• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Fact sheet
 Vision, mission, and objective...
 History of sparc
 Counties served by sparc
 Methodology and expected resul...
 Community outreach services
 Transition house goal and...
 Services and limitations
 Sparc services
 Gallenkamp shelter goal
 Gallenkamp shelter services
 Children's program
 Sparc serves four counties
 Children are silent victims of...
 Domestic violence crime facts
 Shelter poem
 Systematic approach for developing...
 Definition of battered woman














Title: Sexual and Physical Abuse Resource Center (SPARC) History and Documents
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077458/00023
 Material Information
Title: Sexual and Physical Abuse Resource Center (SPARC) History and Documents
Physical Description: Archival
Creator: SPARC
Publisher: SPARC
Publication Date: 1990s
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077458
Volume ID: VID00023
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Fact sheet
        Page 1
    Vision, mission, and objectives
        Page 2
    History of sparc
        Page 3
    Counties served by sparc
        Page 4
    Methodology and expected results
        Page 5
    Community outreach services
        Page 6
    Transition house goal and services
        Page 7
    Services and limitations
        Page 8
    Sparc services
        Page 9
    Gallenkamp shelter goal
        Page 10
    Gallenkamp shelter services
        Page 11
    Children's program
        Page 12
    Sparc serves four counties
        Page 13
    Children are silent victims of domestic violence
        Page 14
    Domestic violence crime facts
        Page 15
    Shelter poem
        Page 16
    Systematic approach for developing new services and strengthening existing ones
        Page 17
    Definition of battered woman
        Page 18
Full Text


"A PLACE TO GO, A SHOULDER TO LEAN ON"


SPARC FACT SHEET



One of Florida's 38 certified domestic violence centers, SPARC was established to meet the needs of battered
women and their children by implementing services designed to alleviate physical abuse and the accompanying
cycle of violence.

Beginning as the Rape Information and Counseling Services (RICS) in 1974, SPARC has helped thousands of
abused women and their children who have been victims of domestic abuse. In 1978, SPARC opened its present
shelter site. It has grown to a 30 bed facility, providing services to HRS District III serving the four counties of
Alachua, Putnam, Bradford and Union. Funding comes from private donations, contributions, United Way of
Alachua and Putnam Counties, Marriage License Trust Fund Fees, Federal Family Violence, Alachua County,
donations and fundraising functions.

In addition to the shelter, SPARC has an out-of-shelter program which includes advocacy and support groups.
SPARC also provides a 24 hour helpline, information and referrals, community education, professional training,
counseling, a children's program and most recently, a batterer's intervention program. In 1985, SPARC opened
an Outreach office in Gainesville which houses the administrative staff and the out-of-shelter programs.


24-hour Helpline
Children's Program
Advocacy
Emergency Food &
Clothing


ABUSED WOMEN & CHILDREN

The following victim services are free:

Safe shelter for adults & children *
Enrollment of children in school *
Referrals to housing, legal aid, jobs *
& financial aid, medical care, food *
stamps

ABUSIVE PARTNERS

Batterers learn that violence destroys families.


Individual counseling for sheltered women
Emergency Transportation
Regularly scheduled support groups
Ongoing support and guidance


Civil and criminal courts order offenders to a 26-week
intervention program

CRISIS HELPLINE (904) 377-8255
SUPPORT GROUPS (904) 377-8255
VOLUNTEER PROGRAM (904) 377-5690


* Voluntary clients seek services directly
* Participants pay their own program costs.

TOLL FREE 1-800-393-SAFE
ADMINISTRATION (904) 377-5690
DONATIONS (904) 377-8255


SEXUAL AND PHYSICAL ABUSE RESOURCE CENTER
MAILING ADDRESS: OUTREACH ADDRESS:
P.O. Box 5099 3008 N.W. 13th St.
Gainesville, Fl. 32602 Gainesville, Fl. 32609


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to go .
a shoulder *:'
to lean .-


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Mary E. Nutter, PhD.


Programs Offered
Shelter
904-377-1083


Hotline
904-377-TALK
1-800-393-SAFE










Administration
904-377-5690

FAX
Available 24 hours
904-373-0676


P.O. BOX 5099


SEXUAL AND PHYSICAL ABUSE
RESOURCE CENTER

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 32602-5099


VISION

SPARC'S vision is of families in which each member is loved, supported, and
valued for their uniqueness as an individual; of communities which work
together for the good of all. We believe in the capacity of every person to
pursue their personal goals with dignity and without violence or the threat of
violence. By advocating for social change through education, legislation and
alliances with others who share our mission, SPARC hopes one day, to see the
end of violence in the lives of all families.

MISSION

SPARC'S mission is to interrupt the cycle of domestic violence in our
community, and to encourage the development of nonviolent means of conflict
resolution.

OBJECTIVES

1. To provide emergency shelter, counseling, information and access to
community resources, to victims of domestic violence; to encourage the
development of self-reliance and self-esteem.

2. To provide outreach and advocacy to victims of domestic violence not
seeking emergency shelter.

3. To operate a 24 hour hotline.

4. To educate the community at large regarding the issue of domestic
violence. This includes training of and cooperation with medical, legal,
law enforcement and media personnel.


SPARC Is sponsored through United Way and HRS


r







HISTORY OF SPARC

THE SEXUAL AND PHYSICAL ABUSE RESOURCE CENTER (SPARC), has it's
origins in the Rape Information and Counseling Services (RICS), which began in 1974.
RICS established a rape hotline in 1974 and almost immediately began receiving phone
calls from battered women. As media coverage of spouse abuse increased, so did the
numbers of calls RICS received from victims of battering. In 1976, RICS expanded it's
services to include battered women, providing many of the services to these victims that
were available to rape victims. It became obvious, however, that victims of battering
needed more than crisis counseling or occasional shelter in a volunteer's house.

IN MARCH 1977, RICS applied for and received three positions through the
Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) for a one year project on domestic
violence. The project provided counseling, information m referrals, victims advocacy
services, and community education. Clients were referred to local agencies for shelter
(Pleasant House, Salvation Army). There were unsuitable for several reasons; they had
limits of three to four days, they did not offer counseling or a supportive atmosphere for
women, and they were only open at night. The women and children had to stay
somewhere else during the day.

IN SEPTEMBER 1977, a spouse abuse hotline, 377-TALK, was added and RICS changed
it's name to the Sexual and Physical Abuse Resource Center (SPARC), to reflect the
organization's broader mission. SPARC applied for its present shelter site through the
Regional Utilities Board and was chosen over several other applicants in January 1978.
Although the first client was admitted March 11, the shelter was officially opened March
30 with a dedication and ribbon cutting ceremony. SPARC became a charter member of
the Refuge Information Network and was selected to send a delegate to represent the
southeastern region on the steering committee of the National Coalition Against Domestic
Violence (NCADV).

IN 1979, SPARC, applied for and was granted state funding. As a result, SPARC received an
official mandate to provide services to HRS District Three. At present, our funding comes
from the United Way, the Marriage License Fund and our own fundraising. The Marriage
License Trust Fund monies are administered by HRS and we are mandated to serve the
four counties of Alachua, Putnam, Bradford, and Union.

SPARC'S SERVICES HAVE CONTINUED TO EXPAND. In addition to our
shelter, we have an out-of-shelter program which includes advocacy and support groups.
SPARC also provides a 24 hour crisis hotline, information and referral, agency inservice
training, community education, a volunteer training program and a children's therapeutic
program. In 1985, SPARC opened an Outreach office in Gainesville, which houses the
administrative staff and the out-of-shelter programs. Having a public location helps keep
SPARC's services well known to the community.


















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ABSTRACT

SEXUAL AND PHYSICAL ABUSE RESOURCE CENTER

OVERALL OBJECTIVES

The Sexual and Physical Abuse Resource Center was established to meet the needs of
battered women and their children by implementing services designed to alleviate physical
abuse and the accompanying cycle of violence. SPARC maintains three general objectives
in this regard:

1. Provide a 24 hour hotline an emergency shelter facility, and outreach services.
2. Educate the community at large regarding the issue of domestic violence.

3. Initiate prevention services by developing programs in the community designed to
create social change.

METHODOLOGY

To meet these objectives, SPARC provides the following services:
1. A twenty-four hour hotline staffed by trained volunteers and staff members, who
.provide crisis intervention, counseling and information and referral services.

2. A thirty (30) bed emergency shelter facility providing shelter, emergency food,
transportation and personal items.

3. A children's program at the shelter.

4. Community and professional education and training.

EXPECTED RESULTS

SPARC will provide immediate refuge for victims of domestic violence and short term
support and assistance for shelter residents and victims currently living in the community.
Such support, counseling, and direct assistance will provide clients with the opportunity to
explore and create alternatives to their current life situations. Educational programs will
produce a more sensitive community with regard to the needs of victims and will encourage
a more peaceful resolution to human conflict.















COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES

*Community-based Support Groups

*Information and Referrals

*24 Hour Help Line

*Restraining Order Assistant Program

*Batterer's Intervention Groups
Victim's Contact

*Liaison with Community Agencies

*Law Enforcement Training

*Community Education

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TRANSITION HOUSE


GOAL

To provide women and their children an
opportunity to make the transition from
domestic violence to a violence free
independent living environment.

SERVICES

*Advocacy

*Job Counseling

*Educational Assistance

*Assistance with Child Care

*Housing Advice


-,-1 I 1-4













SPARC CAN:
*PROVIDE SUPPORT
*LET YOU TALK ABOUT YOUR PROBLEMS
*HELP YOU FIGURE OUT WHAT YOU ARE
FEELING
*TELL YOU WHAT OTHER AGENCIES ARE
AVAILABLE TO HELP
*HELP YOU LEARN HOW TO TAKE THE
BUS OR ARRANGE OTHER
TRANSPORTATION
*HELP YOU WORK OUT PROBLEMS WITH
CCMMUNITY LIVING
*PROVIDE EMERGENCY FOOD, CLOTHING,
AND PERSONAL CARE ITEMS AS NEEDED
SPARC CANNOT:
*SOLVE YOUR PROBLEMS FOR YOU
*TELL YOU WHAT DECISIONS TO MAKE
*FIND YOU A JOB OR PLACE TO LIVE
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SPARC CAN:
*PROVIDE SUPPORT
*LET YOU TALK ABOUT YOUR PROBLEMS
*HELP YOU FIGURE OUT WHAT YOU ARE
FEELING
*TELL YOU WHAT OTHER AGENCIES ARE
AVAILABLE TO HELP
*HELP YOU LEARN HOW TO TAKE THE
BUS OR ARRANGE OTHER
TRANSPORTATION
*HELP YOU WORK OUT PROBLEMS WITH
CCNMUNITY LIVING
*PROVIDE EMERGENCY FOOD, CLOTHING,
AND PERSONAL CARE ITEMS AS NEEDED














GALLENKAMP SHELTER GOAL


*To provide women and their children
with a safe environment, information,
access to resources and programs and
services which promote her self-reliance
and esteem.
COMMUNITY OUTREACH GOAL
*To advocate for change through
education, legislation and alliances
with others who share our mission and
provide services to the community
designed to alleviate physical abuse and
the accompanying cycle of violence.




















GALLENKAMP


SHELTER


SERVICES


*SAFE ENVIRONMENT FOR


30 WOMEN


CHILDREN UP TO SIX WEEKS


*INFORMATION AND REFERRALS


ZMedica.1 Aid


Legal Help
HRS Food Stamps
FinancialX Aid


*EMERGENCY FOOD AND CLOTHING


*INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP COUNSELING


Gcon1 Set tirkg
Pnr erit irig
Stuwpoz-t


Problem Solvinrg
Understanrding the
Dynamics of Domestic
Viol ence


ADVOCACY-RESTRAINING ORDER ASSISTANT
PROGRAM


*TRANSITION HOUSE


AND



















CHILDREN'S PROGRAM

SUPPORT GROUPS

*Domestic Violence
*Feel ings
*Self Esteem

INFORMATION AND REFERRALS

*Counsel irng
*Medical Services
*Child Care

SAFETY PLANNING


SCHOOL ENROLLMENT


TUTORING


SCHOOL SUPPLIES


CHILDREN' S ACTIVITIES

*Arts and Crafts
*GCames
*Parties, Field Trips
















SPARC SERVES FOUR COUNTIES

*ALACHUA

*BRADFORD

*PUTNAM

*UNION


THE YEAR OF 1994-95 SPARC


PROVIDED EMERGENCY SHELTER TO















CHILDREN ARE THE SILENT
OF f T Mu TI TTTC CWTfr
OF D MJE* l .2lif3 J X.p V J.X A % ."J. "%oJ., .


VICTIMS


DO YCU KNOW THAT CHILDREN WHO GROW
A HOME WHERE DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS
DR WITNESSED ARE:


UP IN
HEARD


*Six times more likely to commit suicide


*Twenty-four
sexually


times more
assaulted


likely


to be


*Sixty times
delinquent


more likely
behavior as


to engage in
an adult


*Thousand
abusers


times more
themselves


likely


to be






A 1


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS A CRIME....

Domestic Violence is one of the most common of all crimes.


Acts of domestic violence occur every 18 seconds in
the U.S.

About 1/2 of all couples experience at least one
violent incident; in 1/4 of these couples, violence
is a common occurrence.

20% of all murders in this country are committed
within the family and 13% are committed by spouses.

Most family violence is committed against women.


95% of all spousal assaults are committed by men.

21% of all women who use the hospital emergency
surgical service are battered.
6 million American women are beaten each year by
their husbands or boyfriends. 4,000 of them are
killed.

Battering is the single major cause of injury to
women ---more frequent than auto accidents,
muggings, and rapes combined.
1 in 4 female suicides were victims of family
violence.

Domestic violence takes its toll on the family, society, and
the future.


Over 1 million women each year seek medical help
for injuries caused by battering.

Victims of domestic violence are three times more
likely to be victimized again than are victims of
other types of crime.
Children are emotionally traumatized by witnessing
family violence; many of them grow up to repeat the
pattern as victim or abuser.

While you were reading this, 4 women were severely beaten.









SHELTER


We are here to LISTEN...
not to work miracles.


We are here to HELP a woman DISCOVER
what she is felling...
not to make feelings go away.


We are here to HELP a woman IDENTIFY her OPTIONS...
not to decide for her what she should do.


We are here to DISCUSS STEPS with a woman...
not to take steps for her.


We are here to HELP a woman DISCOVER her own STRENGTH...
not to rescue her and leave her still vulnerable.


We are here to HELP a woman DISCOVER SHE CAN HELP HERSELF...
not to take responsibility for her.


We are here to HELP a woman LEARN TO CHOOSE...
not to make it unnecessary for her to make difficult choices.


WE ARE HERE TO PROVIDE SUPPORT FOR CHANGE.


U











SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO DEVELOP NEW SERVICES AND STRENGTHEN
EXISTING ONES FOR BATTERED WOMEN



PRIMARY PREVENTION

Public Education

Work with agencies, support groups to eliminate social problems that cause
condition

1. Eliminate sex-role stereotyping during child development
2. Reduce the violence in our society
3. Reduce the harshness of child discipline
4. Understand the victimization process of battered women

Agency Involvement

1. Agency personnel can be taught to be more supportive of battered women
2. Institutions and agencies should be encouraged to enforce proper rules and
regulations for treating battered women
3. New laws need to be written
4. Development of community support groups

SECONDARY INTERVENTION

1. Home visits
2. Telephone hotlines
3. Outpatient clinic visits
4. Crisis intervention counseling
5. Legal advice
6. Financial assistance
7. Information distribution

TERTIARY INTERVENTION

1. Safe House
2. Long term therapy








DEFINITION OF BATTERED WOMEN


- a woman who is repeatedly subjected to any forceful physical or psychological behavior
by a man in order to coerce her to do something he wants her to do without any concern
for her right.

- battered women include wives or women in any form of intimate relationships with men.

- also, in order to be classified as battered women, the couple must go through the
battering cycle at least twice.



*From The Battered Woman by Lenore E. Walker


COMMON CHARACTERISTICS OF BATTERED WOMEN

1. has low self-esteem

2. believes all the myths about battering relationships

3. is a traditionalist about the home, strongly believes in family unity and the
prescribed feminine sex-role stereotype

4. accepts responsibility for the batter's actions

5. suffers from guilt, yet denies the terror and anger she feels

6. presents a passive face to the world but has the strength to manipulate her
environment enough to prevent further violence and being killed

7. has severe stress reactions, with many physical complaints caused by stress

8. uses sex as a way to establish intimacy

9. believes that no one will be able to help her resolve her predicament, except herself.




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