• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of state of Florida
 Part I
 Chapter II. Crop condition, prospective...
 Part III. Rice hulls, deleterious...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00061
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00061
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Chapter II. Crop condition, prospective yields and live stock condition
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Part III. Rice hulls, deleterious and unwholesome--prohibited in stock feed sold in Florida; fertilizers, feeding stuffs, and foods and drugs
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
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        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
Full Text






-J
Vol. 28 No.



FLORIDA'
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


JULY 1, 1918.


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

Part 1-Mlich Goats; Wheat Conditions; Home Cured
Beef; Value of Dairy Cows at Various Ages;
Weight of Dairy Products; Weight of Fat Cattle;
Indian Runner Ducks; Preserving Eggs; Tonic
for Hogs; Poison Bran Mash; Poison for MMole
Crickets; Percentage of Plant Food in Animal
Excrements.
Part 2--Crop Conditions and Prospective Yields and Live
SStook Conditions.
Part 3-Rice Hulls, Deleterious and Unwholesome-Pro-
hibited if Stock Feed Sold in Florida. Fertilizers,
Feeding Stuffs, and Foods and Drugs.

Entered January 81, 1908, at Tallabasmee, Florida, a second-elass
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.
THESE BUILTINS ARE ISSUED FRB TO THOSE REQUESTING THMI

T. J. APPLTAnD, STATE PalIT-a
TALLRAXABS, PLOAIDA



























COUNTY
MAP OF
STATEoFFLORIDA
SHOWING SUBDIVISIONS


' 0ni wZr


















PART I.


Milch Goats.
Wheat Condition.
Home Cured Beef.
Value of Dairy Cows at Various Ages.
Weight of Dairy Products.
Weight of Fat Cattle.
Indian Runner Ducks.
Preserving Eggs.
Tonic for Hogs.
Poison Bran Mash.
Poison for Mole Crickets.
Percentage of Plant Food in Animal Excrements.













MILCH GOATS

By H. S. Elliott,
Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture.

For several months this Department has received many
inquiries relative to this subject and the probable success
of such an industry in Florida.
On investigation by this Department we find this is a
very limited industry, the territory covered in its opera-
tion probably not exceeding half a dozen States in num-
ber, excepting Florida, where the number of goats used
for supplying milk to human beings does not exceed fifty
at this time.
Thq industry is operated to some extent in New York,
Virginia, New Mexico, Arizona, and in California, to a
considerable extent in the latter, and where it probably
meets with more success than in any other section of the
United States. We believe there can be no reasonable
grounds, for doubting its adaptibility to and entire suc-
cess in Florida, and especially when confined to the hilly
and rolling lands of the State without regard to section.
With the present economic condition and the extraordi-
nary high cost of living, the use of the milch goat is one
sure means of reducing living expenses on the part of
small families and at the same time placing one of the
most nutricious and wholesome foods within their daily
control at the minimum of cost. It is our deliberate opin-
ion that it is an industry both capable and worthy of the
highest development.

GENERAL INFORMATION CONCERNING MILCH

Milch goats are kept for milk production in many for-
eign countries, especially in Continental Europe, Great
Britain, Scandinavia, and in the countries bordering the
Mediterranean. They are found in limited numbers in
different States in the Union, and are doubtless more nu-
merous in.California than elsewhere in the United States.
They are generally kept in very small herds that supply
the milk used by the family. A relatively small number
of large herds is found in California, some in Alabama,
and some in Virginia.












The comparatively dry climate of the Southwest agrees
* well with milch goats, and they are kept on land differing
greatly in topography and feed conditions. If sufficient
feed is available, hilly and even rocky land can be used for
keeping goats. Goats do not thrive well on low, damp, or
swampy land as the conditions on such land are conducive
to foot rotand other troubles. Provided they are properly
cared for, goats will do well on well-drained valley land.
Alfalfa in tre Southwest furnishes an abundant feed
supply in the interior valleys, which could be utilized in
goat keeping as at the present time for dairy cattle and
other classes of live stock. In most places, where alfalfa
cannot be grown successfully, other pasture crops well
adapted for feeding goats can be raised to advantages, such
as clover, vetch, rape, and peas, cow peas ,velvet beans,
etc., such as is found growing in waste places, on vacant
city lots, along roadways and fences, on hill lands where
there is not sufficient available feed for keeping a cow.
Goats thus largely derive their living from feed that would
otherwise go to waste, which accounts for their popularity
among people in urban communities and for the fact that
they are generally considered most economical milk pro.
ducers. The present conditions,>care and possible exten-
sion of the milch goat industry in this 'State will be
discussed further on in this bulletin.

BREEDS OF MILCH GOATS.

Trere are many different breeds of milch goats, but
comparatively few of these are represented in California,
or other States, those present in largest numbers being
the Toggenburg, Saanen, and Anglo-Nubian. A great va-
riety of crosses and numerous goats of no particular
breeding are also found.
Toggenburg.-This breed has its native home in Tog-
genburg Valley, Switzerland, where it has been bred for
centuries. The prevailing color is brown, both light and
dark, with white markings. A white brindle mark is al-
ways present on each side of the face. White is also pres-
ent on the under line and on the legs below the knees and
hocks. White is also now and then found on the sides of
the animals. As a rule, they are hornless, but horns are
some times developed.' The head is rather long, facial
lines straight or slightly concave, ears of a medium size,












more or less erect, although some times held almost hori-
zontally. The neck is somewhat long and slender and
there may or may not be wattles at the base of the lower
jaw. Toggenburgs usually have a beard, which on the
male is long and heavy; the better specimens if the breed
are always lean and of medium size, females weighing
about 100 to 140 pounds, while bucks as a rule weigh from
110 to 140 pounds. Both long-haired and short-haired ani-
mals are often seen in the same herd. It has been our ex-
perience that the Toggenburgs are very hardy and make
splendid mothers.
Saanen-This is another Swiss breed which is quite
similar to the Toggenburg in general conformation. They
are a little heavier in weight, mature bucks weighing from
175 to 200 pounds and does from 110 to 140 pounds. Tney
are of a white or cream color, and usually short-haired.
The Saanen is considered a hornless breed but horns often
occur as in the case of the Toggenburg. The Saanen may
be used to great advantage in grading up herds, as many
of the common goats are white in color. \
Nubians or Anglo-Nubians.-This goat is probably the
result of a cross between the common short haired goat of
England and the Nubian, Egyptian, Abyssinian, Chitral,
or some other Oriental breed of goats. They have a short
coat of no fixed color, all colors and combinations being
found. The ears are long, wide and pendant or semi-
pendant. The facial lines is arched with a slight taper
toward the muzzle. The eyes are large and full and the
forehead wide. The kids are relatively large and grow
rapidly.
THE MILK OF THE GOAT.

One of the first questions usually asked about milch
goats is in regard to the quantity and quality of milk pro-
duced. Milch goats are similar to dairy cows in that some
do not yield a sufficient quantity to pay for their keep,
while others are profitable dairy animals. A good goat
should give 800 to 1,000 pounds (approximately 400-500
quarts) during a lactation period. Many breeders speak
of the production of their animals in rather uncertain
terms, such as a four quart doe, a three quart doe, etc.
This refers to the production for a single day during the
maximum flow of milk. The individuality of the animal
is the greatest factor influencing milk production. Breed












is also an important factor. The Toggenburg and Saanen
are, as a rule, heavy milkers. While but little is definitely
known in regard to the production of the other breeds at
the present time. Pelger states that the Anglo-Nubian is
a good milker of rich milk, containing more butter-fat
than that of Swiss goats, although the yield is not as a
rule as large.

COMPOSITION OF GOATS MILK.

The composition of goats' milk varies as that of cows'
milk, with the breed, period of lactation, and the individ-
uality of the animal. But little information is at hand
concerning the composition of the milk of goats of differ-
ent breeds. So far as known, the milk of the breeds of
ISwiss origin does not contain as high a percent of butter-
fat as that from the Anglo-Nubian or even from some of
the common goats. As the doe advances in her period of
lactation the fat content of the milk increases. This also
varies with other conditions, like intervals between milk-
ings, completeness. of milking, etc., so that the test of a
single sample of milk will not give a reliable index to the
average quantity of the milk. This can only be obtained
by the regular testing of the milk for one or more full
days at intervals during the lactation period. In the
same way as for dairy cows. A few analyses of goats' milk
taken from different sources are given below:

COMPOSITION OF GOATS' MILK (GENEVA, N. Y.,
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.)

Analyses were made of twenty-three samples of milk
from eleven animals:
Average Variations
per cent. per cent.
Fat .................. 3.82 ................ 1.80- 8.40
Total solids.......... 12.12................ 9.22-17.63
Total Proteins ........ 3.21................ 2.24- 5.21
Casein ............... 2.40................ 1.56- 4.06
A sh ................. .55................ .40- .80
Specific gravity, 1,0294.












COMPOSITION OF GOATS' MILK (CALIFORNIA AG-
RICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.)

Analyses of the milk from the does in the University
herd are made weekly. The average given below are the
results of the analyses made weekly during the entire lac-
tation periods. With one exception these does are Tog-
geuburgs:
Average Variations
per cent. per cent.
W aler ................ 88.05 91.5-85.2
Total solids .......... 11.95 ................ 9.5-14.8
Fat .................. 3.40................ 1.7- 5.6
Solids, not fat ....... 8.55 ................ 7.8- 9.2

OTHER SOURCES GIVE THE COMPOSITION OF
GOATS' MILK AS FOLLOWS:


IWater
Authority. per .
cent.
Renessc ....... 85.501
Landweinth ... 85.601
Hoffman ...... 86.911
Koenis ........ 86.881


Fat
per
cent.
4.80
4.60
4.73
*4.70


Casein aud Sugar
albumen | per
cent. cent.
5.001 4.001
4.80 4.30
3.68 4.50
3.76 4.64


Ash
per
cent.
.70

.90
.85


*Variations, 2.29-7.55 per cent (Compiled from about
100 analyses).

FLAVOR AND ODOR OF GOATS' MILK.

Many people believe that all goats milk has a peculiar
goatyy" odor or taste. This is not, however, necessarily
the case. A disagreeable flavor is often times due to the
presence of a buck in the milking herd; it may also come
from the feeding of improper feed. Provided good feed
and care are given the doe, and the dilk is produced under
sanitary conditions, no disagreeable odor or flavor is
found in goats milk, although it has a distinct flavor, dif-
ferent from that of cows milk.
Length of Lactation Period.-Some of the common goats
milk for only four or five months; on the other hand it is
not easy to "dry-up" many well-bred does even after they












have been milking for ten months. The common goat herd
may be improved, however, by the use of pure bred bucks
of known milking strains. A good milch goat should give
milk for at least eight months.

USE OF GOATS' MILK.

Direct Consumption.-Goats' milk is a common article
of diet throughout Europe. Foreign writers agree in at-
testing to the value of goats milk for invalids and children.
Physicians give testimony as to the beneficial use of goats'
milk for infant feeding.
The following quotation from the annual report of the
Geneva, N. Y., Agricultural Experiment Station for 1915
is of interest in this connection:
"During the past few years the station has maintained,
a herd of milch goats for the purpose of studying, not only
the cost of maintenance, but also the adaptability of the
milk to certain uses. The most striking result so far se-
cured relate to feeding goats milk to infants. The station
has had the opportunity to supply this milk to a fairly
large number of very young children who were in serious
physical condition, due to their inability to properly di-
gest and assimilate other modified cows' milk or any'of the
commercial infants' foods that were tried. In nearly all
cases of this kind, the physical condition of the children
has been built up, and satisfactory growth has been
brought about by the use of goats' milk. It is not entirely
clear why this milk has proven to be so efficient a food in
the instances under observation.2
2New York (Geneva) Agri. Exp. Sta., Bull. 413, p. 639."

CARE OF MILCH GOATS.
The quantity and quality of milk which a goat will give
depends very largely on the animal herself.
A good scrub, or common garden goat may give as much
as 1 or 2 quarts a day for two months, but if her milking
qualities are notdeveloped, she soon goes dry.
A grade-i. e., the product of a pure bred or cross bred
sire and a scrub dam will produce more milk than her
dam and the quality will depend largely on her sire.
A cross--i. e., the product of two specimens of different
pure breeds will give a fine quantity of milk and it will
vary in quality according to the herds of sire and dam.












The Swiss goats are the Holsteins of the goat family,
giving an enormous quantity of rather poor milk, the
amount of milk being as much as 6 quarts in exception-
ally good animals. The butter fat would not be higher
than 3,5 per cent. Of course individuals vary-some more,
some less.
The Nubian goat and the Indian goat are the Jerseys
of the goat family. The Nubian will produce 41 quarts of
milk which will test 8 per cent or 9 per cent butter fat.
Note carefully the distinction that is made all through
this article between grades and crosses.
The young does should be kept growing all the time, and
should never be bred until fifteen months of age at least.
The period of gestation is from 147 to 152 days and the
dams stand a great deal of rough usage without accident.
Two kids are generally born at a time, but we have
known goats to have three, four, and sometimes five young
at a birth. The kids should.be allowed to take the cole-
strum, or first secretion of the glands, which is yellowish
and thick, and of a mucilagenous nature. It seems to act
as a laxative and tones up the systems of the young.
The udder should be very carefully watched and if it
becomes inflamed and over-distended it should be very
carefully washed with warm water with a few drops of
turpentine in it, and then carefully massaged with olive
oil. Then a part of the contents of the udder should be
drawn-sometimes even before the kids are born.
If the kids are pure bred or cross bred they may all be
kept for stock, as there is a great demand for young ani-
mals. If they are grades, the males may be killed at birth
or else emasculated and at from six months to a year they
make most excellent meat, resembling' mutton, if fed on
pasture, and venison, if fed in the woods.
The females should be bred to pure or cross bred bucks.
It is good to breed back one generation to its own sire to
fix the type. A grade should never be allowed to be the
sire of any kids. Never keep one.
There is a general impression that goats are omniverous,
eating any and everything to which they may gain ac-
cess. This is a great mistake. Under proper conditions,
the goat is the most fastidious of all our domestic ani-
mals, and refuses to drink any but pure, fresh water, and
scorns sloppy, sour or greasy food. Indeed the greatest
trouble in goat feeding is to prevent waste in stall feed-












ing, for if once any of the food is dropped under foot, it
is never touched.
When it is available the best results are obtained from
free.grazing on land which has been deforested, but not
yet reduced to good pasture, as the animals are browsers
rather than grazers, and relish a very diversified diet.
It is best to have the land well fenced, and a good fence
consists of woven wire twenty-six inches high, with a
strand of barbed wire three inches above it, and another
strand six or eight inches above that. The tendency of a
goat is rather to squeeze through or crawl under than
jump over an obstacle.
The goat should be exceedingly valuable to persons
dwelling in an arid or semi-arid country, for she will not
only make a living but thrive, and supply a generous
quantity of delicious milk and wholesome, palatable meat,
where the cow would perish from starvation. Of course,
on such land a goat should. have free range.
Easily handled., readily finding her own food, and trans-
ported with but little trouble, the goat makes a fine foster
mother for infants, and has been used to raise lambs,
calves, and by the irony of fate, one was foster mother to
a lion cub in the Zoological Gardens in Paris.
It is surprising how small a quantity of water will suf-
fice for a goat, and she must be frequently encouraged
to drink.
The Angora produces mohair, and is largely used as a
means of destroying brush and shrubbery on newly
cleaned land but is not a milch goat.
The garden refuse, clean and fresh, with scraps from
the kitchen, supplemented with some sweet hay and a
little grain, will be ample to feed these animals. Their
kids, if pure bred or cross bred, will bring enough to pay
for all the bought feed for a year.
A first class milch goat, pure bred or cross bred, giving
a gallon of milk a day when fresh, will readily bring
$50.00 to $100.00 or more. But even at that apparently
:high price they are exceedingly scarce, and for every doe
kid a breeder has sold, he has had not less than fifty
chances to sell the same kid. Following are the names
and addresses of a number of milch goat breeders in the
several States:
D. R. Schmidt, Hannibal, Mo.-Anglo-Nubians, Toggen-
burgs, and grades.












Esther Tufts, Meredith, N. H.-Saanen and Toggen-
burgs.
Edwin W. Pritchett, Rt. 1, Long Beach, California-
Swiss Toggenburgs.
Will L. Tewalt, Richey, Miss.-Pure Toggenburgs.
Victor D. Hondt, Spankle, Washington.
Fred C. Lounsbury, Plainfield, N. J.-Anglo-Nubian
and Toggenburg grades.
G. T. Etzel, 293 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Miss H. A. Wood, Swiss Goat Dairy, Pasadena, Cali-
fornia-Purebred Swiss Toggenburgs.



WHEAT CONDITION

Compiled by H. S. Elliott,
Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture.
The economic importance of the food supply in rela-
tion to the Allied Cause and our National Life is little
realized by the majority of the people. Many statements
are made that under certain conditions if not complied
with, our fight for liberty and human rights will fail.
To give our people a clearer understanding of the situa-
tion and enable them to realize what is essential to rsuc-
cess, we have compiled the following information, mostly
From the Year Book of the United States Department of
Agriculture for 1917. It will prove of interest and value
to all who read it.
PRESENT WHEAT SITUATION AS IT AFFECTS
THE ALLIES.
The situation at the beginning of the year 1917-18 may
be summarized as follows: The total production of the
neutral and entente allied countries, exclusive of Russia
and Roumania, is greater than in 1916-17, but stocks are
low, except in Australia. The allied western uropean
countries have produced 213,000,000 bushels less than
their average before the war, but the exporting countries
which supply their deficiencies are harvesting more grain
this year and will probably reduce their consumption, so
that they may export a larger proportion of their crops.
Argentina, the United States, and Canada, the three












countries which are in a position to export grain in large
quantities and most easily, are harvesting this year nearly
150,000,000 bushels more than last year, and slightly more
than before the war.
A large share of the needs of the Entente Allies in
Western Europe must be met by export from the United
States. The annual distribution of the wheat crop of
the United States is shown in table first quoted. It will
be seen that America enters into the war with a short
crop and with a low stock on hand. The problem is to
reduce domestic consumption of wheat products to a
minimum in order that there may be as much as possible
left for export to the allies.
The estimated stock on hand July 1 added to the esti-
mated production of the year gives 699 million bushels
to be distributed between July 1, 1917, and July 1918.
This is the lowest supply that has been available in any
year. The per capital consumption of wheat varies from
year to year, the highest shown in the table being 5.80
bushels in 1915 and the lowest 4.70 bushels in 1916. The
Bureau of Crop Estimates has estimated that the normal
consumption in the United States amounts to 5.3 bushels
per capia. Estimating the population of the United
States this year to be approximately 103,500,000, normal
conditions would require 556 million bushels; the seed re-
quirements for next year.are 87 million bushels, and by
leaving very small stocks on hand July 1, 1918, there will
be only 23 million bushels left for export. If we consume
wheat at the rate computed for last year, 4.7 bushels per
capital or 0.6 bushel less than the normal amount, there
will be approximately 86 million bushels for export. The
investigations of the Bureau of Crop Estimates deter-
mined that the normal consumption of wheat in some of
the Southern IStates, where little wheat is raised and
the people eat much corn bread, was 4 bushels per capital.
If the people of the entire United States will substitute
corn and potatoes for wheat to the extent that some of
the Southern States do, the per capital consumption may
be lowered to 4 bushels, and then there will be 158 million
bushels available for export. Even this amount is con-
siderably below what the United States has contributed
to the allies during the previous years of the war, for the
exports of domestic wheat during 1914-15 were 332 mil-
lion bushels and during 1915-16 they were 243 million.











MONTHS IN WHICH WHEAT MATURES AND IS
HARVESTED IN THE VARIOUS COUNTRIES
OF THE WORLD AND THE STATES OF
THE U. IS. A.

January-Australia, New Zealand and Chile.
February and March-East India, Upper Egypt.
April-Lower Egypt, Syria, Cyprus, Persia, Asia Minor,
India, Mexico and Cuba.
May-Algeria, Central Asia, China, Japan, Morocco,
Texas and Florida.
June-Turkey, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, South
of France, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama,
Georgia, Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, Kan-
sas, Utah. Missouri.
July-Roumania, Bulgaria, Austria-Hungary, South of
Russia, Germany, Switzerland, France, South of England,
Oregon, Nebraska, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Colorado,
Washington, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio,
New York, New England and Upper Canada.
August-Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark,
Poland, lower Canada, British Columbia, Manitoba, North
and South Dakota.
September and October-Scotland, Sweden, Norway,
and North of Russia.
November-Peru, South Africa and Argentina.
December-Burmah and Argentina.









SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION OF WHEAT OF THE UNITED STATES, 1914 TO 1917.-
Continued.
-DISTRIBUTION-

S. On hand at close of
Year.

Year beginning I
July 1. 0 In In
U- Farmers Second
S Hands Hands


Millions I Millions IMillions I Millions I Millions


Thousands
(000 omitted)


98,646
100,264
101,882
103,500


Bushels


of
Bushels


5.01 494,000,000
5.98" 591,000,000
4.70 479,000,000
S . ............ .. ...


of
Bushels


86,000,000
81,000,000
80, 000,000


Hypothetical distribution for
1917-18: |
Normal consumition......... 5.3
Last year's average consu'pt'n. 4.7
Very low average consumption. 4.0


of
Bushels


29,000,000
74,000,000
16,000,000


of
Bushels


26,000,000
89,000,000
32,000,000


of
Bushels


332,000,000
243,000,000
196,000,000




23,000,000
86,000,000
158,000,000


1914
1915
1916
1917


^^'^ ^ '~ ~ ^' ^ ^"'


1-


. . .... . .
. . .. .. . .. ..
.............i












PRODUCTION OF WHEAT IN THE UNITED STATES
FOR YEARS NAMED.

Total all wheat
(bushels).
Average 1910-1914 ...................... 728,225,000
1914 .................................. 891,017,000
1915 ..... .............................. 1,025,801,000
1916 ................................... 636,318,000
1917 .................................. 650,828,000
1918 (estimate) ........................ 930,902,000
Winter wheat
(bushels).
Average 1910-1914 ..................... 494,654,000
1914 ........................ ......... 684,990,000
1915 ................................ 673,947,000
1916 .............. .................. 480,553,000
1917 ............................... 418,070,000
1918 (estimate) ......................... 586,915,000
Spring wheat
(bushels).
Average 1910-1914 ...................... 233,571,000
1914 ................................... 206,027,000
1915 ................................... 351,854,000
1916 ................................... 155,765,000
1917 ................................... 232,758,000
1918 (estimate) ........................ 343,987,000



HOME CURED BEEF

HOW TO PRESERVE BEEF ON THE FARM-SATIS-
FACTORY METHODS FOR GENERAL USE. ALL
ARE GOOD-MAKE YOUR CHOICE.

Curing meats with brine is a good method for farm use.
It is less trouble to pack the meat in a barrel and pour
brine over it than to go over it three or four times and
rub in salt as in the dry-curing method. The brine also
protects the meat from insects and vermin. Brine made
of pure water and according to the directions in the fol-
lowing recipes should keep a reasonable length of time.
During warm weather, however, brine should be watched
2-Bul.












closely, and if it becomes "ropy" like syrup, it should be
boiled or new brine made. A cool, moist cellar is the best
place for brine curing.
Pure water, salt, sugar or molasses, and saltpeter are
all the ingredients needed for the ordinary curing of
meat. The meat may be packed in large earthen jars or
a clean hardwood barrel. The barrel or jar may be used
repeatedly unless meat has spoiled in it. It ,should be
scalded thoroughly, however, each time before fresh meat
is packed.
Curing should begin as soon as the meat is cooled and
while it is still fresh. Ordinarily, twenty-four to thirty-
six hours after slaughtering are sufficient for cooling.
Frozen meat should not be salted as the frost prevents
proper penetration of the salt and uneven curing results.

RECIPES FOR CUIRING.

CORNED BEEF.-The pieces commonly user for coming
are the plate, rump, cross ribs and brisket, or in other
words, the cheaper cuts of meat. The loin, ribs and
other fancy cuts are more often used fresh. The pieces
for corning should be cut into convenient-sized joints,
say five or six inches square. It should be the aim to
cut hem all about the same thickness so that they will
make an even layer in the barrel.
Meat from fat animals makes choicer corn beef than
that from poor animals. When the meat is cooled thor-
oughly it should be corned as soon as possible, as any
decay in the meat is likely to spoil the brine during the
ocrning process. Under no circumstances, should the
meat be brined while it is frozen. Weigh out the meat
and allow 8 pounds of salt to each 100 pounds of meat;
sprinkle a layer of salt one-quarter of an inch in depth
over the bottom of the barrel; pack in as closely as pos-
sible the cuts of meat, making a layer five or six inches
in thickness; then put on a layer of salt following that
with another layer of meat; repeat until the meat and
salt have all been packed in the barrel, care being used
to reserve salt enough for a good layer over the top.
After the package has stood over night add, for every
100 pounds of meat, 4 pounds of sugar and 4 ounces of
saltpeter dissolved in a gallon of tepid water. Three
gallons more of water should be sufficient to cover this












quantity. In case more or less than 100 pounds of meat
is to be corned, make the brine in the proportion given.
A loose board cover weighted down with a heavy stone
or piece of iron should be put on the meat to keep all
of it under the brine. In case any should project, rust
would start and the brine would spoil in a short time.
It is not necessary to boil the brine except in warm
weather. If the meat has been corned during the winter
and must be kept into the summer season, it would be
well to watch the brine closely during the spring, as it
is more likely to spoil at that time than at any other
season. If the brine appears to be ropy or does not
drip freely from the finger when immersed and lifted,
it should be turned off and new brine added after care-
fully washing the meat. The sugar or molasses in the
brine has a tendency to ferment, and unless the brine
is kept in a cool place, there is sometimes trouble from
this source. The meat should be kept in the brine 28 to
40 days to secure thorough coming.
DaIED BEEF.-The round commonly is used for dried
beef, the inside of the thigh being considered the choicest
piece, as it is slightly more tender' than the outside of
the round. The round should be cut lengthwise of the
grain of the meat in preparing for dried beef, so that
the muscle fibers may be cut crosswise when the dried
beef is sliced for table use. A tight jar or cask is neces-
sary for curing. The process is as follows: To each
100 pounds of meat weigh out 5 pounds of salt, 3 pounds
of granulated sugar and 2 ounces of saltpeter; mix
thoroughly together. Rub the meat on all surfaces with
a third of the mixture and pack it in the jar as tightly
as possible. Allow it ,o remain three days when it
should be removed and rubbed again with another third
of the mixture. In repacking, put at the bottom the
pieces that were on top the first time. Let stand for
three days, when they should be removed and rubbed
with the remaining third of the mixture and allowed to
stand for three days more. The meat is then ready to
be removed from the pickle. The liquid forming in the
jars should not be removed, but the meat should be
repacked in the liquid each time. After being removed
from the pickle the meat should be smoked and hung in
a dry attic or near the kitchen fire where the water will












evaporate from it. It may be used at any time after
smoking, although the longer it hangs in the dry atmos-
phere the drier it will get. The drier the climate, in
general, the more easily meats can be dried. In arid
regions, good dried meat can be made by exposing it
fresh to the air, with protection from flies.
CORNED BEEF.-Cut up the pieces of meat in sizes to
suit. Put in reasonably cold water for one hour; then
take out and drain off the water, well. Pack in a clean
barrel with a layer of coarse salt between each layer of
beef. Then make a solution as follows: Put in a large
pot six gallons of water, four or five quarts of coarse
salt, two ounces of powdered saltpeter, half-pound of
brown sugar and one pint of molasses. (Substitute for
the two latter if untaainable, one pint of heavy cane
syrup.) Boil and skim off the scum and set aside.
When perfectly cold pour it over the beef in the barrel,
being careful to keep weights on it to keep it beneath
the brine. This quantity will be about right for 80 to
90 pounds of beef. In ten days the beef in the above pickle
can be sliced for steaks if desired, being quite palatable;
in this condition it is often called "jerked beef" and is
fine for broiling. When this is to be kept and used for
corned beef let it remain in the brine and be kept under
the surface.
DRIED BEEF.-When it is desirable to have a supply
of "dried beef," the corned beef referred to in the pre-
vious formula can be used as follows: After the beef
has been in the pickle for a period of ten days, take it
out and dip it in boiling water for one or two minutes,
then hang it up to drip and dry in a well-ventilated
room with good circulation of air at all times. In this
way it keeps well and is fine for broiling for breakfast
or tea. Two weeks will be long enough for it to cure
thoroughly. Take down and pack away for use.









21

VALUE OF DAIRY COWS AT VARIOUS
AGES

THE VALUE OF DAIRY COWS AT VARIOUS AGES,
SHOWING HIGHEST VALUE AT AG.E
OF SIX YEARS.

The accompanying tables summarize the results of
this subject, showing the estimated rise and fall in value
for the different breeds and grades in' percentage of
maximum value.
It is believed that within certain limits this table will
Sbe of use to the average dairyman in determining roughly
the values of classes of cows other than those specified.
Thus the per cent column for the cow worth $80.0-0 at
3 years o/f age should be approximately correct for the
one worth $70.00 at that age; likewise the figures for the
eow worth $100 at 3 years should hold for the one
worth $110 at that age. On the other hand, however,
tle figures for the $300 pure bred would not be applic-
able to the cow worth $600 or more at 3 years of age.

INFLUENCE OF AGE ON VALUES OF DAIRY COWS, SHOWN IN
PER CENT OF MAXIMUM VALUE.


(Averages of 1.844 estimates)












GRADE COWS WORTH $80 AT 3 YEARS OF AGE


Age. Ho
Pe
Birth ..... .....
6 Months ......
1 Year ........
2 Years .......
3 Years .......
4 Years .......
5 Years .......
6 Years .......
7 Years .......
8 Years .......
9 Years .......
10 Years .......
11 Years .......
12 Years .......
13 Years .......
14 Years .......


stein. Guernsey.
r cent. Percent.
10 11
24 24
38 40
60 62
78 81
89 92
98 100
100 100
97 97
91 91
82 83
74 74
66 65
59 56
51 48
43 42


Estimates ..... 107


Jersey. Ayreshire.
Percent. Per cent.
11 9
24 20
38 36
62 57
87 81
94 88
98 96
100 100
98 99
94 95
82 90
77 79
66 71
56 62
47 52'
39 45

144 137


GRADE COWS WORT
Age. Holstein
Per cen
Birth .......... 9
6 Months Old... 21
1 Year ........ 36
2 Years ....... 59
3 Years ....... 82
4 Years ....... 92
5 Years ....... 98
6 Years ....... 100
7 Years ....... 95
8 Years ....... 88
9 Years ....... 78
10 Years ....... 68
11 Years ....... 59
12 Years ....... 51
13 Years ....... 47
14 Years ....... 39

Estimates .... 159


H $100 AT 3
. Guernsey.
t. Per cent.
10
21
35
57
79
92
99
100
95
87
76
67
56
48
39
32

103


YEARS
Jersey.
Per cent.
10
21
36
60
83
92
98
100
98
93
84
74
64
53
43
34


OF AGE.
Ayreshire.
Per cent.
10
21
35
59
81
90
97
100
98
94
86
77
67
59
50
41


134 141












COWS WORTH $200 AT 3 YEARS
OF AGE.


Age. Holstein. Guernsey. Jersey. Ayreshire.
Percent. Percent. Percent. Percent.
Birth .......... 24 22 18 17
6 Months ...... 34 33 27 27
1 Year ........ 46 45 41 39
2 Years ....... 62 63 61 57
3 Years ....... 78 78 80 76
4 Years ....... 91 90 91 88
5 Years ....... 99 100 99 97
6 Years ....... 100 100 100 100
7 Years ....... 96 96 96 98
8 Years ....... 89 89 90 93
9 Years ....... 80 79 79 85
10 Years ....... 69 70 68 75
11 Years ....... 59 59 55 63
12 Years ....... 50 49 45 51
13 Years ....... 41 39 35 39
14 Years ....... 32 30 26 30
Estimates .... 114 70 137 79
PURE-BRED COWS WORTH $300 AT 3 YEARS
OF AGE.
Age. Holstein. Guernsey. Jersey. Ayreshire.
Per cent. Per cent. Percent. Per cent.


Birth .... ...... 26
6 Months ...... 36
1 Year ........ 48
2 Years ....... 66
3 Years ....... 86
4 Years ....... 94
5 Years ....... 99
6 Years ....... 100
7 Years ....... 95
8 Years ....... 87
9 Years ....... 76
10 Years ....... 64
11 Years ....... 55
12 Years ....... 45
13 Years ....... 35
14 Years ....... 27
Estimates .... 148


23
34
48
67
86
95
100
99
95
88
78
67
57
47
37
28
115


17 18
25 27
38 38
59 58
85 82
94 91
99 97
100 100
94 97
87 91
76 81
63 68
51 57
40 46
30 35
21 24
96 59


I'PLRE-BRED










24

WEIGHT OF DAIRY PRODUCTS


Article


(


Pure Water .............
Skim Milk ..............
Whole Milk .............
20 Per Cent Crea .........
24 Per Cent Cream.......
30 Per Cent Cream.......
Pure Butter Fat ........


Specific
Iravity.
1.000
1.036
1.032
-1.022
1.009
1.001
0.910


Weight of
Gal.-lbs.
8.342
8.642
8.609
8.525
8.417
8.350
7.591


WEIGHTS AND MEASURES
Feeding Stuff
Protein Feeds.

Cottonseed meal .............
N. P. Linseed meal ...........
0. P. Linseed meal ...........
Glutten meal ................
Gluten feed .................
Germ Oil meal ...............
Distillers dried grains ......
Malt Sprouts ..............
Brewers dried grains .........
Wheat Middlings (Flour) ...
Wheat Middlings (Standard)
Wheat mixed feed ............
W heat bran .................
Oat Middlings ..............
Rye feed ....... ..........
Starchy Feeds-
Whole Oats .................
Ground Oats ................
Whole Wheat ...............
Ground Wheat ...............
Whole Barley ................
Barley Meal .................
W hole Rye ..................
Rye M eal ....................
W hole Corn .................
Corn M eal ...................
Corn and Co Meal ...........


OF FEEDING' STUFFS
One Quart One Pound
Weighs. Measures.
Lbs. Qts.
1.5 0.7
0.9 1.1
1.1 0.9
1.7 0.6
1.3 0.8
1.4 0.7
.. 0.5-0.7 2.0-1.4
0.6 1.7
0.6 1.7
1.2 0.8
0.8 1.3
0.6 1.7
0.5 2.0
1.5 0.7
1.3 0.8


1.0
0.7
1.9
1.7
1.5
1.1
1.7
1.5
1.75
1.5
1.4


Weight of
Qt.-lbs.
2.085.
2.160
2.152
2.131
2.104
2.087
1.898


_










25

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES OF FEEDING STUFFS
(Continued)


Feeding Stuff
Protein Feeds.


One Quart
Weighs.
Lbs.


Corn Bran ....................
Hominy Meal ................
Oat Feed ....................
Miscellaneous-
Cotton Seed ..................
Cottonseed Hulls ..........
Cow Peas ....................
Soy Beans ...................
Alfalfa Meal ..................
Molasses Feed ................
Molasses Cane ................
Beet, Pulp, Dried .............
Sunflower Seed ...............
Cocoanut Cake ..................
Cocoanut Meal ................
Rice Bran ....................
Rice Polish ...................
Millet. Fox Tail ..............


0.5
1.1
0.8


0.8
0.3
1.7
1.8
0.6
0.8
3.0
0.6
1.5
1.3
1.5
0.8
1.2
1.6


One Pound
Measures..
Qts.
2.0
0.9
1.3


1.3
3.3
0.6
0.6
1.7
1.3
0.3
1.7
0.7
0.8
0.7
*1.3
0.8
0.6


--












WEIGHT OF FAT CATTLE

TABLE FOR ESTIMATING WEIGHT OF FAT
CATTLE


Girth in
Feet and Inches


Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ...........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inch .........
Inches .. .......
Inches .. ..
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inches ..........
Inch ............
Inches ..........
Inches ..........


Medium Fat
Fair Shape. 'Good Shape.
Pounds. Pounds.
850 900
875 925
900 950
925 975
950 1,000
975 1,025
1,000 1,050
1,050 1,100
1,000 1,150
1,150 1,200
1,200 1,250
1,250 13,00
1,300 1,350
1,350 1,400
1,400 1,450
1,450 1,500
1,500 1,550
1,550 1,600
1,600 1,650


5 Feet
5 Feet
5 Feet
5 Feet
5 Feet
5 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
6. Feet
6 Feet
6 Feet
7 Feet
7 Feet
7 Feet
7 Feet


1,700
1,750
1,800


INDIAN RUNNER DUCKS

FROM QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1914.

Indian Runner Ducks have received attention from
many people during the past five years. Their hardiness
and their egglying capability recommend them. From
200 to 250 eggs a bird is not an uncommon yearly aver-
age, when the flock is properly handled. The eggs are
readily accepted in our markets in place of hen eggs.
Bakeries find a ready use for the-eggs, and the claim is


1,650
1,700
1,750












made that two of these duclf eggs are equal in food value
and for cooking purposes to three hen eggs.
Unlike hens, the egg production of the Indian Runners
does not diminish immediately after the second year.
Even up to seven or eight years they retain their normal
egg-laying powers. They are only slightly subject to
diseases, and parasites are seldom, if ever, found to
trouble them. These ducks are wild-natured, and have
little regard for a nest, dropping their eggs in any con-
venient place, frequently in the water or mud. It is best
to keep them in yards. Then the eggs can all be gath-
ered, and with the better attention they receive, they lay
better, the ducklings grow faster, and being less fre-
quently disturbed by strangers they are tamer. A pond
is much enjoyed by them, but is not a necesisty. In fact,
some people claim that the egg-production is greater
without any water for swimming. Nevertheless, the
ducks must have an abundance of fresh water for drink-
ing purposes, and this especially must never be neglected.
Indian Runners, like all other live stock, require regu-
lar feeding. A meal three times a day is advocated dur-
ing the laying season, and twice a day when moulting.
The feed may not materially differ from a suitable ration
for hens, but as the duck utilizes less grit, it is better
when moistened or made into a mash.
Indian Runner ducks are very poor sitters, so that
the hatching must be done by hens or in incubators.
One of the greatest hindrances to good hatches in incu-
bators is the want of moisture during incubation, as
these machines are built for hatching hens eggs and duck
eggs require more moisture. Additional moisture must
be supplied for a successful hatch. Even when hatched
by hens, it is advisable to moisten the eggs once a week,
and twice during, the last week of hatching.
The eggs are usually fertile if the flocks are properly
managed. Thirty or forty in a flock is large enough,
with one drake to every six ducks. An 80 to 85 per cent
hatch may be expected under good conditions. If the
eggs are to be bought better hatches are usually secured
from flocks of sufficient size to give quantities of fresh
eggs for shipment each day. While they ship fairly well,
their hatching qualities (as in the case with hen eggs)
are likely to be injured by long shipment or too much











jolting around. So it is preferable to secure the eggs
from near home when possible.
At present, we have two varieties of Indian Runners
although not particularly distinct-the dark fawn and
the light fawn. The American standard describes the
perfect female specimen as light fawn.
There seems no claim to any superior egg production
in the light fawn variety. On the other hand, the dark
fawn is said to produce a whiter egg without the greenish
tinge that more closely resembles a hen egg, and is more
acceptable for table use.
Ducklings up to three weeks old are sensitive to cold
and wet. Getting their feet into very cold water or
exposure to a cold rain is almost sure to kill many. Up
to five or six weeks of age, they need a good shelter
with a dry floor. After that they will require little or
no shelter in Florida, and if well fed will begin laying
when four and a half to six months of age.
Indian Runner ducks have many things to recommend
them. They are not bothered with lice or vermin, no
roup, no scaly legs, very little housing, and hawks do
not molest them; but if they have access sto a Florida
pond their is a danger from loss by the large turtles that
are quite numerous in most sink holes, streams and
ponds.
In addition to the demand for eggs, there is a growing
demand for the meat, and while these ducks are not as
heavy and plump as some other breeds, if they have been
well cared for and kept growing, they make nice roasters,
fryers and broilers at an early age.

DUCKS AND CHICKS MUST BE KEPT SEPARATE.

It is not a good plan to yard ducks and chickens to-
gether. Ducks are naturally good feeders and greedy
and will get the most of the feed, and as they enjoy
getting into the drink water, will keep the drinking
vessels in a dirty condition. Separate yards are best.
Indian Runner Ducks, like chickens, can be made
profitable if they are properly managed. There is suf-
ficient waste on the average farm to supply a good
portion of the necessary feed, and while the ducks can
be handled as a side issue on the farm, they will not give
profitable returns if neglected.









29

PRESERVING EGGS

PRESERVING EGGS BY THE USE OF WATER
GLASS.

Use pure water that has been thoroughly boiled and
then cooled. To each ten quarts of water add one quart
of water glass. Pack the eggs in a jar and pour solution
over them, cover well. Keep the eggs in a cool, dark
place. A dry, cool cellar is a good place. If the eggs
are kept in too warm a place the silicate is deposited
and the eggs are not properly protected. Do not wash
the ggs before packing, for by so doing you injure their
keeping quality, probably dissolving the mucilaginous
coating on the outside of the shell. For packing, use only
perfectly fresh eggs, for stale eggs will not be saved and
may prove harmful to the others.
I Water glass is a very cheap product, that can usually
be procured at about 50 cents per gallon, and one gallon
would make enough solution to preserve 50 dozen eggs, so
that the cost of material for this method would be only
about one cent per dozen.
Water glass is sodium and potassium silicate, sodium
silicate being usually the cheaper. If wooden kegs or
barrels are used in which to pack the eggs, they should
first be thoroughly scalded with boiling water, to
sweeten and purify them.



TONIC FOR HOGS

Hogs require continually mineral supplements to their
feed. These 'can be supplied by allowing hem free
access to the following mixture:
Charcoal, one bushel; ,hardwood ashes, one bushel;
salt, eight pounds; air-slaked lime, eight pounds; sul-
phur, four pounds; pulverized copperas, two pounds.
Mix thoroughly the lime, salt and sulphur, and then
mix with the chacoal and ashes. Dissolve the copperas
in two parts of hot water and sprinkle over the whole
mass, mixing it thoroughly. Keep some of this mixture
in a box before the hogs at all times.












POISON BRAN MASH

For poisoning cut worms, army worms, grasshoppers,
and the central powers of wormdom, now driving against
the safety of garden and field crops, "Poison bran mash"
is the Browning gun of immediate relief. The following
is the formula:
Paris green or powdered arsenate of lead (whichever
you prefer or can secure), one-fourth of a pound;
wheat bran coarse4 preferred), 5 pounds; one or two
oranges or lemons ground or cut into very, very small
pieces; molasses or syrup, one quart; water, three quarts,
or as needed to make a crumbly and not sloppy dough.
Bran and Paris green (or arsenate of lead) should be
first mixed together in bucket or other receptacle.
To the water, first add juices and pulp of oranges or
lemons. Add next syrup or molasses, mix, and then
pour onto the poison bran and stir thoroughly. Add
more bran or water only as needed to make a crumbly
mash.
Scatter on ground alongside of plants or sow broad-
cast if you have a large area, and increase or decrease
bulk of mixture according to amount of ground to be
"doctored."


POISON FOR MOLE CRICKETS

The West Indian Mole Cricket is becoming quite
troublesome in some parts of the State. This is a pale
brown insect, which, when full grown, is over an inch in
length.
Like other crickets, they avoid the sunlight. They
live in the ground, deep into which they go during the
day. But at night they come out to feed. The follow-
ing directions may be used against the native species as
well as against the West Indian one:
To reduce their number in the ground, plow frequently
during their spring breeding season, which is from March
to May. Allow chickens and especially turkeys to fol-
low the plow. They are fond of these insects and will
eat all that they can find. If possible pasture hogs in
the infested field.












During March and April, when they are flying (they
do not fly much at other seasons) they are attracted
by lights and may be captured by light traps. Suspend
a lantern over a dish of water that has a thin skum of
kerosene on top.
Sulphur placed in the seed drill is said to repel them
to some extent. They may be kept out of seed beds by
gauze bottom and sides. At the time that the seed bed
is made up, place the gauze in the ground at the depth
of a foot, more or less according to whether the plants
to be grown are deep or shallow rooted, and place soil
over it. This gauze to be at all enduring in such a situ-
ation should be of copper or galvanized iron.
Plants set out in the field may be protected by band-
ing them. For this purpose melt off the teps and bottoms
of tin cans and place the resulting cylinders around the
plants, pushing them well into the ground, but allowing
them to project at least an inch or two above the ground.
Instead of the tin cans one may use tarred paper.
The moles may be poisoned by a mixture of cottonseed
meal or bran and Paris green. Thoroughly mix a pound
of Paris green with twenty or thirty of the cottonseed
meal and moisten the whole with diluted syrup.
Like other insects which live in the ground, they may
be destroyed by the use of carbon-bisulphide. Sink into
the infested garden several holes for each square yard.
These-can be made with a cane if the soil is moist and
should be pushed to a depth of a foot. Pour into each
hole an ounce of the liquid and quickly cover up and
tramp solid. Keep the liquid as far as possible from the
roots of the plants or the latter will be killed also
Also keep the liquid away from fires and lights, as it is
very inflammable.











PERCENTAGE OF PLANT FOOD IN ANIMAL
EXCREMENTS
Kind of Phosporic
Animal. Excrement. Water. Nitrogen. Acid. Potash
Portion % % % %0 %
Horse.. Solid ....... 80 75 0.55 0.30 0.40
Liquid ...... 20 90 1.35 trace 1.25
Mixed ........ 78 0.70 0.25 0.55
Cow....Solid ....... 70 85 0.40 0.20 0.10
Liquid ...... 30 92 1.00 trace 1.35
Mixed ......... 86 0.60 0.15 0.45
Pig.... Solid ....... 60 80 0.55 0.50 0.40
Liquid ...... 40 97 0.40 0.10 0.45
Mixed ........ 87 0.50 0.35 0.40
Sheep.. Solid ....... 67 60 0.75 0.50 0.45
Liquid ...... 33 85 1.35 0.05 2.10
Mixed ........ 68 0.95 0.35 1.00
Hen.. Mixed ........ 55 1.00 0.80 0.40

COMPOSITION OF DRIED OR WATTR-FREE
EXCREMENTS.


Kind of Portion of
Animal. Excrement. Nitrogen.
%
Horse......Solid ....... 2.20
Liquid ...... 13.50
Cow........ Solid ....... 2.65
Liquid ...... 12.50
Pig........ Solid ...... 2.75
Liquid ...... 13.00
Sheep...... Solid ....... 1.90
Liauid ...... 9.00


Phosphoric
Acid. Potash.
% %
1.20 1.60
.... 12.50
1.35 0.65
.... 17.00
2.50 2.00
4.00 15.00
1.25 1.15
0.35 14.00









33

PLANT FOOD CONSTITUENTS PRODUCED ANNU-
ALLY IN EXCREMENTS BY FARM ANIMALS ..
PER 1,000 POUNDS OF LIVE WEIGHT.

Nitrogen Phos- Potash.
Sphoric Acid g
Kind of I i^
Animal 5 'S S -,
o .o 0 0 o.
Horse .... 79 49 43 .. 58 45 23.60
Cow ...... 76 80 38 19 108 29.60
Pig ...... 101 49 92 12 73 55 30.60
Sheep .... 62 57 42 2 38 88 24.25
Hen ...... 85 .. 68 .. 32 .. 18.70



















PART II.

Crop Condition, Prospective Yields and Live
Stock Condition.













DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES

Following are the subdivisions of the State, and the
counties contained in each:


Western Division.
Bay,
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-9.


Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns,
Suwannee-10.


Broward,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Lee,
Manatee,


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Lafayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Taylor,
Wakulla-10.

Central Division.
Brevard,
Citrus,
Flagler,
Hernando,
Hillsborough,,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Osceola,
Pasco,
Pinellas,
Polk,
Seminole,
Sumter,
Volusia-16.


Southern Division.
Monroe,
Okeechobee,
Palm Beach,
St. Lucie-9.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner H. S ELLIOT, Chief Clerk


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS-
BY DIVISIONS.
WESTERN DIVISIoN.-General crop conditions in this
division are above the average. At the same time these
conditions indicate what is commonly known as spotted
conditions. For the first part of this quarter, including
a portion of May, the seasons were favorable. Precipi-
tation and sunshine very well balanced. These conditions
are of course admirable for bringing up the crops into
good stands, if they could have been maintained but
since that time precipitation has been scarce and has
favored only certain localities. The dry cool weather
also in the latter part of June being exceedingly dry was
much against the growing corn which at this season of
the year requires moisture. These conditions are what
is termed spotted and the effect to a considerable extent
has been quite unfavorable to general crop production-
unless we make cotton a partial exception. The result
of the above indicated conditions are shown in the results
of the tabulated portion of this division. These con-
ditions have affected live stock in the same manner as
crops; too little water in some places and about enough
in others. Pastures therefore cannot be said to be in
the usual good condition.
NORTHERN DIVISION.--The conditions obtaining in this
division do not differ essentially from those described in
the previous district and what has been said in relation
to climatic conditions in the first district can be applied
with equal force to this division. The lack of precipi-
tation has probably cut the yield, of the corn crop
approximately 20% and sweet potatoes 25%; and has
to some extent prevented development of the cotton
plant. The cool, dry winds that have recently obtained
and are still continuing at this time, are damaging to
corn, cotton, potatoes, and to pastures in particular.
Live stock is holding its own under the circumstances
and when the usual rainy season begins if it does not
pass us by, this year, there will be plenty of pasture for
the fall and early winter.












NORTHEASTERN DIVISION.-In this division conditions
have been somewhat better. Precipitation has been
greater and more regular and crops are farther advanced
and in better condition than in the two former districts.
The cotton planted in this district is mostly Sea Island
and while it has been favored with precipitation, the
crop has suffered from boll weevil. To some extent the
rains have been scattered; otherwise conditions in this
district are quite similar to those first discussed.
CENTRAL DIVISION.-In this division crops were planted
to a considerable excess over 1917 and the conditions
are probably no better-in fact there has been little
change in climatic conditions in this district during the
growing season for some months. Good crops have been
harvested but transportation to the markets has been
poor, consequently entailing a loss in many instances
to the grower, while in the end many of them have come
out about even. In this district climatic conditions as
above indicated have been better than in any of the three
divisions first named. Quite a number of new crops has
been introduced and in a year practically have become
standard crops. Had markets been good growers in this
district would have been unusually prosperous. Live-
stock in this district is in good condition.
SOUTHERN DivISIoN.-Climatic conditions in this dis-
trict have been somewhat better than for two or three
years and the crops which are principally fruits and
vegetables have done well and production has been sat-
isfactory. Citrus fruit'trees have improved greatly under
the conditions and in spite of the cold of last year will
yield fairly satisfactory crops. Live stock in this dis-
trict is in good condition and the industry is increasing
rapidly. Few of the standard crops are grown in this
district, although .a few of the counties are making
experiments with Sea Island cotton. The counties in
this and the Central Diviison growing Sea Island cotton
appear to be doing so with success. The greatest draw-
back, however, to successful farming in the East and
South at present appears to be the lack of transporta-
tion for marketing the products of these portions of the
State and not the ability of the country to produce them.
Production is not the problem; it is the lack of trans-
portation facilities.















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS,
FRUIT AND FRUIT TREES FOR QUARTER ENDING JUNE 30th,
1918. ALSO CONDITION OF LIVE STOCK, AS COMPARED WITH
SAME PERIOD FOR .1917.

Upland Sea Island Crn Kaffir
COUNTY Cotton Cotton Corn

Western Division. Conditio Condion Condtion C ondition condition
Bay -.. .-.......... .............- -.............-..... ...... ................ 110 ... .......
Calhoun ......................... 50 40 80 ....
Escambia .......................... 75 .................... 110
H olm es ................-............. 100 .................... 85 ........
Okaloosa ............................ 100 ............. 85 ...........
Santa Rosa ........................ 80 ................... 85 .. .. ....
W alton e............................ 75 75 95 ................
W ashington ...................... 70 ................. 85 ..................
Div. Av., per cent........ 78 57 92 ...............
Northern Division.
Gadsden .............................----------------- 6 .................... 73 ...................
Hamilton .......................... 100 100 85 -.............
Jefferson ...............-.-........ 60 50 95 .............
Lafayette ....----------- 100 100 100 ......... ....
Leon .......-- ......---...... ---- 80 75 95 ..............
Liberty ...--..... --.......... 50 ......--........ 90 ..................
M adison ............................ 100 80 110 ....................
W akulla ................... ...... 90 .................... 95 ......
Dlv. Av., per ceent....... 78 79 91 ....................
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............................. 60 50 90
Baker ......:...................... .....-- .....----- -. 50 125 ........
Bradford ........................ 66 67 125 .............
Clay .....-.............----- .................-... ..... 80 75 ................
Columbia ........................................... 50 60 ...................
Duval ...-......... ....... ................ 100 100 ...................
Nassau .............................. 80 80 90 75
Putnam ............ ---.....----....---...........-- 75 75 ..................
Suwannee ........................ .................... | 50 25 ..............
Div. Av., per cent........ 69 67 86 82
Central Division. ~ _
Brevard ....................... .... ......... 50 50 80
Hernando .......................... 100 100 80 70
Hillsborough ................... ............ 100 90 75
Lake ..... --- 80 85 85 ..................
Levy ...........------------. 75 80 75 ..................
Marion- .....--------- -- 80 85 95 ...................
Orange ....................------- .....---... 90 85 ..................
Osceola ............................. ............. ..... 100 70 ....................
Pasco -.---. -..----- ---------. -------100 100 90
P olk ...................................................... 90 0 5.
Pinellas ----------............ ----------------. ------- M .........I 100 ....................
Polk -----------------------------------M----- 90 50 ..................
Volkusla ............................ 50 50 85 .................
Div. Av., per cent........ 77 85 88 79
Southern Division.
Broward ........................... ...................................... 80 ... .....
Dade ...............- ......- -.... ...... 125 100 100
Lee ........... .. .......................... .................... 90 90
M anataee ............ ........... ........... ... 60 85 ...................
Palm Beach ..................... .................. .................... 100 100
St. Lucie ............................ ......... .. ................. ..... .. 90 ...................
St ucaI 0I--------I -
Div. Av., per cent.... .......... 92 91 97
State Average, per cent.... 5 72 90 86
State Average, per cent ----. 75 72 90 1 86












40


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued..


Cu ar Potatoes
COUNTY Ca ne Re potatoes Dasheens

Western Division. Condition Condition condition [ Gondition
Bay -.......................--- ..... 90 100 125 ........
Calhoun ............................ 90 75 90 ..... ...
Escambla .......................... 75 100 150 i 00
Holmes ............................. 75 100 100 ...............
Okaloosa ............................ 90 90 150 |.................
Santa Rosa ........................ 100 100 100 95
Walton .............................. 50 75 100 ....
Washington ...................... 75 75 85 ........ ...
Div. Av., per cent........ 78 89 113 97
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............................ 90 100 95 ................
Hamilton .......................--- 50 100 100 ......
Jefferson -----......- -.....--... 75 90 90 ........
Lafayette .........................- 85 100 100 ....................
Leon .............--.....-...----- .. 90 90 100 90
Liberty ............................ 100 110 100 75
M adison ............................. 100 .................. 120 ...................
Taylor --------------------------- 590 65 75o
Taylor ................................ 50 65 75 ..................
Wakulla ............................ 90 95 100 100
Div. Av., per cent........ 81 94 98 88
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........-.................... 100 ........ .....-.. 100
Baker ................................. 80 100 100 ........
Bradfod ............................ 95 125 100 100
Clay ................................. 100 100 50 ......
Columbia ........................... 50 .................... 60 .......
Nassau ---------------------- 90 90 100 75
Nassau .............................. 90 90 100 75
Putnam .........-- .....-.......... 100 .................... 90 ..............
Suwannee ......----................ 90 .95 ..............
Div. Av., per cent..-..... 88 | 103 89 92
Central Division.
Brevard ..........................--- 90 50 90
Hernando .......................... 110 80 .................... 120
Hillsborough ..................... 110 50 ................... ....................
Lake ................................... 80 80 85 85
Levy ................................... 85 60 70 .
Marion .............................. 80 75 95 .. ......
Orange .............................. 100 ................... 100 100
Osceola .............................. 90 90 70 .. ......
Pasco ................................ 80 .................... 100 90
Pinellas ............................. 100 100 100....
Polk ............................... 90 95 75 ..-- -......
Volusia .............................. 100 90 90 60
Div. Av., per cent ........ 92 78 87 91
Southern Division.
Broward ............................ --......----- .........--...... 75 .............-
Dade .............................. 100 100 100 100
Lee ................ ......... .. 95 90 85 ....................
Manatee .......................... 75 90 90 ...................
Palm Beach ...................... 100 .................... 100 ....................
St. Lucie .......................... 80 .................... 80 ..................
I- -
Div. Av., per cent........| 90 93 90 100
State average, per cent....| 86 ] 91 96 94












41


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE Y.IELD-Continued.


COUNTY Field Egg Onions 1 Cassava
I Peas I Plants I
Western Division. Condition Condition Condition Cotn~Elos
Bay ...............--------------------............... 9 100 75--
Calhoun ................. 90 ...--... ...
Escambia ........ .... ... 75 75 100 75
Holmes -----............. 100 ..
aloosa ............................ 1.5 .. .-... ::::::::::::
Okaloosa --------------------- I -- --------
Santa Rosa ...................... 75 .......... .....
Walton ............................---- ------------ 50 50 75 90
W asihngton ...................... .................... .
Div. Av., per cent........- 86 62 92 80
Northern Division.
Gadsden ....... 5 ----...... ... .... .. ..... ---
Hamilton --------------.......... .... 100 ....-. .......... 100
H lmilto ............................ ..................................
Jefferson --.---------.................--...95
Lafayette ..................... 100 __ __ .. ........
Leon --........................... 90 80 90 ...............
Liberty .............................. 100 95 95
Madison ......- ................ 100 ................... 100 100
Wakula---------------- 100
Div. Av.. per cent...... -- 96 92 1 97 I 1
Northeastern Division.
Alacua ............................. 100 75 100 .5 ...-
Baker ............................ 125 -................... ..---....- 10-0
Bradford ..--..................... 100 100 110 .............
Clay .................................... ---------------------- 100 ----- ...---- 100 .... 0- -
Columbia ---..................---- ........... - ..--......--. ......... I-................
Nassau ..-. --------------------- 0 90 90 ........10
Putnam --.........................- 100 ---. -- ...----------. ..... .
Suwannee .....----......-.............. .... ..... 90 .... .....
Div. Av., per cent........ 96 91 98 I 100
Central Division.
Brevard-----------------------I 60 ----------- ---------
Brevard ........................... 60 ........ ........ ....................
Hernando .......................................... 100 ...........:....
Hillsborough----- ................... 100 100 100 60
Lake ---...--...................... 70 80 ----....... 90
Levy ..----------------------............................ 80 ......... .... 60 ..............
Marion ......--------------........................ 90 80 ...............
Orange ........................... 100 100 -- ........-.... -............
Osceola .............................. .................... 100 100 100
Pasco ---------------------- 90 80 ...................
Pinellas ............................. 100 100 100 100
Polk -- -...--........................ 100 ............. ....... ......... ... .........
Volusia .--- ----------................ 85 90 .................... I............ ......------
I 1 I
DTv. Av., per cent........ 88 91 90 87
Southern Division. 91 _3 92 91
roward -------------------............................ ................-------.. .................---------...................--. I -----..................
Dade -------.. ....------------- 100 90 100 ..............
Lee .........---------------------- 90 40 40
Manatee ...................-- ......... 85 T5 ....................
Palm Beach ...................... 75 100 100 ...... ...........-
St. Lucle .. ........... ... ...................... ..................... ] ................
StLucle---------------------- -------------I-----..
Div. Av., per cent........ 87 79 80 I 90
State Average, per cent-. 91 83 92 I 91
State Average, per cent 1.. 91 83 92 j 91












42


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Tobacoo Peanuts Beans Pastures

Western Division. Condition condition Condition Conditio
Bay ............ ............................................ 125- 100 150
Calhoun ....... ..... ........ 100 .................... 100
Escambia ............... 100 150 100 100
Holmes ...... -- ....... ......... 100 100 100
Okaloosa ........................................... 125 100 100
Santa Rosa .............----. 100 90 75 90
Walton ..........-........................ 100 100 75
Washington ........ ............. 95 .................... 95
Drv. Av., per cent....... 100 111 96 99
Northern Division.
Gadsden --.-....--.----- 90 95 90 90
Hamilton ................----.-- 100 100 90
Jefferson ...............----- ..... 95 80 85
Lafayette ...................... 85 ................ 95
Leon .............. 100 100 95 90
Liberty ................ .......-- 100 100 1U,
Madison -......... ........ 120 125 100 100
Taylor ........................ 50 85 80 65
Wakulla ..............--.. .........------ 110 100 100
Div. Av., per cent -..-. 96 | 99 93 91
Northeastern Division.
Alachua -. ... .............. ... --------- ... 100 75 0
Baker ...- -. .................. 150 125 150
Bradford ............- ..... ......... 125 100 125
Cray ........ .. ......- -.. 100 100 80
Columbia .-......-- _-:::::::::::: 80 60 -
Duval ...........---..-..-.-.. 105 100 100
Nassau .................--.--- ......- ....... 85. 75
Putnam ............. ...... .. ... .. I ----.--- ...---
Sicwannee ...........-..... 5 80 95 I 90
* |- I I
Div. Av., per cent .... 85 I 93 94 101
Central Division.
Brevard ....- ... ......... .. .. 90
Hernando ...- ....-- ... 90 120 90
Hlllsborough ..................... 100 100 100
Lake ................ ...---.----.- -.------- 85 80 85
Levy ..................................... 90 60 75
Marion ......... .........-........ 108 90 95
Orange ..... ..............--.... .................. 100 90
Osceola ....-. --- .... ...100 90
Pasco ....-..............-- ......- 100 100 90 ........
Pinellas ............ -------- .... .. ....... 100 100.
Polk ........... 100 75 .................... ..-- 7 ..... ...
Volusia .............. ----- ....... 100 85 | 100
Di. Av.: per cent ..... 100 97 90 92
Southern Division.
B row ard .............r.... ....... .... I -..................... ........-.....
Dade ............----------........- .... ....---..- 100 100 .
Lee .......... ......-- ........ ..--------- 60 95 100
M anatee ................ .... ....... ... ..... .. .......... 90 ...........
Palm Beach ........ .. ... ... 100 100 100
St. Lucle ...... ................. 75 60 65
Div. Av., per cent.................... 84 89 88
State Average, per cent-.. 94 97 98 94











43


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

Hay Velvet Boy
COUNTY Grasses Beans Beans Aa

Western Division. Condition Condttion Condition Condition
Bay .................... ........ 100 100
Calhoun ........................... 100 90 ...
Escambiba ......................... 110 100 ...
Holmes ............................. 85 100
Okaloosa ............. ..... ....... 100 110 ............ ..
Santa Rosa ..................... 100 100 ........ ....... ...... ..
W alton .............................. 100 100 ........... ...
W ashington ..................... 95 100 .................
Div. Av., per cent........ 99 I 100 ......... .... ........
Northern Division.
Gadsden ......................... 90 100 80
Hamilton ...................... 90 100 60 ...........
Jefferson ............................ 80 75
Jefferson ............................ 80 75 ................... .................
Lafayette .......- --....... ....-- ... 100 ................... 100
Leon .... ........... 90 100 90 90
Liberty .............. 100 100 --- ----.
Madison -......-.......... 00 100
Taylor ...................... .... 60 85
Wakulla ........................ 100 110.......... ..........
Dlv. Av., per cent........ 88 97 77 95
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........................... 75 100 ........................- ......-
Baker ................................ 125............. .. .. .............
Bradford ......................... 125 125 .... .............
Clay 90 80
Clay -......................--- ..- 75 75 -.................---- I -- ----------
Columbia .......................... --- ----- 60 ......-...... ----------------
Duval ................ 100 100 ..
Nassau ............... .. 60 100
Putnam ............... .......... 75
Suwannee ............. ... ....... 95 .......
Div. Av., per cent........ 93 91.. ......
Central Division.
Brevard .............................. .................... 60 ..... ...................
Hernando ................... ....... 90 100 ...
Hillsborough .. .......... 100 100 .................... .... ....
Lake .. ............... ..... 5 90 80 .... ............
Levy -..........--.. .... ---- 90 80 .................... ...
Marion _................ --- 90 100 ............ -------- --
Orange -.. ..................--- 100 ......- ----------------- --
Osceola ............-- 90 ........... ...............
Pasco ....... ............. 100 90 ....................
Pinellas --......--...--- 100 100 .-....... -
Polk 25 75 ...................-- 25 75....
Volusia .... ...------------ 100 90 90 .....
Div. Av.. per cent........ 88 89 9.0 ..-
Southern Division.

ade ....................-.... 100 100 ........
Lee ........ .................... ............ . 7 ............-60
Manatee .............-.,-.- 75 75
Palm Beach ................... 100 100
St. Lucie .................--- 65 80
Div. Av., per cent........ 83 83 100
State Average, per cent....I 90 92 89 95












44


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE. YIELD-Continued.


ilo I
COUNTY Maize Guavas Avocados Pears

I PrSp'tive |pratp'tive
Western Division. Condition Londition YieW Condition Yield
Calhoun ---..................... ................. ....... ...- ..-----------
Calhoun ---......._.. ----- .----- .------------.---- ------------------
Escambia .......................... .............. ..... -------------------
Holmes--..--------- ---- --------
Okaloosa ....................... ............... ... .. ............-- ----
Santa osa ..............-- .......... ..............
W alton .................... -- ................ ........ ........---..... -------
Washington .................... ................- --............... .-----
Div. Av.. per cent.....---... -- ..............-- ... ---- ---

Northern Division.
Gadsden ...................................... .. ...----------- --- --- --- --
Hamilton .......................... l ............... .-- ... iiii ... I --.. I -iiiii J .....
JefHamierslton ......................................... ............ ....
Lafayette ...............-.......... ..... ....
Leon ....................................

Liberty ... ....... ... .. ........... ..... ---.......- -
Lieon y---------------- --------------- -------------- ----------- ------------- --------------
Laiberty -------------------------------------- ---------------- -----------------*---------------
Madison .---..---- -- ---...- ...--.........------ ----
Taylor ......................-- ............... -------------- -
W akijlla ............................ .........
Div. A ., per cent........ ............... ... --

Northeastern Division.
Alachua ---------------I----....- ....---- -...--.. ------I-- ----
Baker ------------------I----------- ---------------- ------------ -----------

B aker ......................... ... ................ ... ..--.....- ..-............- .....- ..... ..
Du ral ........ ................ . .. .... .... .... -- -
Colubau------------- --- ----------------- -------------
Columbia ......................... .....................
Duval ....------.....--..................-------------------. ---- ------- ---- ---------
Nassau .-
Putnam ...........................................
Suwannee ........................................ --- ....-- -- --

Div. AT., per cent ........ __ ............. ........ ........- ....--
Central Division.
Brevard F
Hernande I
Hillsborough ..--------- --- ------------- 90 100
Lake ..-...---- ------ -------------- 50 25 60 60
Levy ................... M ............ 2 ......... .............

Marion .-----------.-- -----..---- -------------
Orange .----------- --- ----- -----------
Pasco .................................. ............ .. ..................
Osceola ------ -------------100 80 10------ -----. .

Pinellas ......................----
Polk ..------------- --. .............
Volusa ............................. ------------ 50 40

Div. Av., per cent........ 100 60 25 75 80
Southern Division.
reward ............................ ................ 60 90 60 60
Dade ................................. 100 75 80 50 45
Lee ................................... ..----.... 75 30 70 60
Manatee ................. ............... ... ....... ......... .....
Palm Beach ..-............... 100 80 100 80 100
St. Lucie ................. ...... .. ....----....--- 60 50 40 70

Div. Av., per cent........ 100 70 70 60 67

State Average, per cent. 100 65 48 67 78














45


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Bananas Mangoes

Western Division Condition Prospective Condition Prospective
Yield I I Yield
Bay
Calhoun ................................... .................... .................
Escambia ........ ................. .... ................. ............
Holm es ................ ...... ............. ............. ....
Okaloosa ................................................... ........................................................
Ok maloosa ----------------- ---- -- ----------- --------------------
Santa Rosa ....................... ....................... ....................
W alton ...... ................ .................... .................... .................... .............
W ashington .......................................... ............ .................... ....................
Div. Av., per cent.......................................................... ...................
Northern Division.
Div. Av., per cent ............................ .....I
Gadsden ............................................... .
H am ilton .......................... ................................. .......
Jefferson-------------------------
Jefferson ........................... .................... .................... ..................... ....................
Lafayette ............................................ ........... ............... ....................
Leon .................................... ....................I................................. ...............
Liberty ......... ............ ......... ............ ..........
L -------erty-------------------------- -------------------- ---------- I-..
Madison -.....--....--. ...-.--..- (.--..-- -------...... -- -................ -.---....
W akulla ..................... ....... .. ...... .... ... .... ... ... .. ... ...............
T lo----------------- ------ -- ---------- ------------
W i.Aku .,a----------------------- -- --------------------------I---------
Dlv. AT., per cent-j---.. -..------... .... .. ..
Northeastern Division.
~~~~. ..I .. . ...-----' __
Alachua ............................ --- .... .....................---....... -........
B aker ................................ .................. .................. ................... .............
Bradford --.........----...-.-- --------------- -----I.........
Clay ------------------ ..-------- -------------------- .------------------------
Col b ......................... ...... ........... .... ..... .... ........... .........
C olu m b ia ... .... . . .. ....... ... .... .. ..... ......... ..... -- ........
D uval ..... ........... ...... ... ... ...... ........ ... ...........
Nassau ........................... ... .............. .......... ...... ............
Putnam ....... ..... ....... ........................................ -- -- -...... -...
Suwannee .......... ............... .............................. .... .....
D iv. Av., per cent........ ............|........ -................... ......... ........ ...::............
Div. Ar., per cent -------- ------------ ---------------

Central Division.
Brevard ... .. ... ..... .... ....
Hernando ..... .............
Hillsborough .. ------................. 75 75 70 5 75
Lake .................................. 70 60
Levy -------------------------70 60..................
Mevy ....................................a.......................................... -1 --------------j
M arion ................................ 100 90 .....-- .... ...................
Orange .. ... ....... .... ...... ....................................
Osceola ...-----.........................-- 80 50 .---------------------
Pasco ..- .. ..... ....--- .. . ..- ............... ...................
Polk ------------ -------------------- ------------------------- -------------I-----
Pinellas ............................. -...... .... ......... ..... ...................
Volus .. .................................... ................... a...................
Volusia I--- ------ --...---.... ........ ............... ....I..............--.
Div. Av., per cent........l 81 6 9 i 70 1 75
Southern Division.
Broward ----.----..------------..--------- ............... 60 60
Dade ----........... ...-----50 65 50 70
Lee ...................-.......... --..................... .... 50 20
Manatee ............--..........---.. ........................................ ... ...... ...
Palm Beach ...................... 85 100 65 75
St. Lucie ............................ ................. ................ .........
Div. Av., per cent........ 67 82 56 56
State Average, per centI 74 75 63 65
State Average, per cent--- I 74 I 75 I 68 65













46


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Orange Trees Lemon Trees

Western Division. Condition Prospective Condition Prospective
Yield Yield
ay --- 60 60 ........................................
Calhoun ...- ---- --- 70 70 ......................................
Escambia ......................... 85 100 ................. ..............
Okaloosa .................. ..... ........ ......................
Santa Rosa ...................... 110 110 .................. ..... ....
W alton .............................. ................. .. ................... .. .................
W ashington ...................... .................... .................... .................. ........ ....
Dlv. Av. per cent........ 81 85 ......................................
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............-------..- .-------..... -.---........... ---.. ---...--.-..- ..-------..------.
H amilton -.-.--...... ...- ........--- .... ............ ................... .................... ....................
Leon ....... .......... ...... ... ..... .......................................
Liberty ... ......................40 ...1........ .......... ........5........ ..... .
M adison ----------.. -... -.... --- --------- ... -- - ................. -- ------------- 1-...-.....-....
Libertylor ...--------... ..... ----------------..... ------.......... ------------------
M adisonkulla .. ................. 100 40 ........................................
Taylor----
Wakulla 100 40
Div. Av., per cent.... 70 27 .............
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............-................ 75 50 ........................................
Baker ................................. 50 15 ........................................
Bradford ........................ 80 50 .......................................
Clay ............................-------..-- ....----..-----.----..--- .--------------------
Columbia ..--------------.---....-....-... -...---------....-------------.
Duval ................................ 100 100 ........... ..... ....................
N assau ......... ............ ...... ..... ........ ...... .................... ..............
Putnam .............................. 50 50 ........... .........
Putam----------------5 50....
Suwannee ... ----.. --.---- -.......-.....-- ....-......- -..........
Div. Av., per cent........ 71 -53 .................... .................
Central Division.
Brevard ............................ 85 100 80 100
Hernando ................. .. 0 200 ................... ....... ......
Hillsborough ................... 65 75 60 60
Lake ................................... 80 90 50 20
Levy .................................... ........ ................. ......
M arion .............................. ..... 100 75 ........................................
Orange ................................ 90 90 .................... ...... ......
Osceola .............. ..... 100 70 50 25
Pinellas .............................. 100 150 100 100
Polk .......... ................... 50 75 ........................................
Pk---------------------------07
Volusia .................... 90 70 .............. ... ... ... ..
Div. Av., per cent........ 85 99 68 61
Southern Division.
Broward .........---- 6-----.................... 80 60 ....... ................
Dade .........--------. -------... 80 85 ---------
Lee ................................. 80 75 .
M anatee ............................ 75 60 .........
Palm Beach ...................... 100 100 90 100
St. Lucie ............................ 85 75 .... ----...... ---.. .--
Div. Av., per cent........ 83 76 90 100
State Average, per cent....| 76 I 68 79 I 80











47


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY I Ume Trees I Grapefruit Trees

Western Divitson Condition Prospectivel Condition Prospective
Y field t Yield
Bay .................................... ........... ............... .. -- 0
Calhoun ...... ..... .......-........ ...... 80 80
Escam bia ............................ .................. .................................. ... ---.
Holmes .-............ .....------- ..------ ----..------.----.--.....
Okaloosa ............................ ......... ..... ............ ...- ..... ........-...
Santa Rosa .. .......... ................ ........ .. ..... .
W alton ..... ........ .......... ................. ....
W ashington ................. ............................... ............ ....
Div. Av., per cent........ .................... ........... 65 65
Northern Division.
Gadsden ........................... ........... .... .........
JefHamiltrson ............................ ..................--------------------.. -- ---.--
Jefferson ............................ .................... ............ .. |......................... ...,-, -
Lafayette .---........---.--.....---..-....--- ----- --.
Leon .................................. .......... ................... 25 15
Liberty .......................... .................. ........---- . .................)) ......--- --.
M adison ............. -..... ....-......2..... ... .... ....
Liberty--- -------------- -------------------- ---------------- --------------------
Madison --------*--------------------------- ------------------------------------*-- ----------*--
Taylor ............................... ....................- -..................................--- -----..
W akulla ................... ............ ............... ...... .. ..
Div. Av., per ceent........ .................... ..... ..... 25 15
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ....................--....... ........... --..............-- ---------. 75 40
Baker .......................................................... .... 50 12
Bradford ...................... ... -...................... 80 50
Clay .............................. .. .. .....-- ...-- -. -.. ................-........--- -----
Columbia .....---..............----------------- ..........---.....-.---- ...-.-.-. ----....-.--. .....---
Duval ...................... ........................................... .......
Nassau ...
Putnam ....- .........-..-....... ..........-- ........ 50 50
Suwannee ---------- ------------------ ------------- -
Div. A. per cent........ ...... ........ ---.........--... 64 38
Central Division.
Drevard ................. ............. 75 90 85
Hernando ................-....................... ..... ........-- ....-- 80 1s0
Hillsborough ..................... 50 60 70 75
Lake .................................... 50 10 75 60.
Levy ...........-- ----...-- -------------.---------- ----- --------
Marion .......................-....... .....-...-............. ----- 100 80
Orange .------------------.... ----------------------..... ------------- 80 80
Oseeola ............................ 50 10 100 90
Pasco ...........--- ......----------- ------------.. ....... ............. 80 65
Pinellas ................... .... 100 100 100 50
Polk ....................---........... --.....--.-- ...------.... 50 5
Volusia .......................... ....- .. -- -----.. ---. -------. 9070
Div. Av., per cent........ 65 54 83 77
Southern Division.
Broward ...... ....---...- ..-...--. -- ... ....... 85
Dade .................................. --- 90 90 85 9 .
Lee ..........-- ... .........-- 70 70 85 85
Manatee ............... ...... .... --- --------..... .... 75 60
Palm Beach ....................... 85 100 90 100
St. Lucie .........................---- -.... .................... 85 75


Div. Av., per cent ....... 82 87 84 78

State Average, per cent.... 73 70 64 55












48


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Japan Persimmon Plum

We strn Division. Condition Prospective Condition I Prospective
Y______ield I I Yield
........ 100 60
Bay .. ............... ....._.. .......... ......... ...... . ............. ......
Calhoun ................- 100 100
ambia ...--...... ....... ..................- ----................ 75 75
talon .......R o.. .................... ............. ---------- -oo ...----- ......
Waltn
SantaRosa------- ----------- ----------- --- 100 100
W ashington ------ .. .. ............ ................ .. ......... .

Div. Av., per cent........ 100 60 91 91
~orthern Division.
Gadsden ...........- ..-- ..--..... .... ....-........ ............- -------
Hamilton ... ..................... ................. ......... ..
Jeffer n --- ------ -- .......................... ... ..
Lafayett ............................. .........----.. .................. 100 100
leon -.............-...............-- 50 20 85 90
Liberty ............---...........-- ............... .........--.... .......
Madison .--...---.-.......... ..............-.................... 90 100
Taylor ....--------------..---.- --- ....... ..-....- 80 85
W a lla .......................------------........-------- -.................................. .. ..............

ply. Av., per cent..-...... 50 20 89 94
Northeastern Division.
Alaehua -....................---... 80 90 100 100
Baker ................------... 100 50 100 100
Bradford .................---- ....... 100 125 125 150
Cla .- -------------...... ---............ .....--- .......... .......... ....... . .
Columbia ................... .... .- ....... ... . ..........
Duval ................................ 100 100 100 150
Nassau ........-.----............. 100 100 90 100
Putnam ..................---- -- -.. -------... ..........
Suwannee -.------.---...... -- ---------- 70 90
Dtv. Av.. per cent....... 96 93 98 115
Oestral Division.
Brevgrd ......................-.. ...... .................. ........ .. ------- -
Herpando ......-- --.......- -........... ......... --- ------...-- 100 200
Hillsborongh .------. ..-.....--. --.- ................I .
Lake -... ...- ......------------ 70 70 .... ....
Ley .........................--..... 50 50 75 75
JMarton ..-.....-............-...... ............... ......
Orange -..............-- ...........-- . .................... .....-.............. ..
Osoeola ..........-- ......---- 100 100 100 100
Pasco ....--.---- --.-------- ------- ---- ... .........---- .... 90 90
Pinellas .--....... ...- .. .. --- ..-.................
Polk ....------....................-..----- ---.. --......-....-......-
Volnsia .............------........ 70 50 .......... .. ..
Div. Av., per cent........ 73 68 91 116
southern Division.


B r o W a r .. .... .. --- ........ . ............. . . ..... r ... .
Dade ----..-----------........... --- ---------------- .....
Lee ...---........---------....- ... ----- -.
Manatee .-- ---- --........
Palm Beach -..--........... ..--- -- ...............
St.Lce ..............---........ 90 100
Div. Av., per cent -.... 90 100
State Average, per cent-- 82 68


------------------- I ------------.......-

-------- ------- -------------
.................... -- .......... ,-...
-------------
I -

92 101












49


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Pears Peaches

Western Division condition Prospective Condition Prospective
Yield I Yield
Bay .----................................................................... ---- 100 11
Calhoun ......................................................... ...... 100 100
Escambia ........................... 75 80 100 100
Holmes ..---.................... ----------------. 90 100
Okaloosa ..---------........------- ---------------...... 80 80
Santa Rosa ........................ 100 100 60 65
Walton ....................-------------------.. 75 80
Washington ....--........... ..... -----............ 75 75
Div. Av., per cent........ 88 90 85 89
Northern Division. -
Gadsden ............................ .................... ................... 95 100
Hamilton ...................... 80 100 95 100
Jefferson ........ .............................. I ------------------- ------------------ ------------- ----- ------------
Lafayette ..................... 100 100 100 100
Leon ......-..................... 70 60 75 80
Liberty ......... ..... ......... ........... .................... 85 125
M adison ........................... ... ..... ........... 90 100
Taylor ................................ 75 85 0 85
Wakulla ........................... 100 10D 100 110
I- -------
Div. AT., per cent ........ 85 89 90 100
Northeastern Division.
Alacha ............................------- --- 100 100
Bakerb ............................ ---- 100 100 100 100
Bradford ........................... 125 150 125 150
Clay .........................----------------------- --"---------- --- 100 100
Columbia ............................ ..------- ---- --------------95 7
Duval ................................ 100 125 1 .) 100
Nassau .......................... 80 60 90 100
Putnam ---------- .----- ........I .................... .................... .................... ....................
Suwannee ............. 65 90 20 25
Div. Av., per cent.... 95 104 91 94
I. -n i l~in.


B
H
H
L
Li
M
0
0
P
P
P


revard ............................ .................... ........ ......-----
ernando ........................... 100 200
illsborough ......................--------...----..------
ake ......................-.......-------..... 95 95
evy ................................... 75 75
arion .............................. 100 125
range ..............---.......-----.. ........
ceola ...... .................. 80 60
asco ................... 50 60
Inellas .------..-- -- ------- ---- ----.--
olk ................. ........ ........------------.........--------------
olusia .................-----------.. 50 40
Di. 'Av., per cent ........ .79 93


DI-, Dv


OU
100
90
95
50
100
100
100
100
do
60
S84


ou
200
100
95
50
100
150
90
125
75
80
104


Southern Division.
Broward ---
Laee- ------------ -- -------------------------------------------------

St. Lucie .......................... ...--.........--......--------.. .............----...... -...................-------. ....--.....-...........
Palm Beach ...................... ..------------------ ----------- ---

Div. Ay., per cent........---- ---------
State Average, per cent.... 87 94 88 97


4-Bul.


I











50


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Watermelons Cantaloupes

Western Division. Condition Prospective Condition Prospective
__Yield Yield
Bay ................................... 100 100 100 100
Calhoun ............................ 60 65 .......... .. ......
Escambia .......................... 75 100 75 100
Holmes .............................. 50 60 50 60
Okaloosa ............................ 75 90 75 90
Santa Rosa ........................ 80 75 80 75
Walton .............................. 75 80 50 70
Washington ....................... 60 60 ........................................
I
Div. Av.. per cent........ I 72 80 72 1 83
Northern Division.
*Gadsden ......................................... ........................................ ......... ...........
Hamilton ........................... 80 90 .............. ............
Jefferson .....-.. .....-----.. 50 75 50 75
Lafayette .......................... 90 100 ......... ...... ....................
Leon .................................. 75 80 70 75
Liberty .............................. 90 95 ........................................
Madison ............................ 90 100 80 90
Taylor ................................ 60 75 60 70
Wakulla ............................ 90 80 90 80
Div. Av., per cent........ 78 87 70 78
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ..................... ....... 75 0 .....................
Baker ................................ 100 90 .................... .... .....
Bradford ............................ 125 140 125 140
Clay ................................... 100 100 ................ ... ............
Columbia ------------------- 90 75
Columbia ........................... 90 75 ................... ....................
Duval ................................ 100 100 100 100
Nassau .............................. 80 90 50 60
Putnam .............................. 60 75 ......... ....................
Suwannee ......................... 60 65 .......................................

Dlv. Av., per cent........ 88 92 91 I 100
Central Division.
Brevard ............................ 40 25 ...................................
Hernando .................--.-- 40 50 ........................................
Hillsborough ............---60 75 60 75
Lake .................................. 95 95 85 80
Levy ------------------------- 95 95 85 0
Levy ....................................................... ......
Marion .. --------------------- 95 95 100 100
Orange ...----------.----- 85 85 ................................
Osceola ... -------------------- 100 100 100 100
Pasco ................................ 80 90 75 90
Pinellas ......................... 100 100 100 100
Polk ......................... ..
Polk .. ... ...... . .---.-- -- ...... 80 ................ 80 ................. i ................. i ......
Volusia .-. --------------8------0 70 70
Div. Av. per cent........ 77 79 84 88
Southern Division.
Broward .------------------ --------- .----------- .------------
Dade ........................ .............. .................. ....................
Lee .50 60 ................. ....................
Manatee ................ 75 75 ............... .............
Palm Beach ..................-- 100 125 ........................................
St. Lucie .........................-- 90 85 40 25
Div. Av., per cent........ 79 8 40 25
State Average, per cent... 79 85 71 75












51


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Pineapples Grapes

Western Division. Condition Prospective Condition Prospective
I Yield Yield
Bay -.................................... .................... .....*.............--- 100 -
Calohun ............................... .. .....
Escambia .......................... .................... ................... 50 50
Holmes ....................................... ................... 100 100
Okaloosa ----------------- .................... ------- --------------------
W alton ............................ .................... .................. .................... ....................
Washington ...........................
Santa o ........................ .................... .................... .................... ....................
Walton --------*----------------------------- -------------------- ------------------
W ashington .......................................... -- ----------- - -- -------------- -
Div. Av., per cent........ .............-....................... 83 83
Northern Division.
uadsden ............................ .................... ,.................... .................... ..........6.. ....
Gadsden --------------------- --------------------- -
Jefferson .............................-....- .................... 90 95
Lafayette ..---. -----... ------- ---- ------ ..90 100
Leon ...------........ ---------------- ... .------- ----. 75 80
Liberty ....--. .....-- ....---- .. --........---...---- ....-...---------........- --.------ ---.-------
M adison ... ......................................... .................... 90 100
Taylor ----------------------- -------------------- -
Taylor ...................................................................... -....----.----- .. ........-..- ....
W akulla ................................... ................. 90 100
Div. Av., er cent....... .................... ....-...-............ 86 96
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ......................... .. .............. ..... .................... 100 100
Baker ...................................................-......-.............. 100 100
Bradford ........................................... ------....-------------- 100 100
Clay .........-------....--..----..... ........ .......................... 100 100
Columbia ....... ..... ------------------ ---------------------- --- .......
Duval .----............................ ................... 100 100
Nassau ..............................-........................................ 50 60
Putnam ..-- ---......---....--------- --------- --- ----....--.- .....-------..------------.--
Suwannee ---------- ------------- ....... -------------........ ...-- ..--- ....-..-........
Div. Av, per cent........ ................ ................... 92 93
Central Division.
B reward ...................... ... ........ ... . ....... ................... ...... .... ....
Hernando .......................-................. .................. 100 200
Hilllsborough .------------.........-...-......... ....-------------------.................................... 100 100
L ake ......................... .....- .......- ......... ...... .... .. -- ........-- ...... ..... ............
Levy ..--------------------------- 75 75
Marion .-----...........................-........ -------. 100 100
Orange ------...-...................... ..-.... -------.-.. -------.----------...--.-
Osceola .....--------------- 50 30 100 120
Pasco ........................-------.................. .... ................ 80 90
Pinellas ....................---- ............------..------ ---- ..- ....--...
P olk ................................... .................... .................... ................... ....................
Polk-------------- ------------------------ -------------------------
Volusia ............................-------- ... .....--...-.. 100 110
Div. Av.. per cent........ 50 30 79 114
Southern Division.
Broward ...-....-...-.......--........... -----........---- .......-------- ......... .... ............ ..................
Dade ------------------------------ 50
Lee ....----------- --------------------- ------- .... ........--- ... ................
Manatee .........................-- ... ........------- --------
Palm Beach .....:................. 00 20 ..................
St. Lucle ....................---....- 10 20 95 100
Div. Av., per cent........ 53 98 95 100

State Average, per cent.... 51 64 87 97















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

Horses
COUNTY and Cattle Hogs Sheep
M, 1 es

Western Division. C n condition I condition I Condition Condition
Bay- ..- .............. 100 100 125 110
Calhoun ............................ 100 100 100 100
Escambia ......................... 100 100 100 75
Holmes .......................... 115 120 150 100
Okaloosa ........................ 100 100 100 100
Santa Rosa ...................... 90 90 125 100
Walton .. ..................... 90 95 100 85
Washington ...................... 85 95 80 85

Div. Av., per cent........ 88 100 110 94
Northern Division.
badsden .......--..... ... 9 65 90 85
Hamilton ........................... 100 100 100 ..................
Jefferson ...................... 75 85 85 ....................
Lafayette .................. 100 100 100 ...............
Leon ........................ ..... 90 100 100 85
Liberty ...................... 100 100 125 100
Madison ............................ 100 125 125 ....................
Taylor ........ ....... 80 65 75 65
Wakulla .................... 100 105 120 100
Div. Av., per cent........ 93 94 102 87
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............................. 100 100 100 100
Baker ................................ 125 125 130 100
Bradford ............................ 100 100 110 100
Clay ................................... 100 100 80 100
Columbia .................... 80 100 100 ..................
Duval ..........--...................... 100 110 110 100
Nassau ............................. 90 85 85 75
Putnam ............................. 100 75 100 75
Suwannee ......................... 95 80 95 ...

Div. Av.. per cent...... 99 97 101 93
Central Division.
nrvau---------


orevaru ............................
Hernando ..........................
Hillsborough .................
Lake ... ....... .......
Levy .................................----
Marion ..............................
Orange ..............................
Osceola .........................--
Pasco ................................
Pinellas .............................
Polk ........................
Volusia ....................


100
100
90

100
100
100
100
100
75
95


100
100
85
60
95
90
100
90
100
75
90


Div. Av., per cent........ 90 90


Broward .....................
Dade ...........................
Lee ... ..... .............
Manatee ..........
Palm Beach .. .....
St. Lucie ............. ---....


100 90
100 100
85 .. ........
60 15
100 90
100 --
140 100 ..................
140 100
90 100
100 ............
95 75
95 90

96 90


Southern Division.


'IU u U
100 125 125
90 100 100
90 90 90
100 100 100
85 85 90


Div. Av., per cent........ 89 94 99
State Averaee. oer cent.... 92 I 95 101


90
100


95

92












53


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Tobacco Honey Wool

Western Division. Pounds Pounds Pounds
ay ....................................... ....................... 4,000 5,000
Calhoun ............................................................. 115,000 12,000
Escambia ............................................................ 18,000 15,000
Holmes .............................................................. 15,000 25,000
Okaloosa ............................................................ 12,000 50,000
Santa Rosa ................................ 3,000 2,000 45,000
Walton ....................................... ....................... 20,000 50,000
Washington ........................................................ 20,000 50,000
Div. Av., per cent......... 3,000 206,000 252,000
Northern Division.



Leon---- 500,000 2,000 500
Gadsden ..................................... 2,500,000 1 00 -1,500
H amilton .................................... ..... .................. ...................................----.............
Jefferson ...................................... ............. .....................
Lafayette .................................... ............................................... ..............--........- .
Leon ............................................ 500,000 2,000 500
Liberty ................................... ........................ 60,000 1,500
M adison ...................................... 300,000 ...................... ..... .. ....
Taylor ........... ....................... ...... ..... ... 1,000 50
Wakulla ................................... ........ 36,000 200

Div. Av., per cent......... 3,300,000 99,500 3,450
Northeastern Division.
Alaclua ....... .... .... ............. ............. 3,000 ........... .....
Baker ........................................ ------------------------------.................. 300 500
Bradford ..................................... ....................... 4,500
Clay ........... ........................... ....................... 3000 ............. 3,000...
Clay ... .3,000
Columbia ................................ ........... ............. -....-- ........
Duval ................................. ............ 1,000 3,000
Nassau ............. ................. ... .. ..... .... 4,000
Putnam ............. ................... I 50,000 ........................
Suwannee ...............................-- 4,000 2,000 ..................

Div. Av., per cent......... | 4,000 67,800 I 3,500
Central Division.
Brevard ...................................... ......40,000 ..... .....
Hernando .............................................. 1,500
Hillsborough ............................. ........ ... 6,000 ...............
Lake ..................................... .................. 17,000 ...............
Levy ...........................-.............-- ---.......--.. -----
M arion ........................................ ........ ............. 3,000 5,000
Marion --------------------------------------- 3,000 5,000
Orange ............ .... .. .
Osceola ...................................... .. .... ... .. 1,000 11,000
Pasco ....................................... ...................... 1,000 ... ..
Pinellas ...... ...................... .. ............. ...... 10,000 ....
Polk 2.000 4,000
Polk .................................................................... 2,000 4,000
Volusia ........................................I ...... 120,000 14.000

Div. Av., per cent......... ............I 203,000 I 35,500
Southern Division.
Broward ............................................------------- --- ----------- ----
Dade ....................................... ...-----------------------------------------.....................------------- ........................ ----........................
Lee ..---..--.. ......... .------ ---- ---------------........... ----- .------- ...
Manatee .---- -----........--- -------- ------- -------
Palm Beach ................ ............ .. ..
St. Lucie .................. a.......... 4,000 .....

Total for State.............. 3,307,000 580,300 294,450












U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,
WEATHER BUREAU.
ANNUAL SUMMARY CLIMATOLOGICAL SERVICE WEATHER
BUREAU, FLORIDA SECTION.
Alexander J. Mitchell, Meteorologist.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, ANNUAL.

GENERAL SUMMARY.

The year, 1917, was exception al in respect to both
temperature and rainfall. Since 892 only 5 years gave
a lower temperature. And the rainfall, 41.36 inches,
was the least annual amount during the last 26 years.
The annual deficiency, 12.72 inc ies, far surpasses pre-
vious records. As shown in tabular matter, August and
September were the wettest months, and November with
a total of only 0.57 inch, was th, driest month. The
severe cold waves of February and December, and the
persistent cold during the last ftw months of the year
were unusual. These negative co editions, however, were
further attended by insufficient moisture during much
of the Spring and Summer, whichh unfavorably affected
the recovery of citrus trees froi, the damage by the
February cold. A tropical storn of unusual severity
and unprecedentedly low baromeic pressure prevailed
on the extreme northwestern coast on September the
27-28. A maximum wind velocity of 103 miles an hour
occurred at Pensacola, where the lowest pressure was
28.51 inches.
Coincident with the. cold wave of December 29 and
30 was a fall of snow, traces beirg noted in the lowest
portion of the central division. This was the heaviest
snowfall since February, 1889. The citrus crop was
much reduced by the cold weather, and most field crops
were backward during the Spring and early Summer.
As the Summer rains increased snd became more gen-
eral, however, crop growth responded favorably. The
frost on October 25, when temperatures of 320 or below
occurred in the northern and portions of the central
division, damaged fall truck considerably, and menaced
the saving of seed cane. The Autumn, however, was very
favorable for harvesting, and the cotton, forage, and












grain crops were gathered in good condition. The de-
ficiencies in temperature during October, November and
December, 2.40, 4.50 and 4.90, surpassed all previous
records for those months since 1891, except in 1 or 2
instances. The dry, cold weather retarded the opera-
tions of the boll weavil, giving cotton time to take on
and hold fruit.

THE WEATHER BY MONTHS.

JANUARY.--The weather during the month was re-
markably dry and mild, being practically a duplicate of
the same month in 1916. The excess in temperature
approximated 60. The coldest weather occurred gen-
erally on the 12, with minima in the 20's over the
northern division. Droughty conditions persisted, and
in the south the severity approximated the record of
many years. Truck growth was delayed, except on low
lands and in the extreme west. Large shipments of
strawberries were made, and much citrus bloom was ob-
served. Farm work was well advanced.
FEBRUARY.-The chief feature of the month's weather
was the cold period which began in the extreme western
counties on the 1, and which persisted with varying
intensity until the 7. Almost record temperatures oc-
curred on the 3, the lowest during the month being 130
in Gadsden County. Freezing prevailed throughout
the mainland, and a minimum of 370 was recorded at
Long Key, Monroe County. Precipitation was much
below the normal, although the rainfall on the 5 and 9
was very beneficial to citrus trees many of which were
defoliated by the low temperature. Truck was gener-
ally killed, and strawberries were set back several
weeks. Much corn and cotton were planted.
MARCH.-The month was drier than th normal, and
the temperature was above the average. Heavy frost
occurred on the 5 and 6 in the northern and central
divisions, and light frost on otherdates,, but no serious
damage was done. Rainfall was insufficient, the second
decade being without precipitation of moment. Farm
work was well advanced, but most crops were backward;
and citrus fruits and vegetables were slow recovering
from the effects of the February freeze. Cotton was












planted, except in the west, and corn planting was fin-
ished. One person was killed by lightning.
APRIL.-The month was dry, moderatly cool, and sun-
shiny. The last half of the month was warmer than
normal, except on the southeast coast, where the temper-
atut~e continued below .the seasonal. Rainfall occurred
on several days of each decade, but the amounts were
insufficient and below the normal. The dry weather was
unfavorable for citrus fruits; the bloom was light. Cot-
ton was about chapped out; and corn, cane, peanuts,
melons and truck made fair progress. Large shipments
of white potatoes began from Hastings, St. Johns County.
Severe electrical storms damaged property to the extent
of 8 or 10 thousand dollars. And one person, Harley
Rayborn, was killed at Seddon Island on the 5.
MAY.-May was agreeably cool and dry. In Jackson-
ville it was the coolest May, except two, since 1872, and
the coolest in Pensacola since 1879. Record minima for
May occurred at Tampa, the lowest being 51.30. The
cool period prevailed generally from the 8 to 17, when
daily deficiencies ranged from 10' to 140 over much of
the section. The month's rain fell from 1 to 8; there
was none of moment thereafter. Cool nights and dry
weather unfavorably affected the growth of cotton, corn,
truck, tobacco, fruits and melons.
JUNn.-The weather continued dry during the first
decade, but the rainfall increased during the following
weeks. The total for the month, however, was much
below the normal. The dry weather was unfavorable for
cotton, corn, cane, peanuts, tobacco and citrus fruits,
but these crops improved as the rainfall increased and
became more general. The absence of the normal rain-
fall was not an unmixed evil, as the dry weather re-
tarded the maximum activity of the boll weevil. Cotton
bloom was general, and a few early bolls were reported.
The temperature averaged below the normal.
JULY.-This was the seventh consecutive month with
deficiency rainfall, although showers occurred almost
daily. The drought in the Miami section become more
aggravated, the deficient rainfall there during recent
months exceeding 7 inches. Temperatures were mod-
erate, the highest for the month being 30 less than in
June. As a whole, crops advanced satisfactorily, except












in portions of the south. Cotton lost some fruit-due
to shedding and the weevil. Corn, cane, peanuts, sweet
potatoes, melons and velvet beans did well. Citrus
fruits were backward. An electrical storm on the 27
damaged property in Jacksonville approximating
$10,000 in value. Three persons were killed by lightning
during the month.
AUGuST.-The temperature was moderate. The rain-
fall exceeded the normal for the first time in eight
months. The first decade was too dry in the citrus belt,
and the last two weeks were rather wet for the best
development of the cotton crop. Other crops, such as
corn, cane, sweet potatoes, ind tobacco were improved
by the showers. The boll weevil damaged cotton to
some extent. The first bale of cotton was marketed at
Live Oak on the 2.
SEPTEMBER.-The month was showery during much of
the time. The temperature averaged below the normal,
and most of the month was pleasant. A tropical storm
of much severity approached the extreme west coast
on the 27-28 doing much damage on the coast and to
crops. The lowest barometer reading was 28.51 inches
at Pensacola, and the highest wind velocity was 103
miles an hour. The weevil continued to damage cotton;
there was no top crop. Citrus fruits improved to some
extent. Much corn and hay were harvested. Seeding
and planting for fall truck were active, except where
the soil was too dry.
OCTOBER.-Rainfall and temperature weer much below
the normal, the negative conditions, however, favored
harvesting purposes. Freezing temperatures occurred in
some northern, and frost in centurar, counties. The
drought continued severe on the southeast coast, the
rainfall deficiency at Miami being 8.43 inches. Truck
was damaged by frost; seed cane was generally saved.
The last of the cotton crop was gathered. The cool
weather benefited citrus fruits, celery and lettuce in
*southern counties.
NOVEMBER.-The dry, cold weather of October con-
tinued during November, which 'was the coldest of that
name, except one, since 1891; and it was the driest of
record. The frost on the 25 practically destroyed the
bulk of the truck crops, except in the extreme south,












although damage was done there. Strawberries were
set back a month or more. The planting of oats was
delayed by dry weather. Cane grinding was active, es-
pecially after the 25.
DECEMBER-The twelfth month of the year was, like
most of the preceding ones, much drier and colder than
the normal. The deficiency in temperature was about
50. Damaging frost was frequent ,and the temperature
was unusually low in the southern division of several
dates. The heaviest and most widespread snowfall since
February, 1899, occurred during fhe night of the 29
and on the 30 and 31. Traces of snow were observed
in portions of the central .division. The cold waves of
the 10 and 31 practically ruined such trukc as had pre-
viously escaped, except that some cabbage, celery and
lettuce were found in fair condition. Citrus fruits were
frozen in the northern portion of the belt, but the trees
escaped serious damage.
















COMPARATIVE ANNUAL DATA FOR FLORIDA.

Temperature. Precipitation.


Year. 1 .



1892 .................... 704 -0.2 101 22 47.99 -4.42
1893 .................... 71.0 +0.4 104 19 53.01 +0.60
1894 .................... 71.2 +0.6 101 12 52.51 +0.10
1895 ................... 69.9 -0.7 100 11 45.50 -6.91
1896 ....................71.0 +04 103 20 49.62 -2.79
1897 .................... 71.2 +0.6 104 17 56.69 4.28
1898 ........ 70.5 -0.1 102 17 48.36 -4.05
1899 .................. 71.0 +0.4 104 2 53.93 +1.52
1900 .................... 70 7 0.1 104 13 61.19 +8.78
1901 .................... 68.8 -1.8 107 12 58.47 + 6.06
1902 .................... 70.8 +0.2 105 15 51.24 -1.17
1903 ..... ............... 69.8 -0.8 105 17 55.79 +388
1904 .................... 69.2 -0.7 102 20 48.15 -4.26
1905 .................... 70.5 -0.1 103 10 61.43 +9.02
1906 .................... 70.9 +0.3 101 14 53.76 +1.35
1907 .................... .71.5 +0.9 102 21 49.15 -3.26
1908 .................... 71.2 +0.6 103 20 48.54 -3.87
1909 .................... 71.1 +0.5 103 16 49.52 -2.89
1910 .................... 69.2 -1.4 102 19 50.88 -1.53
1911 .................... 72.3 +1.7 104 15 47.40 -5.01
1912 .................... 71.1 +0.6 104 21 64.88 +11.61
1913 .................... 71.2 +0.7 104" 23 48.02 -6.20
1914 .................... 70.3 -0.1 107 19 49.08 -4.62
1915 .................... 70.4 -0.1 105 23 56.30 +- 1,23
1916 .................... 71.1 0.3 102 21 47.10 6.26
1917 .................... 10.3 -0.7 102 13 41.36 1-12.72

MONTHLY SUMMARY, 1917.

Precipi- Average number
Temperature tation of days



Month S t l |



) o S 0 2
January ... 64.4 +5.8 87 22 1.41 -1.76 4 19 8 4sw.
February .. 60.1 -0.2 92 13 1.75 1.53 5 18 7 3 sw.
March .... 68.2 +2.3 93 24 -1.98 1.16 5 19 8 4 se.
April ...... 70.21 +0.3 971 35 1.56 0.96 5 20 8 4 e.
May ....... 73.4 -2.7 100 40 2.64 -1.18 5 19 8 4 sw.
June .. 79.2 -0.8 102 5% 5.17 1.77 10 11 11 8 se.
July ....... 81.2 -0.2 99 62 6.55 0.42 14 10 15 6 se.
August .... 81.2-0.1 99 58 7.73 +0.44 15 9 15 7sw.
September .. 78.1 -1.1 101 49 7.73 + 0.48 15 8 12 10 ne.
October .... 71.2 -2.4 94 25 2.83 1.70 6 17 9 5 ne.
November .. 60.8 -4.5 85 23 0.57 1.63 3 19 7 4 ne.
December .. 54.8 -4.9 .86 16 1.44 1.54 5 15 8 8 ne.
Year.... 70.31 -0.7 1021 13 41.36 -12.72 02 184 115 66 sw.














60


KILLING FROSTS,1917.


Stations Last in
Spring


Northern Division
Archer .......... Mar. 6
Bristol .......... Mar. 6
Carrabelle ...... Mar. 6
Cedar Keys..... Feb. 6
Crescent City.... Feb. 11
Federal Point .. Feb. 7
Fenholloway .... Mar. 6
Fernandina .... Feb. 10
Gainesville ... Mar. 6
Hilliard ........ Mar. 6
Jacksonville .... Mar. 6
Jasper .... ... *
Johnstown Mar. 6
Lake City ...... Mar. 6
Live Oak....... *
Macclenny ..... Mar. 6
Madison ....... Mar. 6
Middleburg ..... Mar. 6
Monticello ......
Morton's Farm... Mar. 6
Mount Pleasant.. Mar. 6
Quincy ......... Mar. 6
St. Augustine. ... Feb. 10
Satsuma Heights.| Feb. 11
Switzerland .... I Feb. 6
Tallahassee ..... I Mar. 6


First in
autumn


Oct. 25
Nov. 25
Nov. 25
Nov. 25
Dec. 9
Oct. 25
Dec. 9
Nov. 24
Oct. 25
Nov. 25

Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Nov 24
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Nov. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Dec. 9
Nov. 25

Nov. 25


Central Division
Bartow ........ Feb. 11 Nov. 25
Bassenger (near) Feb. 6 Nov. 25
Brooksville (1).. Feb. 7 Nov. 25
Brooksville (2)... Mar. 6 Nov. 2o
Clermont ....... Feb. 6 *
Coleman ....... Feb. 6 *
De Land........ Feb.11
Eustis ......... Feb. 11 Nov. 25
Fellsmere ...... Feb. 6 Dec. 10
Fort Meade ..... Feb. 7 Nov. 25
Fort Pierce ..... Feb. 6 Dec. 10
Inverness ...... Feb. 7 Nov. 25
Kissimmee ...... Feb. 6 Nov. 25
Lakeland ....... Feb. 6 Dec. 1
Lucerne Park ... Feb. 6 Dec. 10
Malabar ........ Feb. 6 Dec. 10
McDonald ....... Mar. 6 Nov. 25
Merritts Island...| Feb. 6 Dec. 31
II


Stations Last in
I spring


New Smyrna .... Feb. 7
Ocala ........... Mar. 6
Orange City ...... *Feb. 11
Orlando ......... Feb. 7
Pinellas Park..... Feb. 6
Plant City ....... Feb. 6
Rockwell ........ Feb. 7
St. Cloud ........ Feb. 6
St. Leo ......... Feb. 7
St. Petersburg.... Feb. 6
Sanford ......... Feb.11
Tampa .......... Feb. 6
Tarpon Springs..: Feb. 6
Titustille ....... Feb. 6
Southern Division I
Arcadia .........I Feb. 6
Avon Park ...... Feb. 6
Boca Grande ..... Feb. 6
Bradentown ...... Feb. 6
Devie ........... Feb. 10
Fort Lauderdale... Feb. 6
Fort Myers....... Feb. 4
Griffin .......... Feb. 6
Homestead ...... Feb. 6
Hypoluxxo ...... Feb. 6
Key West ....... None


Lock No. 1.......
Long Key .......
Miami (1) .......
Miami (2) .......
Punta Gorda ...
Ritta ...........
Sand Key ........

Western Division
Apalachicola .....
Bonifay .........
De Funlak Springs
Garniers (near)...
Marianna ........
Molino ..........
Pensacola .......
St. Andrews ......
Wausau ......... .


Mar. 6
Mar. 6
*M
Mar. 6
Mar. 6
Mar. 6
Mar. 6
Mar. 5
*


* Record incomplete. Data incomplete, but this date probably correct

*


First in
autumn





Dec. 10
Nov. 25
Nov. 25
Nov. 25
Dec. 10
Nov. 25
Nov. 25
SDec. 10
Nov. 25
Dec. 31
Nov. 25
Dec. 31
Nov. 25
Nov. 25

Dec. 10
Dec. 31
Dec. 31
Dec. 10
Dec. 10
Dec. 10
Dec. 10
Dec. 10
None
Nov. 25
None

None
None
None
None
Dec. 10
None
None

Nov. 24
Oct. 25
Nov. 24
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Oct. 25
Dec. 9
Nov. 25
I Oct. 22








61

CO-OPERATION WITH OTHER SERVICES.

Bureau of Plant Industry: Cooperation wioh this Bu-
reau is carried on at Brooksville and Miami, %Where maxi-
mum and minimum thermometers thermographss and
rain gages are installed.
Coast and Geodetic Survey: Stations at Cedar Keys
and St. Augustine are equipped with standard ther-
mometers, anemometers and rain gages, records of which
are furnished the Survey.
Forest Service: There is cooperation at Garniers and
-Lynne, maximum and minimum thermometers and a rain
gage being in use at Garniers, and a gage at Lynne.






CLIMATOLOGICAL DATA FOR THE YEAR 1917.


Stations


Northern Division
Archer ...........
Bristol .... ....
Carrabelle ........
Cedar Keys ......
Crescent City .....
Federal Point .....
Fenholloway ......
Fernandina .......
Gainesville ........
Hilliard ..........
Jacksonville ......
Jasper ...........
Johnstown ........
Lake.City ........
Live Oak .........
Macclenny ........
Madison .........
Melrose ..........
Middleburg .......
Monticello ........
Morton's Farm ...
Mount Pleasant ...
Quincy ...........
St. Augustine ....
Satsuma Heights ..
Switzerland .......
Tallahassee ......

Central Divison
Bartow ..........
Bassenger (near) .
Brooksville (1) ...
Brooksville (2) ...
Clermont .........
Coleman .........
De Land .........
Eustis ...........
Fellsmere ........
Fort Meade ......
Fort Piercce .....


Counties


Alachua ....
Liberty ....
Franklin ...
Levy ......
Putnam ....
Putnam ....
Taylor ....
Nassau......
Alachua ...
Nassau ....
Duval .....
Hamilton
Bradford
Columbia
Suwanee ...
Baker ......
Madison ..
Alachua ...
Clay ......
Jefferson ...
Dural .....
Gadsden ...
Gadsden ...
St. Johns...
Putnam ....
St. Johns...
Leon ......

Polk .. .
Okeechobee
Hernando
Hernando
Lake ......
Sumter ....
Volusia ....
Lake ......
St. Lucle ...
Polkl .......
St. Lucie ....


Temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit.


32 ...... 99 June 12*
8 65.9 97 June 25
19 66.7 97 Sept. 4
29 69.6 98 Sejt. 4
19 70.5 99 May 27
26 70.3 100 June 2*
11 ...... 98 June 25
25 67.3 98 July 29
22 68.6 98 June 23
9 68.0 98 June 23*
47 68.1 94 June 23
16 ..... ..... ..... .
19 ...... 97 June 22
34 68.2 99 June 2
17 ........... ........
22 ...... 98 June 1
18 67..4 98 June 24*

17 68.0 98 May 27*
14 ...... 97 July 28*
3 ...... .... ........
12 66.6 99 June 11'
3 ...... 96 June 4
66 ...... 96 July 29
10 ...... 96 June 9
25 ...... 96 May 27"
31 67-.7 101 Sept. 9


115 31
40 5
126 26
6
105 25
65 2
27 21
56 27
25 4
1251 291
101 171


71.0

69.2


71.1
70.9
71.91
73.31


May 27
May 29

July 15*
June 12

June 9*
June 12
May 27
June 8*
July -12*


Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3

Feb. 3
Feb. 3

Feb. 3
Feb. 3

Feb. 3

Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 3

Feb. 4
Feb. 4
Feb. 4
Feb. 4
Feb. 3
Feb. 3
Feb. 4
Feb. 4
Feb. 4
Feb. 4
Feb. 3


Precipitation, in inches.


52.85
o








40.19

38.17
30.49
32.79
41.41
32.56

30.13
35.63

3964
34.11
44.95

40.31
44.10
34.79
38.99
39.26
40.83

61.77

48.45


35.35
41.50
49.181
31.731


r .


5 ;








11ii.18 July 626 Oct
.... .. . . 0.14 Oct.
9.37 July 0.50 Nov.
8.82 July ..... ..
9.10 June 0.17 Nov.
9.83 Aug. 0.86 Oct.
5.94 Aug. 0.34 Jan.
6.73 July 0.55 Oct.
9.76 Aug. 0.10 Oct.
10.36 July 0.26 Nov.

5.74 Aug. 0.18 Oct.
6.57 July 0.72Oct*

S ' '. Nov.
7.21 July 0.56 ....
8.05 July 1.13 Jan.
16.34 Aug. 0.50 Jan.
... .:::::.. ... .. :::.. ....

8.01 Jan. 0. 20 Oct.
8.33 July 0.08 Oct.
9.01 Sept. 0.37 Nov.
9.01 Aug. 0.26 Jan.
9.55 July 0.40 Jan.
8.73 Aug. 0.75 Oct.

12.351 Sept. 0.19 Nov.
10.50 Sept. T. Jan.
...... ... ... 0.40 Nov.
9.39 Sept. 0.36 Mar.

..13 Nov.
7.95 July 0.48 Nov.
11.76 Sept. 0.48 Mar.
11.861 Sept. 0.25 Nov.|
6.651 Sept. 0.19 Mar.


Sky



O






II 11
ga a







89 124 1791
83 . .
112 93 199
91 223 117
107 144 141

60 . . . .
90 136 128

110 132 39

92 15 i29



98 223 77
79 . . . ..
102. .... ... I.
75. .. .. ....
89 206 81

121 130 181

.... .... ....
117 148 129



104 190 104
861 1961 1101
961 1491 1421


'0
0
C
V


a
I
a
1
2


5w.

5w.
se.
se.
sw.
se.
sw.

sw.

sw.

SW.
SW. .
Sw.



sw.

se.
ne.

s.


54 a.
54 s.
.... se.

88 ne.

se.
58 ne.
71 e.
59 ne.
74[se.


*






Inverness ........ Citrus .....
Isleworth ......... Orange ....
Kissimmee ........ Osceola ....
Lakeland ......... Polk .......
Lucerne Park ..... Polk .......
Lynne (near) ..... Mario ....
Malabar ......... Fre i d .
McDonald ........ Orange
Merritts Island ... Brevard .
New Smyrna ...... Volusia ....
Ocala ............ Marion ...
Orange City ...... Volusia
Orlando .......... Orange ....
Pinellas Park .. Pinellas ....
Planty City H.. llsborough
Rockwell ......... Marion
St. Cloud ......... Osceola
Pasco .....
St. Petersburg .... Pinellas ....
Sanford .......... Seminole ...
Tampa ........... .Hillborough
Tarpon Springs ... Pinellas ...
Titusville ......... Brevard

Southern Division
Arcadia .......... De Soto ....
Avon Park ....... De Soto ....
Roca Grande ..... Lee ......
Bradentown ....... Manatee ..
Davie ........... Broward ...
Fort Lauderdale .. Broward ...
Fort Myers ....... Lee ....
Griffin ........ Broward ...
Homestead ...... Dade ......
Hypoluxo ......... Palm Beach
Key West ......... Monroe ....
Lock N.o 1........ Broward ...
Long Key ........ Monroe ....
Miami (1) ...... Dade ......
Miami (2) ...... Dade .....
Punta Gorda ..... De Soto ....
Ritta ........ ... Palm Beach
Sand Key.......... Monroe ....

Western Divisioa
Apalachico a ..... Franklin ..
Bonifay ......... Holmes
De Funlak Springs. Walton ....
Garnlers (near .. Okaloosa .
Marianna ....... Jackson ....
Molino .......... Escambia
Pensacol ...... .. Escambia
St. Andrews ...... Bay .....
Wausau .......... Washington


71.9
72.8
72.5

72.4
71.4

67.8
72.1
70.9


70.2
72.5
70.4
71.5
70..4


May 27

May 26"
July 90
May 27
May 23
May 27*
July 29
June 9"
July 16
June 11
Sept. 4
June 12*

July 25
May 300
June 2
June 5
May 27
Sept. 5
July 15*
July 28


20 Feb. 4

24 Feb. 3
24 Feb. 3
24 Feb. 3

25 Feb. 3
17 Feb. 3
26 Feb. 3
19 Feb 4
18 Feb. 3
15 Feb. 4
22 Feb. 4
27 Feb. 3*
24 Feb. 3
20 Feb. 3
21 Feb. 3
22 Feb. 3
28 Feb. 3
22 Feb. 3
26 Feb. 3
24 Feb.4"
23 Feb. 4


17 ...... 98 May 27 21 Feb. 4
19 72.4 97 June 11 27 Feb. 3
2 ...... 93 July 150 28 Feb.3 3
34 ...... 95 July 15 21 Feb. 4
5 71.3 95 Aug. 10* 21 Feb. 6
5 73.7 95 Aug. 10 281 Feb. 6
46 72.4 94 May 26* 27| Feb. 4
5 .... .. .... .. .. 24 Feb. 6
8 73.1 98 Sept. 16 30! Feb. 3
23 ...... 98 Aug. 10 28 Feb. 3
47 76.3 92 Aug. 17 44 Feb. 3

2 76.7 94 Aug. 21 37 Feb 3
16 73.6 89 Aug. 20 27 Feb 3
7 74.8 92 June 120 26 Feb. 3
4 ...... 94 June 4V 28 Feb. 3
5 ...... .... .... .... 29 Feb 4
12 75.6 90 Aug. 9 45 Feb. 3

14 ...... 95 July 30* 19 Feb. 3
12 ...... 96 July 290 14 Feb. 3
20 ...... 97 June 25 ..... ... ....
5 ...... 96 May 22 16 Feb. 3
16 66.2 99 July 28* 15 Feb. 3
16 ...... .... .... .. ..
88 65.9 91 July 29 17 Feb .3
21 ...... 97 Sept. 4 16 Feb. 3
191...... 1011 Sept. 9 .... .......


191...... ...... . . ....
2 42.21 964 Sept. 0.00
26 37.70 7.35 Aug. 0.10
3 52.00 10.47 Aug. T.
.6 47.48 11.77 Sept. T.
4 38.61 9.55 June 0.30
26 36.16 9.47 Sept. 0.64
15 33.87 7.56 Sept. 0.51
39 30.54 8.29 Sept 0.01
34 36.86 10.271 Sept. 0.18
26 46.16 9.04 Aug. 0.26
27 47.90 10.94 Sept. 0.29
26 47.81 1117 July 0.19
,6 57.34 20.06 Aug. 0.48
25 . . . .
18...... 10.13 Aug. 000
4 3281 8.741 Sept. 0.30
23 54.05 14.561 Aug. 0.38
3 44.0 | 1083| Aug. 0.19
10 37.99 8.84 Sept. 0.29
28 37.54 10.541 Aug. 0.20
26 41.23 11.801 Aug. 0.36
22 ...... .... .. ... ... 0.09

17 .... 9.12 Aug. ....
19 37.00 1064 Sept. 0,47
34 49.17 15.021 Aug. 0.44
5 4406 9.76 Sept. 0.12
5 47.49 11.131 Sept. Ti
S51 46.19 9.921 July 001
5 57.64 14.03 Sept. 0.00
8 57.90 15.841 Sept. 0.26
23 5306 15.691 Sept. 0.13
47 28.77 8.37 Sept. 0.14
5 47.25 8.20 Sept. 0.10
2 28.77 10.36 Sept. 0.12
27 47.82 18.55 Sept. 0.11
7 55.30 18.71 Sept. 0.41
4 ...... 12.07 Sept. 0.21
5 ...... ...... ... ... .....
12 28.99 10.39 Sept. 0.03

14 ...... 10.59 Aug. 0.16
12 .. . . . . . . 0.29
20 ...... ... . .. . .. 2. .

5 38.45 8 75 Jan. 0.38
16 43.17 8.47 Aug.. 0.79
16 ...... 15.74 Sept. .
38 51.97 10.23 Sept. 0.75
21 36.77 10.81 Aug. 0.16
19 ...... ..... ... .... .


Nov.
Nov. I
Dec*
Nov.
Nov.

Nov.
Jano
Nov.
Nov.I
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.

Nov.
Nov.
Mar.
Mar.
Nov.
Nov.
Jan.
Nov.


Dec.
Mar.
Tan
Tan.
Jan.
Jan.
Nov.
Jan.
Jan.
Jan:
Jan. I
Jan.
Nov.

Jan.

Oct.
Ort.
Oct.
Oct.
'Oct.

Oct.
Oct.


0 69 196 90 79 e.
0 77 223 1061 3 nw.
0 95 87 243 5 ne.
T. 106 275 57 33 sw.
0 91 . .. se.
T. 115 . ... . w.
0 89 249 77 39 se.
0 94 . . .. . . se.
T. 104 .... .. .. ...
T. 109 154 1661 45 se.
0 94 249 90 26 s.
0 91 258 73 34w.
S .. ... ... ....
T.
0 73 213 1211 31 nw.
0 105 203 1081 54e.
0 102 1651 1311 69ne.
T. 100 189 91 85 se.
0 104 127 158 80.ne.
0 75 202 121 42 w.
0 .. .... .. .. se.


0 .w. . sw.
0 96 183 139 43 e.

0 87 228 83 54 sw.
0 119 248 67 SOle.
0 105 223 63 791e.
0 931.... . .... ne.
0 93 182 137 46 e.
0 110 ... . . . .. se.
O 98 223 89 583 e.
0 97 185 118 62 e.
0 99 194 92 79el
0 82 226 117 221e.
0 117 154 118 931e.
0 110 . ....
0 .... .... .... ... .
0 88 193 111 61 e.

T. . . . . . .... n.
0.1 . . . . . . .
0.5 . .... . ..
T. .. .. . . W.
0.8 87 99 23 3 s.
T.- 98 1 121 113 n.
0.5 771... .... ....
o. ....I.... . !* *


, . ..


, ,





















PART III.

Rice Hulls, Deleterious and Unwholesome-Pro-
hibited in Stock Feed Sold in Florida.
Fertilizers, Feeding Stuffs, and Foods and Drugs.












R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist


5-Bul.












RICE HULLS, DELETERIOUS AND UN-
WHOLESOME-PROHIBITED IN STOCK
FEED SOLD IN FLORIDA

To All Dealers, Dairymen and Livestock Feeders.
Stock Feed Adulterated With Rice Hulls.

The attention of the Agricultural Department has been
called by the Food Inspectors to large quantities of stock
feed adulterated with rice hulls, a deleterious substance
prohibited by the Laws of this State. A number of
attachments of such adulterated, deleterious and unwhole-
some feeds, containing ten to twenty-two percent of added
rice hulls, have been made in various parts of the State
aggregating some 1,394 sacks or 70 tons, invoiced at
$45.00 per ton to dealers, or $3,150.00 wholesale, and sold
at larger prices to consumers. Doubtless much larger
amounts have escaped the scrutiny of the Inspectors and
have been sold to Florida feeders.
The following quotations from Bulletin No. 77, of the
LOUISIANA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STA-
TION, Louisiana being the largest producer of rice in
America, show the danger attending the feeding of rice
hulls:











THE FEEDING VALUE OF RICE PRODUCTS
"The rice feeds, as sold in Louisiana, may be divided
into four general classes-rice hulls, rice meal, rice polish
and commercial rice bran.
"1. Rice Hulls, which are sold either in the coarse con-
dition or ground. As a stock food they have
absolutely no feeding value, and are, in fact, injurious,
as will be shown.
"2. The Rice Meal. This is the pure bran, and prop-
erly speaking, should be so designated. It is the most
nutritious of the rice feeds, containing the most protein
and fat.
"3. The Rice Polish. This contains less fat and pro-
tein than the meal, but a higher percentage of starch.
"4. Commercial Rice Bran. What is usually sold
under the name of rice bran in Louisiana, is a mixture
of the pure bran with varying amounts of hulls, the quan-
tity of the latter being sometimes as high as 70 per cent."

RICE HULLS AND THEIR FEEDING VALUE
"An inspection of the analyses of rice hulls shows that
these have but a low percentage of protein and fat, and
that the percentage of woody matter is high. In addition
to that the tissues of the hull are heavily impregnated
with insoluble silica (12.15 per cent), which renders the
work of digestion very hard. But a greater objection to
rice hulls for feeding purposes is the element of danger
which attends their use. The hull of the rice is not only
itself very coarse and rough, but the hard silicified fibers,
which make it up, are exceedingly harsh and sharp, so
that when the hulls are eaten in any quantity an intense
irritation is provoked in the delicate membranes which
line the stomach and intestinal tract. *
"An interesting ease illustrating the danger resulting
from feeding rice hulls recently came to light. Large
feeders of cattle attempted to use rice hulls to supply
part of the roughage, and immediately began to be
troubled with their animals vomiting. A considerable
correspondence took place between these feeders and Dr.
Stubbs in regard to the matter. The following summary
of the case is given.: Finding that the vomiting did not
cease, they sent on samples of the vomit and excreta from












the sick animals. Dr. Dalrymple, veterinarian of the
Experiment Station, made an examination of these, and
reported as follows:
"* There appeared to be a great quantity of
the hulls intact, which would indicate that they had
escaped mastication, which condition shows up well in the
feces, where one would think they ought to have been in
much finer division after having undergone a second
mastication. Of course, when first swallowed,
the hulls would be much more irritating to the delicate
stomach walls. Taking the history of the case, and if
you cannot suggest any chemical irritant in the mass of
food material, as a whole, I believe the most feasible
diagnosis would be, as stated in my previous communica-
tion, gastric irritation produced mechanically by the hard,
fibrous and pointed condition of the hulls, due to their
being swallowed in that condition and not sufficiently
reduced and softened to prevent their irritating effect
upon the delicate nerve filaments in the mucous membrane
in the gastric walls."
"These feeders reported that several bulls died during
the feeding of rice hulls. In dissecting one of these the
paunch was found distended with rice hulls, although
none had been eaten in two weeks. In cases where hulls
were omitted from the feed the vomiting of the animals
ceased."

THE ADULTERATION OF RICE BRAN WITH RICE
HULLS

"The experience just recorded is of especial value as
illustrating the dangerous effects of feeding rice hulls.
Our feeders cannot be cautioned too strongly
against these brands of mixed feeds, as all sorts of refuse
and miller's waste frequently enter into their composition.
"The practice of mixing hulls and rice meal, which is
really the most nutritious portion of the rice for feeding,
should therefore be discouraged."
I quote also from Bulletin No. 570 of the United States
Department of Agriculture "The By-Products of Rice
Milling:" '
"A consideration of the chemical results on all samples
taken shows that all the rice hulls examined were very











high in both ash and fiber and were of such low protein
and fat content as to have practically no feeding value.
In addition, their physical structure renders them harm-
ful to animals if fed in too large amounts.
"* This product (Huller bran) when produced
under known conditions that preclude the addition of
ground hulls, should contain over 26 percent of fat plus
protein. It should not exceed 13 percent of crude fibef
or 5 percent of ash insoluble in hydrochloric acid.
"* Rice hulls also are indicated by a high
crude-fiber content. Low figures in protein and fat may
be due to an excess of hulls or to an excess of broken rice
due to poor material or careless milling, but when they
are considered in connection with the figures for ash and
fiber, the character of the product can be judged
accurately."'
Various simple methods are in use among feeders for
the detection of hulls in rice bran. If the hulls are not
too finely ground, they may be separated together with
the grits, by passing the bran through a ine sieve (an
ordinary 20-mesh flour sieve). Stirring the bran up in a
glass of water is a method sometimes employed, the
amount of floating material being taken as an index of
the extent of adulteration, but this is not very reliable
as the hulls have a greater tendency to sink than to float.
Determination of fiber by chemical analysis is the only
reliable means of detecting adulterations with hulls.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.












FERTILIZER, FEEDING STUFFS, AND
FOODS AND DRUGS

ANALYSES MADE BY STATE LABORATORY.

Only such materials are analyzed by the State Labora-
tory as are directed& by the Pure Food, the Fertilizer, and
Stock Feed Laws.
There are no fees or charges of any kind made by the
State Laboratory.
The State Laboratory is not permitted to compete with
commercial laboratories.
No commercial work of any kind is accepted.
The State Laboratory-does not analyze the materials
used by, nor the products of Fertilizer, Feed Stuffs or
other factories, by which to guarantee their goods. Such
analyses are commercial problems.
The State Laboratory does not analyze samples for in
dividual account wherein the public is not interested.
Such samples should be sent to a commercial laboratory.
The State Laboratory does not make bacteriological
examinations for disease germs. Such examinations are
made by the State Board of Health at Jacksonville, Fla.,
which has entire charge of the public health.

ANALYSES IN CRIMINAL CASES.

The State Laboratory doe, not make post mortem ex-
aminations, nor furnish evidence in criminal cases, (ex-
cept as provided by the Pure Food, Fertilizer and Stock
Feed Laws). Such analyses and examinations are made
by specialists employed by the grand jury and prosecut-
ing attorney, the cost being taxed as other criminal costs,
by the court.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla., July 1, 1917.












STATE OF FLORIDA.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

JULY 1, 1917.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF SAMPLES OF COMMERCIAL
FERTILIZER AND COMMERCIAL FEEDING
STUFF TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICUL-
TURE FOR ANALYSIS BY THE STATE CHEMIST.

The following regulations for drawing, preparing and
sending samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial
stock feed, under the authority given in Section 15 of
Chapter 4983, Acts of 1901, (Chapter XXII, General,
Statutes), as amended by Chapter 5660, Acts of 1907, and
Section 15, Chapter 5452, Acts of 1905, as amended by
Chapter 5661, Acts of 1907, are this day adopted.

OFFICIAL SAMPLES, drawn by State Chemist, As-
sistant State Chemists or Inspectors.

An approximately equal quantity (a pint or a pound
approximately), shall be taken from each of ten original
packages of the same brand in the possession of any
manufacturer, dealer or person, when the lot being sam-
pled contains ten or more packages of the same brand.

In case the lot contains less than ten packages of the
same brand, each package shall be sampled as directed.

Preparation of Sample.-The several samples, drawn as
above from each package, shall be carefully and thor-
oughly mixed. From this well mixed lot drawn from
each package as above, a fair sample of not less than one
pound, in the case of fertilizers, and of not less than
one-half pound in the case of stock feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can-approximately a quart can or
bottle.












The sample shall be delivered to the State Chemist,
who shall prepare the same for analysis (by properly
grinding, mixing and sifting the same). The State Chem-
ist shall retain one-half of this prepared sample for ana-
lysis, the remainder shall be placed in a glass bottle,
sealed, and identified by the laboratory number and date,
and placed in the custody of the Commissioner of Agri-
culture. These duplicate samples shall be retained for a
period of three months from the date of the certificate
of analysis. In case of appeal from analysis of the State
Chemist (within three months from the date of the cer-
tificate), the sample shall be retained indefinitely, until
the final disposition of the case.
Special Samples.-Samples drawn and transmitted by
the purchaser under Sections 9 of both the Commercial
Fertilizer and the Commercial Stock Feed Laws.
The purchaser or owner of the material to be sampled,
when the lot or shipment contains ten or more original
packages, each bearing the guarantee tag and stamp re-
quired by law, of the same brand, shall take in the pres-
ence of two witnesses, within -sixty days after delivery,
an approximately equal quantity from each of ten pack-
ages of the same brand (approximately a pint or a
pound), after carefully and thoroughly mixing these
samples, a fair sample of the mixture, not less than a
pound in the case of commercial fertilizer, and not less
than one-half pound in the case of commercial stock feed,
shall be placed in a bottle or tin can, and sealed in the
presence of the witnesses.
On the sample thus drawn shall be written the name
and address of the purchaser, and the name of a disin-
terested party, who shall transmit the package to the
Commissioner of Agriculture by mail or express, properly
packed -to prevent damage in transportation.
In case the lot or shipment contains less than ten
original packages of the same brand, each bearing the
guarantee tag and stamp required by law, each package
shall be sampled as provided in the foregoing paragraph,
the samples mixed and a fair sample of the lot, "one or
more packages," shall be drawn and transmitted as pro-
vided in the foregoing paragraphs.












The purchaser, or sender of the sample, shall also ad-
dress a letter to the Commissioner of Agriculture, advis-
ing him of the sending of the sample, stating the number
of original packages purchased, each bearing the guar-
anteed analysis and inspection stamp required by law,
the number of packages represented by the sample, the
date of purchase, and the date of delivery of the goods.
THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE ENCLOSED IN THE PACKAGE.

The object of the sealed bottle or tin can is to prevent
the evaporation of.the moisture from the sample-an im-
portant determination.

SAMPLES IN PAPER OR WOODEN PACKAGES WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.

These regulations are adopted to secure fair samples
of sufficient size to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for three months from the date of
certificate of analysis.

The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser.

The propriety of the method of drawing and sending
samples as fixed by law is obvious.
*
The drawing and sending of special samples is in rare
cases in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper boxes, badly packed, and frequently in very
small quantity (less than an ounce) ; frequently there
are no marks, numbers or other means of identification;
the postmark in many instances being absent.

The attention of those who desire to avail themselves
of this privilege is called to Sections 9 and 10 of the
laws, which are clear and explicit.










75

NOTE: HEREAFTER, STRICT COMPLIANCE WITH ABOVE
REGULATIONS WILL BE REQUIRED. THE SAMPLE MUST NOT BE
LESS THAN ONE POUND OF FERTILIZER OR ONE-HALF POUND OF
STOCK FEED, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, SEALED AND ADDRESSED
TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE. THE PURCHASER'S
'NAME AND ADDRESS, AND THE NAME OF THE SENDER, MUST
ALSO BE ON THIS PACKAGE, THIS RULE APPLYING TO SPECIAL
SAMPLES OF FERTILIZER OR COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFF,
DRAWN AS DIRECTED.

NOTE: A one-pound baking powder tin can, properly
cleaned, filled with a fairly drawn, well-mixed sample,
drawn as directed, is a proper sample. IT MUST BE SEALED
AND ADDRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE, AT
TALLAHASSEE. THE PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS, AND
THE NAME OF THE SENDER MUST ALSO BE PLACED ON THE
PACKAGE.

IF MORE THAN ONE SAMPLE IS SENT REPRESENTING DIF-
FERENT BRANDS, THE SAMPLES MUST BE NUMBERED SO AS TO
IDENTIFY THEM. ALL THIS SHOULD BE DONE IN THE PRES-
ENCE OF THE WITNESSES, AND THE PACKAGE MAILED OR EX-
PRESSED BY A DISINTERESTED PERSON.

NOTE: The tags off the sacks with the guaranteed
analysis and stamps, and names of manufacturers, should
be retained by the purchaser, to compare with the certifi-
cate of analysis when received and NOT SENT TO THIS OF-
FICE.

Raw Phosphates:. Ground raw phosphate rock-hard
or soft-contains phosphoric acid, more or less available,
hence is classed a fertilizer, when sold to consumers for
fertilizing purposes, under Section 11 of the law; and is
required to be guaranteed and stamped as required by
Section 3; listed and guaranteed under oath, as,required
by Section 5, and the inspection fee paid previous to sale
as provided by Section 6.

Lime is not classed as a fertilizer. It is not required to
be sold under guarantee, nor the inspection fee paid;
hence is not subject to free analysis by the State Labora-
tory.












OBJECTS OF THE LAWS.

The objects of the Fertilizer and Stock Feed Laws are:
SFirst, to protect the consumer from fraud, false repre-
sentations by illegitimate dealers who have not complied
with the law, nor filed their guaranteed analysis under
oath, and who have not paid their inspection tax fixed
by law.

Second, to protect the lawful dealer wh6 has fully com-
plied with the law, by filing his guarantee under oath,
and has paid his inspection fee, and who has placed upon
each bag or other package, a guarantee tag showing the
Minimum percentage of valuable ingredients in the ferti-
lizer or feed stuff, as provided by the law.

These regulations supercede and revoke all previous
regulations governing the drawing and transmitting of
samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial stock
feed.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved:

W. A. McRAE, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Florida, July 1, 1917.

NOTE: These regulations are adopted to conform with
the decision of the Supreme Court of Florida of May 12,
1917, as follows:
"The- terms of the statute in giving the special right
of action to 'any person purchasing' fertilizer clearly con-
templates that the test shall be made with at least some
degree of promptness after the delivery of the fertilizer,
and that more than one sample shall be taken when the
quantity of fertilizer purchased makes it expedient to
have plural samples to secure a fair test."











SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only state in the Union that provides
for the "Special Sample" drawn by the consumer or pur-
chaser, UNDER PROPER RULES AND REGULATIONS FIXED BY
LAw-to be sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture for
analysis free of cost. Any citizen in the State who has
purchased fertilizers or feeds FOR HIS OWN USE MAY DRAW
A SAMPLE OF THE SAME, ACCORDING TO LAW AND REGULA-
TIONS and have the same analyzed by the State Chemist
free of cost. In case of adulteration or deficiency, the
purchaser can, on establishing the fact, receive double
the cost demanded for the goods.

The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Quarterly
Bulletin for drawing and transmitting "special samples."

This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.

Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of foods and drugs will be sent to
any citizen requesting the same.

"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS
MATERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE
OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FER-
TILIZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."












COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the
respective laws, including rules and regulations and
standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissioner of Agriculture, or
State Chemist. The bulletins of the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station can be had by application to
the Director, at Gainesville.
The form letter for transmitting special samples of
fertilizers or feeding stuffs as shown below is adopted and
must be explicitly complied with in order to obtain a legal
certificate of analysis.

FORM FOR TRANSMITTING SAMPLES OF COM-
MERCIAL FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF.

................., Fla., ............, 191..
HON. W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:
I send you today by mail (or express) a sample of
(Indicate Fertilizer, Cotton Seed Meal, or Feed Stuff.)
for analysis by the State Chemist.
This sample is taken from a lot of......packages, each
bearing the guarantee tag and stamp required by law,
purchased from a registered dealer, on the...... day of
.......... ,191...., and delivered on or about the......
day of ................., 191.....
This sample was drawn from........ packages in the
presence of two witnesses, this day.
The guarantee tags and stamps off the packages sam-
pled are retained by the purchaser.
This sample is sent by me, one of the witnesses, for
Mr .................................., the purchaser.
Very truly,












HOW TO LEGALLY DRAW, PACK AND TRANSMIT
SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS AND COMMER-
CIAL FEED STUFFS FOR ANALYSIS
BY-THE STATE LABORATORY.

1; Only such samples as. are drawn from original
packages, EACH BEARING THE GUARANTEE OF A LAWFUL
DEALER, AND THE INSPECTION STAMP REQUIRED BY LAW, will
be analyzed by the State Laboratory, when drawn within
sixty days after date of delivery.
2. If the lot or shipment be TEN or more packages, the
sample must be drawn from NOT LESS THAN TEN packages.
3. If the lot or shipment be LESS THAN TEN packages,
the sample shall be drawn from EACH package.
4. The sample shall be drawn in the presence of TWO
disinterested witnesses, and shall be SEALED IN THEIR
PRESENCE, and TRANSMITTED by a DISINTERESTED PARTY
(one of the witnesses), to the COMMISSIONER OF AGRI-
CULTURE.
5. Not less than one pound of fertilizer, or one-half
pound of commercial feed stuff must be placed in a tin
can or glass bottle and addressed and sent, prepaid to
the Commissioner of Agriculture.
6. The purchaser (or sender) shall address a letter
to the Commissioner of Agriculture, stating:
1. The number of original packages represented by
the sample, and the number of packages sampled.
2. That each package had attached to it the guaran-
tee tag and stamp required by law.
3. That the sample was drawn in the presence of two
or more witnesses within sixty days of delivery.
4. THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE ENCLOSED IN THE PACKAGE.
5. The tags OFF THE PACKAGES SAMPLED, with the guar-
anteed analysis and stamps, must be RETAINED by the pur-
chaser, to compare with' the certificate, and for future
evidence, if necessary, and BY NO MEANS SINT TO THIS
OFFICE.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
the sample.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. MCRAE, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla., July 1, 1917.












STATE VALUATIONS.

(Based on Commeroial Values, July 1, 1918.)

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of 1918:

Available Phosphoric Acid .............$ .071/2 a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............ .01 a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .35 a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K2O) ........ .35 a pound
If calculated by units:
Available Phosphoric Acid ............ 1.50 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............ .20 per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) 7.00 per unit
Potash ............................ 7.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $3.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent. of a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for cal-
culating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take
for example, a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid 6.22 per cent. x $1.50-$ 9.33
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. .1.50 per cent. x .20- .30
Ammonia .................3.42 per cent. x 7.00- 23.94
Potash ................... 3.23 per cent. x 7.00- 22.61
Mixing and Bagging ...... 3.50

Commercial value at seaports .................. $59.68

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid 8 per cent. x $1.50-$12.00
Ammonia ...................2 per cent. x 7.00- 14.00
Potash ......................2 per cent. x 7.00- 14.00
Mix and Bagging ........... 3.50

Commercial value at seaports ............... .$43.50

The valuations and market prices in preceding illus-
trations are based on market prices for one-ton lots.












MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTI-
LIZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA-
PORTS, JULY 1, 1918.

"Under unsettled conditions, quotations are wholly
nominal."
AMMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 17% ammonia ............... $110.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25% ammonia ........... 175.00
Dried Blood, 16% ammonia ... ................ 144.00
Cyanamid, 20% ammonia ...................... 140.00
PoTAsH.
High-grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% sulphate
48% KI O, .............................. Nominal
Low-grade Sulphate of Potash, 48% sulphate,
26% K20, .................. ............. Nominal
Muriate of Potash, 80% ; 48% K~ O, .......... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 15% ammonia,
44% potash K20, ....................... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% ammonia,
42% potash K0O, ........................ Nominal
Kainit, potash, 12% KO, .................. Nominal
Canada Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 4% K20
potash ................................. Nominal
AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.
High-grade Tankage, 10% ammonia 5% phosphor-
ic acid ......... .................. ......... .$99.00
Tankage, 8% ammonia, 10% phosphoric acid ..... 84.00
Low-grade Tankage, 6%/2 ammonia, 12% phos-
phoric acid .............................. 76.00
Sheep Manure, 32%% ammonia, 1/2% potash ...... 31.00
Imported Fish Guano, 10% ammonia, 7% phos-
phoric acid ................................107.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% ammonia,
22% phosphoric acid .......... ............. 50.00
Raw Bone, 4% ammonia, 22% phosphoric acid .... 55.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/% ammonia, 2% phos-
phoric acid .............................. 56.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7% ammonia ........... 60.50
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 4%% ammonia .......... 35.00
6-Bul.












PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High-grade Acid Phosphate, 16% available phos-
phoric acid ................ ... ... ....... $24.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% available phosphoric acid .... 22.50
Bone Black, 17% available phosphoric acid ........ 32.00

MISCELLANEOUS.

High-grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 2% ammonia,
7% potash ............................... .. $73.25
High-grade Ground Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
21/2% ammonia, 8% potash .................. 77.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% ammonia, 2% potash .... 32.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% ammonia, 4%
Potash .................................... 54.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% ammonia, 4% pot-
ash ....................................... 38.00
Land Plaster, in sacks ........................ 17.00
The charges by reputable manufacturers 'for mixing
and bagging any special or regular formula are $3.50 per
ton in excess of above prices.












NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT JULY
1, 1918-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
"Owing to unsettled conditions quotations are wholly
nominal."
AMMONIAThS.

*Ammonia, sulph., prompt, single bags, 200
lbs., each ....................... 7.80 @ 7.85
futures ............................. Nominal
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia and 14 p.
c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. Chesa-
peake ....................per unit 7.30 & 20
wet, acidulated, 6 p. c. ammonia, 3 p. c.
phosphoric acid, delivered, New, York .. 6.25 @ 50
Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and 11 p. c.
bone phosphate, c. i. f. N. Y., Balto.
or Phila. ................. ........ Nominal
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c., f. o. b. Chi-
cago ................... ........ 6.65 & 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c., f. o. b., Chicago,
ground .......................... 6.65 & 10
'Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago, .
Ground ......................... 6.65 & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b., Chicago, 14
to 15 p. c ........................ 6.60 @ -
blood, f. o. b., Chicago ................. 6.65 @ -
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b., Chicago .......... 5.0010 1.50
Hoofmeal, f. o. b., Chicago.......... per unit 6.25 @ -
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b., New
York ........................... 6.85 @ -
Tankage, New York ..................... 6.80 @ -
Garbage tankage, New York .................. 6.95 10 2.00
*Nitrate of soda, 95 p. c., spot, per 100 lbs. ... 4.75 @ 4.80
futures. 95 p. c. ..................... Nominal
*Resale offerings.











PHOSPHATES.
Acid, phosphate, bulk. ............ per ton.18.00 @ -
Southern ports ......................... 14.50 & 16.00
Bones, rough, hard ........................30.00@32.00
soft steamed, unground ................ 26.00 @ -
ground, steamed,1 1/4 p. c. ammonia and
60 p. c. bone phosphate ............31.00 @ -
ditto, 3 and 50 p. c ....................37.00' @ -
raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and 50 p. c.
bone phosphate ...................42.00 @
South Carolina phosphate rock, kiln dried, f.
o. b., Ashley River ................ Nominal
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68 p. c.,
f. o. b., Tampa, Fla ............... 3.75 @ -
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 75 p. c.,
f. o. b., Tampa .................... 5.75 @ 6.00
Florida high grade phosphate hard rock, 77 p.
c., f. o. b. Florida ports ............ 6.50 @ -
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt. Pleas-
ant, domestic, 78@80 p. c. .. per ton 5.50 @ 6.00
75 p. c. guaranteed ... per ton, 2,240 Ibs. 5.50 @ 6.00
78 p. c .............. per ton, 2,240 lbs. 6.00 @ 6.50
68@72 p. c., ground so that 90 p. c., will
pass through 100-mesh screen, per
ton, 2,000 lbs .................... 6.00 @ --

POTASHES.

Muriate of potash, 80@85 per cent., basis 80
per cent,, in bags ........ per ton.310.00 @ -
Muriate of potash, min., 90@95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags .........325.00 @ -
Muriate of potash, min. 98 per cent., basis 80
per cent, in bags ................. 325.00 @ -
Sulphate of potash, 90@95 per cent., basis 80
per cent., in bags ............... 350.00@ -
Double manure salt, 48@53 per cent., basis 48
per cent, in bags ................. Nominal
Manure salt, min. 20 per cent., K.20. in bulk Nominal
Hardsalt, min. 16 per cent., K,.O., in bulk ... Nominal
Kainit, min. 12.4 per cent., K2.O., in bulk ... Nominal
First sorts potashes ................ per lb. 30 @ -











-COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED
STUFF FOR 1918.

For the season of 1918 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation January 1st.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:
Indian corn being the standard at $73.50 per ton.
($3.65 per sack of 100 lbs., $2.04 per bu., 56 lbs.)
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.

Protein, 7.60c per pound ................. $1.52 per unit
Starch and Sugar, 3.50c per pound ........ .70 per unit
Fats, 7.90c per pound .................... 1.58 per unit

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

Corn and Oats, Equal Parts:
Protein ...........................11.15 x 1.52, $16.95
Starch and Sugar ............... 64.65 x .70, 45.25
Fat ............................ 5.20 x 1.58, 8.22

State value, per ton ............. $70.42

EXAMPLE NO. 2.
Corn:
Protein ........................10.50 x 1.52, $15.96
Starch and Sugar ................. 69.60 x .70, 48.72
Fat ..... :........................ 5.40 x 1.58, 8.53


State value, per ton .............


$73.21











STATE VALUES.
It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertiliers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or de-
cline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked, "What is Smith's
Fruit and Vine worth per ton ?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
materials to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets", loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values," January 1, 1918, are nominal.













COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Total
Ammonia. Phosphoric Potash.
___Acid.
Nitrate of Soda......... 17 to 19 ............ ............
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 26 ............ ...........
Dried Blood ............. 12 to 17 ............ ...........
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1 to 4 ...........
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap........ 6 to 11 3 to 8 ...........
Cotton Seed Meal....... 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal ............ 13 to 17 1 to 2 1 to 2
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.

Ammonia. Available Insoluble.
Phos. Acid. Phos. Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphate .............. ......... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ........................ 30 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to a
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... I to 4 6 to /9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Actual Am'onia. Phos. Lime.
Potash. Acid.
Muriate of Potash...... 50 to 62 .................. .........
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 ..........................
Carbonate 'of Potash.... 55 to 60 ...........................
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ......... .........
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag. 25 to 30 ...........................
K ainit ................. 12 to 13 ......... ........ .........
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20 .......... ......
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8 .........1 to 2 ........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 .........1 to 1 135 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 3 to 9 2 t 4 ......... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.50 0.30 0.30
Horse Manfre (fresh).. 0.50 0.60 0,25 0.30
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.60 1.00 0.35 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.50 0.75 0.50 0.70











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by ............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by ............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by ............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by ...... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by .............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoiic acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash .into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by .... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit" multiply potash (K0O) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. nitrate of soda, and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
Want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiv-
alent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214, and you
get 18.99 per cent. the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (KO).









89

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.



NAME OF FEED. a a z



Maiden Cane Hay..... 28.60 11.60 42.40 2.60 4.20

Natal Grass Hay...... 36.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00

Para Grass Hay...... 31.20 8.00 45.70 1.60 6.20

Rhodes Grass Hay.... 41.10 7.70 36.80 1.30 6.60

Beggarweed Hay...... 24.30 21.60 35.10 4.10 4.00

Kudzu Vine Hay...... 32.30 15.90 33.00 1.60 6.80

Cow Pea Hay......... 20.50 13.00 45.90 4.20 7.50

Velvet Bean Hay..... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70

Velvet Beans ......... 7.00 21.00 53.10 5.40 3.60

Velvet Bean Hulls.... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30

Velvet Beans and Hulls 10.70 19.40 50.60 4.50 3.50

Cow Peas ............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.20

Soy Bean Meal....... 4.50 48.40 27.50 6.40 4.40

Peanut Vine Meal..... 29.60 9.90 38.40 6.30 6.60

Cotton Seed.......... 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 3.50

Cotton Seed Hulls.... 44.40 4.00 36.60. 2.00 2.60

Bright Cotton S'd Meal 9.40 38.62 28.60 7.80 5.80









90

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continued).


NAME OF FEED.


Dark Cotton Seed Meal

Corn Grain...........

Corn Meal............

Hominy Feed.........

Corn and Cob Meal....

Ground Corn Shucks..

Ground Corn Cobs....
Equal parts, Corn in
Shucks & V'lv't Beans

Oats (grain) .........

Rice (grain) .........

Rice Bran............

Wheat (grain) .......

Wheat Bran..........

Wheat Middlings .....

Wheat Mixed Feed....

Wheat Ship Stuff.....

Dry Jap Sugar Cane..


a.

S.S
0S
9:L-
0,
,20 1
oaafa *<


a)





20.00 23.15

2.10 10.50

1.90 9.70

4.00 10.50

5.80 7.50

30.20 2.80

30.00 3.00

16.03 12.56

9.50 11.80

0.20 7.40

9.50 12.10

1.80 11.90

9.00 15.40

5.40 15.40

7.80 16.90

5.60 14.60

26.20 2.30


5.00

1.50

1.40

2.60

1.20

1.90

1.60

4.33

3.00

0.40

10.00

1.80

5.80

5.80

5.30

3.70

2.80


37.10

69.60

68.70

65.30

70.80

54.60

56.60

53,71

59.70

79.20

49.90

71.90

53.90

53.90

54.40

59.80

62.60











AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continued).



NAME OF FEED.



Peanut Hulls ........ 56.6 7.3 18.9 2.6 5.5

Peanut, with Hulls.... 16.4 20.4 16.4 36.2 4.1

Peanut Kernal....... 2.6 26.4 17.5 44.9 2.2

Peanut Meal (without

Hulls ............. 5.1 47.6 23.7 8.0 4.9

Peanut Feed, (includ-

ing Hulls .......... 23.4 28.4 27.0 11.0 5.5








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE. State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1918. FRANK T. WILSON. Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9. Act Annrnved May 22 1901


Phosphoric Acid

NAME, OR BRAND. 3S FOR WHOM SENT.



0 [-


(Black) Dry..........|4609 2.87 ..... ..... 0.25
(Black) Wet ......... 460 980.00 ..... ..... 0.05
(Brown) Dry......... 4610 3.822 ......... 0.20

(Brown) Wet ......... 1461 80.00 ..... 0.04
(Green) Dry.......... 4611 3.68 ..... .... 0.50
(Green) W et.......... 461180.00 ......... 0.10

(No. 1)............. 4612 9.7910.101 7.25 17.35
(No. 2) ....... .....461311.871 9.05 5.0014.05
(No. 4) .............461410.5811.50 6.25117.75


2.85 18.33 J. Asakiah Williams, Tampa.
0.59 3.77 J. Asakiah Williams, Tampa.
1.55 2.60 J. Asakiah Williams, Tampa.
0.32 0.54 J. Asakiah Williams, Tampa.

2.5513.00 J. Asakiah Williams, Tampa.

0.53 2.70 J. Asakiah Williams, Tampa.
4.23 1.45 D. J. Mason, Orlando,

3.40 .... D. J. Mason, Orlando,

3.05 0.35 D. J. Mason, Orlando,


Seaweed

Seaweed
Seaweed

Seaweed

Seaweed
Seaweed

Fertilizer
Fertilizer

Fertilizer








Commercial Fertilizer ..........|4615 0.70 7.28 3.12

Fertilizer ..................... 46161 6.03 9.58 0.42

Cotton Seed Meal ............. 4617 ....

Fertilizer ..................... 146181 8.63 9.601 0.95

Fertilizer ..................... 469 9.60 7.73 3.021

Acid Phosphate ............... 146201..... 17.60 2.10

Cotton Seed Meal ..............4621 9.37 ..... ....

Goat Manure ................. 14622 0.87 0.95 0.10

Cotton Seed Meal .............. 4623 ..... .... .....

Fertilizer (No. 1) Nitrate of Soda 4624 .... ...........

Fertilizer (No. 2)............... 462 8.93 8.90 5.26

Fertilizer .............. ........ 4626 9.33 7.25 3.35

Fertilizer (Bone Meal) ......... 4627 5.55 5.97 19.38

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)....... 462 10.5 10.63 1.77

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ....... 4629 8.75 8.03 1.07

Goat Manure (No. 3)........... 4633 29.87 1.10 0.15


10.40.4.55

10.00 3.52

..... 6.23

10.55 3.33

10.75 4.48

19.70.

..... 7.05

1.05 2.08

... 6.08

. 1.... 8.85

14.10 5.27

10.60 4.63

25.35 4.35

12.40 3.20

9.10 5.02

1.25 1.60i


2.97 C. M. Howell, Larkin,

1.94 I. M. Starke, Beresford.

..... W. M. Owens, Quincy.

0.48 0. F. Wofford, Lockhart.

1.65 S. R. Love, DeLand.

.....S. R. Love, DeLand.

..... S. R. Love, DeLand.

3.16 S. R. Love, DeLand.

..... Geo. Flake, Quincy.

..... B. Royer, Orlando.

0.56 L. W. Tildcn, Winter Garden.

3.03 C. M. Howell, Larkin.

..... Fugazzi Bros., Clearwater.

0.35 0. P. Swope Land Co., Sanford.

2.85 0. P. Swope Land Co., Sanford.

3.08 O. P. Swope Land Co., Sanford.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1918-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid

NAME, OR BRAND. S FOR WHOM SENT.
__ O_ _ D.__ [
I |


Mixed Fertilizer ............... 431110.201 6.80 1.70
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 463 3.21 4.90 0.30

Mixed Fertilizer ...............|4633 12.15 6.50 1.30
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4634 11.95 6.05 1.35
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 463511.87 6.93 3.97
Tankage (No. 2) ............... 4636 9.17 6.70 8.15

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 463712.35 8.88 1.02
Special Mixture ............... 4638 6.28 5.60 5.45
Fertilizer (No. 1) ..............4639 8.70 6.25 8.05

Fertilizer (No. 2) .............. 4640 8.90 9.60 6.75


8.50 3.05 1.14 R. L. Garrison, Sanford.
5.?0 5.13 0.921 S. Jewett, Sanford.
7.80 4.75 2.82 T. S. Huff, Sanford.
7.40 4.70 3.02 S. W. Steele, Sanford.
10.0o 4.95 1.37 John Meisch, Sanford.

14.85 7.60 ..... John Meisch, Sanford.
9.90 4.47 1.311 Hodgson & Henry, Sanford.
11.05 4.27 2.90 Geo. A. Flake, Quincy.
14-3o 3.95 1.99 Nichols & Kinne, Sanford.

16.35 4.05 0.30 Nichols & Kinne, Sanford.







Fertilizer (No. 3).............. 4641 8.871 9.40

Mixed Fertilizer ......... .....|146421 8.30 5.70

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4643 8.88 6.23
Tankage .....................4644 7.221 2.75

Tobacco Dust .................. 4645 13.43 ....

Fertilizer ..................... 14646 9.02 8.68

Raw Bone MWal\Coarse Ground
Bone) ...................... 4647 7.87 7.50
Fertilizer (No. 2).............. 464 8.32 5.90
Fertilizer (No. 1) ............. 4649 9.73 5.43

Fertilizer ..................... 14650 11.46 7.951

Fertilizer (No. 67)........... 4651 9.62 5.15
Fertilizer (No. 68).............. 46521 9.92 9.35

Fertilizer (No. 69) .............. 4653 8.78 7.20

Fertilizer (No. 70).............. 4654 8.81 6.28
Fertilizer (No. 71) ............ 4655 8.92 8.25
II I


6.12114.80


L4.2021.701 4.85

1.35 7.25 3.55
3.32 8.75 3.57

0.65 8.60 4.47

1.05 6.2 5.37

1.2510.60 4.55

1.22 8.42 4.47

1.17! 7.45 6.52|

1.251 9.501 4.47


0.19 Nichols & Kinne, Sanford.

2.63 F. L. Green, Sanford.

3.34 C. E. Henry Farms, Sanford.
..... Irving Post, Sanford.

2.29 Irving Post, Sanford.
0.28 J. J. Chapman, Mt. Dora.


SW. M. Cobb, Largo.
2.81 H. C. Conner, Bartow.
3.10 H. C. Conner, Bartow.

1.16 0. B. Floyd, Orlando.
2.49 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

2.49 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

2.47 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

2.58 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.
2.43 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1918-Continued.


Fertilizer ..................... 4656

Fertilizer, No. 1 (Bone Meal).... 4657

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)......... 4658

Fertilizer (No. 1).............. 4659

Fertilizer (No. 2).............. 4660

Horse Shoe Crab Product....... 4661

Uypress Ashes (Light)......... 4662

Pine Ashes (Dark) ............. 4663

Fertilizer ..................... 4664

Fertilizer (No. 4)............... 4665


12.431 7.58


FOR WHQM SENT.


1.15 9.60 2.3 2.03 J. Mathew Miller, Dorcas.

15.0021.95 5.15..... H. H. Constantine, Jr., Clearwater.

1.85 9.40 5.00 0.37 H. H. Constantine, Jr., Clearwater.

1.47 6.25 5.45 1.95 Estate of J. B. Stetson, DeLand.

0.95 6.55 6.35 2.051 Estate of J. B. Stetson, DeLand.

0.10 0.9012.12 0.44 Dr. Geo. S. Stone, Punta Gorda.

........;...... 0.62 W. G. Tilgham, Palatka.

..... ..... ... 1.48 W. G. Tilgham, Palatka.

3.12 9.30 4.10 ..... G. L. Huxtable, Orlando.

0.62 8.20 4.201 1.35 Dr. P. Phillips, Orlando.








Fertilizer (No. 5) .............. 466612.57 9.65 1.1510.80 6.23 ..... The Orlando Country Club, Orlando.
Fertilizer (Mark X)............. 466712.18 8.08 0.54 8.62 4.38 1.24 Dr. P. Phllips, Orlando.
S Fertilizer ("A") ................ 466810.23 9.10 1.5510.65 4.5 ....J. A. Neilsen, White City.
Fertilizer ("B") ................ 4669 10.27 8.08 1.9210.00 4.80 0.51 Jas. A. Neilsen, White City.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist SPECIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1918, E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 24, 1905.


NAME, OR BRAND. d .. BY WHOM SENT.



Oat Feed .......................... 419 26.70 6.54 49.61 1.05 6.50| Miller-jackson Gr. Co., Tampa, Fla.
Sorghum Meal ..................... 420 1.87 10.53 69.73 3.07 1.85 A. M. Henry, Tallahassee, Fla.
Sweet Papa Horse and Mule Feed... 42 14.56 10.04 55.80 2.66 4.93 R. E. Rose, Tallahassee, Fla.
Molasses-Alfalfa Meal ............. 422 12.51 12.52 50.09 1.30 7.67 R. E. Rose, Tallahassee, Fla.
Feed Stuff ....................... 423 12.25 15.36 55.17 2.80 3.30 J. O. Traxler, Marianna, Fla.
St. Augustine Grass ................ 424 24.67 9.83 41.89 2.57 14.62 U. C. Zeluff, Tampa, Fla.
Feed Stuff (No. 1) ................. 425 7.82 21.94 50.54 2.50 6.601 E. F. DeBusk, Orlando, Fla.
Feed Stuff ........................ 426 9.97 14.04 58.02 2.65 3.52 Dr. Dowling, Sanford, Fla.
SI 1 I








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1918. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspectors Under Sections 1, 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1906.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND.

'

Red Turkey Wheat, Brown 2730 Guaranteed
Shorts and Wheat Screenings. Found.....

Grey Mule Horse and Mule 2731 Guaranteed
Feed ....................... Found.....

Purina Cow Chow Feed....... 2732 Guaranteed
Found .....

Golden Sweet Mule Feed...... 2733 Guaranteed
Found.....

Red Mill Molasses Feed........ 2734 Guaranteed
IFound.....

Rice Pclish .................. 2735 Guaranteed
IFound.....


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.


8.50 15.00 52.00 4.20 ......
9.67 18.78 49.65 4.42 5.65

20.00 9.00 50.00 1.50 ......
20.21 9.26 47.98| 1.40 7.88

13.50 24.00 38.00 4.50 ......
14.30 26.52 42.52 3.07 5.66

18.00 9.00 55.00 2.00 ......
15.61 9.74 51.49 1.35 6.10

16.00 9.00 55.00 1. ......
12.38 10.62 52.15 1.59 6.3

6.30 11.50 60.00 7.00 ......
2.551 13.161 55.55 12.72 6.12


The S'thwest'n Milling Co.,
Inc., Kansas City, Mo.

The Superior Feed Co.,
Memphis, Tenn.

Purina Mills, St. Louis,
Mo.

The Quaker Oats Co.,
Chicago, Ill.

National Milling Co., Ma-
con, Ga.

The Adler Export Co., New
Orleans, La.










OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1918.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


'0
IB.
&..' .'*

=2 0
Iz C
~ s 4^ 4
S- 27


Rice Bran and Hulls. ......... 2736 Guaranteed
Found.....

Liberty Horse and Mule Feed.. 2737 Guaranteed
Found.....

Peters' "Rabbit" Mule Feed.... 2738Guaranteed
Foind.....

Green Dot Molasses Feed...... 2739 Guaranteed
Found.....

Ambrosia Horse and Mule Fee 2740 Guaranteed
Found.....

Rice Bran and Hulls........... 2741 Guaranteed
Found.....
Rice Bran and Hulls........... 2742 Guaranteed

Found.....

Red Star Brand Fish Scrap.... 2743 Guaranteed
IFound .....


,IO
0 "
fl f .C
*S d~t


22.00
17.25

12.00
12.61

18.00
16.85

12.00
12.94

13.50
13.16

24.00
17.75
22.00

17.75

1.00
0.60


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.


10.00 32.00 10.00......Steinhardt & Co., New Or-
10.27 39.71 17.25 12.65 leans, La.

10.00 50.00 2.50 .... Cumberland Liberty Mills,
12.13 52.60 2.91 6.45 Tampa, Fla.

9.00 50.00 1.50 ......M. C. Peters Mill Co.,
10.06 48.78 2.30 7.12 Omaha, Neb.

9.50 55.00 2.50...... J. T. Gibbons, New Orleans,
10.81 54.66 2.35 5.96 La.

9.00 55.00 2.00 ...... Alfocorn Milling Co., E. St.
10.50 57.00 1.79 5.98 Louis, Ill.

9.50 30.00 9.50 ...... Steinhardt & Co., New
10.791 45.49 7.80 12.70 Orleans, La.

10.00 32.00 10.00 ...... Steinhardt & Co., New
10.75 39.80 10.45 12.50 Orleans, La.

45.00 ..... 2.00 ...... International Glue Co.,
48.50 7.75 1.751 35.8 Boston, Mass.


--




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