... 155,77
17. Pensions ... 38,63(
18. Police ... 81,584
19. Port and Marine ... 20,427
20. Post Office .. 33,123
21. Prisons ... 35,069
22. Public Debt ... 59,358
23. Public Library .. 4,424
24. Public Works Department, ... 46,638
25. Public Works Recurrent ... 36,172
27. Social Welfare ... 1,476
27A. St. Vincent Grenadines ... 10,669
28. Subventions ... 14,679
29. Supply Control ... 12,932
30. Telephone ... 15,018
31. Treasury ... 57,655
1,399,347
26.' PublicWorks Extraordinary ... 49,020
1,448,367
8. Colonial Developmentand Welfare Schemes 353,496
Total Exnenditure $ 1,801,863


TREASURY,
25th November, 1950,
(F. 38/1947V


Actual Expen- xpediefor
diture for the Expenditue for
period of same period of Increase. Decrease.
the return. preceding year.
$ c. c. $ c. $ c.
4,378 50
3,060 24
21,212 01
28,950 09
4,621 17
4,500 00
51,941 27
620 54
9,405 19
83,861 13
54,666 '11
11,091 43
4,600 33
6,659 20 Expendit ure Estimates
S137,212 21 reclassifiedin1950. Im-
S112,629 39 .possible to givefullcom.
S20,617 61 parative fi guresforindi-
20,617 61 vi TT i
36,896 02 vidual *Hea ds.
36,896 02
11,252 49
12,183 08
25,377 54
42,483 42
2,005 47
22,341 53
43,709 97
915 52
S7,772 74
12,179 10
7,259 45
8,268 48
31,518 62 -
827,659 99 749,820 65 77,839 34
36,003 42 45,713 06 9,709 64
863,663 41 795,533 71 77,839 34 9,709 64
163,498 34 131,032 53 32,465 81
1,027,161 75 926,566 24 110,305 15 9,709 64
BERNARD GIBBS,
Acting Colonial Tr2arww.


$
19,299

2,146
4,239
1,162

399

1,204


1,283
323

500

78
172,47


$ c.

640 09



631 01

143 68


3,706 90




86 40


262,469 03
1,030 69


2,304 00
271,011 78

271,011 78

271,011 78


592 07
2.140 65

50,618 56
6,781 59
57,400 15
122,908 46
180,308 61


I


~-~r`-----~-c~I I













Statement of the Assets and Liabilities of the Colony of Saint Vincent at 31st July, 1950.


LIABILITIES.

DEPOSITS: SPECIAL FUNDS ...

DEPOSITS: OTHER THANISPECIAL FUNDS


SURPLUS:
Colony's Reserve Fund
General Revenue Balance z/c
Balance at 1. 1. 50
Surplus & Deficit a/c


... $361,253 79
... 103,913 54


$ c.






96,985 22


257,340 25

















$


$

855,801

361,526


354,325 47

















1,571,653 38


A ASSETS.

CASH :
In Treasury & Sub-Treasuries
With Barclays Bank
,, Crown Agents
Drafts & Remittances

ADVANCES

INVESTMENTS : COLONY :
Reserve Fund
Surplus Funds

INVESTMENTS: SPECIAL FUNDS:
Through Crown Agents
Loan to Govt. of St. Lucia
Savings Bank Loan A/c


$ c.


8,999 50
116,476 11
119,173 76
1 16
---I



92,100 88
216,845 08


622,083
60,000
14,400


$ c.





244,650 53

321,573 65



308,945 96




696,483 24











1,571,653 38


Note: 1. At 31st July, 1950, the Public Debt (not recorded in the above Liabilities) amounted to $528,886.16. This figure includes the sum of $16,987.62 for the C.D.F. Loan for Co-operative
Arrowroot Association, and $480.00 for the Kingstown Board Water Supply Loan, 1930, for which General Revenue is only responsible in case of default.
2. The accumulated funds for, redemption of the Debt, amounted, at 31. 7. 50 to $168.168.50.
BERNARD GIBBS,
Acting Colonial Treasurer.
25th November, 1950.










SAINT VINCENT.

STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS,

1950, No. 99.



DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (INTERNATIONAL REFUGEE
ORGANISATION) (AMENDMENT) ORDER.

(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. This Order may be cited as the Diplomatic Privileges
(International Refugee Organisation (Amendment) Order, 1950, and shall be read
as one with the Diplomatic Privileges (International Refugee Organisation) Order,
1950, (S.R. & O. 1950, No. 23) (hereinafter referred to as the principal Order).

2. Section 9 of Principal Order amended. section 9 of the
principal Order is hereby amended by the insertion therein after subsection (2)
of the following subsection :-
(3) The provisions of the preceding paragraphs of this Article shall
not confer any immunity or privilege upon any person as the representative
of the Government of Saint Vincent in the Colony or as a member of the
staff of such a representative, or any person who is a British Subject and
who is not the representative of a Government of His Majesty other than
the Government of Saint Vincent or the member of the staff of and
accompanying any such representative."

Made by the Governor in Council under section 3 of the Diplomatic Privileges
Ordinance, 1947, (No. 40 of 1947) this 22nd day of September 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Executive Council.
Approved by the Legislative Council this 7th day of December 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(A 46/1948).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
S19 PKINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.

1950. 0 Price 2 cents. 3


a"rc-EaS








191


SAINT VINCENT.

STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS,


1950, No. 100.


DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (UNITED NATIONS
EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND CULTURAL
ORGANISATION) (AMENDMENT) ORDER.

(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. This Order may be cited as the Diplomatic Privileges
(United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation) (Amendment)
Order, 1950, and shall be read as one with the Diplomatic Privileges (United
Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation) Order, 1950, (S.R. & 0.
1i50, No. 24) (hereinafter referred to as the principal Order).

2. Section 9 of Principal Order amended, section 9 of the
principal Order is hereby amended by the insertion therein after subsection (2)
of the following subsection :-
(3) The provisions of the preceding paragraphs of this Article shall
not confer any immunity or privilege upon any person as the representative
of the Government of Saint Vincent in the Colony or as a member of the
staff of such a representative, or any person who is a British Subject and
who is not the representative of a Government of His Majesty other than
the Government of Saint Vincent or the member of the staff of and
accompanying any such representative."

Made by the Governor in Council under section 3 of the Diplomatic Privileges
Ordinance, 1947, (No. 40 of 1947) this 22nd day of September 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Executive Council.

Approved by the Legislative Council this 7th day of December 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
AActing Clerk of Legislative Council.
(A 46/1948).


PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THi GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.

S1950. [ Prioe 2 cent

Sp pl, 5 ao'


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.1


/









SAINT VINCENT.

STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS,

1950, No. 101.


DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
ORGANISATION) (AMENDMENT) ORDER.

(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. This Order may be cited as the Diplomatic Privileges
(Food and Agriculture Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950, and shall be read
as one with the Diplomatic Privileges (Food and Agriculture Organisation) Order
1950, (S.R. & O. 1950, No. 25) (hereinafter referred to as the principal Order).

2. Section 9 of Principal Order amended. Section 9 of the
principal Order is hereby amended by the insertion therein after subsection (2)
of the following subsection :-
(3) The provisions of the preceding paragraphs of this Artiele shall
not confer any immunity or privilege upon any person as the representative
of the Government of Saint Vincent in the Colony or as a member of the
staff of such a representative, or any person who is a British Subject and
who is not the representative of a Government of His Majesty other than
the Government of Saint Vincent or the member of the staff of and
accompanying any such representative."

Made by the Governor in Council under section 3 of the Diplomatic Privileges
Ordinance, 1947, (No. 40 of 1947) this 22nd day of September 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Executive Council.

Approved by the Legislative Council this 7th day of December 1950.
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(A 46/1948).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.

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SAINT VINCENT. \M

STATUTORY RULES AND O*E

1950, No. 102.


DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (WORLD HEALTH
ORGANISATION) (AMENDMENT) ORDER.

(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. This Order may be cited as the Diplomatic Privileges
(World Health Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950, and shall be read as one
with the Diplomatic Privileges (World Health Organisation) Order, 1950 (S.R. & O.
1950, No. 26) (hereinafter referred to as the principal Order).

2. Section 9 of Principal Order amended. section 9 of the
principal Order is hereby amended by the insertion therein after subsection (2)
of the following subsection :-
(3) The provisions of the preceding paragraphs of this Article shall
not confer any immunity or privilege upon any person as the representative
of the Government of Saint Vincent in the Colony or as a member of the
staff of such a representative, or any person who is a British Subject and
who is not the. representative of a Government of His Majesty other than
the Government of Saint Vincent or the member of the staff of and
accompanying any such representative."

Made by the Governor in Council under section 3 of the Diplomatic Privileges
Ordinance, 1947, (No. 40 of 1947) this 22nd day of September 1950.
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Cleri of Executive Council.

Approved by the Legislative Council this 7th day of December 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(A 46/1948). :: '

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SAINT VINCENT. \

STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERi -

1950, No. 103.

DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (INTERNATIONAL CIVIL
AVIATION ORGANISATION) (AMENDMENT) ORDER.
(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. This Order may be cited as the Diplomatic Privileges
(International Civil Aviation Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950, and shall
be read as one with the Diplomatic Privileges (International Civil Aviation
Organisation) Order, 1950, (S.R. & O. 1950, No. 27) (hereinafter referred to as the
principal Order).

2. Section 9 of the Principal Order amended. Section 9 of the
principal Order is hereby amended by the insertion therein after subsection (2)
of the following subsection :-
(3) The provisions of the preceding paragraphs of this Article shall
not confer any immunity or privilege upon any person as the representative
of the Government of Saint Vincent in the Colony or as a member of the
staff of such a representative, or any person who is a British Subject and
who is not the representative of a Government of His Majesty other than
the Government of Saint Vincent or the member of the staff of and
accompanying any such representative."

Made by the Governor in Council under section 3 of the Diplomatic Privileges
Ordinance, 1947, (No. 40 of 1947) this 22nd day of September 1950.
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Executive Council.

Approved by the Legislative Council this 7th day of December 1950.
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(A 46/19,48).
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S* 1950. [ Price 2 cents.]




f/~ '* L/oZ^
fSccrs ^I~8 6









9AINT VINCENT.I


STATUTORY RULES AND N(WIRS, > ,i

1950, No. 104.



DIPLOMATIC PRIVILEGES (INTERNATIONAL LABOUR
ORGANISATION) (AMENDMENT) ORDER.

(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. This Order may be cited as the Diplomatic Privileges
(International Labour Organisation) (Amendment) Order, 1950, and shall be
read as one with the Diplomatic Privileges (International Labour Organisation).
Order, 1050, (S.R. & 0. 1950, No. 28) (hereinafter referred to as the principal
Order).

2. Section 9 of Principal Order amended. Section 9 of the
principal Order is hereby amended by the insertion therein after subsection (2)
of the following subsection :-
(3) The provisions of the preceding paragraphs of this Article shall
noi confer any immunity or privilege upon any person as the representative
o: the Government of Saint Vincent in the Colony or as a member of the
staff of such a representative, or any person who is a British Subject and
who is not the representative of a Government of His Majesty other than
the Government of Saint Vincent or the member of the staff of and
accompanying any. such representative."

Made by the Governor in Council under section 3 of the Diplomatic Privileges
Ordinance, 1947, (No. 40 of 1947) this 22nd day of September 1950.
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Cleric of Executive Council.

Approved by the Legislative Council this 7th day of December 1950.
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(A 46/1943).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.

S1950. I Price 2 cents. ].
ORPSS^


OVPf 4V1 A^./^V







S. -- .A rV 201

SAINT VINCENTi '

STATUTORY RULES AND ELDERS, '/

1950, No. 105. l


EDUCATION (KINGSTOWN PREPARATORY SCHOOL)
(AMENDMENT) REGULATIONS.

(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. These Regulations may be cited as the Education
(Kingstown Preparatory School) (Amendment) Regulations, 1950, and shall be
read as one with the Education (Kingstown Preparatory School) Regulations,
1948, (S.R. & 0, 1948, No. 69) (hereinafter referred to as the principal Regulations).

2. Regulation 5 of principal Regulations amended. Subsection
(2) of Regulation 5 of the principal Regulations is hereby revoked and replaced as
follows :-
(2) The Governor shall have power to order, on the recommendation
of the Education Officer, the refund or the remission of the whole or of a
portion of a term's fees as he may think reasonable : Provided that where
the period of absence in respect of which any such recommendation is made
shall be less than one-half of a term, no such refund or remission shall be
ordered."

Made by the Governor in Council under section 29 of the Education Ordinance
.(No. 29 of 1937) this 22nd day of September 1950.,,
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Executive Council.

Approved by Resolution of the Legislative Council under section 30 of the
aforesaid'Education Ordinance, 1937, this 7th day of December 1950.
HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(F 4/1949).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.
72 T I-f 4 .1 V 1950. Price 2 cents. ]


SlSS<^ ./d








*;V '"- .203

SAINT VINCENT.' .

STATUTORY RULES AND (jRDERS,

1950, No. 106.

EXPORT DUTIES (AMENDMENT NO. 2) ORDER.

(Gazetted 12th December, 1950.)

1. Short title. This Order may be cited as the Export Duties
(Amendment No. 2) Order, 1950.

2. Replacement of Schedule to Export Duties Ordinance, 1933.
The Schedule to the Export Duties Ordinance, 1933, (No. 12 of 1933) as replaced
by the Export Duties Order, 1947, (S.R. & 0. 1947, No. 72) and amended by the
Export Duties (Amendment) Order, 1948, (S. R. & O. 1948, No. 101) and the Export
Duties (Amendment) Order, 1950, (S. R. & O. 1950, No. 22) is hereby revoked and
replaced as follows :

SCHEDULE.


Articles.


1. Cotton lint, all types and grades and
liters (excluding stained Sea Island
Cotton and Marie Galante Cotton sent
to Carriacou to be ginned) ...... ......
2. Stained Sea Island Cotton ...... ......
3. Cotton Seed ............ ......
4. Arrowroot...... ......
5. Starch (other than Arrowroot)
6. Cocoa
7. Copra, Coconuts and Coconut Oil


Rates.


6%
2%
212%
6%
6%
6%
6%


8. Sugar ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... 21/2%
9. Syrup or Molasses .... ...... ...... ...... 3%
10. Rum ...... ...... ...... 6%




S cpp /. I- f 9. /06 <


on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
up to and including
$168-00 per ton of co-
pra, $3.36 per 100 nuts
and $1-44 per gallon of
coconut oil respective-
ly; 'and, when the re-
spective selling prices
F.O.B. of these pro-
ducts at the date of
exportation from the
Colony exceed these
figures, an additional
sum of 20% of any
such excess.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.


Items.







204


Items.
11.
12.
13.
14.


Articles.
Horses and Mules ......
Horned Cattle
A sses ...... ......
Pigs ...... ......


15. Goats and Sheep ......
10. Poultry
17. Fruit and Vegetables
18. Corn and Peas
19. Peanuts ...... ....
20. Hides and Skins ......
21. Nutmegs ...... .....
22. M ace ...... ......
23. Cinnamon ......
24. Ginger ......
25. Eschallots ......
26. Vanilla ......


Rates.
$9-60
$4-80
$2-40
15%


$0-60
$0-12
3%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%
6%


per head.
per head.
per head.
on price of live weight
in Trinidad with min-
imum duty of $1-50.
per head.
per head.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.
on selling price F.O.B.


Provided that the minimum amount of duty payable into the Treasury on
Items 16 and 17 shall not be less than twenty-four cents.

Provided further that the expression selling price shall mean such price as
shall from time to time be fixed by the Collector of Customs.

3. Cancellation. The Export Duties (Amendment) Order, 1947, (S. R. &
0. 1947, No. 65), The Export Duties (Amendment) Order, 1948, (S. R. & O. 1948, No.
101) and the Export Duties (Amendment) Order, 1950, (S. R. & O. 1950, No. 22) are
hereby cancelled.

Made by the Governor in Council under section 3 of the Export Duties
Ordinance, 1933 (No. 12 of 1933) this 1st day of December 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Executive Council.

Approved by the Legislative Council this 7th day of December 1950.

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk of Legislative Council.
(J. 16/1948).

PRINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.


[ Price 4 cents. ]


1950.







205


SAINT VINCENT.

STATUTORY RULES AND ORDERS,

1950, No. 107.


PRICES CONTROL (AMENDMENT NO. 36) NOTICE.


S(Gazetted 12th December, 1950).


1. Short title. This Notice may be cited as the Prices Control
(Amendment No. 36) Notice.
2. Amendment. The prices set out hereunder are the Maximum prices
for which the articles enumerated may be sold in the Colony and the First
Schedule Part B to the Prices Control Order 1947 (S.R. & O. No. 25) is hereby
amended by deleting all the words, figures and symbols occurring in the columns
opposite the articles : Lard-Barbados," and substituting therefore the following:
FIRST SCIHEDULF-PART B.

Article. Maximum Wholesale Price. Maximum Retail Price.

A rea A" Area "B" Area "C."
Lard-Barbados ... $11.80 per pail of 30 lbs. 44.c. per lb. 45c. per lb. 46c. per lb.

Area A" means the town of Kingstown and within one mile thereof.
Area "B means all other places throughout the Colony other than those.
mentioned in Areas A and C".
Area C" means all the villages of Overland. Sanay Bay, OwBa, Fatap
Windsor Forest and the St. Vincent Grenadines.


M]a- by the Competent Authority under asebten 30 of the PtiUe Central
Order 1947 (S. R. & O. No. 25) this 9th day of December, 1950.
A. V. SPROTT,
Controller of Supplies.
(T 20/1904). 1'
3f PTED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER AT THE GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE,
SI KINGSTOWN, ST. VINCENT.
^.( Me Prie 3 ete. ]
5 .. .. .. ,1950. :r .;

Su ppN. 6-







9 -. S -1.\r |

MViNUTES OF SPECIAL MEETING OF THE LEGISLATIVE CCOL :CIi. HEI D .7
THE COUNCIL .CHAMBER ON SATURDAY, 13TH MAY, 1952,-' IT 10.15 A M.1 I
COMMEMORATION OF SILVER JUBILEE OF ELECTED REPRESENTATION. /

PRESENT .. :
His Honour W. F. COUTTS, M.B.E., Administrator, President,
The Honourable D. K. MCINTYRE, Acting Crown Attorney,
MCDONALD SMITH, Acting Colonial Treasurer,
S O. D. BRISBANE, Nominated Member,
E. A. HUGHES, Nominated Member,
S" G. A. MCINTOSH, Member for Kingstown,
E. DUNCAN, Member for North Windward,
E. A. JOACHIM, Member for Leeward.

ABSENT
The Honourable W. A. HADLEY, Nominated Member,
S. G. DEFREITAS, Member for the Grenadines,
S. F. BONADIE, Member for South Windward.


1. PRAYERS.
The meeting was opened with prayer.
President : I must apologize to Honourable Members and all the people
present this morning for the delay in starting this meeting. We had to wait for
certain papers which had not yet been completed by the printer and have only
now been received.
I now call upon the Honourable Member for Leeward, E. A. Joachim, to move
a resolution of Loyalty to the Throne.

2. RESOLUTION OF LOYALTY TO THE THRONE .
(By the Honourable E. A. Joachim, Member for Leeward.)
Your Honour, Your Honour the Puisne Judge, My Lord Bishop, and Hon.
Members of Council, I rise to move the following resolution :
BE IT RESOLVED : That this Council now assembled on the occasion of the
twenty-fifth anniversary of elected representation on the Legislature of this
Colony desires to convey to Hlls Majesty the Kinu the assurance of the fervent
loyalty and devotion of the people of Saint Vincent to His Majesty's Throne and
Person, with the earnest prayer that His Mrjesty my lon; be spared and that the
Commonwealth may be blessed with peace and prosperity.'
It is both a privilege and a pleasure to move this resolution on thia memorable
day when Hon. Members meet together to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of
Elected Representation on the Legislative Council. I feel that loyalty to the
throne is deeply rooted in the hearts of the present legislators. His Majesty's zeal
and devotion to public duty is ac inspiration to all his subjects. Our king has
always borne his vast r: ,:...i, ':..:, i: and anxieties with fortitude and courage
and has gained not only the affection of his own people but also the admiration of
the whole world.


. S S s -VN







His Majesty's throne represents the highest traditions of the past as well as
the ideals we cherish for the future. No Vincentian can allude to the throne
without a thrill of patriotism and I rejoice at the wider patriotism of the British
West Indies. His Majesty's throne is the slender thread that binds us together. I
remember on one occasion having been shown a wire so fine and delicate that a
blow might break it, yet I was told that it was capable of transmitting an
electrical energy that would set powerful machinery in motion. May it not be the
same with the relations which exist between His Majesty's throne and ourselves
and may not that thread be capable of carrying a force of sentiment and of
sympathy which will yet be a potent factor in the history of the world?
His Majesty's throne and loyalty to it has bound us together in the past and
year by year, generation by generation, is going to bind us still closer in the future.
Thank you.
Honourable O. D. Brisbane : I beg to second the motion.
President: Is the motion approved?
Members : Ay.
President : A paper on the history of, and constitutional development in, St.
Vincent has been prepared by the Honourable E. Duncan, Elected Member for
North Windward. I am going to ask the Honourable Member now to introduce
that paper and have it laid before us.

3. PAPER LAID.
Your Honour, Your Honour the Puisne Judge, My Lord the Bishop and
Honourable Members of Council, I rise to lay on this table a paper which I have
been asked to prepare for this occasion. It is an occasion which causes me to be
thrilled and rather emotional, and I am feeling it very difficult to suppress that
emotion.
I have been associated with this Council during all its life, the 25 years. That
is to say I have been at work with others in the endeavour to bring about that
change which came about 25 years ago and so it has been to me a duty and a
pleasure always to keep in touch with the movements of this Council. You would
understand, therefore, that I have very close at heart anything that touches this
Council, anything that touches the political life of this community; and today I
am filled with joy. I feel happy that this Council has justified the confidence
placed in it when in 1925 His Majesty the King thought fit to bestow on it the
measure of representation that was granted at that time, shortly after the visit of
the Wood Commission.
I remember, well when Major Wood spoke after interviewing the deputations
that awaited him-when he spoke from the step of the Court House to that vast
enthusiastic crowd. I remember how joyous the country was when the report of
his Commission came and we were granted the first measure of representation.
I remember, too, when later the political consciousness of the community had
been sufficiently developed for another forward step, when through the energetic
work of that institution, the Representative Government Association, we were
carried farther on the path of political advancement. I remember when the
Closer Union Commission arrived. I might mention that just before that
Commission arrived the Association-and some of its members are here; some
have served on this Council, some have departed, having done their duty well-
the Association working in harmony with similar Associations in the British
Caribbean islands made further constitutional demands at a Conference which





-I .. :' ... 31


met at Dominica in 1932 when Mr. R. M. Anderson and myself were the delegates
representing this Colony. I remember how that Closer Union Commission held
its interviews in this Council Chamber, and I remember how joyous we were when
we got another step up the Constitutional ladder; and I can never forget how the
Council worked in those days. Sometimes there had to be fights between it and
the Administration; but those fights had their mutual settlements, and they
resulted in our being able to make further advances. The Colony has progressed,
not only politically, but economically, socially, and educationally. Today we
should be proud; let us feel proud that this Colony in advancement now stands
where it has never stood in all its history.
In this paper, which I have the pleasure to lay on the Council Table,
Honourable Members will find a review of the work, the accomplishments of the
Council. I like to think of this institution as an ever-living organisation, not as of
Councils each of three years' duration, but of the Council from its beginning, from
the time when organised Government was first set up in St. Vincent under
Governor Melville; from that time on we think of it as the Council, the Assembly
of St. Vincent, and we have every reason to be proud that from that beginning in
Governor Melville's time we have carried on and advanced the Colony to the place
where it stands today, on the threshold of being an autonomous unit in a
federated West Indies. I want every one of us in this House today to go away
feeling that we are about to step out into a larger area of the political field. We
are about to make a big advance. Here in St. Vincent we have nobly done our
share towards the development of that political consciousness, that has placed St.
Vincent and the rest of the West Indies in the position where they are recognized
as fit to take charge of their own affairs and as a self-governing unit in the British
Commonwealth able and willing to make its contribution to world progress. We
have the talent; let us use it. God placed us here that we should make St. Vincent
better, that we should make the world better. Let St. Vincent feel that it has its
part to play in making a better world.
Honourable Members, I have great pleasure in laying now the paper on
Constitutional Development in St. Vincent.

4. PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS.
Honourable Members of Council,
It is a very great honour for me to have the privilege of addressing you on this
the .25th anniversary of elected representation in the St. Vincent Legislative
Council. I must apologise for the absence of His Excellency the Governor who has
been prevented from attending, but I have much pleasure in delivering the
following message from him which I have received-
"Today marks the twenty-fifth anniversary of the elected representation
in St. Vincent. Similar anniversaries have recently been celebrated in
Grenada and St. Lucia, but I was privileged to preside at the former only.
On an occasion like this, it is fitting to pause a moment to remember the
leading figures and personalities who have helped to guide our destinies so
far. But it is on the present and the future that we should concentrate our
hearts and minds.
Let us go forward, determined each in his own way to make our
maximum contribution to West Indian unity and progress."
The Honourable L. T. Augier McVane from St; Lucia. had h6ped to be with us
t@day and bring froni his own Legislature greetings of mutual .understanding and
good will on this. day of jubilation, but I hear the boat has been delayed and has
not yet arrived. I hope he will be able to join us in the later celebrations today.


t








Both Grenada and Dominica have conveyed to us their regrets that it will not
be possible for their representatives to attend our celebrations, but they have serit
us, on behalf of the Members of their Legislative Councils and people, heartiest
congratulations on the occasion of our Silver Jubilee.
I have also received a letter from the Honourable S. F. Bonadie, Elected
Member for South Windward :
Please convey to Members of the Legislative Council my deep regret that
owing to my recent sudden illness I will not be able to attend the historic meeting
of Council that takes place on Saturday 13th inst.
Nevertheless I send my warmest feelings of appreciation for the work done by
the various Legislatures during the past twenty-five years. I send also the added
wish that the future work of our Council will be characterized by an increasingly
high standard of vision and statemanship so necessary in these trying times."
I would like to consider for a few moments the priceless heritage of
parliamentary institution which is ours and turn back a few pages, of history to
examine the foundations of the Council which now sits in this Hall. Our niodel is
of course that great Mother of Parliaments" in Westminster whose roots were
founded in Anglo-Saxon times in a Council known as the Witan. This might be
now described as the first wholly nominated Council although its writ ran but
limpingly and only covered a very small area-a collection of the scions of nobler
families who gathered together from time to time to advise their King on matters
of general import. This habit formed in years before the oNrman conquest of
1066 persisted through the intervening centuries during which the Nobles and
later also the Commons met from time to time to discuss national affairs.
But through it all there remained the doctrine of the 'Divine right of Kings '
and the King's prerogative, and the modern conception of the limiitation of the
powers of one man and giving power to the people grew but slowly. The struggle
for truly, representative Government only began to crystalize with the Stuarts,
and since then what great and glorious names have been spattered upon the
parliamentary canvas. Cromwell, in referring to the Mace, said Take away that
bauble ", but in a decade the Mace was back in its place, symbolic of the real
dignity of Parliamentary Institution. A noble copy of the British craftsman's art
lies before you on the table this morning. At the.same time the era threw up men
like Hampden, Pym and Eliot who fought against the imposition of ship money"
to provide for King Charles' navy, and which was an unjust levy on the common
people. They fought for the rights of property, and the parliamentary system,
and stood for the supremacy of the House of Commons. A statue was erected to
Hampden as the noblest type of the parliamentary opposition.
There followed the CABAL, so called from the initials, of Clifford, Ashley,
Buckingham, Arlington and Lauderdale, all peers of the realm, who advised
Charles II. An early example of an Executive Council, but it did not last, because
it was nominated and not truly representative.
The early lCtDh century produced men like Cobden and Bright who fought for
free trade and the repeal of the Corn Laws. They were symbolic of the common
man trying to exercise his rights as a free citizen against the gripping power of
landed gentry and privileged classes.
-About the came time, there disappeared the "pocket" boroughs which had
been held by a privileged few so that they were enabled virtually to nominate
members to sit in Parliament. They went because the idea of true representation
was being hammered out on the anvil of Time. And over and above it all, the
great burden of No ta.,itori' without representation was sung. By the end of






33


the last century all the familiar trappings of free election and '-one man one vote '
had been added, and with the turn of the century, women had entered the lists,
throwing themselves under race horses and tying themselves to railings in their
determination to exercise their rights to a vote also.
So you will understand from this brief and, I trust, accurate sketch that the
idea of elected representation, coupled with the overriding power of the House of
Commons, based on the free democratic vote of the people for the people and by
the people, has only come about over a period of nearly 1300 years by the struggle
of man against man, often by bloodshed, though it was all achieved without
revolution and by the fixed determined intention of men like Hampden and
Cobden, not to compromise with their principles and to go down fighting for what
they felt was just.
In coming nearer home, I do not wish to cover our local history in detail, but
a paper has been laid containing much valuable information prepared by the
Honourable Eb. Duncan, to whom I am much indebted. We have struggled
through the stages of witans and cabals to more representative Government, but
perhaps for good and sufficient reasons we have not entirely yet dissolved our
" pocket boroughs ". Nomination still exists, but twenty-five years ago, the first
step towards dissolving nomination was taken, and after this testing period, we
are standing on the threshold of further developments. In a speech on just such
an occasion as this to the Grenada Council, His Excellency the Governor promised
adult suffrage and an elected majority in elections to be held in February, 1951.
It will take eight months of very hard work for us to be ready in time even for
the date as the whole election map of St. Vincent will literally have to be changed.
So by 1951 this Council will have taken yet one more step towards the goal of
self-government, but I must reiterate the moral of my preamble. It has taken
Britain nigh on 1300 years to evolve a system of democratic free self-government
which is acknowledged to be unique in the history of man. If anyone quotes to
me the glories of Greece and Rome, I would remind them that they were based on
slavery. Therefore, although the span of political development in St. Vincent may
be measured as a period of about 160 years, and it has had the benefit of Britain's
experiences, the way ahead will still be hard and fraught with danger. As we lift
our eyes beyond the immediate horizon and see federation and dominion status
beyond the seas, remember that there are shoals and reefs to negotiate. The
Standing Closer Association Committee's report should be debated in this House
ere long, and I hope that it will be fully understood and will have been fully
debated by all the people of this Island before the members of this House make
this the forum of their discourse. When charting these seas put not your faith in
a speed launch to hurry swiftly to the spot but setforth in a well tried and tested
barque and above all, -with a seasoned crew who understand the dangers. There
were good men and true, twenty-five years ago who were prepared to -assume
responsibility for the sake of progress in the Colony, and I pay tribute to their
memories this morning. Let there be others just as determined who will take
their place.
As I was turning over in my mind what to say today, I found amongst the
closing paragraphs of the speech delivered to the Legislative Council by Mr.
Robert Walter, C.M.G., the then Administrator of St. Vincent, at that historic
meeting, these words :
".Our problems require the whole-hearted co-operation of the best minds
in the Colony with a single and pure desire to promote the true interests of
the people. Remember that the millennium has taken many years in coming








and that the new Council with the best intentions in the world will not be
able to turn this dear little island into a Paradise.

"Economic and material prosperity is no doubt a desirable thing but what
is essential in this mechanical, money-loving world is a sober, God-fearing,
law-abiding, hard-working people. I should like to see the Government of
this Colony broad-based upon the trust and affection of the people and our
deliberations based upon mutual confidence rather than mere captious
criticism.
"The solution of our difficulties will rest largely on the manner in which
we approach them. We must try to discriminate between the merely
desirable and the essential and between what may be expedient and what is
right, and strive to stick to the right through thick and thin. Progress
comes from dissatisfaction and renewed effort.
"The common problem, yours, mine, everyone's,
Is not to fancy what were fair in life
Provided it could be, but finding first
What may be, then find how to make it fair
Up to our means."
Let us aim at practical idealism and remember always that we simply
cannot get on without God. Let us also remember that the universe works
slowly :
"Let no man think that sudden in a minute
All is accomplished and the work is done;
Though with thine earliest dawn thou shouldst begin it
Scarce were it ended in thy setting sun."
That was a good ending then and it is a good ending now. We want for the
future honest, God-fearing men who will stick to the right through thick and thin;
men like Hampden, Cobden and Bright who were prepared to think only of the
common good first and themselves afterwards, who sought no gain but the
satisfaction of a job well done. The parliamentary system has been forged by
man in the crucible of time but the institution requires able direction and just
guidance.
"Quit ye, therefore, like men-Be strong."


5. REPLY TO PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS.

(By the Honourable G. A. McIntosh, Member for Kingstown.)
Your Honour, Your Honour the Puisne Judge, My Lord Bishop, and
Honourable Members of Council :
A task has been placed on me to reply to His Honour's address-a very
arduous task. I just listened to it, and I am wondering whether I am capable of
making an adequate reply. I would like to say that I must disagree with the first
paragraph in which His Honour stated that His Excellency the Governor has been
prevented from attending. Though I agree with everything that he has stated in
his message, I believe that His Excellency could have attended if he considered it
of sufficient importance, both here and in St. Lucia.








I regret that the delegates of the other islands have been unable to attend.
It is a very sad reflection on St. Vincent, in that our transportation is so difficult
that we are unable to come in and go out of St. Vincent as we would like; but I
hope that is one of the things this Council will set to work to remedy in the
future.
In spite of all that His Honour has said with regard to the Mother of
Parliaments, I think we have a great right to be proud of what we have had. His
Honour said it will take perhaps eight months or more before we can visualize
Constitutional Reform here in St. Vincent; we are hoping that when we get that
Constitutional Reform we will have an improved Council and greater progress in
St. Vincent. I would like to repeat a few words in one of the paragraphs : "When
charting these seas put not your faith in a. speed launch to hurry swiftly to the
spot but set forth in a well tried and tested barque and, above all, with a seasoned
crew who understand the dangers. There were good men and true, twenty-five
years ago who were prepared to assume responsibility for the sake of progress in
the Colony." In looking back on the history of St. Vincent, I wonder whether we
have a. seasoned crew; and on occasions like this we have not only to consider the
present but we have to look back at the past and consider the future. In looking
back at the past we see that St. Vincent in 1786 had an Assembly of 19 members, 3
for each of 5 elective districts, 2 for Kingstown and 2 for the Grenadines. It was
a superior Constitution to what we are privileged to have today; and its powers
were vastly greater than what we are privileged here to exercise; and I see as it
went on that the Assembly was increased in 1843 to 25 members, still with greater
powers; but what I cannot help remarking is the mentality of the people that we
have in St. Vincent to deal with our affairs. As far back as 1843 we have a sad
reflection on those people; they did not seem to have the interest of St. Vincent at
heart. I cannot blame the Mother Country; I think it was her endeavour to give
us the best Constitution, but the undesirable characters that we had in our
Council thought it best to ask the British Government to rid us of the splendid
Constitution that we had and put us under what we have suffered for so many,
years Crown Colony rule; so that to my mind was not an advance, it was a
retrogression. We had to bear the evils of this Crown Colony rule, and we are still
bearing them because the people did not seem to understand their responsibility.
I read an address by Governor Dundas, when this Constitution was changed,
in which he reminded the Assembly as it was then in these words :
"I need hardly remind you that this is no light responsibility. The interests
of nearly 40,000 people ", (which it was then; today we have 60,000) are in our,
keeping. We must protect every class, from the highest to the lowest, from the
wealthiest to the poorest. All interests must be jealously guarded by us." That
is the responsibility that still remains with this Council, and I would impress on
Honourable Members to take due consideration of that if we are to look forward
to a progressive St. Vincent in the future.
We will pass out and I am not able to boast of 25 years' service on the Council
but, like the Honourable Member for North Windward, I can say that I have been
associated with all the efforts for Constitutional change in St. Vincent. I
remember the old Council sitting here. I do not cast any aspersions on them;'
they did their best, but they were more engaged in their own interest than in the
interest of their people. I remember when there were four Nominated Members
only there were no elected members sitting around this table. The people had no
voice, no representation; and then there came men, not only in St. Vincent, but in
the other Colonies, who felt that a change should be brought about; and the








thought became a frequent slogan by the Honourable Capt. Cipriani-" Agitate,
Educate, Federate Crown Colony rule must go "
The Honourable T. Albert Marryshow, who, by the way, is still alive and had a
complete 25 years' service, and celebrated his Silver Jubilee on the Council of
Grenada on the 28th of last month, is, I think, the only one who is alive today in
the West Indies who can claim that privilege. Men like us all in places like St.
Vincent and St. Lucia oft times get in the flood; and I can remember the
Honourable Member to my right was associated with us in the very earliest move;
and I see in this audience many others who took active part in endeavouring to
bring about that change which would give us an improved Constitution. We set
about to form what was afterwards the St. Vincent Representative Government
Association. That was a spark that set the flame for Constitutional change. We
made the first step. We had a petition prepared signed by members of the
Committee and submitted to His Majesty the King through the Secretary of State
for the Colonies. We got a reply that that was not a popularly signed petition;
that it would be necessary for the people to make a request for the Constitutional
change that they desire. At that time Grenada took the hint from us. They
gained by our experience and they had a properly signed petition prepared and
submitted. This they sent on by the Honourable T. Albert Marryshow; and as a
result of that a Commission was sent out to these islands to enquire, into the. need
for Constitutional changes. The Honourable Member for North Windward made
reference to that. We eventually did get a first step in elected representation;
but we were not satisfied with what was granted to us. I would like to quote.here
the Honourable T. Albert Marryshow; he said in a recent Council Meeting in
Grenada : "We have been deceiving ourselves in thinking that we are forging
aheadd" He said that as a boy he remembered being taught at Sunday School to
sing, among 'certain things:
"From Greenland's, icy mountains,
From India's coral strand,
Where Afric's sunny fountains
Roll down their golden sand,
They call us to deliver
Their land from error's chain.
"What though the spicy breezes
Blow soft o'er Ceylon's isle,
Though every prospect pleases
And only man is vile,
In vain with lavish kindness
The gifts of God are strown,
The heathen in his blindness
Bows down to wood and stone."
Mr. Marryshow said that to show that we were then and we are still singing the
hymns while Ceylon has passed us, and gone on to Dominion status. They can
sing for us; we need some song or some prayer of that sort to awaken West
Indians to their responsibility and to bring about a change that will cause us to
move on to progress like the places that we have been praying and singing for.
We have too much petty jealousies among us; we have too much selfishness; what
we need is a change in the hearts of men. We want men. God give us men I I
think we will have to train our youth to fill posts, as we do not find in the men
sufficient material to move us on to the goal we desire. We don't want men who






37

will'put an "L" in God and find more satisfaction in worshipping Gold. We
don't want men who are the embodiment of avarice, greed, and selfishness. We
don't want men who preach and do not practise what they preach, nor men who
gloat over the rum bottle, talking nonsense while ignoring facts: but we want
men. We must ask God to give us men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; men
who possess opinions and a will; men who have honour, men who will not lie.
We need also to take a deeper interest in the masses if we are to progress in
the future. I remember the Archbishop of York stating these words : "The
select classes of mankind are no longer the rulers of mankind. The Governments
of the people are in the hands of the common people of the world. (Satisfy them
and you will justify their confidence. Fail to satisfy them, and nothing you can
set up will either regulate or steady the people of this world.") We must pay
particular attention to that. When we look at the majority of our people in
poverty, in distress, in want, in suffering, should we not question ourselves as to
whether we are doing what it is our duty to do in bringing up the standard that we
desire to see? Remember the words of Edwin Markham in his poem Man with
the hoe" : O masters, Lords and rulers in all lands how will the future reckon with
this man, how answer his brute question in that hour when whirlwinds of rebellion
shake all shores. How will it be with kingdoms and kings with those who shaped
him to be the thing he is, when this dumb terror shall rise to judge the wide
world after the silence of centuries ". Sufficient importance is not given to those
who are placed in our trust. I say that without fear or doubt whatever.
If we are to progress to the state that we are aiming at now we no longer can
consider St. Vincent only; we want to move on where we will consider the West
Indies as a new nation taking her place in the world; and if we are to do that, we
must have a change, an entire change in our Constitutional set-up. Not only do
we want representation-what is representation if it is not the proper kind? We
want democracy, a true democracy. While speaking about that, I want to relate
a little joke Mr. Marryshow gave me : he met up with a man called Brown. Brown
was invited to visit one of the schools, and in the school he was asked to say
something. He was in a dilemma; but he thought he would speak on Democracy.
He told Mr. Marryshow he had just addressed the children on Democracy. Mr.
Marryshow said, "I hope you stressed the mock' in it, for that is all we know
here."
It is time we get down to a real social order whore we will care not only for
ourselves, not only for our pockets, not only for our bank accounts 'and what we
can accumulate; but for the general good of the masses and to bring them up
physically, educationally, and socially. That is true democracy and to carry it out
it needs a dictator. That is the task of what we call a true Dictator. There are
two types : one that likes to be deified, ahd the other that 'wants to bring 6he
people up to his standard. I wish we had the type to bring the people up to our
standard and make a change in this state of affairs That is what I would like tQ
say today, and I want the members of Council to take away with them; :aot only
the members of Council, but the people of St. Vincent. Cooperate with the
members of Council if you desire this change, because the people will always get
the Government they deserve. We must have the cooperation of the people, and
we must have men who are not only thinking of themselves, but of those who are
in our charge and want to live as decent, civilized human beings should.
I feel that this is a very auspicious occasion. We have achieved in the 25
years some .measure of progress. We have moved from where we had three
representatives to where we have five, and we are hoping, as His Honour said, that








we will get a further representation in the Constitutional reform. We are told we
should have manhood suffrage; but there is a little snag also in the desire of our
members for that manhood suffrage. Still lingering in the -minds of some of our
members is the desire to keep our people back and they are putting hampering
efforts on the Constitutional reform, to keep us back from having true manhood
suffrage. Manhood suffrage could be nothing more than every man of 21 years
going forward and exercising his right to vote; but some want to attach a literacy
test. It is not manhood suffrage if we are going to hang on a literacy test. The
man who can't read and write needs representation more. We should not hamper
him if he has not been taught to read and write; and I am going to oppose that
literacy test which is not true manhood suffrage. The man who can't read and
write has greater need to have manhood suffrage than the man who can read and
write and see about himself; and so when this does come up, whatever I may be
asking for, I want to see the widest scope of democracy which will give every man
his chance. It is the only way we are going to bring him up. Ie will never learn
to swim if we do not give him a chance to get into the water. Give them every
opportunity to rise.
In conclusion I would iust like to quote from Dickens :
"The voice of Time cries to man, 'ADVANCE!'. Time is for his advancement
and improvement, for his greater work, his greater light, his greater happiness,
and his betterment."
Ruskin also.tells us-
The will of God is that we should live by each other's happiness and live not
by each other's misery or death."
Let us advance and do everything in the coming years to make the next 25
years far superior and better than those years which we have come through during
tlhe past 25 years.
6. HONOURPABTJE 0. D. BRISBANE, NOMINATED MEMBER.
Your Honour, Your Honour the Puisne Judge, My Lord Bishop, and Honourable
Members of Council :
I am told that I am granted the privilege to say a few words on this great
occasion. My name has not been placed among the set speakers because I am a
Nominated Member, and this occasion is given to the Elected Menbers of Council.
I am very pleased, however, that the privilege has been granted to me to say a few
words, because I do not think I could.have been here without being able to express
myself on this special occasion. I take pleasure in being a Member of this Council
and I say that whether I sit as a Nominated Member or have sat as an Elected
Member, I have done my duty to this community no less than if I had been an
Elected Member. As a Nominated Member it has'been my pleasure to serve and
to do my duty in the best way I could for the advancement of my island home and
this community for the past ten years as a member of the Legislative Council and
for a little over five years as a member of the Executive Council. My work on
those Councils is known to those who are better able to judge. I am very happy to
be a member of this Council and particularly today when we celebrate 25 years of
service, 25. years with a measure of representation. When Mr. McIntosh and Mr.
Duncan are able to tell you of the part they played, I am able to tell you also of
the.part I.played more than 25 years ago.
Soon after the first World War, in 1920 or 1921, many of us started to think.
I do not say the ideas first originated in St. Vincent, but the ideas started in these







islands-Grenada, Trinidad, and so on. We all started and we realized then that
we had no representation on the Council, and we planned and worked. I call to
mind and I refer to certain persons, many of whom are today gone to the great
Beyond. I refer to Messrs. H. M. Haywood, Byron Cox, C. D. McDowall, R. T.
Samuel, W. C. Forde, F. Casson, G. A. McIntosh, E. Duncan, and myself; (if there
are others who were with us, I hope they will pardon me for not mentioning their
names). We banded ourselves together and set about to try and bring about a
political change in this island. The Representative Government Association was
formed, and I believe our first President was the deceased W. M. Grant, and he
was the first Elected Member for Kingstown. I am sorry that as I looked at Mr.
Duncan's pamphlet I did not see the name of Mr. Byron Cox. We know he played
a great part.
We banded ourselves together and we decided to send a petition to His
Majesty the King. St. Vincent fired the first shot, although we were told that the
shot was not properly timed and did not have the sting; but it was the first shot.
The petition was drafted and I, your humble servant standing.before you had the
pleasure of manuscripting that petition. It had been stated then that petitions
should be written and not typed, and as my handwriting was good then as I
believe it is today, I had the privilege to manuscript that first petition which went
to His Majesty the King. And as a result the Wood Commission under Major
Wood who is now Lord Halifax came to St. Vincent. Other gentlemen of the
community who were probably casting envious eyes on the Representative
Government Association thought they would form a Citizens Committee; and men
like Messrs. C. J. Simmons, and Prince McLeod with the assistance of members of
the Representative Government Association put our cares before Mr. Wood. We
entertained -him, and I remember with pleasure a luncheon at the Carnegie
Library; and we made him feel at home. That is a function which I believe St.
Vincent did its part well in bringing off, and after Mr. Wood left, the Citizens
Committee was dissolved and the Representative Government Association
continued to do its good work.
Twenty-five years ago the first measure of representation was granted, and I
recall the first Elected Members of Council, Messrs. W. M. Grant, Alex. Fraser, J.
M. Gray, and the first Nominated Member J. Elliot Sprott. I think we should do
honour to those men and bow our heads at some time in this meeting to those
men who laid the foundation and were the first Elected and Nominated Members
of that Council and pay tribute to them for having laid the foundation.
I can give you one or two stories of the first time we started out.' It was a
matter of educating the public in the conduct pf elections. We had then what we
call mock elections in the Association. We had to find out from the voters whom
among the members they wanted or did not want. And the Representative
Government Association played its part well. I had to pull our good friend Mr.
Fraser out of a rut when I thought he was not well placed and the rival candidate
was opposing him at Leeward was leading in the trials but eventually Mr. Fraser
was elected Member for Leeward. We continued to work; time passed on and the.
Association, assisted by such other persons as Mr. F. A. Casson who also became a
Member of Council and afterwards Mr. N. Nanton, Mr. A. Da Santos and Mr. A.
DaSilva, were elected as members.
Further representations were made and another Commission, the name of
which I do not remember, came out to these islands. A further measure of
representation was given to St. Vincent, and the Leeward Islands were theri given







their measure of representation. That was about 14 years ago. We continued the
work in St. Vincent, and later on about 12 or 13 years ago Messrs. G. A. McIntosh,
J. L. Cato, S. F. Bonadie, A. C. Allen, P. S. Stephens, E. Duncan, R. S. Brisbane, H.
A. Davis, Fred Hazell and others were elected. I call to mind those names
because it is right that we should remember those who have served. We are here
today, and we should remember our brethren who have done their duty. Some are
in this room today; I see before me one who has served as a Nominated Member,
the Honourable A. M. Punnett. He has been a Member of Council for a great
number of years. If I fail to call all the names, I ask you to pardon me. I cannot
say that we have not done anything; we have accomplished many things. We are
human and we have not done as much as some people felt should have been done,
but it is every little bit that counts; we measure the good and the bad, and we see
some good has been accomplished during those 25 years. We must continue to
work to make'St. Vincent a better place.
We stand now on the threshold of a new era and it is a fitting coincidence
that we should be celebrating the 25 years of our first measure of representation
granted to this island and looking forward to a subsequent meeting of Council to
debate the question of Closer Association and a federation for these Caribbean
islands. It is a happy coincidence that after 25 years of a small measure of
representation we should be looking for something greater. It is something that
we should endeavour to take and go on further, overlooking certain difficulties
here, certain financial obstacles there and continuing in the march for progress,
so that when something new shall be granted to these islands those of us who are
here-I don't know if there will be many of us-we shall be able to look back and
see those who worked for 25 years, and look forward to those who will carry on
and do their part also.
I cannot help but close by stating that what has been done in these islands
has been done by us and I think that it is the best that could have been
accomplished.
We want men, as Mr. McIntosh told you, men of ability, men of worth, and
honest men to carry on the tradition which has been handed down to us. We
know it is difficult to get people to serve. We know that in a small community
like St. Vincent our young men are not willing. We hope the young men will
come forward. One must not come with any hope of getting praise; he who does
Public Service is like a statue that is in the open; the rain hits it, the sun hits it.
As men we must stand up; we must not expect privileges or thanks. We know
human nature. The masses give no thanks; if they praise one man today, they
turn him down the next day. We know those who cried "Hosanna! when
Christ was going up to Jerusalem, soon after cried Crucify him But we
devote our lives to service and I promise you that if I continue to serve, I will
serve in the same way as I served in the past; and I expect those who come
forward to go on and build a new St. Vincent and a federation of the Caribbean.
I can only say I pray God this morning that we realise we are standing on the
threshold of a new era, and we also realise that this ship ofstate is here to move
on; and I quote those great words of Longfellow :-
"Sail on, O Ship of State !
Sail on, 0 UNION, strong and great !
Humanity with all its fears,
With all the hopes of future years,
Is hanging breathless on thy fate.!"





. .... . . ... .. . ..... ... ," "' : .. .. . .. . -.... -:
-, -
SHonourable Crown Attorney (Actig) : I beg leave to move that this Council
adjourn sine die. %
Honourable E. A. C. Hughes : I beg to second the motion.
President : Before I pronounce the adjournment I would like all people here
present to stand in silence in remembrance of those who were members of Council
and have worked for constitutional reform.

7. OBSERVANCE OF SILENCE IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE WHO WERE MEMBERS OF
COUNCIL.

8. ADJOURNMENT.
President: I now declare this Council adjourned until Monday, 15th May, at
10 a.m. ..

HENRY H. WILLIAMS,
Acting Clerk, Legislative Council.


Confirmed 7th December, 1950


W. F. COUTTS,
President.




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