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Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00068
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00068
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Natal grass
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
Full Text



Volume 25 Number 2 r Ppl

SUPPLEMENT TO

FLORIDA-

QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT

APRIL 1, 1915,

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.


NATAL GRASS


Entered January 81, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-clau
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.
THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED FRE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM
T. J. APPLEYARD, STATB PRINTER
TALLAHASSBB, ILORIDA




J 6.25
1\ /
/ o~2)












COUNTY MAP OF STATE OF FLORIDA.












NATAL GRASS

BY JOHN M. ScorrT.

This grass (Tricholaena rosea) is an annual grass from
South Africa, which is now commonly grown in many
tropical and semi-tropical countries. Sometimes it is
called "Australian Redtop," or "Hawaiian Redtop," but
it is not related to the true redtop. It was introduced
into Florida some twenty years ago. It is now grown
abundantly in Marion, Lake, Sumter, Orange and Polk
Counties, and to some extent in all parts of South
Florida.
Natal grass is sometimes confused with Rhodes grass.
However, there is no likeness between the two, except that
they are both of African origin. In the Natal grass the
seeds are borne in loose, pink, downy, branching sprays,
the color of which fades to almost white when the seed
is matured.

SOIL.

Natal grass makes its best growth on any good vege-
table land. It will grow on quite sandy soil, but will
not produce as good yields as it will on the better soils.

SEED BED.

The preparation of the seed bed for Natal grass is
similar to that for any other cultivated crop. It is not
necessary to prepare a deep seed bed, but it is essential
to see that the surface is well pulverized. Plow the land
"broadcast" to a depth of four to six inches. Then pre-
Ipare the seed bed by the use of the harrow. If the sur-









face is rough, it may be necessary to harrow the field
several times. The tooth harrow or the Acme harow are
two good implements that can be used to advantage for
this work.
SEEDING.

The seed may be sown broadcast, or it can be planted
in rows eight or ten inches apart. The seed is very-light
and fluffy and it is difficult to scatter it uniformly over
the surface of the soil. This, however, can be overcome
to a considerable extent if the seed is mixed with moist
sand. If the sand is made too wet it will not be possible
to get an even distribution. It will require ten to four-
teen pounds of seed to plant an acre. It will always be
found best to use a liberal quantity of seed, so as to get
a good stand.
Care should be taken not to cover the seed too deeply.
If the seed is covered too deeply a poor stand is likely to
be the result. The seed is very small, and it is not pos-
sible for it to come up through a heavy covering of soil.
Natal grass seed is widely distributed by the wind, and
it may come up from seed in cultivated fields or else-
where like crab grass. It is more or less winter-killed in
centrall Florida, but farther south, or in warm winters,
it may live over from one season to the next. There
should be no fear of it becoming a pest in cultivated
fields, for it can be eradicated without ldiffinlty. It
ripens seed uniformly, so if it is made into Ihay just be-
fore it blooms, no seeds will he scattered, and next year
there will he little or no Natal grass in that field.

IHAY.

If the seed is sown about May 1, the first crop of hay
will be ready for harvesting about July 15. Natal grass
requires about eighty to eighty-five days from seeding to
maturity under favorable conditions.









The yield of hay per acre varies greatly, depending
upon the soil and climatic conditions. The heavier yields
will, of course, be obtained from the better soils.
Natal grass was first planted by the Experiment Sta-
tion in 1892, and on the Station farm at Gainesville in
May, 1908, where it has been growing each year since.
The average yield of hay per acre during the past four
years has been about one and a quarter tons. The
heaviest yield of hay during one season was 2.6 tons per
acre: this being the yield of two cuttings. The soil upon
which it was grown is what is classed as high pine land.
such as would produce 15 to 20 bushels of corn per acre.
The following figures give some idea of the feeding
value of Natal grass hay when compared with timothy:

Natal. Timothy.
Moisture ............. 9.75 per cent. 1:3.2 per cent.
Fibre ................ .36.75 29.0 "
Ash .................. 5.02 4.4
Protein ............... 7.45 5.9 "
Starch, sugar, etc.......39.23 45.0 "
Fats, etc............ .1.80 2.5

Large quantities of hay of various kinds are shipped
into Florida each year. When hay was cheap, the buy-
ing of a few tons each winter did not require tire expen-
diture of much cash. But now when we have to pay as
much or more than $1.00 or $1.50 per hundred for hay,
the expenditure for this feed alone soon amounts to sev-
eral hundred dollars. Thus a large sum of money is sent
out of the State each year for a product that we can and
should produce at home. Every ton of hay produced on
the farm means that much extra profit for the season's
work.




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