• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Directory
 Directory
 Directory
 Roles and responsibilities
 Roles and responsibilities,...
 The individual role of a board...
 The individual role of a board...
 Involvement in public affairs
 Involvement in public affairs,...
 Legal obligation of board...
 Recruitment and selection of board...
 Objectives
 Questionnaire regarding respon...
 Additional notes














Title: Sexual and Physical Abuse Resource Center (SPARC) History and Documents
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077458/00029
 Material Information
Title: Sexual and Physical Abuse Resource Center (SPARC) History and Documents
Physical Description: Archival
Creator: SPARC
Publisher: SPARC
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077458
Volume ID: VID00029
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Directory
        Page 1
    Directory
        Page 2
    Directory
        Page 3
    Roles and responsibilities
        Page 4
    Roles and responsibilities, continued
        Page 5
    The individual role of a board member
        Page 6
    The individual role of a board member, continued
        Page 7
    Involvement in public affairs
        Page 8
    Involvement in public affairs, continued
        Page 9
    Legal obligation of board members
        Page 10
    Recruitment and selection of board members
        Page 11
    Objectives
        Page 12
    Questionnaire regarding responsibilities
        Page 13
    Additional notes
        Page 14
Full Text





SPARC BOARD OF DIRECTORS

OUTREACH OFFICE 377-5690 FAX 378-9033


NAMES & ADDRESSES CONTACT NUMBERS COMMITTEES
Penny Moeller President (H)372-3913 Executive Comm.
5600 NW 91st Blvd. Comm. Education, Chair
Gainesville, FL 32653 Transition House Comm.
Tobi Doering V. Pres. (W) 374-5346 Fiscal & Operations Chair
4529 NW 43rd Place (H) 377-2518
Gainesville, FL 32606 (F) 374-5355
(M) 317-8047
Jeff Kropp, Past Pres. (W) 373-0170 Executive Comm
2516 NW 43rd Street (M) 538-1781 Finance Comm.
Gainesville, FL 32606 (F) 392-5145
Karen Smith Treasurer (W) 378-5892 Executive Comm.
3500 Windmeadows Blvd. (H) 335-7596 Finance Comm., Chair
#79 Transition House Comm.
Gainesville, FL 32607
Dr. Phillip A. Clark (W) 392-2391, ext.279
200 Norman Hall (F) 392-3664
Gainesville, FL 32611-7049
Donna Cohen (W) 331-8585
3708 NW 97th Blvd. (F) 331-8584
Gainesville, FL 32606
Rita Cowan (W) 392-1251 Finance Comm.
3648 NW 67th Avenue (F) 392-3464 Fiscal & Operations
Gainesville, FL 32653 (H) 332-3621

Major James Eckert ( ) 955-2518 Transition House Chair
913 SE 5th Street (F) 955-2513 pg. 491-7841 Community Education Comm.
Gainesville, FL 32602 (H) 332-1633

Francis Edwards (W) 392-4700, ext.5106 Finance Comm.
6220 NW 54th Way (F) 392-8351
Gainesville, FL 32653-3242 (H) 373-0314









Anne Haynes (W) 904-964-2530
Victim Advocate (H) 904-468-1154
State Attorney's Office F) 904-966-6168
Starke, FL 32091


Jay Herrington (W) 331-7573 Liasion to Transition House
912 NW 56th Terrace (H) 372-9875 Advisory Board
Gainesville, FL 32607 (F) 331-2734
or
(H) 4720 NW 71st Blvd.
Gainesville, FL 32606

Jan Hughey (W) 372-8400
P.O. Box 749 (H) 372-5155
Gainesville, FL 32602-0749


Joanne Jenkins (W) 955-6701
1373 NE 31st Avenue (H) 372-7666
Gainesville, FL 32609


Lisa w. Prows (W) 336-7333
5027 NW 34th Street (F) 336-7333
Gainesville, FL 32605 (H) 332-7037


Roger Reep (W) 392-4700, ext. 3859 Executive Comm.
5825 NW 53rd Court (H) 373-0773
Gainesville, FL 32653 (F) 392-5145

Dee Dee Smith (W) 371-2777
1373 NE 31st Avenue (F) 371-4490
Gainesville, FL 32615 (H) 462-1521


Sheryl Wolfe (W) 376-1893,ext517
P.O. Box 147012 (F) 378-4080
Gainesville, FL 32614-7012

Mark Avera (W) 372-9999 Ad Hoc
302 SE 2nd Avenue (F) 375-2526 Community Education Comm.
Gainesville, FL 32601 Transition House Comm.


- -








VonCille Bruce (W) 374-3693 Ad Hoc
State Attorney's Office (F)
P.O. Box 1437 (H) 373-6164
Gainesville, FL 32602-1437

11w:8/96














ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF BOARD AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Board of Directors represents the corporate entity which
assumes full legal and financial trusteeship of the agency on
behalf of the community. In fulfilling these responsibilities,
the Board develops policy for implementation by the executive
director.

As individuals, Board members represent the agency at state,
regional and national meetings as appointed by the Board.
Individual Board members also give time and money to the agency;
clearly understand programs and policies of the agency and
interpret, support and defend them in the community; and
participate in the agency fund raising effort.

The executive director represents the unique professional linkage
between the Board of Directors, the agency staff, and the
community. In concert with the Board of Directors, the paid and
volunteer staff, and with an appropriate sense of timing, the
executive director initiates action on the part of the agency in
developing its resources, establishing its policies, providing
its services or telling its story to assure adequately meeting
real community needs. The executive director is solely
responsible for administering the programs of the agency and for
executing all program policies established by the corporate
action of the Board ofj Directors. The executive director is "The
Keeper of the Vision" of what SPARC can be and bears the
responsibility for initiating action to assure its fruition.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

BOARD OF DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Policy Making: Policy Making:

1. Sets broad policy guidelines 1. Identifies areas needing
for the operation of the policy decisions and
agency. recommends policy for
consideration by the Board.
2. Sets terms of employment,
employs and evaluates 2. Interprets policy adopted
executive director. by the board to the staff.

3. Establishes personnel
practices.

4. Approves all contracts.

5. Establishes policev and
related issues.















BOARD OF DIRECTORS


Funding:


1. Approves, monitors and
assures compliance with
the budget.

2. Authorizes and adopts
audit.

3. Establishes fundraising
plan and goal.

4. Sets fundraising plan and
goal.

5. Contribute financially.

6. Assumes responsibility for
implementation of the fund-
raising plan.

7. Establishes on-going
investment policy.


Community Relations:


1. Proooses budget.

2. Establishes, monitors and
manages accounting
procedures purchasing
procedures, etc.

3. Staffs board effort to
secure funds, develop
foundation proposals,
consistent with plan.

4. Contribute financially.


Community Relations:


1. Assume full legal and finan-
cial trusteeship of the
agency.

2. Represents the entire
community.

3. Actively seeks input from
all sectors of the community
including consumer of
SPARC's services.


1. Is chief spokesperson for
the agency in the
community.

2. Integrates agency services
within the local
environment.

3. Works toward a supportive
community environment.

4. Seeks or identifies input
from the community on
community needs.


Advocacvy


1. To be an advocate for
SPARC and our issues,.


1. To be an advocate for SPARC
and our issues.


Funding


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR














THE INDIVIDUAL ROLE OF A BOARD MEMBER


Although the board of directors functions as a body in its
deliberations and policy level decisions, the members are elected
as individuals. Each member of the board of directors either
reflects a point of view, a specific segment of the population in
the community, or has enough administrative background to make a
significant contribution and has the time available to devote to
the job. Decisions made as a member of the board should reflect
concern for the agency. Each director should understand and
accept the different role of policy-maker as opposed to the role
of carrying on the day-to-day operations.

No individual board member, regardless of knowledge, expertise,
or community contact, has any legal authority to act upon her/his
own in the name of the agency unless given specific authority by
the board of directors.

Today's climate of increasing legal actions against boards of
directors of non-profit corporations, has increased awareness of
the need for the individual board member to be more alert to
his/her individual conduct when making key decisions for the
corporation.

Being an individual with the knowledge and time to devote to
being a board member is not, in itself, sufficient. Attending
board meetings is not enough. An individual must be well
informed as to what the business of the board is, be prepared to
challenge and question, and to risk the displeasure of
management* as well as of fellow board members.

As individuals, board members have the responsibility, if they
find themselves unable to make the fullest commitment possible or
if they do not feel able to support the decision made by the
board of directors as a body, to take the initiative to resign
from the board.

Although individual board members very often work in productive
partnership with employed staff members, it is not considered
prudent for individuals or for the board as a whole to become
involved or to interfere in problems dealing with staff members.
Decisions related to the release of staff and/or disciplinary
problems are in the domain of the executive director, and it
should be her/his prerogative to seek advice from the board. The
board of directors is exclusively concerned with the executive
director as a staff member and does not concern itself directly
with staff administration.

Below is a checklist for individual board members to use in
monitoring their own performance as directors:

Understand and accept the organization's philosophy and
position on affirmative action and equal employment
opportunity.
















Understand and accept the board's obligation to abide by
the policies of SPARC.

Be willing to be trained.










BOARD of DIRECTORS' INVOLVEMENT IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS


The Board of Directors is one key constituency in an agency's
public affairs program. Board members are generally chosen with
some important criteria in mind, such as their high standing in the
community (academics, prominent businessperson, clergy), their
expertise in the area of domestic violence or a related area
(physicians, social workers), and their contacts with an important
constituency such as the media or government. These same criteria
make the board members important constituents from a legislator's
perspective. If they are influential, they may be able to win
his/her ear; if they are wealthy or prominent, they may be able to
improve your access to his/her office; if they are domestic
violence specialists, they can present the legislator with expert
information.

Increasingly, agencies are determining that the ability of an
individual to contribute to the agency's public affairs program is
an important factor in his/her suitability for board membership.

Although all board members should participate in the agency's
public affairs activities, the public affairs committee is at the
helm of the agency's program.

A. THE AGENCY PUBLIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

In general, the Public Affairs Committee is responsible for:

S the monitoring of federal, state and local policy
developments and ensuring that the board of directors is
kept abreast of these developments.

encouraging and coordinating board member' participation
in the agency's public affairs program

in conjunction with the board, determining the staff
resources, time and money to be devoted to public affairs

in conjunction with the board, prioritizing public
affairs issues and developing strategies to influence
these issues

where appropriate, representing the agency on the board
of a State Public Affairs Office or in a Statewide
coalition

S developing high-level personal and organizational
contacts which further the agency's public affairs goals

S ensuring that the agency's public affairs program is in
compliance with the law and with board and committee
policies










if there is little staff support for public affairs, the
committee may also implement the agency public affairs
program

The Public Affairs chair assumes responsibility for the agency's
public affairs program and should be a member of the agency's board
of directors.

b. OTHER BOARD MEMBERS

As already noted, individuals on the agency board of directors play
a critical role in public affairs. Among the functions they may
perform are:

S helping to prepare letters to legislators, testimony,
etc., on specialized topics

lobbying on domestic violence issues

S involving their friends and colleagues in the agency's
public affairs program

S developing high-level personal and organizational
contacts which can further the agency's public affairs
goals.

Board involvement in public affairs can be fostered by the public
affair chair, by ensuring that the board is kept abreast of current
federal, state and local public policy developments at and between
board meetings.

The board should also, of course be kept abreast of the agency's
public affairs program. This can be accomplished by sending board
members, copies of all important public affairs mailings and
publications and by providing regualr briefings at board meetings.









LEGAL OBLIGATIONS OF BOARD MEMBERS


1. Board members should avoid:
Mismanagement
A failure to follow fundamental management principles
such as failure to ensure that -planning occurs and t
review reports for problems
Non-management
Failure to use existing opportunities for good
management such as failure to use available control systems
Self-Dealing
Concerns board members voting on decisions in which
they face possible personal gain

II. Methods of Minimizing Liability:
Have a thorough knowledge of the organization's charter
and bylaws
Attend all board and committee meetings regularly
Keep informed of general organizational activities
Ensure that minimum legal/technical requirements are met
Have an independent financial audit completed each year
Record personal conduct and register dissents officially
Disclose financial interests and dealings
Have access to professional counsel for the board
Insure board members through the organization



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Recruitment and Selection

of
Board Members

* a most important function
* members recruited from agency volunteers, United Way or Voluntary
Action Center
* those who wish to serve but aren't asked may "help out" in agency
assignment, or enroll through file system
* potential members should know
In recruiting board members you should be sure that potential
members know:
why they are being asked
what is expected
what organization is about
importance
a work
organization
budget
roles of volunteer and staff


OBJECTIVE 2
C. recruitment and
selection







Objectives


"Objective 1:

Agenda...

Objective 2:


Agenda...



Objective 3:

Agenda...


Objective 4:

Agenda...


Objective 5:

Agenda...


Objective 6:


identify the key functions of a volunteer policy making
board.
A. functions of policy-making boards
B. board member responsibilities
describe the activities that enable a board to fulfill its
functions:
* dividing workload; assigning responsibility
* recruiting and selecting board members
* orienting and training members to do their jobs
effectively and assume greater responsibility
conducting effective board meetings.
A. committee and chair responsibilities
B. effective meetings
C. recruitment and selection
D. orientation and training
Identify both the responsibilities and the expectations of
board and staff in non-profit organizations
A. clarifying responsibilities of board, president and
executive director
B. expectations: board of executive; executive of the board
clarify the communications and understandings between
board and staff.
A. communications based on mutual trust and
understanding
B. principles of partnership
determine criteria for selection and evaluation of the
executive director
A. criteria for hiring the executive director
B. criteria for performance appraisal of the executive
director


to assess your needs in these subject areas and plan for
future action"









PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY CLARIFICATION QUESTIONNAIRE


Plese heck the ppprae bo signing eh emtothae l BOARDS RESPONSIBILITY BOARD'S RESPONSIBILITY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR/STAFF
(group) having y responsibility is ed. THROUGH PRESIDENT RESPONSIBILITY
yo var Shel rerponrsbilay is shared. THROUGH PRESIDENT I RESPONSIBILITY


1. Determine organization's goals
2. Fund raising for the organization
3. Hire the executive director
4. Execute policy
5. Keep board members informed regarding organization's
operation
6. Recommend organization policy (policy formulation)
7. Administer all phases of organization's operations
8. Hire and supervise professional staff
9. Plan models (methods) for program delivery
10. Implement programs
11. Responsible for meeting all legal requirements
12. Recruit new board members
13. Orient, train and develop board members
14. Draft the annual corporate budget
15. Establish salary administration plan
16. Implement salary administration plan
17. Make policy decisions
18. Prepare materials on alternatives for board consideration
19. Recommend board members for various committees
20. Serve as professional resource to the board
21. Provide community relations contacts with community
22. Prepare and write reports for the board
23. Evaluate organization's results
.24. Assess organization problems
25. Approve the annual corporate budget















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