• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Cinderella; or, the little glass...
 Cinderella; or, the little glass...
 Cinderella; or, the little glass...
 Cinderella; or, the little glass...
 Cinderella; or, the little glass...
 Cinderella; or, the little glass...
 Rumpelstiltzkin, part I
 Rumpelstiltzkin, part II
 Rumpelstiltzkin, part III
 The master cat; or, Puss in boots,...
 The master cat; or, Puss in boots,...
 The master cat; or, Puss in boots,...
 The master cat; or, Puss in boots,...
 The master cat; or, Puss in boots,...
 Why the sea is salt, part I
 Why the sea is salt, part II
 Why the sea is salt, part III
 Why the sea is salt, part IV
 Why the sea is salt, part V
 Little Thumb, part I
 Little Thumb, part II
 Little Thumb, part III
 Little Thumb, part IV
 Little Thumb, part V
 Little Thumb, part VI
 Little Thumb, part VII
 Little Thumb, part VIII
 Little Thumb, part IX
 Little Thumb, part X
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: Fairy tale books
Title: Cinderella, or, The little glass slipper
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077422/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cinderella, or, The little glass slipper and other stories based on the tales in the "Blue fairy book"
Series Title: Fairy tale books
Uniform Title: Cinderella
Rumpelstiltskin (Folk tale)
Puss in Boots
Alternate Title: Little glass slipper
Physical Description: 96 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lang, Andrew, 1844-1912
Ford, H. J ( Henry Justice ), 1860-1941 ( Illustrator )
Jacomb Hood, G. P ( George Percy ), 1857-1929 ( Illustrator )
Spottiswoode & Co ( Printer )
Longmans, Green, and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Longmans, Green, and Co.
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Manufacturer: Spottiswoode and Co.
Publication Date: 1890
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1890   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1890   ( rbgenr )
Lang -- Authors' presentation inscription (Provenance) -- 1890   ( rbprov )
Lang -- Authors' autographs (Provenance) -- 1890   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1890
Genre: Children's stories
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Authors' presentation inscription (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
Authors' autographs (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Andrew Lang ; with illustrations by H.J. Ford & G.P. Jacomb Hood.
General Note: Bound in deep blue cloth over boards; stamped in silver on front cover and spine; blind on rear cover; pale yellow endpapers.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy inscribed by the author: Pastorella, from A. Lang, 1890.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077422
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232770
notis - ALH3166
oclc - 11167198

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper, part I
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper, part II
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper, part III
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper, part IV
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper, part V
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper, part VI
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Rumpelstiltzkin, part I
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Rumpelstiltzkin, part II
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Rumpelstiltzkin, part III
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The master cat; or, Puss in boots, part I
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The master cat; or, Puss in boots, part II
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    The master cat; or, Puss in boots, part III
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The master cat; or, Puss in boots, part IV
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The master cat; or, Puss in boots, part V
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Why the sea is salt, part I
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Why the sea is salt, part II
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Why the sea is salt, part III
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Why the sea is salt, part IV
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Why the sea is salt, part V
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Little Thumb, part I
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Little Thumb, part II
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Little Thumb, part III
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Little Thumb, part IV
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Little Thumb, part V
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Little Thumb, part VI
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Little Thumb, part VII
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Little Thumb, part VIII
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Little Thumb, part IX
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Little Thumb, part X
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text



























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CINDERELLA'S FLIGHT









CINDERELLA
OR
THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

AND OTHER STORIES


BASED ON THE TALES IN THE 'BLUE FAIRY BOOK'
BY
ANDREW LANG

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY H. J. FORD & G. P. JACOMB HOOD


LONDON
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
AND NEW YORK: 15 EAST 16't STREET
1890


All rights reserved






















CINDERELLA; OR, THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER-PART I.


RUMPELSTILTZKIN-PART I.


S,, II.
,, ,, III. .
THE MASTER CAT; OR, PUSS IN BOOTS


WHY THE SEA IS SALT-PART I.
,, ,, ,, II.
,, ,, ,, III.
IV.
V.
LITTLE THUMB-PART I.
S II.


,, IV.
SV.
,, VI .
,, ,, "VII.
,, ,, VIII.
S IX. .
X.


CONTENTS


,, .

III.
SIV. .
V.





,T I. .
II. .
III. .
IV. .
V. .


-PAR


.


PAGE
5
8
11
16
20
22
26
29
32
36
40
43
46
49
52
54
58
62
64
67
70
74
77
79
81
85
89
91
94


,, II


,,
1,

,,
,,


,,
,,
,,














CINDERELLA


OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

PART I

ONCE there was a man, who had for his
second wife, the proudest woman that was
ever seen.
Both the man and the woman had
been married before. He had one girl
who had the best and sweetest temper in
the world.
The woman had a very bad temper,
and was so proud, that every one hated
her. She had two girls who were just
like her.
No sooner was the wedding over, but
the woman began to show how unkind she
could be.






CINDERELLA; OR


She could not bear the goodness of
this pretty girl, and the less because it
made her own daughters seem the worse.
She made her do the meanest work of
the house.
She cleaned the dishes and tables,
and rubbed madam's chamber, and those
of misses, her daughters.
She slept in a room up at the top
of the house, upon a hard straw bed.
But her sisters lay in fine rooms,
upon beds of the very newest and softest
kind, and where they had looking-glasses
so large, that they might see themselves
at their full length from head to foot.
The poor girl bore all as well as she
could, and dared not tell her father, who
would have sent her off; for his wife made
him do just as she wished.
When she had done her work, she used
to go into the chimney-corner, and sit
down among cinders and ashes, which
made them call her Ginderwench.
The youngest, who was not so rude








THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER 7


CINDERELLA IN THE CHIMNEY CORNER






CINDERELLA; OR


and unkind as the eldest, called her
Cinderella.
However, Cinderella, in spite of her
poor clothes, was a hundred times prettier
than her sisters, though they were always
dressed very richly.



CINDERELLA

OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

PART II

Now it came to pass that the King's
son gave a ball, and asked all the finest
people to come to it.
Our young misses were also asked,
for they were thought much of by the
rich.
They were much pleased at being
asked, and were very busy in choosing
out such dresses and hats as might be-
come them.






THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


This was a new trouble to Cinderella;
for it was she who washed and got up
her sisters' fine things.
She was very sad at the thought of
being left at home alone.
They talked all day long of nothing,
but how they should be dressed.
'For my part,' said the eldest, 'I will
wear my red silk dress with lace trim-
ming.'
'And I,' said the youngest, 'shall have
my usual dress; but then I will put on
my mantle which is trimmed with gold
flowers, and is one of the finest that can
be seen.'
Cinderella was also called up to them,
to be asked about these matters, for she
was very clever, and told them always
for the best.
She also said she would do up their
hair for them, and this they were very
willing she should do.
As she was doing this, they said to
her:






CINDERELLA; OR


'Cinderella, would you not be glad to
go to the ball?'
'Alas!' said she, 'you only laugh at
me; it is not for such as I am to go
there.'
'Thou art in the right of it,' said they;
'it would make the people laugh to see
a Cinderwench at a ball.'
Anyone but Cinderella would have
dressed their heads, so as to make them
look ugly.
But she was very good, and dressed
them so that they were very pretty.
They were almost two days without
eating, so pleased were they.
They broke above a dozen of laces in
trying to be laced up close, that they
might have a fine shape.
Every now and then they ran to the
looking-glass, to see if they looked nice.






THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


CINDERELLA

OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

PART III

AT last the happy day came; they went
to Court, and Cinderella looked after them
as long as she could, and when she had
lost sight of them, she fell a-crying.
Her godmother, who saw her all in
tears, asked her what was the matter.
'I wish I could-I wish I could- '
She was not able to speak the rest for
her tears and sobbing.
This godmother of hers, who was a
fairy, said to her:
Thou wishest thou could'st go to the
ball; is it not so?'
'Y-es,' cried Cinderella, with a great
sigh.
'Well,' said her godmother, 'be but a
good girl, and I will see that thou shalt
go.'






CINDERELLA; OR


Then she took her into her room,
and said to her, 'Run into the garden,
and bring me a pumpkin.'
Cinderella went at once to get the
finest she could find, and brought it to
her godmother, not being able to think
how this' pumpkin could make her go to
the ball.
Her godmother took out all the inside
of it, leaving nothing but the rind.
She then struck it with her wand,
and the pumpkin was turned into a fine
coach, gilded all over with gold.
She then went to look into her mouse-
trap, where she found six mice, all alive,
and told Cinderella to lift up a little the
trap-door.
Out ran the mice, and as they passed
her, she gave each a little tap with her
wand.
At once every mouse was turned into
a fine horse, and so they had a very fine
set of six grey horses. But they had no
coachman.






THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


'I will go and see,' says Cinderella,
'if there is never a rat in the rat-trap
-we may make a coachman of him.'


Thou art in the right,' said her god-
mother ; go and look.'
Cinderella brought the trap to her, and
in it there were three very big rats.





CINDERELLA; OR


The fairy made choice of one of the
three which had the largest beard, and,
having touched him with her wand, he
was turned into a fat, jolly coachman,
who had the finest beard eyes ever beheld.
After that, she said to her:
'Go again into the garden, and you
will find six lizards behind the water-
ing-pot; bring them to me.'
She had no sooner done so, but her
godmother turned them into six footmen,
who skipped up behind the coach.
They looked very smart, for their
clothes were trimmed with gold and
silver.
They clung as close behind each other,
as if they had done nothing else their
whole lives.
The Fairy then said to Cinderella:
Well, you see here a coach fit to go
to the ball with ; are you not pleased
with it?'
'Oh! yes,' cried she; 'but must I go
there as I am, in these nasty rags ?'





THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


Her godmother only just touched her
with her wand, and, at the same instant,
her clothes were turned into cloth of gold
and silver.
This done, she gave her a pair of
glass slippers, the prettiest in the whole
world.
Being thus finely dressed, she got up
into her coach.
Her godmother, above all things, told
her not to stay till after midnight.
'For,' said she, 'if you stay one
moment longer, the coach will turn into
a pumpkin again, the horses mice, the
coachman a rat, the footmen lizards, and
your clothes will become just as they
were before.'
So she said that she would not fail of
leaving the ball before midnight.
Then away she drove, as happy as a
queen.





CINDERELLA; OR


CINDERELLA

OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

PART IV

THE King's son, who was told that a
great princess, whom nobody knew, was
come, ran out to meet her.
He gave her his hand as she got out
of the coach, and led her into the hall,
among all the fine people.
At once every one. became quiet. They
left off dancing, and the music ceased to
play.
They all stopped to look at the
lovely princess, whom no one seemed to
know.
Nothing was heard but many voices
all saying at once:
'Ha! how lovely she is! Ha! how
lovely she is!'
The King himself, old as he was,
could not help watching her, and told






THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


the Queen softly that it was a long time
since he had seen anyone so lovely.
All the ladies were looking at her
clothes and head-dress, so that they might
have some made next day after the same
kind, if they could meet with such fine
stuff, and as able hands to make them.
The King's son led her to the best
seat, and then took her out to dance
with him.
She danced so well, that they all
more and more looked at her.
A fine supper was served up, whereof
the young prince ate not a bit, so busy
was he in gazing on her.
She went and sat down by her sisters,
saying many kind words to them, and
giving them part of the oranges and other
fruit, which the Prince had given to her.
While Cinderella was thus talking to
her sisters, she heard the clock strike
eleven and three-quarters, whereupon she
at once made a bow to the fine people,
and hasted away as fast as she could.






CINDERELLA; OR


Being got home, she ran to seek
out her godmother, and, after having
thanked her, she said she could not but
wish she might go the next day to the
ball, because the King's son had asked
her.
As she was telling her godmother all
that had passed at the ball, her two sisters
knocked at the ddor, and Cinderella ran at
once to let them in.
'How long you have stayed!' cried
she, rubbing her eyes and stretching her-
self, as if she had been just waked out of
her sleep.
She had not, however, had any thought
of sleep since they went from home.
'If thou hadst been at the ball,' says
one of her sisters, 'thou wouldst not have
been tired with it.
There came thither the finest princess,
the most lovely that ever was seen.
'She was very kind to us, and gave
us oranges and other fruit, and talked to
us for a long time.'






THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


Cinderella did not seem to want to
know much about the matter.
But she did ask them the name of
that princess.
They told her they did not know
it, and that the King's son would give
all the world to know who she was.
At this Cinderella, smiling, said:
'She must, then, be very lovely indeed.
How happy you have been! Could not
I see her ?
'Ah! dear Miss Charlotte, do lend me
your dress which you wear every day, and
then I could go to the ball.'
'Ay, to be sure!' cried Miss Charlotte;
'lend my clothes to such a dirty Cinder-
wench as thou art I should be silly.'
Cinderella was very glad she would not
lend them. to her; for she would have
been sadly put to it, if her sister had
lent her, what she in fun had asked for.






CINDERELLA. OR


CINDERELLA
OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

PART V
THE next day the two sisters went to the
ball, and so did Cinderella, but dressed
even more finely than before.
The King's son was always by her, and
never ceased his kind words to her; to
whom, all this was so far from being tire-
some, that she quite forgot what her god-
mother had told her.
All at once she heard the clock strik-
ing twelve, when she took it to be no
more than eleven.
She then rose up and fled, as fast as
a deer.
The Prince ran after her, but could
not overtake her.
But she left behind one of her glass
slippers, which the Prince took up most
carefully.





THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


She got home, but quite out of breath,
and in her nasty old clothes.
She had nothing left her of all her fine
things, but one of the. little slippers, fellow
to the one she dropped.
The guards at the palace gate were
asked :
If they had not seen a princess go
out.
Who said: They had seen nobody
go out but a young girl, very meanly
dressed, and who had more the air of a
poor country..wench than a lady.
When the two sisters came home from
the ball, Cinderella asked them:
If they had been well pleased, and if
the fine lady had been there.
They told her: Yes; but that she
went away in great haste just as the clock
struck twelve, and that she dropped one
of her little glass slippers, the prettiest
in the world, which the King's son
had taken up.
They also said that, he had done






CINDERELLA; OR


nothing but look at her all the time at
the ball, and that he was very much
in love with the pretty lady, who owned
the glass slipper.



CINDERELLA

OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER

PART VI

WHAT they said was very true; for a
few days after, the King's son sent a
great lord to say, that he would marry
her whose foot this slipper would just
fit.
They tried to fit the slipper to the
feet of the princesses, and then to the
other great ladies, but in vain.
It was also brought to the two sisters,
who did all they could to get their foot
into the slipper, but their feet were much
too big.






THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


IJ.~- ~jj


R ,, 4


CINDERELLA TRYING ON THE SLIPPER


' II





CINDERELLA; OR


Cinderella, who saw all this, and
knew her slipper, said to them, laugh-
ing:
'Let me see if it will not fit me.'
Her sisters burst out a-laughing, and
began to tease her.
The lord who was sent to try the
slipper looked very hard at Cinderella,
and, finding her very pretty, said:
It was but fair that she should try
and that he had orders to let every one
try who wished.
He told Cinderella to sit down, and,
putting the slipper to her foot, he found
it went on very easily, and fitted her as
if it had been made of wax.
Just think how angry her two sisters
were, when they saw that the slipper
fitted her, and how much more vexed
they were, when Cinderella pulled out of
her pocket the other slipper, and put it
on her foot.
Thereupon, in came her godmother,
who touched with her wand Cinderella's





THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER


clothes, and made them richer and finer
than any of those she had before.
And now her two sisters found her
to be that fine, pretty lady whom they
bad seen at the ball.
They threw themselves at her feet, to
beg pardon for all the ill-treatment they
had made her undergo.
Cinderella took them up, kissed them
both, and said:
That she forgave them with all her
heart, and wished them always to love her.
She was taken to the young Prince,
dressed as she was.
He thought her more lovely than ever,
and, a few days after, married her.
Cinderella, who was as good as she
was pretty, gave her two sisters fine rooms
in the palace, and that very same day
matched them with two great lords of
the Court.






R UMPE LSTILTZKIN


R UMPELSTILTZKIN

PART I

>HERE was once upon a time a poor miller,
who had a very lovely daughter.
He was very fond of her, and thought
there was no girl in the world as good, or
as pretty as she.
Now it came to pass one day, that he
had to go and see the King.
He was very proud of this, and in
order to make the King think much of
him, he told him that he had a daughter
who could spin straw into gold.
Now that's a talent worth having,'
said the King to the miller.
If your daughter is as clever as you
say, bring her to my palace to-morrow,
and I will see what she can do.'
When the girl was brought to the







R UMPELSTILTZKIN


'GOOD-EVENING, MISS MILLER MAID; WHY ARE YOU CRYING SO ?





R UMPEISTIl TZKIN


King, he led her into a room full of
straw, gave her a spinning-wheel, and
said:
Now set to work and spin all night
till early dawn, and if by that time you
have not spun the straw into gold you
shall die.'
Then he closed the door behind him,
and left her alone inside.
So the poor miller's daughter sat
down, and didn't know what in the world
she was to do.
She had not the least idea of how to
spin straw into gold, and became at last
so sad that she ibe'an to cry.
All at once the door flew open, and
in stepped a tiny little man who said:
' Good-evening, Miss Miller-maid; why
are you crying so ?'
'Oh!' said the girl, 'I have to spin
straw into gold, and haven't the least
idea how it's done.'
'What will you give me if I spin it
for you?' said the little man






R UMPELSTIL TZKIN


'My necklace,' said the girl.
The little man tcok the necklace, sat
himself down at the wheel, and whir, whir,
whir, the wheel went round three times,
and the bobbin was full.
Then he put on another, and whir,
whir, whir, the wheel went round three
times, and the second too was full.
And so it went on till the morning,
when all the straw was spun away, and
all the bobbins were full of gold.



RUMPELSTILTZKIN

PART II

As soon as the sun rose the King
came, and when he saw the gold 'he
was very glad, but the sight of it only
made him wish for more and more.
He had the miller's daughter put into
another room full of straw, much bigger
than the first, and bade her, if she cared






R UMPELSTILTZKIN


for her life, spin it all into gold before
the next morning.
The girl didn't know what to do, and
began to cry; then the door flew open as
before, and the tiny little man came in
again and said:
'What will you give me if I spin the
straw into gold for you ?'
The ring from my finger,' said the
girl.
The little man took the ring, and
whir! round went the spinning-wheel
again, and when morning broke, he had
again spun all the straw into gold.
The King was more pleased than ever
at the sight, but he still wanted more.
So he had the miller's daughter
brought into a yet bigger room full of
straw, and said:
You must spin all this away in the
night; but if you do it again this time,
you shall be my wife.'
'She is only a miller's daughter, it is
true,' he thought; 'but I could not find a






R UMPELSTILTZKIN


richer wife, if I were to search the whole
world over.'
When the girl was alone the little
man came for the third time, and said:
What will you give me if I spin the
straw into gold for you once again?'
'I've nothing more to give,' said the
girl.
'Then promise me when you are Queen
to give me your first child.'
Who knows what mayn't happen be-
fore that ? thought the miller's daughter;
and besides, she saw no other way out
of it.
So she said she would give him her
first child, and then the little man set
to work once more and spun the straw
into gold.
When the King came in the morn-
ing, and found everything as he had
wished, he at once made her his wife,
and so the poor miller's daughter became
a queen.






R Ui~PELSTILTZKIN


RUMPELSTILTZKIN

PART III

WHEN a year had passed, a fine son was
born to her, and she thought no more
of the little man, till all of a sudden
one day, he stepped into her room and
said:
'Now give me your little boy.'
The Queen was in a great state, and
said she would give the little man all the
riches in her kingdom, if he would only
leave her the child. But he said:
No; a living child is dearer to me
than all the riches in the world.'
Then the Queen began to cry and sob
so much, that the little man was sorry for
her, and said :
I'll give you three days to guess my
name, and if you find it out in that time
you may keep your child.'
Then the Queen thought the whole






P UMPELSTIL TZKIN


night, over all the names she had ever
heard.
She sent someone to scour the land,
and to pick up far and near any strange
names he should come across.
When the little man came on the
next day, she began with all the hard
names she knew, in a string, but at each
one he called out:
'That's not my name.'
The next day she sent to ask the
names, of all the people who lived near
by, and had a long list of the strangest,
and most uncommon names ready for the
little man, when lie came.
But no matter what name she tried,
he always said:
'That's not my name.'
On the third day, the man she had
sent to ask all over the land came back
and said:
'I have not been able to find any
new names, but as I came upon a high hill
round the corner of the wood, where the






1? UMPELSZYL TZKxiN


foxes and hares bid each other good-night,
I saw a little house.
'In front of the house burned a fire,
and round the fire was a very funny little
man, hopping on one leg and crying:

To-morrow I brew, to-day I bake,
And then the child away I'll take;
For little thinks my royal dame
That Rumpelstiltzkin is my name!'

You can just think how pleased the
Queen was at hearing the name, and when
the little man stepped in shortly after-
wards and asked:
'Now, my lady Queen, what's my
name ? she asked first,
Is your name Conrad ?'
No.'
'Is your name Harry ?'
'No.'
'Is your name, perhaps, Rumpelstiltz-
kin ?'
Some evil fairy has told you that, some
evil fairy has told you that!' screamed the





R UAEPELSTILTZKIN


little man, and in his rage he drove his
right foot so far into the ground, that it
sank in up to his waist.
Then in his temper he took hold of
his left foot with both hands, and tore
himself in two.
And that was the end of Rumpelstiltz-
kin.





THE MASTER CAT,; OR


THE MASTER CAT; OR
PUSS IN BOOTS

PART I

THERE was once a miller, who died and
left to his three sons nothing but his mill,
his ass, and his cat.
No sooner was the father dead, than
the sons shared what he had left
between them.
The eldest had the mill, the second
the ass, and the youngest nothing but
the cat.
The poor young fellow was very sad
at having so poor a lot.
'My brothers,' said he, 'may get their
living well enough by joining what they
have together.
But, for my part, when I have eaten
up my cat, and made me a muff of his
skin, I must die of hunger.'






PUSS IN BOOTS


The Cat, who heard all this, but made
as if he did not, said to him with a very
grave air :
'Do not thus trouble yourself, my good
master.
'You have nothing else to do but to
give me a bag, and get a pair of boots
made for me, that I may be able to run
through the dirt and the bushes.
'You shall then see, that you are not
so badly off in having only me, as you
think.'
The Cat's master did not build very
much upon what he said.
He had, however, often seen the Cat
play a great many cunning tricks to
catch rats and mice; as wheh he used
to hang by the heels, or hide himself
in the meal, and make as if he were
dead.
So when the Cat said this he felt
cheered, for he thought that very likely
the Cat might be able to help him to
better his lot.






THE MASTER CAT; OR


When the Cat had got what he asked
for, he put on his boots very bravely.
Then, hanging his bag about his
neck, he held the strings of it in his
two fore paws, and went into a warren
where there were great numbers of
rabbits.
He put bran and milk-weed into his
bag, and then stretched himself out at
length, as if he had been dead.
He hoped that there would come
along some young rabbits, who were not
old enough to have learned how artful a
cat could be.
He knew that if they came, they
would poke their noses into his bag, to
see what there was inside.
Scarce was he lain down but he had
what he wanted.
A rash and foolish young rabbit
jumped into his bag, and Puss, at once
drawing tight the strings, took and killed
him without pity.
Proud of his prey, he went with it to





PUSS IN BOOTS 39

the palace, and asked to speak with the
King.
He was shown upstairs into the King's


room, and, making a low bow, said to
him :
'I have brought you, sir, a rabbit of
the warren, which my noble Lord, the





THE MASTER CAT; OR


Marquis of C.' (for that was the title
which Puss was pleased to give his master),
'has told me to give to you from
him.'
Tell thy master,' said the King, 'that
I thank him, and that he does me a great
deal of pleasure.'




THE MASTER CAT; OR

PUSS IN BOOTS

PART II

ANOTHER time he went and hid himself
among some growing corn, holding still
his bag open.
He waited till a brace of birds ran
into it, when he drew the strings, and
so caught them both.
He went and gave these to the King,
who was just as glad to get them, as he





PUSS IN BOOTS


had been to get the rabbit, which the
Cat took in the warren.
The King thanked the Cat, and gave
him some money as a gift.
For two or three months did the
Cat thus carry to the King, from time to
time, game which he said his master
had caught and sent as a gift.
One day, when he knew that the
King was to take the air along the
river-side, with his daughter, the most
lovely princess in the world, he said to
his master:
'If you will do as I tell you, your
fortune is made.
'You have nothing else to do, but go
and wash yourself in the river, in that part
I shall show you, and leave the rest to me.'
The Marquis of C. did what the Cat
told him, without knowing why or where-
fore.
While he was washing himself, the
King passed by, and the Cat began to
cry out:






THE MASTER CAT; OR


'Help help! My Lord Marquis of C.
is going to be drowned.'
At this noise the King put his head
out of the coach-window.
Seeing that it was the Cat who had
so often brought him such good game,
he told his guards to run and help his
Lordship the Marquis of C. out of the
river.
While they were drawing the poor
Marquis out of the water, the Cat came
up to the coach.
He told the King that, while his
master was washing, there came by some
rogues, who went off with his clothes,
though he had cried out: 'Thieves!
thieves !' as loud as he could.
But this cunning Cat had hidden
them under a great stone.
The, King at once told his servants
to run, and fetch one of his best suits for
the Lord Marquis of C.






PUSS IN BOOTS


THE MASTER CAT; OR
PUSS IN BOOTS

PART III

THE King made a very great fuss of
him.
The fine clothes he had given him
made him look very grand (for he was
well-made and handsome in his person),
and so the King's daughter took a liking
for him.
She liked his looks so much, that no
sooner had the Marquis of C. cast two
or three tender glances at her, but she
fell in love with him.
The King would needs have him come
into the coach and take part of the airing.
The Cat, who was full of joy to see his
plan begin to succeed, marched on before,
and, meeting with some countrymen, who
were cutting grass in a field, he said to
them :






THE MASTER CAT; OR


'Good people, you who are mowing, if
you do not tell the King, that the field
you mow belongs to my Lord Marquis
of C., you shall be chopped as small as
herbs for the pot.'
The King did not fail asking of the
men, whose field it was that they were
mowing.
'It belongs to my Lord Marquis of C.,'
said they, for the Cat had made them
very much afraid.
'You see, sir,' said the Marquis, this
is a field which never fails to give a fine
crop every year.'
The Master Cat, who still went on
before, met with some reapers, and said
to them :
'Good people, you who are reaping,
if you do not tell the King, that all
this corn belongs 'to the Marquis of
C., you shall be chopped as small as
herbs for the pot.'
The King, who passed by a moment
after, would needs know to whom all






PUSS IN BOOTS


that corn, which he then saw, did
belong.
'To my Lord Marquis of C.,' said the
reapers, and the King was very well pleased
with it, as well as with the Marquis, whom
he began to think must be very rich.


The Master Cat, who went always
before, said the same words to all he
met, so that the King began to wonder
more and more at the great riches
of my Lord Marquis of C.






THE MASTER CAT, OR


THE MASTER CAT; OR
PUSS IN BOOTS

PART IV

Puss came at last to a castle, the master
of which was an ogre, the richest that had
ever been known.
All the lands which the King had
just gone over belonged to this castle.
The Cat, who had taken care to find
out who this ogre was, and what he could
do, went boldly up to the door and asked
to speak with him.
He said he could not pass so near
his castle, without having the honour of
calling upon him.
The Ogre was as kind to him as an
ogre could be, and made him sit down.
'I have been told,' said the Cat, 'that
you have the gift of being able to change
yourself into all sorts of animals, you have






PUSS IN BOOTS


a mind to; you can, they say, turn yourself
into a lion, or a tiger, and the like.'
'That is true,' said the Ogre very


shortly; and to prove it to you, you
shall see me now become a lion.'
Puss was in a great fright at the sight
of a lion so near him.






THE MASTERR CAT; OR


He at once sprang out of the window
and on to the roof, not without trouble
and danger, because of his boots, which
were of no use at all to him in walking
upon the tiles.
A little while after, when Puss saw
that the Ogre had turned himself into
an ogre again, he came down, and owned
he had been very much afraid.
'I have also been told,' said the Cat,
'but I know not if it be true, that you
have the power to take on you, the shape
of the smallest animals.
'They tell me that you can change
yourself into a rat or a mouse; but I
must own to you that I do not believe it.'
'Don't you!' cried the Ogre; 'you
shall see.'
And at the same time he changed
himself into a mouse, and began to run
about the floor.
Puss no sooner saw this, but he fell
upon him and ate him up.






PUSS IN BOOTS


THE MA-STER CAT; OR

PUSS IN BOOTS

PART V

MEANWHILE the King, who saw, as he
passed, this fine castle of the Ogre's, had
a mind to go into it.
Puss, who heard the noise of the coach
running over the draw bridge, ran out,
and said to the King:
'You are welcome to this castle of my
Lord Marquis of C.'
'What my Lord Marquis,' cried the
King, 'and does this castle also belong
to you ?
'There can be nothing finer than this
garden, and the great castle standing in
it. Let us go into it, if you please.'
The Marquis gave his hand to the
Princess, and so they all went in, the
King, of course, going in front.
D






THE MASTER CAT; OR


They passed into a grand hall, where
they found a fine dinner, which the Ogre
had got ready for his friends, who were
that very day to visit him, but dared


not to enter, knowing the King was
there.
It was a very fine feast. There were
all kinds of fish, soups and meats, and
the finest ripe fiuit.





PUSS IN BOOTS


What a fine house you have,' said
the King. 'You must be a happy man
to be so rich and to have so lovely a
home.'
The King was also charmed with the
goodness of my Lord Marquis of C., and
so was his daughter, who had fallen in
love with him, and, seeing how rich he
was the King said:
'It will be owing to yourself only, my
Lord Marquis, if you are not my son-in-
law.'
The Marquis, making a very low bow,
said that nothing would please him better;
and so, that very same day, he married
the Princess.
They lived in the Ogre's castle, and
were very happy. They never forgot how
large a share Puss had had in bringing
them such good luck.
Puss became a great lord, and never
ran after mice any more, except when he
felt tired of fine clothes, and wanted to
have some fun again.






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


VWHY THE SEA IS SALT

PART I
ONCE upon a time, long, long ago, there
were two brothers, the one. rich and the
other poor.
When Christmas Eve came, the poor
one had not a bite in the house, either
of meat or bread.
So he went to his brother, and begged
him, in God's name, to give him somne-
thing for Christmas Day.
It was by no means the first time,
that the brother had been fore. to give
something to him, and he was not
better pleased at being asked now than
he was at other times.
The rich brother was very fond of his
money, and-did not like to part with any
of it. So he said:
'If you will do what I ask you, you
shall have a whole ham.'






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


The poor one thanked him, and said
he would do anything he was told to do.
Well, here is the ham, and now yon
must go straight to Dead Man's Hall,'
said the rich brother, throwing the ham
to him.
'Well, I will do what I have said I
would,' said the other, and he took the
ham and set off.
He went on and on all the day long,
and at night he came to a place, where
there was a bright light.
'I have no doubt this is the place,'
thought the man with the ham.
An old man with a long white beard
was st. -ing in the outhouse, chopping
Yule logs.
'Good-evening,' said the man with the
ham.
'Good-evening to you. Where are you
going at this late hour?' said the man.
'I am going to Dead Man's Hall, if
only I am in the right track,' said the
poor man.






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


Oh! yes, you are right enough, for
it is here,' said the old man.
'It is a strange place, and if you wish
ever to come out of it again, you had
better do just what I tell you.
'When you get inside they will all
want to buy your ham, for they don't get
much meat to eat there.
'You must tell them you will not sell
it, unless they will give you for it the
hand-mill which stands behind the door.
'When you come out again, I will
teach you how to stop the hand-mill,
which is useful for almost everything.'
So the man with the ham thanked the
other for what he had told him, and rapped
at the door.

WHY TIE SEA IS SALT
PART II
WHEN he got into the Hall, everything
took place just as the old man had said
it would.






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


All the people, great and small, came
round him like ants on an ant-hill, and
each tried to outbid the other for the
ham.
'By rights my old woman and I
ought to have it for our Christmas
dinner, but, since you have set your
hearts upon it, I must just give it up to
you,' said the man.
'But, if I sell it, I will have as the
price of it, the hand-mill which is stand-
ing there behind the door.'
At first they would not hear of this, and
talked and talked with the man, but he
stuck to what. he had said, and so at last
the people were forced to give him the
hand-mill.
When the man came out again into
the yard, he asked the old wood-cutter
to show him how he was to stop the
hand-mill.
.When he had learnt how to do that,
he thanked him and set off home, with
all the speed he could.






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


But he did not get there, until after
the clock had struck twelve on Christmas
Eve.
Where in the world have you been?'
said the old woman. 'Here I have sat


waiting hour after hour, and have not
even two sticks to lay across each other
under the Christmas pudding-pot.'
'Oh! I could not come before; I
had something to see about, and a long






WBY THE SEA IS SALT


way to go, too; but now you shall just
see!' said the man.
Then he set the hand-mill on the
table, and bade it first grind light, then
a table-cloth, and then meat, and beer,
and everything else that was good for a
supper on Christmas Eve.
The mill ground all that he told it to
grind.
'Bless me!' said the old woman, as
one thing after another came out of it.
'How very strange!'
And she wanted to know where her
husband had got the mill from, but he
would not tell her that.
'Never mind where I got it; you can
see that it is a good one, and the water
that turns it will never freeze,' said the
man.
So he ground out of it meat and
drink, and all kinds of good things, to
last all Christmas-tide, and on the third
day he asked all his friends to come to a
feast.






WHlY THE SEA 1S SALT


WHY THE SEA IS SALT
PART III
Now when the rich brother saw all that
there was at the feast, and in the house,
he was both vexed and angry.
He was so mean that he did not- want
his brother to be rich.
'On Christmas Eve he was so poor,
that he came to me and begged for a
trifle, for God's sake, and now he gives a
feast as if he were both a count and a
king!' thought be.
'But, for heaven's sake, tell me where
you got your riches from,' said he to his
brother.
'From behind the door,' said he who
owned the mill, for he did not choose to
tell him.
But later in the evening, when he had
taken a drop too much, he could not stop
from telling how he had come by the
hand-mill.






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


'There you see what has brought me
all my wealth !' said he, and brought out
the mill, and made it grind first one thing
and then another.
When the brother saw that, he tried
hard to buy the mill, and after a great
deal of begging he got it.
But he had to give three hundred
pounds for it, and the poor brother was
to keep it till the haymaking was over,
for he thought:
'If I keep it as long as that, I can
make it grind meat and drink that will
last many a long year.'
During that time you may think that
the mill did not grow rusty, and when
hay harvest came the rich brother got it.
But the other had taken good care
not to teach him how to stop it.
It was evening when the rich man got
the mill home, and in the morning he bade
the old woman go out and spread the hay
after the mowers, and he would see to the
house himself that day, he said.





WHY THE SEA IS SALT


So, when dinner-time drew near, he set
the mill on the kitchen-table, and said:
'Grind herrings and milk pudding, and
do it both quickly and well.'
So the mill began to grind herrings
and milk pudding, and first all the dishes
and tubs were filled, and then it came out
all over the kitchen-floor.
The man twisted and turned it, and
did all he could to make the mill stop.
But, however he turned it and screwed
it, the mill went on grinding just the
same, and in a short time the pudding
rose so high, that the man was like to be
choked.
So he threw open the parlour-door.
But it was not long before the mill had
filled the parlour too, and it was only
with much trouble and danger, that the
man could go through the stream of
pudding, and get hold of the door-latch.
When he got the door open, he did
not stay long in the room, but ran out,
and the herrings and pudding came after






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


him, and the milk began to stream out
over both farm and field.






WVHY THE SEA IS SALT


WHY THE SEA IS SALT

PART IV

Now the old woman, who was out spread-
ing the hay, began to think dinner was
long in coming, and said to the women
and the mowers :
'Though the master does not call us
home, we may as. well go.
'It may be that he finds he is not
good at getting the dinner ready, and I
should do well to help him.' So they
began to go home.
When they had gone a little way up
the hill, they met the herrings and milk
pudding, all pouring forth and winding
about one over the other, and the man
himself in front of the flood.
'Would that each of you had a hun-
dred stomachs! Take care that you are
not drowned in the milk pudding !' he





WHY THE SEA IS SALT


cried, as he ran by them, as if Mischief
were at his heels, down to where his
brother dwelt.
Then he begged him, for God's sake,
to take the mill back again, and that in
an instant, for, said he:
'If it grind one hour more, the whole
land will be covered with herrings and
milk pudding.'
But the brother would not take it, until
the other paid him three hundred pounds,
and that he was bound to do.
And so the poor brother had both
the money and the mill again.
It was not long before he had a farm-
house, much finer than that in which his
brother lived.
The mill ground him so much money,
that he covered the farm with plates of
gold; and as the farmhouse lay close by
the sea-shore, it shone far out to sea.
Every one who sailed by there now,
had to stop to visit the rich man in the
gold farmhouse, and every one wanted to






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


see the wonderful mill, for there was no
one who had not heard tell of it.




IWY THE SEA IS SALT

PART V

AFTER a long, long time there came
also a skipper who wished to see the
mill.
He. asked if it could make salt.
'Yes, it could make salt,' said he who
owned it.
When the skipper heard that, he
wished with all his might and main
to have the mill, let it cost what it
might.
So he made up his mind to buy it if
he could get it.
He thought, if he had it, he would
never again have to sail far away over
the sea for shiploads of salt.





WHY THE SEA IS SALT


At first the man would not hear of
parting with it.
But the skipper begged and prayed,
and at last the man sold it to him,


and got many, many thousands of pounds
for it.
When the skipper had got the mill
on his back, he did not long stay there,
for he was so afraid that the man should
change his mind.
He had no time to ask how he was to






WHY THE SEA IS SALT


stop it grinding, but got on board his
ship as fast as he could.
When he had gone a little way out to
sea, he took the mill on deck.
'Grind salt, and grind both quickly
and well,' said the skipper.
So the mill began to grind salt, till
it spouted out like water, and when the
skipper had got the ship filled, he wanted
to stop the mill.
But, alas! he had gone off in such a
hurry, that he had not learned how to
stop it.
But, no matter which way he turned
it, or how much he tried, it went on
grinding, and the heap of salt grew higher
and higher, until at last the ship sank.
There lies the mill at the bottom of
the sea, and still, day by day, it grinds
on: and that is why the sea is salt.





LITTLE THUMB


LITTLE THUMB

PART I

THERE was, once upon a time, a man and
his wife, fagot-makers by trade, who had
seven children, all boys.
The eldest was but ten years old, and
the youngest only seven.
They were very poor, and their seven
children were a great trouble to them,
because not one of them was able to earn
his bread.
That which gave them yet more trouble
was that the youngest was very, very small.
He was a queer child, and not at all
like his brothers, who were very much like
other children.
He scarce ever spake a word, and so
they thought he was stupid, but this was
only a sign of good sense.
He was very little, and when born he






LITTLE THUMB


was no bigger than one's thumb, which
made him be called Little Thumb.
The poor child bore the blame of all
that was done amiss in the house, and,
guilty or not, was always in the wrong.


But he was more cunning, and had
a far greater share of wisdom, than all
his brothers put together.
If he spake little, he heard and thought
the more.






LITTLE THUMB


But there came a very bad year, and
the famine was so great, that these poor
people made up their minds to rid them-
selves of their children.
One evening, when they were all in
bed, and the fagot-maker was sitting with
his wife at the fire, he said to her, with
his heart ready to burst with grief:
Thou seest plainly that we are not
able to keep our children, and I cannot
see them starve to death before my face.
I have made up my mind to lose them
in the wood to-morrow, which may very
easily be done.'
'While they are busy in tying up the
fagots, we can run away, and leave them,
without their seeing that we are gone.
'Ah!' cried out his' wife; 'and canst
thou thyself have the heart, to take thy
children out along with thee, on purpose
to lose them ? '
In vain did her husband point out
to her, that they were too poor to feed
them. She would not consent to it.






LITTLE THUMB


She was indeed poor, but she was their
mother.
However, having thought what a grief
it would be to her to see them die with
hunger, she at last said he might do as
he wished, and went to bed all in tears.


LITTLE THUMB
PART II
LITTLE THUMu heard every word that
had been spoken.
As he lay in his bed, he saw that
they were talking very busily, so he got
up softly, and hid himself under his
father's stool, that he might hear what
they said without being seen.
This shows how very small he was.
He heard all that was said and then
went to bed again, but did not sleep a
wink all the rest of the night, thinking
on what he had to do.
He got up early in the morning, and






LITTLE THUMB


went to the river-side, where he filled
his pockets full of small white pebbles,
and then came home.
In the morning they all went out,


but Little Thumb never told his brothers
one word of what he knew.
They went into a very thick forest,
where they could not see one another
ten steps away.
Little Thumb kept both his ears and
eyes open to see what would b'e done,






LITTLE THUMB


The fagot-maker began to cut wood,
and the children to gather up the sticks
to make fagots.
Their father and mother, seeing them
busy at their work, got away from them
step by step.
Then, when they saw the children










were not looking, they ran away from
them all at once, along a by-way through
the bushes, and, made their way home as
fast as they could.
The mother was very sorry to have
to leave them there, and cried sadly all
the way.
When the children saw they were left






LITTLE THUMB


alone, they began to cry as loud as they
could.
Little Thumb let them cry on, and
said nothing, though he knew very well
how to get home again.
For, as he came, he took care to drop
all along the way, the little white pebbles
he had in his pockets.
There they lay, bright and shining,
all along the path, and so Little Thumb
felt quite sure of finding the way home
again.
After a little while he said to them:
'Be not afraid, boys: father and mother
have left us here, but I will lead you
home again, only follow me.'
They did so, and he brought them
home by the very same way, they came
into the forest.
By the time they got there, their father
and mother had been home an hour or two.
They dared not go in, but sat thenl-
selves down at the door, trying to hear
what their father and mother were saying.






LITTLE THUMB


LITTLE THUMB

PART III

THE very moment the fagot-maker and
his wife were got home, a rich man sent
them ten crowns, which he had owed them
a long while, and which they never
thought they should get.
This gave them new life, for the poor
people were nearly dead for want of food.
The fagot-maker sent his wife at once to
the butcher's.
As it was a long while since they
had eaten a bit, she bought thrice as
much meat as would sup two people.
When they had eaten, the woman said:
Alas! where are now our poor chil-
dren? they would make a good feast of
what we have left here.
It was you, William, who had a mind
to lose them: I told you we should re-
pent of it.






LITTLE THUMB


'What are they now doing in the
forest ? Alas! dear God, the wolves have
perhaps already eaten them up: thou wert
very cruel thus to have lost thy children.'
The fagot-maker grew at last quite
angry, for she said this over and over
again above twenty times.
She was quite sure they would be
sorry for what they had done, and that
she was in the right of it for so saying.
At last he said he would beat her, if
she did not hold her tongue.
It was not that the fagot-maker was
not, perhaps, more vexed than his wife,
but that she teased him.
He was like a great many others,
who love wives who speak well, but who
do not want to hear them say the same
thing over and over again, no matter how
good it may be.
She was all wet with tears, crying
out:
'Alas! where are now my children,
my poor children ?'






LITTLE THUMB


She spake this so very loud that the
children, who were at the gate, began to
cry out all together:
'Here we are Here we are !'


She ran to open the door, and said,
hugging them:
'I am glad to see you, my dear
children; you must be very hungry
and weary; and, my poor Peter, thou
art dirty all over. Come in and let me
clean thee.'





LITTLE THUMB


LITTLE THUMB

PART IV

Now, you must know that Peter was
her eldest son, whom she loved above all
the rest, because he was somewhat carroty,
as she herself was.
They sat down to supper, and ate so
well, that they pleased both father and
mother.
They told them how much afraid they
were, at being left alone in the forest,
speaking nearly always all together.
The good folks were glad to see their
children once more at home, as long as
the ten crowns lasted.
But, when the money was all gone,
they fell again into their former trouble,
and once more made up their minds to
lose them again.
And, that they might be the surer of
doing it, they made up their minds to






LITTLE THUMB


carry them much farther away than be-
fore.
They could not talk of this but they
were overheard by Little Thumb, who
said to himself:
'I will bring them home again just
as I did before.'
But, when he got up very early in the
morning to go and pick up some little
pebbles, he found the house-door locked,
and was at a stand what to do.
When their father had given each of
them a piece of bread for their breakfast,
Little Thumb thought he might make
use of this instead of the pebbles, by
throwing it in little bits all along the
way they should pass.
And so he put it in his pocket.
Their father and mother brought them
into the thickest and darkest part of the
forest, and then, stealing away into a by-
path, they there left them.






LITTLE THUMB


LITTLE THUDI-B
PART V
LITTLE THUMB was not very uneasy at it,
for he thought he could easily find the way
home again by means of his bread, which
he had thrown all along as he came.
But when he came to look for it, he
could not find so much as one crumb.
The birds had come and had eaten it up,
every bit.
Poor Little Thumb; his clever plan
had failed.
They were now in great trouble, for
the farther they went, the more they
were out of their way, and at last they
saw that they were lost.
Night now came on, and there arose a
high wind, which made them more afraid.
They thought they heard on every
side of them, the howling of wolves
coming to eat them up.
They scarce dared to speak or turn
their heads.





LITTLE THUMB


After a time, it rained very hard, and
they were soon wet to the skin.
Their feet slipped at every step they
took, and they fell into the mud, whence
they got up in a very dirty state.
Their hands and feet were soon numb
with cold.
Little Thumb climbed up to the top
of a tree, to see if he could see the
way.
Having turned his head about on
every side, he saw at last a faint light,
like that of a candle, but a long way from
the forest.
He came down, but when upon the
ground, he could see it no more.
However, having walked for some
time with his brothers, towards that side
on which he had seen the light, he saw
it again as he came out of the wood.
'Now,' said Little Thumb, 'we shall be
all right. Come along, boys, there must
be a house where the light is, and we will
beg to be taken in for the night.'






LITTLE THUMB


LITTLE THUMB

PART VI
THEY came at last to the house where
this candle was, not without a great deal
of fear: for very often they had lost sight
of it, and then again they would see it.
They knocked at the door, and a good
woman came and opened it. She asked
them what they wanted.
Little Thumb told her they were pool
children who had been lost in the forest,
and asked her to let them lodge there for
God's sake.
The woman, seeing them so very
pretty, began to weep, and said to them:
'Alas! poor babies; whither are ye
come? Do ye not know that this house
belongs to a cruel ogre, who eats up little
children ? '
'Ah! dear lady,' said Little Thumb
(who shook for fear, and so did his
brothers), 'what shall we do?






LITTLE THUiMB


'To be sure the wolves of the forest
will eat us to-night, if you will not let us
lie here. We would rather the ogre should
eat us. Perhaps he may take pity upon us.
Will you beg of him to be kind to us?'
The Ogre's wife, who thought she could
hide them from her husband till morning,
let them come in.
She brought them to warm themselves
at a very good fire; for there was a
whole sheep upon the spit, roasting for
the Ogre's supper.
Just as they began to be a little
warm, they heard three or four great
raps at the door. This was the Ogre,
who was come home. Upon this she hid
them under the bed and went to open the
door.
The Ogre came in and soon asked if
supper was ready, and the wine drawn,
and then sat himself down to table.
The sheep was as yet all raw, but he
liked it the better for that. He sniffed
about to' the right and left, saying:






LITTLE THUMB


'I smell fresh meat.'
'What you smell so,' said his wife,
'must be the calf which I have just now
killed.'
'I smell fresh meat, I tell thee once
more,' said the Ogre, looking crossly at
his wife; 'and there is something here
which you are hiding from me.' As he
spake these words he got up from the
table, and went over to the bed.
'Ah, ah!' said he; 'I see then how
thou wouldst cheat me, thou wicked
woman; I know not why I do not eat
thee up too, but it is well for thee that
thou art a tough old crow.
Here is good game, which will make
a fine dinner for the three ogres, who
are to pay me a visit in a day or two.'
With that he dragged them out from
under the bed, one by one.
The poor children fell upon their
knees, and begged him to spare them.
But they had to do with one of the
most cruel ogres in the world, who, far






LITTLE THUMB


from having any pity on them, had
already made up his mind to eat them.


He then took a great knife, and, coming
up to these poor children, rubbed it upon
a great stone which he held in his left





LITTLE THUMB


hand. This he did to make the knife
sharp.
Hie had already taken hold of one of
them when his wife said to him:
'Why need you do it now? Is it not
time enough to-morrow ?'
'Hold your tongue,' said the Ogre;
'they will be all the more tender.'
'But you have so much meat already,'
said his wife. 'Here are a calf, two sheep,
and half a hog.'
'That is true,' said the Ogre; 'give
them their belly full that they may not
get thin, and put them to bed.'



LITTLE THUMB

PART VII

THE good woman was very glad of this,
and gave them a good supper.
But they were so much afraid, they
could not eat a bit.





LITTLE THUMB


As for the Ogre, he sat down again
to drink, being highly pleased that he
had got so much fresh meat to treat
his friends with.
He ate and drank so much, that he
was soon very sleepy, and so he went to
bed.
Now, the Ogre had seven girls, all little
children, and they had all of them very
rosy cheeks, because they used to eat fresh
meat like their father. But they had
little grey eyes, quite round, hooked noses,
and very long sharp teeth, wide apart
from each other.
They were not as yet over and
above cruel, but it seemed as if they soon
would be, for they had already bitten
little children, that they might suck
their blood.
They had been put to bed early, with
every one a crown of gold upon her
head.
There was in the same chamber a
bed of the same size, and it was into





LITTLE THUMB


this bed, the Ogre's wife put the seven
little boys, after which she went to
bed.
Little Thumb had seen that the Ogre's
girls had crowns of gold upon their heads.
He was afraid lest the Ogre should repent
his 'not killing them, and so he got up
about midnight, and first took the caps
off his own and his brothers' heads.
He then crept softly across the room,
and took off the gold crowns from the
heads of the Ogre's seven children.
He then changed the caps for the
crowns, so that the Ogre's children wore
the caps, and he and his brothers wore
the crowns.
In this way, he hoped to make the
Ogre kill his own children, instead of
him and his brothers.
The Ogre woke about midnight, and
being sorry that he had put off till morn-
ing, what he might have done over-night,
threw himself out of bed, and, taking his
great knife,



3i1





LITTLE THUMB


'Let us see,' said he, 'how our little
rogues do, and not make two jobs of the
matter.'
He then went up, feeling his way in
the dark, into his children's bedroom, and
came to the bed where the little boys lay.
They were every soul of them fast
asleep, except Little Thumb, who shook
with fear when he found the Ogre feel-
ing about his head, as he had done about
his brothers'.
The Ogre, feeling the golden crowns,
said:
'I should have made a fine piece of
work of it, truly; I find I drank too
much last night.'
Then he went to the bed where the
girls lay; and, feeling upon their heads,
the boys' little caps,
Ah!' said he, 'my merry lads, are
you there ? Let us work as we ought.'
And saying these words, without more
ado, he cut the throats of all his seven
girls.





LITTLE THUMB


LITTLE THUMB

PART VIII

WELL pleased with what he had done,
he went to bed again to his wife.
So soon as Little Thumb heard the
Ogre snore, he waked his brothers, and
bade them put on their clothes quietly
and follow him.
They. stole down softly into the
garden, and got over the wall.
They kept running about all night, in
great fear all the while, without knowing
which way they went.
The Ogre, when he awoke, said to
his wife: 'Go upstairs and dress those
young scamps who came here last
night.'
The Ogress did not know what to
think of this goodness of her husband,
not dreaming after what manner she
should dress them





LITTLE THUMB


Thinking that he had told her to
go and put on their clothes, she went
up to the room.
Think what a fearful sight met her
eyes, for there lay her seven girls all
dead in the bed, which was soaked with
blood!
She fainted away, for this is the first
thing a woman does in such cases.
The Ogre, fearing his wife would be
too long in doing what he had told
her, went up himself to help her.
He was no less struck with fear than
his wife at this dreadful sight.
'Ah! what have I done?' cried he.
'The wretches shall pay for it dearly.'
He threw a jug of water upon his
wife's face, and, having brought her to
herself,
'Give me quickly,' cried he, 'my
boots of seven leagues, that I may go
and catch them.'
He went out, and, having run over a
vast deal of ground, both on this side






LITTLE THUMB


and that, he came at last into the very
road where the poor children were, and
not above a hundred steps from their
father's house.
They saw the Ogre, who went at
one step from hill to hill, and over
rivers as easily as over the smallest
brooks.
Little Thumb, seeing a hollow rock
near the place where they were, made
his brothers hide themselves in it.
He also crowded into it himself,
peeping all the time to see what would
become of the Ogre.


LITTLE THUMB B
PART IX
THE Ogre, who found himself much tired
with his long walk, had a great mind
to rest himself, and, by chance, went to
sit down upon the very same rock, where
the little boys had hid themselves.






LITTLE THUAfI


He was so very tired that he fell
asleep at once.
After a little while he began to
snore so loud, that the poor children were
no less afraid of him, than when he held
up his great knife, and was going to cut
their throats.
Little Thumb was not so much afraid
as his brothers.
He told them that they must run
away towards home, while the Ogre was
asleep so soundly, and that they were
not to be in any pain about him.
They did what he told them, and
were soon all safe at home.
Then Little Thumb came softly up
to the Ogre, pulled off his boots gently,
and put them on his own feet.
The boots were very long and large,
but as they were fairy boots, they had
the gift of becoming big and little, so
as to fit the legs of those who wore
them.
Hence they fitted his feet and legs






LITTLE THUMB


as well, as if they had been made for
him.
He went off as fast as he could go to
the Ogre's house, where he saw his wife
crying for the loss of her dead children.


4_I


~by~
'r ~3~.~W~_d"L;~J
r~.-
%~; ~p~Y


'N


Your husband,' said Little Thumb, 'is
in very great danger, being taken by a
gang of thieves, who have sworn to kill
him, if he does not give them all his
gold and silver,


--_I



V-s
--r


. _... ra


*^.S3-~





LITTLE THUMB


'The very moment they held their
daggers at his throat he saw me, and
asked me to come and tell you, that you
must give me all the money he has, with-
out keeping a single coin.
'If you do not they will kill him
without mercy. As his case is very
pressing, he made me make use (you see
I have them on) of his boots, that I
might make the more haste, and to show
you that what I tell you is true.'
The good woman gave him all she
had: for this Ogre was a very good
husband, though he used to eat up little
children.


LITTLE THUMB

PART X
LITTLE THUMB, having thus got all the
Ogre's money, came home, and, as you
may think, his father was very, very glad
to see him.





LITTLE THUMB


There are many people who do not
think that this story is quite true.
They say that Little Thumb never
robbed the Ogre at all, and that he only
thought he might very justly take off his
boots of seven leagues, because he made
no other use of them but to run after
little children.
These folks also say that they know
this is true, as they have drunk and eaten
often at the fagot-maker's house.
They say that when Little Thumb
had taken off the Ogre's boots he went
to Court, where he was told that they
were very much in pain about an army,
which was a very long way off.
They wanted very badly to know if
their army had won the battle.
He went, say they, to the King, and
told him that, if he wished it, he would
bring him news from the army before night.
The King told him that if he could
do this, he would give him a great sum
of money.






LITTLE THUMB


Little Thumb was as good as his word,
and came back that very same night with
the news.
This caused him to be well known,
and so he got whatever he asked for, as
the King paid him very well for carrying
his orders to the army.
After having served the King in this
way for some time, and gained thereby
great wealth, he went home again.
His father and mother and all his
friends were filled with joy at his return.
He made the whole family very rich,
bought places for his father and brothers,
and, by that means, made them all very
happy.
He lived to a good old age, and died
happy in the thought, that he had been
able to do so much good to his friends.




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