• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Part I
 Part II: Crop report
 Part III














Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00060
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen; its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.,
s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla
Publication Date: July 1, 1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00060
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Part II: Crop report
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Part III
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
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        Page 126
Full Text








Volume 31 Number 3



FLORIDA

QUART ERILY


B T LLETIN1
OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT

JULY 1, 1921

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICU LFIU 1 R
TALLAHASSEE FLA.

CONTENTS.
PART I-The Concern of the Consumer; Dehydration;
What Do You Know About Florida; Immigration; Blue-
berries; Everbearing Orange; Grapes in Florida; Facts
About Cotton; Federal Warehouse Act; Federal Bureau
of Crop Estimates.
PART II-Crop Reports.
PART Ill-Forage Plants on Florida Drained Soils; Use-
ful and Profitable Production the Ultimate Object of
,Drainage; Analyses of Foods, Drugs, Fertilizers, Stock
Feed and Oils; Market Prices and State Values of Fer-
tilizers and Feeds.
Entered Jannury 31, 1903. at Tallali ss.' Fi( ri., as second-class
matt, under Act of Congress ~f Jual 1900.
"Acceptance for mailing u- speclal rate of portage provided for
in Sectine 1103, Act of October o. 1917, authorized Sept. 11. 1918."
THS BUtLtTINS ARt ISSUED RflR TO THOSt REQUJSTNG THEM
T. J. APPLEYARD, STAT! PRINTER
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.

K )

















PART I


CONTENTS
The Concern of the Consumer.
Dehydration.
What Do You Know About Florida?
Immigration.
Blueberries.
Everbearing Orange.
Grapes in Florida.
Facts About Cotton.
Federal Warehouse Act.
Federal Bureau of Crop Estimates.











THE CONCERN OF THE CONSUMER

BY W. A. McRAE,
Comn issioner of Agriculturc.



No one is more concerned about production than the
consumer, who is not a producer. In fact, the producer
of food products is least concerned over a shortage of any
member of society, for the reason that he is in position to
supply himself first, and the rest of the world must de-
pend upon him to part with his surplus.
For those who live in towns, cities, mining districts and
on the high seas to be indifferent to farm life conditions,
to be unconcerned as to whether agriculture will,continue
to properly function, is the worst kind of short-sighted-
ness. For lawmakers to be so void of statesmanship as
to think that farming will take care of itself and needs
no attention in the scheme of statecraft is a political mis-
fortune that brings its own reward.
Unless the farmer is content, unless he is satisfied, un-
less he feels that he is doing as well as he could at any-
thing else, he is liable to desert the ranks of agriculture,
and leave it to those who proclaim "back to the farm,"
but do not follow their own advice.
So, out of sheer self-defense, from force of absolute
necessity, and to keep civilization from dying, we must
see to it that agriculture is kept healthy and efficient.
There must be something arduous or disagreeable abouc
farm life, or so many would not leave it for other voca-
tions and so few go to it from other vocations.
Friend Reader, does it make any difference to YOU that
half the products of the soil are produced by those who
do not own the land which they cultivate?
That it costs the farmer half the price his staff brings
to get it from his farm to the consumer ?
That while less than half the people live on the farm,
often perishable crops must rot in the field because prices
will not cover the cost of gathering and shipping to mar-
ket?
Are such conditions conducive to successful farming?
Tons and tons of good food are allowed to rot in the
field and orchard, because the price at the market end
will scarcely cover shipping and selling expenses, while











there is no remuneration for the labor of producing, and
no interest for the use of capital invested.
The freight charges, war tax, cartage and commissions
on a car of lettuce, cabbage, or melons from Florida to
New York will approximate $500-which is ofttimes more
than it sells for.
The same is true in shipping from Texas to the north-
ern and eastern markets. A load of spinach shipped from
Laredo, Texas, to New York sold for less than the freight,
which was $627.
Celery shipped from California to eastern markets will
not pay shipping and selling expenses, and citrus fruit
has often netted the same result.
The potato grower of Hastings, Florida, pays $70 in
freight charges alone on an acre of potatoes producing
forty barrels-before lie gets a return!

He pays freight on seed from Maine, 5 sacks, $1.74
each ...................................... $ 8.70
He pays freight on barrels from Jacksonville..... 2.00
He pays freight on fertilizer from Jacksonville, 1
ton ........... ............................. 1.56
Freight on 40 barrels of potatoes to New York
$1.45 each ................. ................ 58.00 "

Total ...............................,...... .$70.26
Add to this cost of fertilizer. ................. .. $50.00
And the cost of labor .......................... 20.00
Cost of 40 empty barrels at 75c each............. 30.00

And we see the "risk" involved ini producing a simple
article of food.
The Okeechobee News says: "A grower shipped two
cars of cabbage from Moorehaven to Baltimore. They
sold $436.35 per carload. The freight was $482.00' per
carload. The railroad company is now looking to the
shipper for the $45.05." Four hundred acres of cabbage
were plowed under in this same section last spring be-
cause it would not pay to ship them. The railroad lost
the freight; the consumer lost the food; the farmer lost
his labor, and income on his investment.
In the Literary Digest of February 5th is a cartoon
entitled: "It's a steep road from.the farm to the table."
It represents a farmer selling sheep on an eastern mar-
ket for $2.10 per head. The freight and charges were $1.77











per head. He then enters a restaurant and finds lamb
chops to be 6ce a pound.
The April 9, 1921, issue of the Country Gentlemen said:
"It takes nearly a wagon load of hides to buy the cattle-
man a pair of shoes." In many places the hides are
thrown away, as they will not pay freight, drayage and
commission.
It takes wool from 200 sheep to buy a $50.00 suit of
clothes.
One hundred and fifty pounds of the best lint cotton
are required to buy the most ordinary Palm Beach suit,
weighing two and one-eighth pounds.
The cotton grower sells a bale of cotton for $40, and
pays at the rate of $1,1000 to $2,000 a bale for it in the
form of laundered shirts.
The farmer sells 100 pounds of live pork for $6 and
buys back 67 pounds of bacon for $13.
He gets 20c a gallon for milk, and the consumer pays
20c a quart.
He pays war prices for farm machinery and sells his
crop at panic prices.
The purchasing power of an acre of crops last year
compared with 1914, when exchanged for necessities,
shows that it would buy (2'j/ as much coal; 5S% as much
sugar 4W/ as much mulslin; (60% as much lumber; 64%
as much lime; and 72% as much wire fencing.
The American Food Journal for May, 1921, makes com-
parison of the years 1913 and 1921, taking 1013 at 100%
standard, as follows:

1913 for the Month of March-
Farm ('loths and Fuel and
Products Food, Etc. Clothing Lighting
99 97 100 102
1921, March-
125 150 192 207.

Secretary Wallace is reported as saying on June Gth,
"In the past six months the price paid the farmer for Iis
bread wheat has decreased 561%, while the price of bread
has decreased but 10c."
But, says someone, the farmer leads such a free, easy,
and independent life.











Oh yes, statistics shows that a larger per cent. of farm-'
ers' wives go crazy than any other class--because of the
isolation and monotony of farm life.
The Agricultural College of New York, upon investi-
gation, found that last year 40,000 men and boys left the
farms of that State. Homes on the larger farms, and in
the most prosperous communities were visited, and it
was found that 70% of them had no running water, and
only 15% of them had bath rooms.
Only rudimentary education can be secured in the rural
districts, and social life is extremely limited. Diversions
are usually of a crude character, and work required is of
an exacting nature.
Do you wonder then that the red-blooded youth looks
elsewhere for venture? The fact that thousands make
serious blunders in leaving the farm does not change the
mental attitude of the ambitious, who see the door of
hope shut against them on the farm.
If, in the city, they meet a -fate even worse, they be-
come possible disciples of some school of extreme rad-
icalism. Where bolshevism flourishes there is economic
wrong. The pyschology of humanity is in a great meas-
ure a question of economic pressure.
The conditions which are indicated by the above cita-
tions never right themselves by being let alone. To ignore
them is to invite "Nemesis" to receive her own-and some
day the offering will be made.
Agriculture constitutes 70% of the nation's dynamic
wealth.
Cities are but the converted wealth of the soil.
This country has a millionaire for every 2,100 people.
Three per cent. of the people own sixty per cent. of the
wealth.
Sixty per cent. of the people own five per cent. of the
wealth.
Does it make any difference?
What are we going to do about it?











DEHYDRATION,

A COMING INDI'STRY IN FLORIIA.

By T. J. Brooks,
Chief Clerk. DeI)lrtmniit of Agriculture.

DIehydration is an important industry that is con-
stantly growing in magnitude. It has reached its great-
est development in the Western States.
It is not always safe to assume that becaub ascertain
business is successfully conducted in one section a similar
undertaking will succeed in another. It is just as unsafe
to assume that because a certain kind of enterprise proved
a failure in one section it must necessarily fail if at-
tempted in another.

At Fort Collins, .Colorado, are dehydrated:
1. Irish potat'o(s
2. Sweet potatoes
3. Carrots
4. Turnips
5. Cauliflower
6. Squash
7. Peas
S. Cabbage
9. Green Leans
10. Celery
11. Berries
12. Peaches
All of which are grown commercially in Florida.

In California are dehydrated:
1. Prunes
2. Pumpkins
3. Grapes
4. Vegetables

In Idaho are dehydrated:
1. Prunes
2. Apples
3. Vegetables












In Florida the folloiwng are produce:l which n;y be
dehydrated:
1. Figs
2. Peaches
3. Potatoes
4. Ieans
5. Squash
(. Peas
7. Pineapples
8. CAbage
9. Celery
10. Berries
11. Turnips
12. Pumpkins
13. Grapes
14. Sea Products
15. Meats

Florida has better transportation facilities to the
larger markets than lhis the West, as both rail and water
transportation are available.

METHOISo OF DEHYDRA.TION.

The old method of sun drying is possible only in arid
climates. Kiln driving was the first artificial method
brought into use: where the article to le dried is laid
on a screened ilor under which heating' appliances are
built. Fruits handled this way are usually spoken of -as
evaporated.
Atmospheric dryers consist of a chamber in which ma-
terial is placed on wire screens, a heating coil, a blower.
and an exhaust for the moisture-laden air.
Heated air carries more moisture than cold air, The
application of this principle is carried out by plants of
various construction. The regulation of the tempera-
ture, humidity, velocity of the current, reheating (if the
current as it cools, reuse of exhaust heat, control of
humidity at different stages of the process to suit differ-
ent nmaterials,-these are some of the problems .to be
worked out under this method.
Another.modification of this type is the long tunnel con-
struction, through whi'h trucks carrying trays move in












the 'opposite direction to the air current. The mateial
being dried thus meets first the air that has been con-
siderably cooled and carrying much humidity, and meets
last the hottest and direst air.
The vacuum method of dehydration consists mostly of
three parts: A heavy cast iron chamber containing hlol-
hw steel shelves capable of being heated by steam.' hot
water or electriicty; a condenser and trap to collect the
condensate; a vacuum pump to exhaust the air from the
chamber and maintain a high vacuum. The material to be
dried rests on fiat pans or screens which slide in, making
thorough metallic contact with the fiat shelves. Heating
is mainly by conduction from the metallic trays and by
radiation from the under surface of the next shelf above.
A pipe of ample size leads from the chamber to the con-
denser. which is usually of the surface type, though the
Laronietric is sometimes used in this system. The cir-
culating medium is generally hot water. This method
avoids oxidation as the drying takes place in the virtual
absence of air.
Meats may lie dried without oxidation, the fats re-
maining white and not melted.-raw meat without water.
A temperature of 131 F. degrees is usually employed.
Fish, oysters, clams, lobster meat. shrimp, etc.. give fine
products. The usual procedure is to dry meat to about
3.r' of its original weight. In conditioning, some n ); of
additional weight is lost and no ('derclofIrlnt of b1i(trt'ri
onccurfs. Thin slices cut across the grain give the best re-
suits. -Drying must not proceed too far or the product
will not refresh in a natural manner.
Liquids are dehydrated by several methods. One is
for the liquid to lie admitted into the dryer as a spray
which meets a current of warm dry air and is recovered
as a powder. Liquids are also handled in a vacuum sys-
tem. In this case a heated roller picks up a fim of liquid
which is dried rapidly under reduced pressure and is
scraped off continuously by a knife-a flaked material
results. Liquids are also dried in the usual types of at-
mospheric dryers. Milk and eggs are kept indefinitely by
this process.
Fifteen years rolled in between the closing of the Boer
War and tile great World War. Dehydration was in use
in England and vegetables were prepared for the making
of soup for the British army in South Africa. "-A manu-











facturer of this dehydrated food found himself'with thirty
thousand pounds of the product on his hands at the clo.e
of the Boer War. It was paraffined and stored away
for a market. Fifteen years later it was fed to British
soldiers in France, instead of in the Transvaal! An ex-
emplification of the possibilities of dehydration.
A portable dehydrator has been put on the market, 60
feet long, 4 feet wide and 6 feet high, with an estimated
capacity of two to three thousand pounds per twenty-
four hours. The machine is shipped knocked down aind
can be erected by four men in ten hours.

ADVANTAGES or DEHYDRATION.

The advantages of dehydration are:
1. Saves food by utilizing that which cannot be profit-
ably marketed at the time of gathering.
2. Keeps from glutting the market.with products and
by enabling the producer to market gradually helps to
stabilize markets and prevent violent fluctuations.
3. Avoids loss in case of a freight shortage and in-
ability to secure prompt transportation.
4. Occupies less space; costs less freight; and can be
shipped in convenient packages to all parts of the world.
Dehydrating should not be looked upon as a mere in-
cidental convenience. It will never come to its own till
crops are raised purposely for dehydration. To be a
permanent business it must have a permanent support
and not be compelled to take chances exclusively on ac-
commodating a few who are unable to handle parts of
their crops at irregular intervals.
Dehydration will never supercede nor take the place
of canning and preserving, but comes in as an able aux-
iliary. California manufactures millions of dollars worth
of by-prodpcts annually from her groves and vineyards.
There is a score of concerns engaged in the manufacture
of by-products from culls and other fruits. Last year
they produced one and a half million pounds of citric
'acid, five hundred thousand pounds of citrate of lime,
fifty thousand pounds bf lemon oil, and six million pounds
of marmalades, jeliles, etc.
Down on the East Coast of Florida a ketchup factory
uses tomatoes in quantities that justify raising-inde-
pendent of the shipping market. Marmalades and'bottled












juices, jellies, candied peel, chili and a number of other
articles are being utilized by domestic preparation. These
enterprises taken in connection with the canning club
work are saving immense quantities of human food that
otherwise would go to waste. It is a cheaper process to
can than to dehydrate and until dehydration can be as-
sured of permanent patronage, investors will not venture
far into the enterprise. Either work for custom, much
like threshers accommodate the grain growers, or by com-
munity ownership and operation, or worked under signed
contacts like the sugar beet industry is conducted, will
have to come into vogue before dehydration will come into
common use.
The writer thinks that there is a great future for de-
hydration in Florida, but it must be introduced on a
thoroughly organized basis to succeed.
The following statistics, compiled by the '. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, show the percentage of water in some
fruits and vegetables:
FRUITS.


Percentage
of Water
Apples ............ 84.6
Apricots ........... 85.0
Bananas ....... ... 75.3
Blackberries ....... 86.3
Cherries ........... 80.9
Cranberries ........ 88.9
Currants .......... 85.0
Currants (black) .. 79.0
Figs .............. 79.1
Gooseberries ....... 85.6
Grapes ............ 77.4


Percentage
of Water
Huckleberries ...... 81.9
Lemons ............ 89.3
Oranges ........... 86.9
Peaches ............ 89.4
Pears ............. 80.9
Pineapples ......... 89.3
Plums ............. 78.4
Prunes ............ 79.6
Raspberries ........ 84.1
Rhubarb ........... 94.4
Strawberries ....... 90.4









14

VEGETABLES.

Percentage Percentage
of Water of Water
Beans, string ....... 89.2 Onions ............ 87.0
Beans, Lima ....... 68.5 Parsnips .......... 83.0
Beets ............. 87.0 Peas ............... 74.6
Cabbage .......... .. 91.5 Potatoes, white ..... 78.3
Carrots ............ 88.2 Potatoes, sweet ..... 69.0
Celery ............. 94.5 Spinach ........... 92.3
Corn, sweet ........ 75.4 Tomatoes ........o.. 94.3
Mushrooms ,....... 88.1 Turnips ........... 89.6

WHAT Do You KNow ABOUT FLORIDA?
(The Florida G-roter.)

Are you a Floridian? Do you expect to become one?
.This page will interest you.
(Can you answer these question?
1. Where is the Suwannee River?
2. What Florida city is best noted for its production of
strawberries, celery, crawfish, cigars, sponges, oys-
ters?
3. Name five game fish found in Florida waters.
4. How many counties are there in Florida? (61)
,5. Name three famous resort hotels on the Florida East
Coast. Two on the West Coast.
6. Name the largest fresh water lake in Florida?
7. What Florida county has a system of hard-surfaced
paved highways connecting every town within its
borders?
8. What are the characteristics of the Valencia orange,
Temple, Parson Brown?
9. Name four famous men who have homes in Florida,
and tell where.
10. Who is Lue Gim Gong and what did he do?
11. Name a famous Florida spring.
12. Name two of the canals that drain the Everglades.
13. What Florida town is known as the "Magic City,"
"The Gateway to Florida?"
14. Name five species of wild game found in Florida.
15. Name five Florida flowers.
16. Name three tropical or semi-tropical plants, not flow-
ers, found in Florida.













17. What is a chameleon?
18. Name two men who played an important part in
Florida's development.
19. Where is the Tamiami Trail.
20. Where is Fort Marion?
21. Name three different types of Florida soil?
22. What is a Mango? An Avocado? A Dasheen?
23. Why is plant and nursery inspection maintained in
Florida?
24. What is meant by the "Backbone of Florida?"
25. What is high H'ammock land?
26. Who owns and operates the Florida Citrus Exchange?
27. Name three Florida grasses?
28. What is a Florida Cracker'
29. Where is the Halifax River?
30. What is coquina?
31. Name three kinds of wood found in Florida.
32. In what Florida county are trees planted in rock?
33. What is a guava?
34. In the production pf what mineral does Florida lead
the nation by 75 per cent?
35. Where is the Florida State Experiment Station lo-
cated?
36. Where and what is Royal Palm Park?
37. Where is Cape Sable?
38. Where are the Ten Thousand Islands of Florida?
39. Name five birds found in Florida?
40. Name the capital of Florida?
41. Who was Gasparilla?
42. Who was Osceola?
43. What is known as the rainy season in Florida?
44. Name two cities in Florida where shipbuilding plants
are located?
45. Where is Iron Mountain?
46. What Florida creature is designated by the term
"Gopher ?"
47. Where is Long Key and for what is it famed?
48. What is the Over-seas Railroad? Give location.
49. What is an Afromobile?
50. What plant is often found growing on telephone wires
in Florida?












WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT FLORIDA?

Answers to Questions on Previous Page.

"What do you know about Florida?" That question is
being asked all over the country, in every State, from
coast to coast, in Canada, in Mexico, in many foreign
lands. Folks everywhere are interested in this great
State, some expect to make it their future home, others
already have property here and are eager for reliable
information. Tourists and motorists plan trips to Flor-
ida, investors want to know of opportunities, people with
friends and relatives in the State often wonder what kind
of a country it is, and hope to pay it a visit some, day. It
is doubtful if any other State is more in the mind of the
average per-on than is Florida.
Undoubtedly the question, "What do you know about
Florida?" has been put to you more than once, and how
did you answer it? Was your answer intelligent and sat-
isfying to yourself and to the party making the inquiry?
Practically every Floridian and almost every person
that has ever visited the 'State or who knows somebody
that did will promptly inform you that they KNOW ALL
ABOUT FLORIDA. Now when you come to think of it,
that is a rather broad statement for even a native-born
Floridian to make, for not many folks know all there is
to know about anything.
It is a good thing sometimes to test our knowledge
and find out how much or how little we really do know on
a certain subject. Let's take Florida as a subject this
time and just for the fun of it see what kind of. a mark
we would be entitled to on the examination. It's a fore-
gon'e conclusion that some folks who have heretofore
claimed full knowledge on the subject will be mighty glad
to know that the answers can be found in the back of the
book and that it won't be necessary for them to take their
report cards home to mother.
On a previous page you will find displayed a list
of 50 questions, all of them pertaining to Florida. Sim-
ilar questions are being'asked every day and most folks
who claim to have a fair knowledge of Florida should find
them easy to answer. Of course, GROWER readers who
reside out of the State and have not'had an opportunity
to secure first-hand information on the subject cannot
be expected to give an answer to all of these questions,











at the same time it should prove interesting to them be-
cause of the information they will gain, and when these
questions are put to you at some later date, as some of
them surely will he, you will have the satisfaction of being
able to give an intelligent answer.
If you are a Floridian, either by birth or adoption, and
claim an average knowledge of your State, you should
know something of her resources, her birds and flowers,
history, geography oud certain general subjects. You
should be able to answer at least 35 out of the 50 ques-
tions. They are not particularly hard, some may seem
ridiculously easy, but don't be too sure, the simplest are
sometimes the hardest. If you answer 35 you are well
informed; if you fall under that mark you had better
brush up.
For your own information and benefit study them any-
how. You will learn something perhaps, and it will
prove an interesting and entertaining half hour's diver-
sion. Try them on the children and your neighbors, too;
it's really fun and worth while as well.
You folks that live up North, cut out this list of ques-
tions, learn the answers and then spring them on those
friends and neighbors of yours that claim to know so
much about Florida.
You won't find it hard to trap them, and on some of
the simplest questions at that. As a rule, the folks who
go out of their way to tell you about Florida are those
who visited the State for a few days, gained their knowl-
edge through a car window, or got it second hand from
some friend or relative who made such an excursion.
The answers to all of these questions are given farther
along in this article; look them up if you must, but be-
fore you do, try and see how far you can go on your own.
We believe that every Bulletin reader will enjoy and
benefit by this article; we will appreciate hearing from
you. Tell us how you succeeded and how the kiddies
liked it, what the neighbors said, and so on. Letters from
Bulletin readers are always welcome; we will like to feel
that you are one of the family, and while we can't meet
all of you personally, it is always a pleasure to receive
your letters.

You will find below the answers to the set of questions
that appeared on page -, the answers are numbered to
correspond with the numbers of the questions. In some
2-Bulletir









18 .

cases your answers need not necessarily correspond with
those given here, inasmuch as a -different answer can be
given and still be correct. For example, see Question 11.
"Name a famous Florida spring." The answer given here
is Silver Springs, Ocala, Fla., but there are a number
of other springs of equal note that would serve to answer
as well as the one we give.
1. The Suwannee River rises in southern Georgia,
flows southwest through the major portion of its course
in north central Florida, emptying into the Gulf of Mex-
ico at Suwannee Bay.
2. Plant City; Sanford; Key West; Tampa; Tarpon
Springs; Apalachicola.
3. Tarpon; King; Mackerel; Snapper; Bass (others).
5. Ponce de Leon, St. Augustine; Royal Poinciana,
Palm Beach; Royal Palm, Miami. West Coast: Belleview,
Bellair.
6. Lake Okeechobee.
7. Polk County.
8. Valencia: Matures late, is ready for market usually
from March to early' June. Popular sized, a good ship-
per. The Temple: In shape somewhat resembles a flat-
tened king orange; the skin is semi-loose; it has a very
dark red color, uniform and easily separated segments;
flesh is deep red; is very juicy; has exceptional keeping
qualities. Parson Brown: An early orange, ripens in
October, will'stand the mature fruit test when the fruit
is not yet fully colored, fine texture and good flavor.
9. Thomas A. Edison, Ft. Myers; Wm. Jennings
.Bryan, Miami; Frank Mulholland, Eustis; Rockafellor,
Ormond; (others).
10. A Chinese horticulturist propagated the famous
orange that bears his name, the Lue.Gim Gong. His
home is DeLand, Fla.
11. Silver Springs, near Ocala; (others).
12. The St. Lucie Canal, Miami Canals, (others).
13. Miami, Jacksonville.
14. Bear, deer, wild cat, wild turkey, quail, (others).
15. Orchid, Cherokee Rose, Yellow Jasmine, Oleander
Alamanda.
16. Bamboo, Banana, Pineapple, (others).
17. A Florida lizard that can change its color to har-
monize with its surroundings.
18. H. B. Plant, Henry M. Flagler, (others).
19. In Dade and Lee Counties now under construc-









19

tion, will connect the eastand west coast by hard-sur-
faced road through the 'Glades.
20. The oldest fort in America. Built in 1565 by Don
Pedro Menendez, at St. Augustine.
21. Norfolk fine sand, muck, sandy loam, (others).
22. An edible tropical fruit. A delicious salad fruit
sometimes called Alligator Pear. A tuber, edible, served
and eaten as a potato.
23. To protect against the invasion of dangerous in-
sect pests and plant diseases and check the spread of
those already existing.
24. The ridge or highland section of central Florida.
25. Florida' land carrying a native growth of hard
woods, generally having a sub-soil of clay marl, limestone
or shell, or combination of these.
26. The citrus fruit growers of Florida who are mem-
bers of the organization. It is operated by the growers
themselves on a co-operative, non-profit basis.
27. Bermuda, Rhodes, Napier and (others).
28. A native-born Floridian.
29. A salt water estuary on the Florida East Coast
separating the main land from outlying keys, connecting
with the Mantanzas River on the north and Turnbull Bay
on the south.
30. A distinctive coral rock formation found on the
Florida East Coast.
31. Pine, Oak, Cypress, (others).
32. Dade.
33. An edible fruit grown in Florida.
34. Phosphate.
35. Gainesville.
36. In Dade County. A beautiful natural park, pre-
served by the State of Florida.and dedicated to the Flor-
ida Federation of Women's Clubs.
37. The furthest point south on the mainland of the
United 'States, on the southwest coast of Florida.
38. Off the southwest coast of Florida, between Ft.
Myers and Cape Sable.
39. Mocking-bird, Red Bird, Woodpecker, Crow, Eagle,
(others).
40. Tallahassee.
41. A famed, bloodthirsty pirate who operated off the
west coast of Florida.
42. The last great chief of the Seminoles.
43. Mid-summer.











44. Tanmpa, Jacksonville.
45. In Polk County, near Lake Wales.
46. On the Key West Extension of the Florida East
Coast Railroad, famed as a fishing ground. j
48. The East Coast extension of the Flagler System
F. E. C., connecting Key West with the mainland of
Florida'.
49). Bicycle chairs found in great numbers at Palm
Beach, propelled by negroes; therefore the name Afro-
mobile.
50. Spanish Moss, an air plant.

IMMIGRATION.

The following names and addresses are taken from our
files since April 1st. They are from people who write that
they are interested in coming to Florida. Those in posi-
tion to offer them service may communicate directly with
them:
George E. Sutton, 330 Pullman Avenue, Rochester,
N. Y.
Gustave Pietrowski, 442 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburgh,
Pa.
M. H. Ligon, 330 West Twenty-first Street, New York
City.
Richard C. Wrestling, U. S. N., S. S. Oklahoma, Key
West, Fla.
T. E. Andrews, Fergus Falls State Hospital, Fergus
Falls, Minn.
L. R. Cook, 3321 N. Griffin Avenue. Los Angeles, Cal.
George Ashton, Box 163, Dravosburg, Pa.
L. M. Reed, Box 7, Atlantic, Mass.
Louis J. Waghorn, 614 Moulton Avenue, Morse Place,
Manitoba, Canada.
J. H. Foran, 55 Vernon Street, Providence, R. I.
Paul St. John, Olney, Ill.
Chas. McCormick, Kenville, Manitoba, Canada.
Harold Archer, R. F. D. No. 1, Box 85, Bear Lake.
Mich.
Miss Ethel E. Haskell, Box 2044, Tulsa, Okla.
C. M. Baldon, 1116 Ivy Street, Janesville, Wis.
George W. Beeson, 976 E. Seventy-eighth Street, Cleve-
land, 0.
Wm. W. Messex, 3712 Ivy Street, Indiana Harbor, Ind.












K. E. Kimball. Moulton, Ala.
S. E. Homan, 1407 X. Bellefontaine St., Indianapolis,
Ind.
Prabodh Chandra Ghosh, 431/ Baburam Ghose Lane,
Beadon Spr. P. O., Calcutta, India.
Andrew Stem, Colonization Agent. State of Durango,
Mexico.
W. R. Leeper, 7544 Yates, Avenue, Chicago, Ill.
L. J. Carroll, 174 Lakeview Avenue, Detroit, Mich.
J. C. Banta, 2121/, Franklin Street, Tampa, Fla.
Van Alen Harris. 423 Chelton Avenue, Philadelphia.
Pa.
W. A. Rausenberger, Box 115 River Edge, N. J.
J. B. Abbott. 429 fHomer Bldg., Thirteenth and F
Streets, N. W., Washington, D. C.
R. C. Stapler, Valdosta, Ga.
Chas. H. Ewing, Parkgrove, Lamanda, Cal.
N. Lauer, Cor. Hunter's Pt. Avenue and Orten Street,
Long Island City, N. Y.
Emil C. Anderson, Sr., 1764 West Eighth Street, Brook-
lyn. N. Y.
Earle A. Kiefer. 14 E. Jackson Bonlevarde, Chicago,
Ill.
George Burkhard, 300 W. Seventy-fourth Street. Los
Angeles, Cal.
A. D. Pugh, 291 Russell Avenue, Akron, O.
D. D. Fennell, 1600 Westminster Bldg., 110 S. Dear-
born Street, Chicago, Ill.
John H. Wolf, Bowling Green, Ky.
C. H. Shubert, 801-2 State Nat. Bank Bldg., Oklahoma
City, Okla.
C. L. Eaton, 2021 Fourth Ave., Seattle, Washington.
Arthur Bridgman, 838 Greene Street, Douglas, Ariz.
Dr. J. F. Watt. Bedford, 0.
Glen A. Torrance, Auburn. Ill.
Joseph Sturni, Aholt, Mo.
H. S. Hines, Box 554, Hot Springs, Ark.
W. S. Hope, Atkins, Va.
Charles Delvin. Box 238, Maple Creek, Sask., Canada.
Wm. J. Sommers. Loyal, Wis.
Fred R. Clark, Chickasaw, Ala.
Chas. Wolthuis, 3559 S. Lincoln Street, Chicago, Ill.
E. L. Robertson, 374 Broadway, New York City.
N. S. Ternest, 602 W. Palm Street, Fitzgerald, Ga.











W. L. Street, 168 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Ill.
A. V. Phillips, Bridgeboro, Ga.
H. J. Wieland, 2409 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O.
A. M. Morley, Windsor, Ontario, Canada.
Miss F. May Lyndon, R. F. D. No. 3, I)elavan, Wis.
T. Petrovits, 221 West Thirteenth Avenue, Homestead,
Pa.
P. M. Wright, Box 831, Morenci, Ariz.
J. W. Fager, 730 Belville, Station A, New Orleans,
Ea.
A. H. Conning, Consort, Alberta, Canada.
Perry J. Cooper, R. R. No. 2, Kenesaw, Neb.
Chas. Heard, East Chattanooga, Tenn.
F. J. Gribben, 1062 South Orange Avenue, Newark,
N. J.
W. C. Baker, 209 Ann Street, Elgin, 111.
E. G. Burnham, Freedom, Me.
Ira C. Wellbourne, 311 Reutchlen Bldg., Hamilton, O.
Wm. DeHart, Box 545, Dawson, N. Mex.
W. H. Penney, Mt. Sunapa, N. H.
Geq. W. DePue, Fort Scott, Kan.
E. L. Robertson, 374 Broadway, New York City.
John R. DeLony, Jr., Tuscumbia, Ala.
A. C. Barbour, Chatham, Va.
R. C. Talbot, 5 Stillwell Place, Ridgewood, N. J.
Geo. Gomperle, 510 Morgan Street, Union Hill, N. J.
Edw. H. Byars, Lexington, Ky., City Nat. Bank Bldg.
Ernest L. Mandel, 132 Nassau Street, New York City.
E. F. Huggins, 1118 Garland Avenue, Little Rock, Ark.
C. N. Peek, 489 Lee Street. Atlanta, Ga.
Olin Albin,. McKenzie, Tenn.
'Mrs. Lurena Fletcher, Motor Rt. No. 9, Station H,
Washington, O. C.
V. E. Sylvester, Box 924, New Orleans, La.
Milton Miller, Champion, Pa.
A. P. Franco, Jr., Box 33, Packer's Station, Kansas
City, Kan.
H. N. Miller, Care Str. D. F. Lane, Dana, W. Va.
James B. Cattel, R. R. No. 1, Box 65, Richmond, Cal.
F. H. Dervoe, Gay-Teague Hotel; Montgomery, Ala.
J. B. Farrell, 818 Hathaway, Cincinnati, O.
L. J. Waghorn, 614 Moulton Avenue, Morse Place, Man-
itoba, Canada.
J. A. Osborn, Canton, N. C.









23'


J. W. Dwyer, West Union, Iowa.
C. R. Fitzpatrick, 1531 N. Penn Street, Indianapolis,
Ind.
Percy R. Odell, 67 Powell Avenue, Otawa, Canada.
L. J. Jennings, Box 593 Berkeley, Va.
H. J. Wilkins. 60 Second Street, Newburgh, N. Y.
Arthur Kaye, Ransdell Avenue, Louisville, Ky.
'lyde Campbell, R. R. No. 16. Box 36, Dayton. O.
G. E. Rodgers, R. R. No. 2, Bothwell, Ont.
Robt. J. Welsh, Eaton, O.
A. F. Christmas, 305 Burke Street, Easton, Pa.
I). McMullen, Box 169, Fort Dodge, Ia.
Mrs. Ch;is. A. Taylor, 1002 N. Thirty-first Street, Bil-
lings, Mont.
Edwin Mattson, 519 Fifty-fifth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y.
J. A. Crew, 182 State Street, Belle Vernon. I'a.
.1. W. Ehimaun. 2275 Halifax Street. Regiina. 8:;sk..
Canada.
.1. F. McRae, Box 946, Morenci, Ariz.
Toin Dobson, Elic, Ky.
J. S. Skaropski. 3338 Farmsworth Street, Detroit. Mich.
M. S. Kline, 1442 E. 112th Street, Cleveland, O,
Miss E. R. McBride, Box 247 Blunt, S. D.
Jasper T. McIntosh, Jordan, Mont.
W. P. Saunders, Red Lick, Miss.
H. 1). Plush, 217 E. Monroe Street. Jacksonville, Fla.
E. E. Weaver, R. F. D. No. 9, Kent, O.
W. I. Pinner, 234 East Eighty-second street New York
City.
Mrs. A. 1'. Dougherty, 215 Ormsby Avenue, Lexington,
Ky.
Mrs. E. B. Van Ness, Mound City, Kan.
Dr. Chas. Hayes, Hastings, Neb.
E. V. Burdick, Claysville, Va.
C. O. McClelland, 1230 .Resaca Place, N. S., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.
J. J. Johnson, Greenwood, S. C.
J. H. Hessel, 342 Frank Street, Ottawa, Can.
John M. Johnson, R. F. D. No. 2, Liberty, Ind.
F. Tennyson Neeley, 621 Fifth Avenue, New York
City.
Dr. A. H. Sissakian, Verdal, Neb.











FLORIDA PRODUCTION 1920.

Cereals, bushels ........................... 20,000,000
Peanuts, bushels .......................... 5,000,000
Velvet Beans, bushels ...................... 2,000,000
Pork, pounds ............................. 47,000,000
Beef, pounds .............................. 82,000,000
M elons, cars ............................... 8.000

Fruit .......................... .. ..... $30,000,000
N uts .............................. ....... 350,000
Tobacco ................................... 2,000,000
Hays .................................. 1,500,000
S Poultry and Eggs .......................... 8,000,000
Syrup .................................... 3,000.000
Irish Potatoes ............................ 8,000.000
Sweet Pptatoes ....................... 5,000,000
Cotton .............................. ... 2,000,000

$59,850,000

M inerals ................................ 20,000,000
Forest Products .................... ..... 25,000,000
Fisheries ................................. 20,000,000

$65,000,000
BLUEBERRIES.

Blueberries and huckleberries are of the same species.
Climate has little to do with their distribution.
They thrive in Maine, in Florida and in the Sierras.
They grow in swamps and on mountains.
The growing of blueberries is developing into a con-
siderable industry.
Because the wild blueberry and huckleberry were so
often found in swampy places it was thought that swamp
land was necessary, to their growth. However, the high
rolling hills of the Appalachian range in many places
were covered with the low bush variety of huckleberry
and frequently the tree varieties Were found on high hills.
Orchardists have demonstrated that the tree varieties of
the blueberry will grow on uplands if the soil is new and
unsweetened. Old land may be used if supplied with
plenty of sour muck or raw humus.














('lIARAT'ERlsTI' AI)VANTAGES OF BLUEBERRIES.


diseases prey upon them
spraying nor pruning necessary
danger from frost
trouble to pick
danger of oversupply
icing required in shipping
difficulty in finding market


Trees should le planted 12 x 12 feet apart on average
laud and 12 x (i feet on exceptionally favorable plot,-
making 3:112,or 6(14 trees to the acre. They should average
ten quarts to the tree and sell for from twenty to forty
cents a quart. Forty quarts have been gathered from a
tree in a season. They ripen from May to July inclu-
sive-varying some two weeks from the northern to cen-
tral counties.

For purpose of comparison, the following figures of tomato shipments
for 1919 and 1!)20 with five-year averages and dates of commercial ship-
ping seasons are given for the chief commercial shipping areas of the
United States:
Carloads


Shipping
Districts


Apliroximaite
Shipping Season


Florida ......... Nov. 1---July 1.5
New Jersey ...... July 1-Nov. 15
Miississippi ...... May 25-July 20
California .......May 1-Dec. 31
Texas ........... May 1-July 20
Indiana ......... July 1-Oct. 31
Tennessee ....... June 1.-Sept. 30
Delaware ........July 1-Nov. 15
Ohio ............. uly 1- Oct. 15
New York ........Aug. 15-Oct. 15
(25 states ship tomatoes in


5-Year
191i) 1920 Average
4468 3792 4222
1012 2330 2213
1388 1363 1363
2186 1374 1308
1205 1286 1207
948 554 714
368 805 687
502 81 (47
489 83 495
457 730 369
carload quantities


EVER-BEARING ORANGE.

There is an ever-bearing orange tree at Avon Park,
Florida. It is about fifteen years old, but only recently
were the wonderful possibilities of revolutionizing the
orange industry by propagating from this tree fully real-
ized.
The tree has been bought by a company capitalized at
half a million dollars. It is expected to have 250,000
trees budded from this tree by 1923 and half a million the
following year. The tree has been enclosed with a double
wire fence 20 feet high. Guards watch it day and night











as a protection against possible invaders who would take
buds without leave.
The origin of the tree is a mystery. The land where it
stands has changed hands several times since the tree
was a small plant. It stands alone as a new departure
in the citrus family. The quality is that of the Valencia.


SEASON A NEW. BURBANK.'

Santa Rosa, Cal.-One hundred and eighty-eight stalks
of wheat from a single grain.
That is the most recent production of California's new
"plant wizard," Elwin D. Seaton, whose discoveries, and
success in increasing food production, are startling the
agricultural world. .0
His amazing "super-wheat" is expected to be used by
the Hoover Food Research Institute at Leland Stanford
University, which seeks to increase food production to
protect America from the "seven lean years."
For'a lifetime, Seaton has devoted his hours to subject-
ing the soil to a microscopic examination to attain in-
creased and better food production. For the past seven-
teen years he has made experiments on his ranches-not
so very far from that other "wizard," Luther Burbank.
Today he is able to produce from one grain of wheat 188
stalks, carrying 188 times as much wheat as formerly.
While these giant stalks cover considerably more ter-
ritory than the former one stalk of wheat, grown from a
single grain, he is nevertheless producing from seven to
eight times as much wheat fer acre as has ever been pro-
duced before.
And this on land where little wheat has heretofore
been produced.
OTHER EXPERIMENTS.

Seaton has not confined his experiments to wheat alone;
he has had the same success with barley, oats, and other
grains, and with prunes and apples.
His Santa Rosa Gravenstein apple and French prune
orchards produce yearly seven times as much fruit as any
other orchard in the country, though his trees are planted
in hard, black adobe soil.
flere is the secret of his success, he says:









27

Maintain the "life substance" of the soil by cultivating
and feeding the bacteria it contains.
Season's theory is that all plant growth and delevop-
ment is dependent primarily on the presence of soil bac-
teria.
Before planting, the soil must be in proper condition
so to receive the seed. To meet this need, Seaton .uses
cover crops of clover, alfalfa and the like. Wheat stalks
he plows under the soil instead of burning, addinf neces-
sary minerals where they do not exist in sufficient quan-
tity:



In 1920, 6,000 acres of flax were cultivated in'the United
States, as against 5,000 acres in 1919, the United States
Department of Agriculture estimates. Wisconsin, Minne-
sota, Michigan and the Willamette Valley of Oregon lead
in production. The 1920 crop is valued at $1,600,000.











GRAPES IN FLORIDA

.BY W. E. BOLLES
President of the Florida Grape Growers' Association,
of Oldsmar.



In Florida every man can live under his own vine and
fig tree. It is a land of corn and' wine (soft pedal on
wine nowadays); it is a land flowing with milk and
honey. Blessed are the families who have an abundance
of home-grown fruits on their tables all the year around,
with some to spare for other people.
Grape growers in Florida have proved that we can pro-
duce the earliest grapes in the United States. They begin
to mature in May and are on the markets in June, a month
to six weeks ahead of the California crop; therefore they
bring good prices. The Florida Grape Growers' Associa-
tion has united the growers and is helping all in handling
the extra early varieties successfully.
There were disappointments in growing grapes here in
past years, not because this State is not suited to grapes,
for it is; wild grapes are found in every county. Florida
is a natural grape region. But* the early growers tried to
introduce Californian, European and Northern States
varieties without much success in a commercial way.
Southern varieties of grapes are the thing in Florida,
varieties adapted to this climate and having disease-
resistant qualities. The summer rainfall and increased
humidity promote certain diseases on grape vines if they
are not native to this latitude and climate. The southern
varieties are able to withstand such attacks, being more
resistant to fungi characteristic of their localities, and
all the diseases can be prevented, controlled or healed.
Many of the best varieties suited to Florida have been
developed by using a native southern Texas grape as the
foundation for crosses. An entirely new race of bunch
grapes was thereby evolved, suited to southern condi-
tions; and the hybrids and multi-hybrids of this interest-
ing breeding are the vines from which we are getting
results in Florida today. The name of Munson has been
inscribed in an honorable place on the pages of southern
grape culture forever. It has been found by experience











that the varieties he originated years ago in southern
Texas are among the best adapted to Floridian condi-
tions, and many of our commercial vineyards include
vines directly descended from his plants.
The leading varieties now being planted in Florida
include the Florida malaga, Florida tokay, Carmen, Coal,
Munson, Black Spanish, Armalaga, Raolo and others.
The Zimmerman brothers have grown a total of seventy-
five varieties, some of which are results of their own de-
velopment in this State.
The soils suited to grapes are well-drained dark sandy
loams found in the rolling high pine lands and in the
flatwoods, the latter as a rule having more humus. Grapes
will flourish in well-drained muck and even in spruce pine
lands. Any land which will grow oranges will grow
grapes. Grapes will stand more moisture than citrus
trees, and are hardier, being in little danger of being
killed by a frost or freeze. They will endure conditions
which would destroy a citrus grove. Many a citrus
grower has planted or is considering planting an acreage
of grapes to secure diversity of crops and regular annual
profits.
The best time to plant vineyards is from December to
March, while the vines are dormant. They should pro-
duce a fair yield one and one-half years from planting,
and should have a full crop in the third summer at two
and one-half years from planting. They require little
fertilizer the first two years, and moderate applications
thereafter.
The plants are set ten feet apart in the rows, with the
rows eight feet apart, usually running north and south.
The new runners are trained on wire strung horizontally
to posts. The three-wire system is preferred; that is, one
wire two feet above the ground, the second wire a foot
and a half above the lowest, and the top wire a foot and
a half above the middle wire, making a total of five feet
from the- ground to the top of the post.
The practice is to cut the branches back severely every
year, during the dormant season early in January, leav-
ing only one trunk with two or three spurs near its top,
the spurs having only two or three joints. Everything
else is trimmed away.
If we could be told, before we are born, what a great
number of human diseases there are in the world, some
of us would hesitate about entering upon such a life.











Those who have never grown grapes or read about fruit
Diseases may likewise feel alarmed over the enemies of
the vine. Yet they are not nearly so numerous as human
diseases and are much easier to handle. As a matter of
fact, intelligent protective measures will save a world of
trouble. The leading diseases we must fight off are the
downy mildew, powdery mildew, grape anthracnose,
bird's-eye rot, crown gall, black rot, white rot, ripe rot,
brunissure and the California vine disease. This is not a
very formidable list, is it? And they can all be easily
remedied. The grape men can have less trouble than the
grapefruit and orange men, and the returns per acre can
be made larger than with citrus crops.
Diseases can all be controlled or prevented by proper
attention and spraying. An ounce of prevention is worth
many dollars in grapes. The ordinary sprays and appli-
cations are Bordeaux 5-5-50, pyrox, arsenate of lead, sul-
phate of copper, sulphur dust, lime-sulphur, kerosene
emulsion, fish oil soap and black leaf forty. A good
spraying of the trunk in the dormant period after cutting
off the branches will do much to prevent diseases later
on. The second spraying is done when the third leaf is
showing, before the leaf gets to the size of a half-dollar.
Spray again before the blossoms open, and again after
the blossoms have fallen. The fifth application should be
made ten to fourteen days later, and the sixth about ten
days to two weeks later. Every spraying should be
thoroughly done. Vigilance is the price of fancy grapes.
The vines should be inspected every few days. It sounds
like a lot of work, but remember, the grape vines are
wright on a level with the sprayer and you can do the work
swiftly and cheaply. It is easy compared to citrus grove
spraying. First-class extra early grapes should bring 25
to 35 cents a pound to the growers, so it pays to protect
the fruit and vines all the way along.
Chickens and birds love grapes. Keep the chickens
- locked up in their own runs.most of the time after the
fruit has set, and use a shotgun as a noise-maker to scare
away the birds while the grapes are ripening. Don't kill
the birds, for they are your friends. They are the' cham-
pion bug destroyers. Some growers tie each bunch of
grapes in a waterproof paper bag, after the manner of
handling persimmons. Birds have caused me more losses
than bugs and diseases. Ants like to make their homes
at the roots of vines, especially when the soil is killed or











ridged up above the surrounding levels on comparatively
low lands. Ants can easily kill a vine if left at work
undisturbed. Sprinkle the ant' hills and entrances at
night with fenole or carbon bisulphide or other ant
poisons, then step on the homes to close the entrances
and smother them.
In prolonged dry, hot weather a dust mulch or dead
grass mulch is good around the roots. Sometimes the
temperature down several inches in the bare soil is just
as high as it is at the surface. Shade reduces the heat
below. A summer cover crop is good in some sections.
The orange men have shown us the way. In preparation
for the fruiting season, clean cultivation is as important
with grapes as with any other crop. Grass and other
growth can take a lot of moisture and fertility away from
'the grape roots.
It is impossible in a short article like this to cover a
subject on which many good books have been written.
If a grower is not interested enough in grapes to buy a
good book on fruit growing and fruit diseases, and study
it and apply the information, then there is not much use
going into the grape or any fruit business at all. The
names of some useful books on this subject are: "Prin-
ciples of Fruit Growing," by L. H. Bailey; "Southern
Agriculture," by Earle; "Manual of Fruit Diseases," by
Hesler and Whetzel. All of these are published by Mac-
millan and can be ordered at any good book store.
The Florida Grape Growers' Association, with head-
.quarters at Oldsmar, has adopted a standard shipping
package, the style the trade is used to-a pony grape
basket holding two and one-half pounds. Nothing but
first-class, sound, clean, mature grapes should be sold.
Keep the others at home. I recommend that every one
interested in growing grapes 'should join the association.
The fee is only two dollars a year, and you should re-
ceive much more than that amount in valuable informa-
tion, as well as the satisfaction of knowing you are help-
ing to establish in Florida on a commercial basis one of
the oldest branches of husbandry known from the early
days of the human race.












FACTS ABOUT COTTON.

Official report of American Cotton Association on cotton acreage
planted in 19'1, indicating the estimated percentage of reduction in
4 cotton acreage, use of commercial fertilizers, and abandoned acreage
after planting ,due to inability of farmers to secure credits and to ad-
verse weather condition, as compared with the crop of 1920. Total
estimated acreage planted for 1921-24,563,486.


Acreage W_ a a M
State. 1020. 0111 0s .. g & a


*Arizona ....... ....... 60.00% ...... .. . I ..
Alamaba ........ 2.871,000 27.76% 55.29% 4.88% 2,074 010
Arkansas ....... 2,92,000 31.88% 51.16% 5.40% 1,990.40f,
Florida ...... 127,000 25.82% 37.50% .84% 94,208
Georgia . 4,072,000 30.00% 50.91% :6.38% 3,480,400
Louisiana ..... 1.581,000 37.80% 53.25% 5.92% 983,382
Mississippi ..... 2.940,000 32.47% 51.61% 6.93% ] 1 985,382
Missouri .547,000 22.50% ... ... . 423,925
North Carolina.. 1,556,000 5'9.95% 45.35% 4.26% 1.089,978
Oklahoma ...... 2,889.000 31,88% ..... 1,067,987
South Carolina.. 2.900,000 29.82% 55.49% 4.52% 2.035,220
Tennessee ..... 798 00M 30.00% 53.33% 3.33% 558,600
T'lxas ......... .I 11,.506.000 30.61% 44.17% 3.24% 7,870,928
Totals.. .... 1. 3.5.4i5.000 1 30.73% I 51.17% 4.9.% | 24.563,486
*Arizona not included in above totals.

SU M MARY.

With a reduction of 30.73 per cent. in the cotton acre-
age for 1921, and with seasons similar to those of 1920,
and disregarding reduction in the use of commercial fer-
tilizers and estimated abandonment of acreage after
planting this year, the estimated yield of the 1921 crop
would be-9,142,098 bales.
Allowing a deduction in production tl'is year of 12 per
cent. on account of the reduction of 51.17 per cent. in the
use of commercial fertilizers, added to the acreage reduc-
tion of 30.73 per cent., making an estimated total of 42.73:
per cent., the forecast of production for 1921, as compared
with the 1920 crop, would be 7,558,365 bales.
If the estimated abandoned acreage after planting of
4.95 per cent. (due to inability of farmers to secure cred-
its, and to adverse weather conditions) is added to the
above estimate, making a grand total percentage of 47.68,
the estimated production for 1921, as compared with the
production in 1920, would be 6,905,075 bales.
Should the estimated percentage of reduction in acre-
age of 30.73 and 12 per cent. allowed for the 51.17 per











cent. reduction in the use of commercial fertilizers, mak-
ing a total of 42.73 per cent., be applied to the five-year
average of production amounting to 11,808,389 bales, the
cslimated production for 1921 would be 6,762,664 bales.
The estimated reduction in cotton acreage for 1921 to
24.563, 486 acres as shown by the tabulated reports above,
closely approximate the acreage of 1897 when there was
planted 24,319.584 acres.
The above estimates on probable production are pre-
sented merely as a basis of what the cotton trade may ex-
pect froin the present outlook of a crop so heavily re-
duced in acreage and in the use of commercial fertilizers,
reinforced by late seasons, bad stands and the present
activities of the cotton boll weevil. No man may fore-
cast production with any degree of accuracy at this time,
but taking the past as a guide and recognizing existing
adverse conditions to the growing crop, we may reason-
ably expect the smallest crop of cotton in 1921 which
has gone upon the markets since 1890, or within the past
twenty-five years.
HARVIE JORDAN,
Secretary American Cotton Association.

WORLD'S COTTON CROP.

(Condensed Statement. Bureau Markets, Washington,
D. C., January 29, 1921.)

Sour ces World's Su1pply.

United States. 1920-21...................... 12,987,000
Indian ................................... 4,676,000
Egypt .................................... 1,315,000
All others ................................ 800,000

19,778,000
Carry over 1919-20 ................ ........ 5,846,000

W orld's Supply .................. ........ 25,624,000

World's Supply and Consumption.

World's Carry Over July 31, 1920........... 5,846,000
W orld's Production ....................... 19,778,000


3-Bulletin









34

World's Supply, 1920-21..................... 25,624,000
World's Consumption, July 31, 1921 .......... 15,757,292

World's Carry Over (Est.) July 31, 1921..... 9,866,708

To the Grow er, Banker and Meerchant.

Above tabular statement speaks louder than words.
Conceding a crop 1921-22 to equal 1920-21,
bales ................................... 19,778,000
With 1921 carry over added, bales........... 9,866,708

World's total supply would be............... 29,644,708
With foreign finances crippled, American bank credits
restricted, economy the watchword, spinners takings re-
duced, necessity demands 331 to 50% acreage reduction
in cotton if we would make our farming profitable and
lead us to the point of self-pricing the staple.

GOVERNMENT FIGURES LABOR REPRESENTS 70 PER CENT OF
CoST OF GROWING COTTON.

Figures from which the cotton grower in certain dis-
tricts can approximate his own cost of production are pre-
sented in a preliminary report on basic requirements in
cotton production, just issued by the United States De-
partment of Agriculture. These figures, gathered by the
office of Farm Management and Farm Economics in a
study of cotton costs on 821 farms, may be taken as a
tentative standard for representative cotton-growing areas
in Arkansas.
It is shown by the investigation that man labor and
mule labor make up about 70 per cent of the operating
expenses of growing cotton, purchased fertilizers about
10 per cent, and labor, seed, and fertilizer together about
80 per cent.












Man hours. Mule hours.
Average Average
for- for-
a ----
REgion.


i! ir :

Arkansas- -
Lee County ............. 83164 99 263 55 49 76

The farmer can figure his labor cost per acre by apply-
ing current rates for labor to the gures for hours of labor
per acre in his locality, as indicated in the table below,
and by adding to this labor cost the cost of seed and fer-
tilizer, which he already knows, he gets a figure that repre-
sents 80 per cent of his total acre cost. To add to this
the necessary charges for manure, equipment, taxes, in-
surance, ginning, and overhead, he has merely to figure
what 10 per cent would be on this basis.
The foregoing table shows the man labor and mule
labor requirements of cotton per acre, as reported in 1920
for the 1919 crop.
The accuracy of the results obtained by using the fact-
ors presented in this table will depend very largely upon
the accuracy with which the farmer is able to estimate
his own labor requirements by judging where he stands
with reference to the average for his locality. The figures
given for the five farms using the least labor and the five
using the most will help in this regard.
The following example, illustrating the application.of
1920 requirements as determined for the 1919 crop in
Mitchell County, Ga., will serve to give an idea of the
way these figures on basic requirements may be used from
year to year in estimating the cost of production:














Items. E



Man labor ......... 100 hrs. $0.30 $30.00 53.4
Mule labor ........ 148 hrs. .20 9.00 17.1
Seed ............... 1 bu. 81.00 T. 1.21 2.2
Fertilizer ............ 292 lbs. 45.00 T. 6.57 11.7

Sub-total .......... ...... ........... 47.38 84.4
If $47.38 equals 84.41
per cent of total
cost, then the total
cost (100) equals. ......... ....... 56.16 ..
Seed credit ......... 300 lbs. 26.00 T. 3.90 .....

Total net cost perl
acre ............... I ....... .. ..... . 2.26 .....
Total net cost perl
pound of lint ...... 1 159 lbs. .......... .33 .....
In this calculation the hours of labor and the quanti-
ties of seed and fertilizer taken as a basis are those re-
ported for the 1919 crop; the rates for labor and the prices
of materials are those current in 1920; the 84.4 per cent
is the precise percentage for Mitchell 'County. The net
cost per pound of lint is determined by dividing the cost
per acre by the average yield for the district, as reported
for 1920.

ADEQUATE STORAGE FOR COTTON NEEDED.

Edwin T. Meredith, Secretary of Agriculture, recently
wrote the following letter to W. W. Long, director exten-
sion service, Clemson Agricultural College, South Caro-
lina:
"I have received .and read with great pleasure your
letter regarding the campaign for the construction of
cotton warehouses and the appointment of cotton classes
under the agreement recently entered into with this de-












apartment, and am pleased with the success you appear to
have had in creating interest in both lines of activity.
"As you already know, this department is anxious that
everything possible shall be done to impress farmers with
the need for the adoption of the best methods of handling
and marketing their cotton so that they can get as near-
ly as possible the full market value of every pound of cot-
ton they produce. As one of the means to this end, they
should have adequate and satisfactory facilities for stor-
ing their product and of financing it while in storage, so
that it may be protected from weather damage and mar-
keted gradually in accordance with consumption needs.
Wherever such facilities are not at hand or are not suffi-
cient,. the farmers should co-operate to secure them. When
they have secured the necessary warehouse facilities, they
should not only see that the warehouses in which they
store their cotton are conducted strictly in occordance
with the laws of the State but they will find it distinctly
to their advantage to have such warehouses licensed and
bonded under the United States warehouse act, so as to
invest their warehouse reecipts with the highest degree
of security and negotiability. The failure of farmers to
avail themselves properly of the advantages to be gained
through safe storage for their cotton is undoubtedly cost-
ing them many millions of dollars annually through coun-
try damage, inadequate and expensive financing, and
otherwise."

ACALA COTTON.

Acala was obtained by the Department of Agriculture
from the State of Chiapas in Southern Mexico in 1906.
It has been grown and acclimatized in different parts of
Texas, Oklahoma and eTqnessee. Its advantages are in
that it matures about 10 days earlier than other popular
varieties of upland cotton and thus escapes some of the
depredations of the boll weevil. It has large oval bolls
and is easily picked. It lints about 32 to 35 per cent.
The lint runs very uniform. The staple is one and one-six-
teenth to one and three-sixteenths inches long, clear
white, without the unwelcome creamy tint.











FEDERAL WAREHOUSE ACT.

(Amlerican Cotton News).

The purpose of this Act is to standardize cotton ware-
housing and the issuing of a standardized bonded ware-
house receipt of unquestioned value and integrity that is
backed up by a bond to the Government and which re-
ceives governmental inspection four times a year. The
bond required by the Government is $5.00 per bale of the
storage capacity of the warehouse. The bond premium is
one per cent. per annum, meaning that a five thousand-dol-
lar-bond will cost the warehouseman $50.00 per annum
and higher in proportion as the storage capacity of the
warehouse increases. In addition to this there is a charge
of $7.00 per annum on a 1,000-bale warehouse for the in-
spection and license.
The operation of cotton warehouses under the U. S.
Warehouse Act is remarkably simple and remains entire-
ly in the hands of the warehousemen. The Government
will not interfere in any way with the warehouseman's
management and control, but will only require that the
conditions of the Act be met, which are not at all bur-
densome. The conditions of the Act 'are nothing more
than that of good business practice. Warehousemen need
have no fear of RED TAPE. Inspections by agents of
the Government will be made from time to time at irregu
lar intervals, which will include a check of all cancelled
receipts against the number of receipts issued to deter-
mine the number of outstanding receipts and the amount
of cotton on hand. Actual counts of cotton will be made,
and the amount of insurance on cotton, if it is the prac-
tice of the warehouseman to insure his cotton, will be de-
termined from the insurance policies in effect. One short
monthly report relating to receipts and deliveries of cot-
ton and the amount of insurance carried, if any, is re-
quired of warehousemen.
The bonded receipts which are issued are uniform
and show the exact grade of the cotton. In event the
warehouseman does not wish to grade the cotton, a co-
operative agreement has been made with the State Bureau
of Markets at the State Capitol at Atlanta, whereby the
State Bureau tenders the services of their expert staff
of graders free of any charge whatever to the bonded
warehousemen, to do their classifying.











As a recognition of the great value of governmental
quarterly inspection, the fire insurance companies have
just announced that where a warehouseman joins under
the United States Warehouse Act that this automatically
reduces the fire insurance rate on stored cotton twenty-
five per cent. (25%). This is an economic saving that
no good business man can pass. Failure to join the bond-
ed warehouse system means that somebody is actually
throwing away 25 per cent. of the fire premium.
Headquarters for the Southeastern States have been es-
tablished in Atlanta, Ga., at 239 Trust Company of Geor-
gia Building, P. O. Box 1393. Interested parties may
apply for application blanks, any information or a per-
sonal visit of a government agent.
Inquiries may also be made from the Chief, Bureau of
Markets, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington,
D. C., or from the State Bureau of Markets, State Capitol,
Atlanta, Ga.

COTTON WAREHOUSE RESOLUTIONS.

The following resolutions were adopted unanimously
at the Convention of the American Cotton Association,
held in Montgomery, Ala., April 14th, 1920:
"Whereas, an investigation of the United States Ware-
house Act shows that it is extremely simple and inexpen-
sive, yet bringing to the warehouse receipt the maximum
of stability and uniformity.
"Therefore be it resolved, That in States which have no
State warehouse system, the United 'States Warehouse
Act is recomnpended as meeting their need and that for
the present it is thought best to postpone the question of
a uniform State Warehouse Act, as the constitutions of
the different States would make the enactment of a uni-
form law difficult, and further the States of North and
South Carolina have laws now in operation that may
serve as a guide for a uniform warehouse law when the
systems of these States have had the test of further actual
experience.
"It is recommended that in the States that have no'
State warehouse law, that they proceed to enact such
State legislation as will enable them to aid the Federal
Government by co-olperation in carrying out the United
States Warehouse Act.











"Where, the construction of a warehouse of space to
house 1,000 bales of cotton can be economically done with
box boards and a composition of metal roof, and the cost
of placing such house in the United States Warehouse
System of Bonded Warehouses, is $57.00 per year, includ-
'ing premium on bond.
"Be it resolved:
"That we recommend all members of this Association
give their active and energetic effort to the construction
of warehouses, where needed, for the 1920 crop, and that
each member attending this convention see that a copy
of this resolution be published in the paper of his county.
"Be it resolved:
"That each county unit of the American Cotton Asso-
ciation shall thoroughly investigate the warehouse facili-
ties of each community and where said facilities are
found to be inadequate, that they undertake to cause to
be organized a Co-operative. Bonded Warehouse, and
where the facilities prove to be sufficient, that the pro-
prietors of the warehouses in operation, shall be requested
by the County Association to put in the bonded system,
either Federal or State, and that if after a reasonable
length of time has elapsed they l ave not complied with
this request, that the County Association is to proceed, if
deemed wise, with the organization of a Co-operative
Bonded Warehouse Company."
A big increase in the number of cotton warehouses
licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture
'under the Federal Warehouse Act is reported by the Bu-
reau of Markets for the past year. A little more than
one year ago a temporary field station was established at
Atlanta, Ga., under the administration of the United
States Warehouse Act. At that time there were 8 cotton
warehouses in Georgia, 2 in Alabama, 3 in Texas, and 1 in
Mississippi licensed under the Act. There are now 137
licensed in Georgia, 37 in Alabama, 3 in Mississippi, 1 in
Louisiana, 9 in Arkansas, and 3 in Texas.
Licensing under the United States Warehouse Act is
permissive and voluntary. During the first years after
its enactment in 1916 warehouses were slow to recognize
its benefits and farmers were slow to see the value of the
standardized receipts made possible by the law, but dur-
ing the past year many warehouses of different kinds have
applied for licenses.









41

The Federal reserve banks of Atlanta and Dallas are
taking an active part in influencing warehousemen to be-
come licensed and bonded, and the Federal Farm Loan
Board has approved forms of receipts to be issued to
growers who use the warehouses. Very substantial re-
ductions in the rates of fire insurance on licensed ware-
houses have been granted by various rating bureaus, in
nmpny instances amounting to 25 per cent. from the sched-
uled rates.














FEDERAL BUREAU OF (U. S.) ESTIMATES.

SUPPI EMENTARY DATA FOR FLORIDA REPORT JUNE 1, 1921.

June 1. Quality
Crop-Year. Acreage. Yield. Production. or Condition.
IrishPotatoes-
1921 a 19,000 92 Bus. 1,748,000 Bus. 86% Quality
1920 25,000 105 Bus. 2,625,000 Bus. 87
1910 24,000 76 Bus. 1 824,000 Bus. 88
1918 35,000 100 Bus. 3,500,000 Bus. 93
Oats-
1921 a 57,000 15 Bus. 855,000 Bus. 70% Condition
1920 60,000 17 Bus. 1,020,000 Bus. 85
1919 54,000 19 Bus. 1,026,000 Bus. 76
1918 60,000 18 Bus. 1,080,000 Bus. 96.
All Hay-
1921 a 129.000 1.17 Tons 151,000 Tons 84% Condition
1920 135 000 1.13 Tons 152,000 Tons 90
1019 131,000 1.23 Tons 161,000 Tons 88
1918 114.000 1.13 Tons 130,000 Tons 91 "
(a) Preliminary Estimates for 1921.

-Per Cent. of Normal Condition on June 1.-

Florida Data.
Crop. 1921. Last Month. 1920. 1919. 1918.

Oranges ........ ............. .
Grapefruit ................... 84 89 75 89 75
Limes ....................... 82 80 84 76 75
Peaches ..................... 75 72 76 80 94
Pears ................. ...... 55 50 40 45 75
Pineapples ................... 77 78 81 80 45
Tomatoes (b) ................ 80 . 68 76 95
Watermelons ................. 80 77 78 $4 83
Cantaloupes .................. 76 73 76 80 83
Cowpens ...................... 85 80 82 87 88
Field Beans ................... 86 80 87 86 00
Pasture ...................... 84 80 91 90 88

-Preliminary Estimates and Comparisons.-

Cond. Estimated Dec. Estimate. Five Year
Crop. Acreage. June 1. Production. 1920. Average.
Bushels. Bushels. Bushels.
Winter Wheat 38,721,000 77.9 578,196,000 577,763,000 572,000.000
Spring Wheat 18,023,000 93.4 251,289 000 209,365,444 258,000,000
All Wheat. 56,744,000 82.8 829;485,000 787,128,000 831,000,000
Oats ....... 44,829,000 85.7 1,404,922,000 1 526,000,00P 1,433,000,000
Barley ...... 7,713,000 87.1 190,661,000 202,0000000 208,000,000
Bye ........ 4,544,000 90.3 70,977,000 69,300,000 69,200 000
All Hay .... 73,842,000 85.0 *85,947,000 *108,000,000 *103,000,000
Apples ................ 41.8 107,700,000 240,000,000 183,000000
Peaches .............. 45.5 31,769.000 43,700 000 46,600,000
Pasture ............. 90.1 Cond. May 1, 91.8 Cond. June 1, 88.8
*Tons.


















PART II.
CROP REPORT











DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the subdivisions of the State, and the
counties contained in each:
Western Division.


Bay,
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,

l)ixie,
Franklin,
(ladsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Lafayette,

Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Iuval,


Brevard,
Citrus,
Flagler,
Hernando,
Hillsborough,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,


Broward,
Charlotte,
Dade,
DeRoto,
Glades,
Ha rdee,
Highlands,


Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-9.

Northern Division.
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison.
Taylor,
Wakulla-11.

Northeastern Division.
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns,
Suwannee,
'nion-11.

Central Division.
Orange,
Osceola,
Pasco,
Pinellas,
Polk,
Seminole,
Sumter,
Volusia-16.
Southern Division.
Lee,
Manatee,
Monroe,
Okeechobee,
Palm Beach,
Rnrasota,
St. Lucie-14.









46

CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

Western Division: Crops in this section were seriously
damaged by drouth, which began in May and extended
until the 20th of June. As a result, corn, cotton, sugar
cane, peanuts, sweet potatoes, oats and sorghum will be
materially cut short in yield. Pastures suffered and gar-
dens were ready for second planting by the end of the
drouth.
Northern Division: The scare about the Australian
blue mold on the tobacco passed away and a good crop
would have been made but for the dry weather. However,
quite a yield will be made, and the tobacco grower will be
less affected than the grower of other staple crops of this
section. The same crops were damaged in this section
mentioned above in the Western Division. Fertilizer
was bought in the tobacco, and potato divisions more
nearly in usual amounts than in the other sections of the
State.
Northeastern Division: This section has faired better
than those immediately to the west. Nassau County has a
splendid showing, as will be seen by referring to the
tables following. Early vegetables and melons were
marketed before seriously affected by the dry weather.
Central Division: The potato acreage of the State was
some 20 per cent. short of last year, and late blight caused
considerable damage. The yield for last year was two
and a half million bushels, and for this year one and
three-quarter million bushels. The price being much less
than last year, the net profit was cut into seriously. Pine-
apples and grapes made a good showing. Polk County
had the peak year in the phosphate business in 1920, but
because of the stagnation in the fertilizer business the
mines are closed-many were thrown out of employment.
Seuthern Dviision: The fruit crop promises fair,
though dry weather has done some damage. Flowing
wells save many by irrigation. Trucking on the East
Coast was a success this spring.












47


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS,
rlitIT ANB F'LIT 1tLS FOR QUAl'lElt ENDING JUNE 30th,
I'J1 ALSO CONDITION OF LIVE SIOCK AS COMU'ARED \ITH
naklE IPElUOD FOR 1920.

I plan Sea Is:and
COUNTY. cotton Cotton Corn Sorghum

i castIrtI Dir'iCiulp. C Uoaition U ondnitiou I Condition Condition
bay ................ 0 0 .. 100 100
Hiull es .............. 4. 0 . I
Jackson ............ 75 .. b5 100
\\alton .............. 75 . 100 75
Div. Av. per cent . 70 | .. 92 92
A ortlc',rn Diviaion.
Gadsden ........ .. 80 80 .
Hamilton ............ 40 35 75
Jefferson. ............ 40 100 100
LaFayette ............ 40 40 100
Leon ................ 7 .. 75 U
'laylor ............. . 40 100 9
\ akulla ............ .. 100 UU
Div. Av. per cent ..... 51 47 87 93
Aorlheuasternl Dicisionl.
Alachua ............ I 110 115 160 100
Baker ................ 100 100 150
Ciay ................ .. 75 100 75
Columbia ............ S 0 95 105 100
Duval ............... .. 110 80
Nassau ............ 150 150 150 150
Suwannee .......... 50 I 50 85 75
I- -~ I I----------
Div. Av. per cent .... 98 98 123 | 7
Central Division.
Brevard ............ ..
Citrus .............. 110 .. 100 25
Hernando .......... .. .. 90
Lake ............... .. 100 100
Marion .............. .. .. 85
Orange .............. .. .. 110
Pasco .............. .. 90 100
Polk .................I .. .. 80
Seminole ............ .. 75 ..
Div. Av. per cent ... 110 I 91 75
Southern Division.
Dade ............... .. .. 100 .
Okeechobee .......... .. .. 100
Palm Beach .......... .... 100
St. Lucie ............. .I
I----j. e
Div. Av. per cent.... .. 100
State Av. per cent... 82 72 97 89
State AT. per cent. . | 82 | 72 97 89












48

REORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


SSugar | Japanese Sweet
COUNTY. Cuune Cane Rice Potatoes

Western Division.. I Condition CondItion Condition Condition
Bay ................ 01 0 100 100 95
Holmes ............. 00 85 00 85
Jackson ........ .. .. 100 80
Walton .......... . 100 I 0 75 100
Div. Av. per rent ..... 8 S 8 ;8 8 i00
Northern Dirisiorn.
Gadsden ..... .. ..... 100 .. I .. 100
Hamilton .......... 65 I .. 60
Jofferson ............ 100 .. .. 100
LaFayetto ......... ... 7 7
Leon .............. 8. 80 00 100(
Taylor ............. 90 90 .7 80
W naknila ............ 8 105 . 85
i---- _---
lv.. Av. per cent ... 88 87 82 88
Northeastern Dirision.
Aluchua ............. 0 9.) S5 80)
lnker ............... 125 100 100 150
('lay ............ 100 7 125
Columbia ............ 100 100 110
uval ................ 1011 00 7.5 95
Nassau .............. .. 200 150 100 150
Suwannee ........... 80 85 75 90
Iiv. Av. per cent .... I 113 100 94 112
Central Dirislon.
Brevard ............. 100 | I 100
Citrus ............ . 100 100 10Q 125
Hernando ......... 100 100 100 90
Lake .............. 100 100 96 100
Marion ............ 75 80 .. 60
Orange ............ 100 0 110
Pasco ............ 110 120 100 100
,Polk ................ 85 85 80 85
Seminole ........... .. 80 .. 90 50
Div. Av. per cent .. I 94 85 93 91
Southern Division.


Dade .. ... ........... 0l .. 90
Okeechobce .......... 80 75 90 80
Palm Beach ......... 105 100 105 100
St. Lucie ..... ..... 90 90 .. 85
Div. Av. per cent. ... 94 88 97 89

State Av. per cent... 97 89 92 93











49

ItEORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

Field Egg
COUNTY. Dasheens Pens Plants I Onions

Western Division. I condition Condition C condition C| condition
Bay ............... .. 90
Holmes ........
Jackson. . ........ 80
W altun ............. 50 80 .. 80
Dliv. Av. per cent ...I 50 85 . 80


Northern Division.
Gadsden ......... 90
Hamilton ........ . .
Jeffvrson ............ .
LaFayett .. .........
Leon ... II...
T aylor ..............I 0
W akulla ............ 94
IDiv. Av. per cent. .... i 7
Northeastern Division.
Aluchua ............ I
Baker ............... .. 1100
C liay ............... .95
Columbia ......... i 100 105. 100 95
Duval ............... 80 1010 SO 80
Nassau ............ 1 0 1011 125 150
Suwannee ............ i ..
Iliv A. per cent... 110 95 96 105
Central Diviaion.
Brevard ............ ..
Citrus ............. 9. 100
Hernando .... ......... . I
Lakr .. ...... ......... 100 : 100 92 97
Marion .............. . I 75 30 20
Orange. ............. 100 . 8
Pasco ................ 110 . 90
Polk ............... ... I 90
Seminole . .. . .. .. 90 9. .
ly v. Av. per cent. ...I 100 I 94 79 72
H,-liutern D)iri.ion.
Dade .... .......... .. I 100 100 I
Okeechobee ..... ..... 100 75
Palm Beach ......... 100 I .. 95 50
St. Lucle ............ I
I ~- I -- I 50 -
Div. Av. per cent .... 100 100 90 50
State Av. per cent. .. I 90 92 I 88 I 77
State AT. per cent.,.. 1 90 92 8-8 77


4-- **Mam











50

REORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

I Cow
COUNTY. Cassava Tobacco -Peanuts Pens

Western Division. Condition I condition Ionditon Condition
Hay ................ .. 95
Holmes ............. .. 75 100
Jackson ............. .... 100
Walton ........... .. 100 100
Div. Av. per cent. .... .. .. 92 100
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............ .. 85 100 100
HIamilton ............. .. .. 80 50
Jefferson .. .. .. 100 100
LaFayette .......... .
Leon ................ .. 80 95 90
Taylor .............. . .. 100
W akulla ... ....... ... 110
Div. Av. per cent ... . 82 98 85
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........... .. | .. 105 100
Baker .............. .. .. 125 100
(lay . ............. .. .. 90 90
Columbia .. ....... .... 90 90 105
Iuval ............... .. 100 100
assau ............... .. [ 150 100
Suwannee ............ 90 90 85
Div. Av. per cent ..... 0 90 107 97
Central Division.
Brcvard ............. .200
Citrus ................ 5 150 100
IIernando ........... .. 100 80
Lake ................ 100 .. 100 100
SMarion ............... .. 80 70
Orange ................ 100 120
Pasco ................. 100 120 10 120
Polk. ............. .. 85 8,
Seminole .............. .100 .. 60 95
Div. Av. per cent.... 99 120 111 96
Southern Division.
Dade .......... ... .. I .. .. 100
Okeechobee . . .. . . . .. 85 100
Palm Beach ..... . . . . . 100
St. Lucie ............ ... .. 75
Div. Av. per cent .... .. .. 82 91
State A. per cent. 94 97 97 93
State Av. per cent. ..I 94 97 97 93











51

REPORT 01 CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


S Hay Velvet Soy
COUNrTY. ] Pastures ( Grasses Beans Beans

l'cstern I)irinion. ( Condition I Condition | Condition | Condition
Bay .......... .... .. I 90 100
lolmes . .............. i 0 5 .
Jackson ............. I .. I 85
Walton .............. i 10 75 100 100
liv. Av. per cent .. 95 81) 91 100
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............ 100 .. 100
Ieamilton ............ I 9 9o0 80
Jefferson ............. 0 .. i 100
I.aFayette ........... . 100
Leon ................ 85H .. I 05
Taylor .............. 95 .0. 0
Wakulla ............. .. 100
Div. Av. per cent ..... 91 95 94 .
- ortheastern1 DirisioIf.


Alanc ua ............. 115 90 100
linker ............... 00 1 10
C(lay ............ . RO 8 9. 85
Columbia . . ..... ... 10 100 110
IDuval .... ........... 7. 8 100
Nassau .............. 100 100 100 100
Suwannee ............ 70 .. I 90
Iliv. Av. per cent .... 9 3 I 92 9) 92


Gcntral Division.
Citrus .............. I 100 100 75 .
IHernando . . . . . 75 75 100
Lake ................I 93 90 100 97
M arion .............. I 50 25 I 80
Orange ............... 120 100 90
Pasco . ............... 110 I 100 110
Polk ................. 80 85 90 90
Seminole ............ 1.50 . 75 |
Div. Av. per cent.....l 98 82 90 93
southernn Division.
IDade .................. 90 100
Okeechobee ........... 75 90 80
Palm Beach ............ 100 I 00 100
St. Luce .............. .. 90 90 .
l)lv. Av. per cent ..... I 88 93 92 I
te A. per cent 93 88 93 93
Stnte Av. per cent. ....[ I3 88 93 I 93















IEORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Contiued.


Holmes .............1 .
Jackson .............
Walton ...............
Div. Av. per cent .. .
Northern Divisioh.
Gadsden ............
Hamilton ............
Jeffeerson ...........
LaFayette ..... I
Leon ............. . ..
Taylor .............. ..
W akulla ........ . ..

Div. Av. per cent....
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............. .. .
Baker ............... .
Clay ................ .
Columbia ............ . ..
D uval ................ ..
Nassall ............... ..
Suwannee ........... ..
Div.'Av. per cent .... ...
Central Division.
Brevard .............. 100 100
Citrus ............. ..
Heernando . . ......
Lake ............... 100 110 100 100
M arion ..............
Orange .............. 130 150
Pasco .............. 100 150
Polk ............... 90 S5 75 70
Seminole ............ 100 125 7. 100

Div. Av. per cent. ..... 103 120 83 o9
southern Division.
Dade ................. 9.5 100 100 100
Okeechobee ........... 75 I 85 60 60
Palm Beach ........... 100 10. 100 75
St. Lude .......... 100 12) 90 100
-- --i 010
Div. Av. per cent ..... 95 103 87 84
SI --AIpc99 il 85 |87
State Av. per cent. ....I 99 111 I 85 87












53


REORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


ome ..
Jackson .......
W alton .......


Northern Division.
Gadsden .............
Hamilton ............
Jelterson ............
LaFayette ...........
Leon ...............
Taylor ..............
W akulla .............
Div. Av. per cent .... I_
Northeastern Division.
Alachua . ...........
Baker .............
Clay .. .............. .
Columbia ........... .
Duval ..............
Nassa ............ ..
Huwannee ........... I ..
Div. Av. per cent ... ..
Central Division.
Brevard .............. 100 100
(Itrus ... .......... 100 I 90
Hernando ........... 100 100
Ike ................ 100 100 98 98
Marion .............I 60 50
Orange .............. 100 100
Pasco .............
Polk ............ ... : 85 85
Seminole .... .. ..... 90 90

Div. Av. per cent. .. 92 89 98 98
Southern Division.


Dade ............ 100 1UU Jo
Okeechobee ......... 100 100
Palm Beadh ......... 100 105 105 125
St. Loce ............ 80 85 100 100
Div. Av. per cent .... 95 97 100 108
State Av. per cent. . 93 83 99 108












B54

JiEORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

I I
COUNTY. Orange Trees Lemon Trees

I Prospective | Prospective
Western Dir)iion. I Condition | Yield | Condition Yield
Bay . ................I 100 1 100 100 100
HIlmes .............. .. .
Jackson .............. .. .
W alton ............... I
Div. Av. per cent . . | 100 100 100 100
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............ .
Hamilton ...........
Jefferson . .. ........ .
LaFayette ............ .. .. ..
L eon ...............| |
'Tnylor ......... ..
W akulla ............
Div. Av. per cent .... I ..
Northeastern IDivision.
Alachu ................ ...
JiB ker ...............
Clay ............... 00 90
Columbia ........... ....
Duval ............. . 0 95.
Nassau ............ 100 100
Suwannee ........... .. .. .. ..
| -------------- I------- I-------
Div. Av. per cent . . 93 95
Central Division.
Brevard ..... ........ 90 90
Citrus .............. 100 100
IIernando .......... 100 00 |
Lake .............. 100 79 I 100 82
Marion ........... .. .. .. .
Ornnge .............. 80 80
Pasco ............... 100 100
Polk ............... 85 85.
Seminoe ............ 80 80 90 95
S I I
Div. Av. per cent ... I 92 80 95 88
Northern Division.
Dade .. ........ ... 100 100
Okeechobet* . ....... 90 90 90 90
Ialin Beach .......... 100 90 100 8 85
St. Lucie .............. 100 110
IStAI .ect.I -5---
Div. Av. per cent. .... 97 97 I 95 87
S I I
State Av. per cent. . 95 1 94 1 96 91











55

IREOIT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Lime Trees I Grapefruit Trees
SProspective [IProspective
Western Dirision. Condition Yield Condition YiellI
Bny ................-- ... 100 100
Iolmes ............ .
Jackson ............. I
W alton ............. *
Div. Av. per cent . . . I 100 100
Sirthern Division.
Gadsden ...........
I amilton ............
Jefferson ............
LaFayette .............
L eon ................. I
T aylor .. .......... .. ..
W akulla ............. . I
Div. Av. per cent .... I I I
Northeastern Division.
A lachua ............ . I I .
Baker .. .... .......
Clay .. .............. ..
Columbia ........... . .
Duval .............. I 90
Nassau ............ 100 I 100
Suwannee ...........
Div. Av. per cent. .. 93 93
Central Division.
Brevard ....... . 90 90
Citrus ............ ... 100 100
IIernando ........... . 100 100
Lake ............... .. 92) 90
Marion ............. .
Orange ................ .
Pasco ...... 100 100
Polk ................ 90 I 80
Semllone ............ 90 100 75 65
Div. Av. per cent. .... 90 100 0 87
Northern Division.


Dude ......... 90 95 10u
Okeechobee .......... 90 90 90 90
Palm Beach .......... 105 100 100 90
St. Lucie ............ ... .. 95 110
Div. Av. per cent .... 95 I 95 96 97
State Av. per cent. . 92 97 92 94














REORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELI--Continued.

I I
COUNTY. I Japanese Persimmons. Plums.

[Prospectivel Prospective
Western Division. Condition I Yield Condition Yield
Bay ................ 100 100 100 100
Holmes ............... ....
Jackson .............
W alton ..............
I)iv. Av. per cent .... 100 100 100 100


Northern Division.
Gadsden ............
Hamilton .......... ..
Jefferson ............
LaFayette ............ ..
I.eon ...............
Taylor ..............
W akulla .............
---- ---------- ---- ---
Div. Av. per cent .... .
Northeastern Division.
Alachna ............. .
Baker ................
Clay ............... 85 80 80 80
(olumbia ........... 100 100
Duval .............. 100 100 75 60
Nassau ............. 100 150 75 75
Suwannee ........... .

Div. Av. per cent ... I 96 107 76 71
U'rntral Division.
Brevard ......... ... . .
(Citrus ..............
Hernando ........... 100 I 100 .
Lake ................ 09 100 97 85
Marion .............. .
Orange ............. 50 .50
Pasco ............... 90 90 50 50
Seminole ............ 90. 80 .
I------- -1---- I -- -
Div. Av. per cent ..... 86 84 73 67
,outhsrn Division.
D)ade ........ ....... .. .
Okeechobee ....... . .I .
Palm Beach ........ .
St. Lucie .......... ... ..

Div. Av. per cent .... . .
State Av. per cent. . 94 9 7 83 79












57

REORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


lVestern D)iisioi. I
B ay ................
Holmes .............
Jackson .............
W alton .............


*U ELtnu m en ............. I
Hamilton ............. ..
Jefferson .............
LaFayette ............
Leon ................ I
Taylor ..............
Wakulla .............
Div. Av. per cent ... .. .


.. 80 80
so


. O 80

I 75 80


Northeastern Division.
Alachu ............. .. 100 90
Baker ...............
Play ............ .. 7 I 70 100 95
('olumbia .......... 90 75. 100 90
Duval ............... 7 70 ..
Nassau ............... 100 123 75 I 75
Suwannee ........... ......
Div. Av. per cent .... 85 85 94 87
Ventral Division.
Brevard .............I .. .
Citrus ................ 90 100
Hernando ............( 60 0 100 100
Lake ................. 100 85 95 90
Marion ............ I ... 60 50
Orange ............... .. 50 50
Pasco ................ 58 50
Polk ................ .
Seminole .............. .. 100 120
Div. Av. per cent .... I 80 57 85 87
southern Division.
Dade .............. .. I ..
Okeechobee .......... . .
Palm Beach ............
St. Lucie ............ .. ..
Div. Av. per cent. .. .. .
State Av. per cent. .. 64 81 83 86












58

REORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.
ICIntaloupe.
COUNTY. Watermelons. Cantaloupes.

I i1'rospectivel Prospective
Western Division. Condition Yield Condition Yield
Bay ................. 90 90 95 95
Holmes ............. . 100 I 100 100 100
Jackson ............. 75 807
W alton . . ..... .... 7 I 90 50 7
I -- -- -- I -_
Div. Av. per rent. .... 85 90 82 120
Northern Dirision.
Gadsden .... . . . ... 40 60 30 40
Hamilton ........... . 80 75
Jefferson ............. 80 100 ..
LaFayette ............ 100 90
Leon ................. 70 60 50 40
Taylor ....... ... 40 30 ..
C ]---- ---- ---- I-----
Div. Av. per cent.... O66 40 | 40
Northeastern Dirision.
Alachuai .......... 80 75 85 70
Baker ............... ..
(lay ................ 100 00 n0 85
Columbia ............. 90 85 90 80
Duval ............... 100 100 50 50
Nassan ............. 1 0 150 | 150 I 150
Suwannee ............ 1 70 73 .
)iv. Av. per cent. . I 8 6 03 87
Central Dirisioa.
Brevard ............. 80 100 ..
Citrus .............. 80 80 .
Hernando ........... .. 75 75
Lake ................ 7 70 75 0 80
Marion ............... 80 80
Orange ............... 0 60
I'aso ................. 00 | 90 .00 90
Polkl ................. 8 83 | 80 70
Seminole .............. 7 85 ..
Div. Av. per cent . 77 81 83 | 80
Southern Division.
D


ade ........... .. .. ..
Okeechobee ............. 65 75 .
Palm Beach .........
St. Lucie ............ 100 1600
Div. Av. per cent .... 82 87 ...
-Stte Av. ere cent. 81 84 74 82
Rtate Av. pere cent...I 81 1 84 74 1 82












59,

REORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY. Pineapples. I rapes.

I Prospective I Prospective
IWritern Diriion. I Condition I Yield I Condition I Yield
nay ................ I 100 100
Holmes ............. 8
Jackson .............
Wailtn ............. I 90 90
Iliv. Av. per cent..... I 90 90
centrala l Division.
Giadsden .............. . 40 50
Hamilton . ............ I
.1JfferoI n . .......... ....
laI.;I lyette ........... ..
L Ieuon ................ . .. I
T aylor .... ...... ..... .
W akulla .............
__________-,- I-----'----
liv. Av. per cent .. 40 5
oi'thrI t ern Dirisiot.
A lachni ............. i
B ak r ................ . . I
('lay .............
(olum in ............ I
val ............... 100 100
Namsau .............. 150 125
Suvannee. .......... .... 75 80
Iliv. Av. peer cent. ... .. 108 101
tlentral Dir.isin.
Brevw rd ............. I
Citrus .................. .. 10 90
IIernando ............ .. 100 100
Lake ................ 100 100
M arion .............. I 7 75
Orange .............
I'.seo .............. 90 90 1I 100
Polk .............. 75
8eminole ............ 50 5 90 110
Div. Av. peer cent ... I 70 I 70 2 93
xNuthern Division.
Dade ..................I 80 | 75 I
Okeechobee . . .. . I .
S Palm Beach ........... 100 100 .
St. Lucie ............ 80 115 ..
Dliv. Av. per cent ....I 86 96
State Av. per cent .... 78 I 83 82 83




1


60

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

Horses and
COUNTY. Mules. 1 Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.

Western Division. Condition Conditiont condition Condition
Bay .................. 100 100 100 1
Hme .... ....... 90 95 95 100
Jackson .............. 100 100 100 100
Walton ............... 100 100 75 100
Dil. Av. per cent ..... 97 98 90 100
Northern Division.
Gadsden .............. 100 100 75 100
Hamilton ............ 75 50 80
Jefferson ........... 90 80 80 ..
LaFayette ............ 75 100 100
Leon ....... ..... 100 100 95
Taylor. .:...... ....... 100 100 90
Wakulla .............I 105 100 75
Div. Av. pere cent ... I 81 90 85 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 100 135 100 |
Baker ............... 100 100 100 100
Clay ................. 100 110 90 95
Columbia ............ 100 110 105
Duval .............. 100 90 100 100
Nassau ............... 100 125 125 125
Suwannee ............ 80 75 70
I I
Div. Av. per cent .... 97 92 115 105
Central Division.
Brevard .......... 100 ..
Citrus .............. 100 80 110 100
Hernando ........... 100 100 100 100
Lake ................ 100 100 75 95
Marion ............... 90 60 80 60
Orange .......... ..... 100 100
Pasco. ............. 100 90 110
Polk ................ 100 1 100 100 100
Kemlnole .......... . 125 80 100
DiR. Av. pere cent .... 98 95 94 92
Southern Div sion.
Dade ...............I 95 I o100 1 0
80.:- .. On C 9.K T 7


Palm Beach ........... 100 100 105
St. Luce ............ 100 I 100 100
Div. Av. pere cent. .... 92 1 94 95
State Av. per cent. . 93 [ 97 I 92 90












61


RHORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIEI.D-Centnued.


COUNTY. Tobacco. Honey. Woel.

Western Division. I Pounds. Pounds. Peunda.
Holmes .............. ........... .. ,000 30,000
B ay ........................... I
Jackson ...............
Walton ......................... .. 2,500 4 ,000
DI). Av. per cent. .............. I .. 3.750 36,000
Northern Division.
Gadsden ......................... I 6,000,000 I 10,000 2.000
Hamilton ........................I I
Jefferson ............. ..........I .
LaFayette ........................ I .
I.eon ........ ............ ... . 4.000 I
T aylor ......................... I . 00
W akulla ....................... . 7,500
Div. Av. per cent. ............... 6,000 000 5,500* 2,000
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ........................ I I
aker .......................... I .. 1.000 5.000
Clay ........................... I . 1,000 2.000
Colum bia ..................... I .
I val ............................ .. 3,000
Nassau ...........................I .. I
ouwanwn e .....................I 700 18,000
Iliv. Av. per cent. .............. I 700 I 9,500 1 r5.000
(Central Division.
IBrevard ......................... i .. 20.000 I
C itrus ......... ............... . I .
IIernando ..................... . . 1..00 6.(.00
Lake ..................... ......I .. 24.000
M arion .......................... .
Orange ........................ 15.000 .
Pasco . ............. ............ 1 .200 . .
Polk .................. ..... I .. ..
S muinole ........................I I
I, ______________
Div. Av. per cent. ................ i 1.200 18.000 I 6.00
N outhern Division.
I Dde ............................I .. 40,000 |
Okeecholbee ............ .......... .. 2,5.00 I
Palm B e c; h ......................I ...
St. L ucie ....................... I .. .
Div. Av. per cent...............I 21,250
State Av. per cent. ............ . I 2.000 633 | 11,600 11.750













PART III.


FORAGE PLANTS ON FLORIDA DRAINED
SOILS
By R. E. Rose, State Chemist
USEFUL AND PROFITABLE PRODUCTION
THE ULTIMATE OBJECT OF
DRAINAGE
By C. G. Elliott
Elliott & Harman Engineering Company
Papers Read Before the Florida Drainage Asso-
ciation, Sanford, Fla., Feb. 28-29, 1916

Market Prices and State Values of Fertilizers
and Feeds.

Analyses of Foods, Drugs, Fertilizers, Stock Feed
and Oils.

Law Regulating Milk and Ice Cream

By R. E. ROSE
State Chemist












FORAGE PLANTS ON FLORIDA DRAINED
SOILS.

Puper read by R. E. IRose. tatc ('hemist, before the F'lor-
ida Drainage Association, an/ford, Florida,
February 28-29, 1916.


Gentlemen:
To those of you who are familiar with the prairies and
marshes of the St. Johns, the Kissimmee, the Peace River,
Miakka, and other river valleys, to say nothing of that
vast area known as the Everglades, with its vast sur-
rounding territory of saw grass and Maiden Cane ponds
and marshes, it is needless to say that the "Maiden ('ane"
(,f Florida (the "I'aille Fiune" of Louisiana), and other
Gulf Coast States. Panicum lIe!nitorinm is the native
grass par excellence for the drained muck ;lnds of this
and other Gulf states. Its value has long been known to
lhe Florida and Louisiana, stock men. Its scientific study
was first made for the Louisiana Agricultural Experi-
ment Station by Prof. S. 31. Tracy. Special Agent of the
U. S. Iept. of Agriculture, in April, 1914, as reported in
Bulletin No. 147, of the Louisiana Agricultural Experi-
ment Station.
This bulletin fully describes the plant, its general habi-
tat and confirms scientifically its well known feeding
value. At the request of Prof. Tracy, the Florida State
Laboratory has made a number of analyses of this grass,
samples taken from all parts of the State. from the ex-
treme northern counties to the Everglades. These analyses
show an average as follows:
Protein 10.10% ; starch and sugars (nitrogen-free ex-
tract) 43.40%, fat 2.15%.
It is unnecessary to say that such a grass growing nat-
urally in vast areas is of enormous economic value, the
protein content (the flesh former), being comparable to
many legumes.
As the grass is a native and grows naturally on the
low, partially submerged meadows of the State, and with
much greater luxuriance on our drained muck and prairie
soils, it is in my opinion, one of the most valuable pas-
.ture grasses of the State, particularly on account of its
5-Bulletin









66

protein content, to hasten the mniscular development of
.niung cattle.
While it grows naturally on low ground, it is by no
means confined to such soils, as it becomes a pest to the
orange grower on high sandy soils.
Next in order of value, some growers say, is the Ber-
muda grass. It is the equal of Blue grasA as a pasture,
l;'articularly for dairy cattle, as are its first cousins, the
St. Lucie grass and joint grass of the St. Johns and other
prairies. These three grasses are but varieties of the
same family (Cynodon Dactlyon). Bailey says of it:
"Bermuda is the best pasture of the South. Its carry-
ing capacity is perhaps greater than that of any other
pasture grass in the country."
The various Paspalums, "Carpet Grass," or "Louisiana.
Grass," as locally known, are among the best pasture
grasses. The same authority says:
"It is greatly relished by all kinds of stock alud its
habit of lying flat and rooting at the joints enables it to
bear closer cropping than any other grass. On light,
sandy soils, when this grass is closely cropped it will
drive out all others."
A grass common to our prairies, locally known as
"switch grass," grows luxuriantly and has long been
known as an excellent pasture grass, particularly in the
early Spring-January and February-when young and
tender; it grows in bunches or stools and often reaches a
height of four to six feet.. A sample of this grass, gath-
ered in January (the new growth), analyzes as follows:
Protein 13.85%; starch and sugar (nitrogen-free ex-
tract) 39.43%, fat 2.47%.
It is relished by cattle of all ages in the early spring
and summer months. Cattle thrive and grow rapidly
when feeding on this grass. The analysis explains the
reason. Evidently these grasses are all very digestible, as
shown by results.
I have mentioned bu t a few of the native grasses, grow-
ing luxuriantly particularly on low lands and with far
greater vigor when these lands are properly drained.
Another grass that will probably yield a larger tonnage
of forage, of excellent fattening quality, is the Japanese
cane, introduced and distributed by the writer when in
charge of the U. S. Sugar Experiment Station, at Runny-
mede, Florida.











This sugar cane was introduced by Commissioner Le
Duc, into Louisiana, many years ago. Specimens were
obtained from t)r. W. C. Stubbs, in 18911-95, and distrib-
uted by the. writer to Florida farmers. Perhaps no plant
will produce a larger tonnage of forage of highly sacchar-
ine content than will Japanese sugar cane. It will grow
on any land in Florida that will produce corn. It is a
perennial; rattoons each year in the northern counties
from the stubble of roots. In South Florida it is seldom
winter-killed, and affords -first class winter as well as
summer pasture. Thirty tons of fresh cane is not unus-
ual on ordinary soil, while on well drained muck soils
larger tpnnage can be, and are frequently made.
Of the recently introduced grasses, probably Para grass
(Panicum Molle) was introduced from Cuba some thirty
years ago by Capt. F. A. Hendry, of Fort Thompson, is
one of the best pasture grasses. It has spread rapidly on
the edges of the Glades and on the partly drained lands
qf the Kissimmee and St. Johns Valleys, and other sec-
tions of the State. It is a most excellent pasture and
makes excellent hay. Its analysis is as follows:
Protein 8.00%; starch and sugar (nitrogen-free ex-
tract) 45.75%, fat 1.55%.
Rhodes grass (Chloris virgata) was introduced into
America in May, 1903, by agents of the U. S. Department
of Agriculture-Messrs. Lathrop and Fairchild. It was
introduced into Florida but a few years ago. It is now
growing in considerable area on reclaimed marl prairies,
particularly on the upper St. Johns prairie at Fellsmere,
where a meadow of some forty acres has made as many as
five cuttings per annum, yielding one and one-half tons
to each cutting. It has also been introduced on the West
Coast with equal success. Prof. P. H. Rolfs, Director of
the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, says:
"Apparently no grass has been introduced in recent
years which has better promise of becoming the com-
petitor of the Timothy of the North."
"Natal Grass" (Tricholearna Rosea) was introduced
into Florida about 1890, by Prof. S. M. Tracy. It has
become well established on the higher lands of the cen-
tral peninsular, particularly in Lake County, where it is
grown in large quantities.
At the recent exposition in Tampa and also in Orlando,
it attracted much attention. It is the equal of Timothy











in feeding value. It has not been grown on low lands,
though on well drained low lands it should be success-
fully produced. For the higher lands of the State it is
eminently adapted, as shown by experience. 'It analyses
as follows:
Protein 7.45%; starch and sugar (nitrogen-free- ex-
tract) 39.23%; fat 1.80%. All livestock relish it both as
pasture grass and as hay. It has been known to yield
three cuttings of hay, averaging two tons per acre per
annum. It is as readily cured as Timothy.
These are a few of the most common and abundant
pasture and hay grasses adapted to, and now growing in
Florida, particularly on the drained, or partly -drained
prairies and marshes of the State.
S Among the legumes we find first, the "Cow Pea," which
it is not necessary to describe. It grows well on all soils
in the cotton belt, and makes a hay similar to clover;
being a legume, it enriches the soil and builds up its
fertility.
The "Velvet Bean" is the most generally planted legume
in South Florida. It produces an immense crop of cattle
and hog feed. The general practice is to use it as a
winter pasture, self-cured after frost, the vines, leaves
and beans being harvested by the live stock. It is cue of
the best legumes for building up a soil.
The "Beggar Weed" (Desmodium Leguminosa), Flor-
ida clover. This is a native legume found in all parts
of the State. When once established it will continue for
years to re-seed itself. H. H. Hume says of this plant:
"As a hay crop it succeeds best on land containing a
considerable amount of moisture. On high dry land it
may also be grown, but the yield is not so heavy as on
th lower lands. When once established but little care
is needed to secure a crop from year to year. It re-seeds
itself without fail, and will continue to occupy a piece of
ground unless destroyed by cultivation, or close cutting,
whereby seed development is prevented. Beggar Weed
fits well into the rotation with farm crops. In corn
lands, it may be allowed to grow after the corn is laid
by, the early cultivation of the corn crop interfering in
no way with the after crop of beggar weed."
This legume is largely used as a cover crop, in orange
groves, particularly in DeSoto County. It adds an im-
mense amount of humus, and the consequent nitrogen
necessary to the orange grove, thus greatly economizing











in the cost of fertilizing. It may be either pastured off,
or made into hay. The hay analyzes as follows:
Protein 21.70% ; starch and sugar (nitrogen-free ex-
tract) 30.20c ; fat 2.30%; showing the greatest food
value of any leguminous hay known. Livestock of all
kinds are exceedingly fund of beggar weed, both green
and as a hay, preferring it to any other forage or feed.
A recently introduced legume is known as "Japanese
Kudzu," a perennial legume, which promises to become
of value. It grows luxuriantly; being a perennial, it is
among the first in the Spring to afford a pasture. It
grows from a tuberous root, taking root at each joint of
the vine, similar to sweet potatoes in this habit. It
produces large crops of forage and hay and can be cut
at any season. Fields, known to the writer, have entirely
covered the ground, destroying all other grasses or weeds,
from which three, and sometimes four, cuttings of excel-
lent hay have been taken in one season. The hay is
similar to cow peas or velvet bean hay, and analyzes as
follows:
Protein 17.43,%; starch and sugar (nitrogen-free ex-
tract) 30.20%; fat 1.67%.
These, gentlemen, are but a few of the native and im-
ported grasses grown in Florida, firmly established and
well known to most of our stockmen. There are many
others. Lespedeza, Burr and Crimson clover, are becom-
ing naturalized in the State.
It is not necessary to say that Rice on our low lands
is one of the best grain and hay crops, while "Crab
Grass" follows each crop of corn and makes a hay in
every respect equal to Timothy, if cut at the proper sea-
son and well cured.
With this list of grasses and legumes, no State in the
Union should have better pastures and meadows. What
with her superb climate, abundant sunshine, well watered
soil, with lakes and rivers, with a 60-inch rain fall well
distributed, with but few,weeks winter in the northern
counties, and practically no winter in the southern part
of the State, where pastures are practically perennial, the
time is but short when Florida will become one of the
greatest livestock States in the Union, when her vast
areas of wet lands, her prairies and marshes, her low
hammocks and jungles are drained, her greatest wealth
will be in her livestock. While her farms and fields, her
groves and truck farms, will increase in fertility and pro-










I I
ductiveness in direct proportion to the increase of her
dairy and livestock industries.
When the "manure pile" and "compost heap" replace
the commercial fertilizer bag and the fertility and pro-
ductiveness of her soil is enriched by the cow, the sheep
and the hog, grown on,her meadows and pastures, return-
ing to the soil the much needed lumus, enriched by the
nitrogen from the atmosphere, secured by her legumes,
the most practical and economical means of fertilizing
her farms, Florida will become the leading livestock pro-
ducer, with the most productive farms, producing staple
crops of corn, tobacco, rice and sugar, to say nothing of
winter vegetables and orange groves.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.












USEFUL AND PROFITABLE PRODUCTION
TiHE ULTIMATE OBJECT OF
DRAINAGE

By C. G. ELLIOTT,
Elliott & Harnma Engineering Company.



This subject is so simple and fundamental that the
general truth of the statement will be admitted by those
who have given careful thought to reclamation matters.
I should regard it as axiomatic to mention on this occa-
sion were not its importance frequently overlooked by
those lwho promote large development projects, particu-
larly those who are outside the jurisdiction of State
drainage laws.
To be more explicit, the details of the undertaking,
from the time the land is first examined with reference to
the possibility of its drainage until it is prepared for the
plow and for growing useful crops, are too frequently not
anticipated and worked out in advance. The fact is lost
sight of that the man who finally comes into possession
of reclaimed land must pay the entire cost of reclamation
and improvement which has accumulated against the land
since the first active move for its drainage was made.
The requirements of the man who is expected to earn a
living for himself and family from the land and become
a valuable member of the commonwealth, are lost sight
of by many promoters of reclamation. Until the land
produces useful and marketable crops no wealth is added
to the individual nor to the commonwealth. Its recla-
mation is an expense with no corresponding income until
the land begins to produce crops in sufficient quantity to
pay the interest on the cost of reclamation and finally
the entire amount that has been expended.
It is, then, of first business importance that every
factor having a bearing on the profitable utilization of
the land should be considered at every step. The view
of the man at the end of the line with his home upon the
land and with such surroundings as will make him a
prosperous and contented citizen should be prominent,
and clear to every promoter, engineer and financier
actively connected with the reclamation and development











of land. Projects have collapsed and others are now
languishing for want of support, because the man at the
end of the line, the man who is to bring out of the soil
the funds wherewith to pay the costs, has been lost sight
of or ignored.
There are difficulties to be met and no end of hard work
.required in making wild and waste land into farms and
prosperous communities. The exploitation of the won-
derful possibilities by promoters and professional boost-
ers only covers up and minimizes the physical and busi-
ness difficulties that must be met by those who are trying
to bring about the ultimate object of reclamation. When
facts that have a direct bearing upon the undertaking,
such as value of the'soil, cost of work, time required in
fitting the land for profitable production, together with
the economic problems connected with it, are pointed out
by any one of experience,-he is at once set upon as a
knocker of progress and enterprise and pointed out as
an undesirable citizen. The engineer cannot afford to
ignore facts nor shut his eyes to difficulties, for it is only
when things which are unfavorable are anticipated and
pointed out that the engineer or the company that pro-
poses to carry the work to a successful termination can
meet and overcome adverse conditions. It is a deplor-
able fact that so-called promoters of development enter-
prises sometimes seek and obtain legal and engineering
talent which entirely loses sight of the welfare of the
ultimate occupier of the land. He is the one who will
demonstrate and determine the intrinsic and lasting
value of the undertaking.
Enterprises inaugurated for the reclamation and de-
velopment of arid lands afford examples of such short-
sighted methods.
About three years ag6. a cry was voiced by the public
press, particularly in technical journals, "What is the
matter with irrigation?" It developed that the man
at the end of the line-that is, the man on the land in
many of the government projects-was not making good.
Various explanations were offered by the professionals.
The settler had started with too little capital and had
not anticipated the amount of labor that was required
to fit his land for producing crops; the market was dis-
appointing. He was not much of a farmer, anyway, and
ought not to have undertaken the job, so argued the land
critics. The administrators of the Government Reclama-










tion Service had worked on the theory that if water were
successfully brought to the land, anybody could irrigate
and cultivate it successfully.
A publicity bureau proclaimed far and wide in highly
colored and glowing terms the possibilities or irrigated
farming. Mention of the inevitable pioneering difficul-
ties which the settler would encounter, and with which
he must wrestle, were avoided. The interests of the set-
tler were not safeguarded, and he found himself unable
to pay the price of his land in ten years without interest,
as was provided in his contract, so Congress has extended
the time of payment to twenty years, and still discon-
tented and disappointed settlers are clamoring for relief.
Private irrigation developments have been promoted
and managed in such a way that irrigation bonds are
discredited among legitimate dealers. Nor is this to be
wondered at when we consider the methods that have
been employed to finance projects without merit. No
consideration whatever has been given the man who in
the end must utilize the land if ever the cost of the work
is to be paid. Irresponsible engineers have been persist-
ently sought by promoters who would ignore or distort
the facts upon which the success and value of the pro-
posed investments rest. Is it strange that settlers are
impoverished or that the scheme collapses?
But there is another thing the matter with irrigation
which develops in a natural manner and is a growing
menace to irrigated agriculture, and that is the over-
saturating and swamping of land which is irrigated.
In a paper presented at the last Pan-American Scien-
tific Congress by the former Director of the United States
Reclamation Service, it was estimated that 20 or 25 per
cent of Western land under irrigation needs draining.
While this is but an estimate, the accuracy of which is
difficult to establish, I know from personal observation
that in some localities fully 50 per cent of the land which
was formerly productive is practically useless because of
over-wetness and its train of evils.
The United States Census of 1910 reported that 13,-
738,000 acres were under irrigation, representing an ex-
penditure of $307,000,000 ($22.53 per acre) for the works
which were required to bring the water from the streams
to the land.
At this time fully 15,000,000 acres of arid land are
under irrigation. Such land has been reclaimed at a high











Cost, and as a general proposition no land is possessed of
such intrinsic fertility. Yet there is no greater menace
to irrigated agriculture than the seeping and swamping
of these otherwise valuable lands. The time has come
when settlers on the irrigated lands must deal with facts
as they exist.
Oratorical dessertations and highly colored pictures of
prosperous and well developed sections will not offset the
losses, discouragements and desperate condition, of occu-
piers of land which has deteriorated from a state of pros-
perous beauty to one of erratic production interspersed
with barren flats. We hear but little of this menace, for
it is an undesirable feature to exploit. The necessity of
draining irrigated land is an unlooked-for hardship and
expense.
The possibility of such a contingency was tabooed by
authorities on irrigation, and particularly by promoters
and boosters. The slogan was "Anything to get the man
on the land," not the assumption that if he did not make
good the fault was his. I recall the instance of a man in
a newly irrigated section who, at a meeting held by
farmers for the discussion of topics of mutual interest,
contended that some of his land was getting wet and
suggested that they all might soon be obliged to give
attention to drainage as well as to irrigation. He was
hooted at and consigned to the realm of "knockers." In
less than five years some of the finest lands in that local-
ity were ruined by wet and alkali.
The teachers of irrigation, wedded to the notion that
arid lants need irrigation only, persistently teach that
the trouble is caused by-the use of too much water. They
say that the man upon the land does not know how to
irrigate his fields properly.
They teach that judicious irrigation will obviate the'
need of drainage. Probably no greater fallacy is pro-
mulgated than this. The cry has been, "Use less water,"
and less water has been used with profit; nevertheless, the
acreage of wet and abandoned lands in the irrigated sec-
tions has constantly increased.
A few examples showing the insidious inroad of over-
saturation into attractive and fertile irrigated farming
sections will serve to substantiate the statement. One of
the more recent government irrigation projects in Idaho,
called the Minidoka Project, contains 64,000 acres. In
1913, seven years after the district was opened up, it was











reported upon good authority that 16,000 acres of the
entire area needed draining and that 5,500 acres of that
area could not be cultivated and were useless.
In 1903, the Yakima Valley, in the State of Washing-
ton, where all agriculture is by irrigation, had but little
seeped land. In 1914, not less than fourteen drainage
districts had been incorporated in that valley for the pur-
pose of draining seeped and alkali lands.
When the United States Reclamation Service made
surveys of the Yakima Indian Reservation, in the same
valley, for the purpose of extending irrigation to other
arid lands, it was reported that 40,000 acres of land al-
ready irrigated was unproductive and needed draining.
Instead of constructing works for irrigating more land,
the government proceeded to drain that already irrigated
and has successfully restored it to production. Large
drainage contracts have been recently let at Roswell, New
Mexico, for draining lands in the Pecos Valley.
I have touched upon these points, not so much to show
the necessity and importance of, drainage in irrigated
agriculture, great as that may be, but to call attention
to the fact that if the conditions of reclaiming lands are
such that the settlers who occupy them can work them
profitably, make good money, good homes and good citi-
zens, the value and stability of such projects are assured.
Nothing more seriously handicaps substantial progress
along new industrial developments than the persistent
ignoring of facts that have a direct bearing upon the
proposition under consideration. They must be met
sooner or later, and if they represent difficulties, means
must -be taken to overcome them.
There are not a few points to be investigated before
undertaking land reclamation. Here, aghin, the inter-
ests of the man who is to finally occupy the land are
often ignored. Swamp lands must not only be drained,
but it must be productive under ordinary management
after it is drained. Perhaps we should go a step farther
and contend that it should be attractive to settlers or
colonists by reason of its intrinsic value.
The teaching of many promoters of reclamation pro-
jects, and of engineers as well, is that all swamps, if
drained, will be highly productive of useful crops under
ordinary management. This is a fallacy and ought to
be recognized as such.
It would seem that with all of our Federal and State










investigational bureaus some assistance might be ren-
dered along this line. Original initiative investigational
work is needed with reference to the value of swamp
lands of the South, and particularly of this State. It
is a subject that has been studiously avoided by both
Federal and State Departments of Agriculture. The
writer knows of no efforts or experiments made by the
Agricultural Department of the State to determine the
value of these lands or advice regarding their treatment.
The Federal Soil Survey usually describes certain wet,
undeveloped areas, as swamp, but ventures no further
information.
When an investigation of the possibilities of the swamp
lands was greatly needed on the East Coast, the Federal
Department of Agriculture, with an experiment station
at Miami, declined to offer a single suggestion relating to
the problems that were under consideration. Further-
more, when most needed, the larger part of the station
was transferred to Brownsville, Texas, where it remained
until the Rio Grande Valley developed some acute and
interesting soil problems by reason of the rise of salt and
alkali on irrigated land. Instead of co-operating with
the farmers in meeting these new and unlooked-for diffi-
culties, the station was abandoned.
It requires nerve, initiative and pioneer work to handle
these problems.
The Experiment Stations of our country. are loaded
with undigested data representing measurements, exam-
inations, analyses and facts which have no value to the
State or county because no deductions have been made,
from them, or useful lesson drawn, nor conclusion
reached.
Some practical sub-stations should be established in
representative localities in this State for intelligent and
sensible experiments on drained lands. There should be
cordial co-operation' between land owners and the station
authorities. Neither should ignore nor suppress the facts
that may be developed. It is time that political and per-
sonal preferment and department jealousies be put aside
and all future work be conducted for the purpose of se-
curing and disseminating information that will be useful
to those who are grappling with land reclamation prob-
lems, not forgetting the cultivator of the soil, who in the
end must pay for all.
C. G. ELLIOTT.












STATE FERTILIZER VALUATIONS.


i.Bu8cl on (Comn crcial ua.lues, January 1, 1921.)

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season 1921:

Available Phosphoric Acid............. $ .021// a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............ .01 a pound
Aniniollina (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .25 a pound
PoIt;is ( as actual potash, K,0C) ........ ..15 a pound
If ru.lcliulatcd b. n i .is:
Available I'lIsihoric Acid ............ 1.50 per unit
Insoiulile Pl'iNsphol i i Acid ............ .41 per unit
A\nmonia oril its eq(liv\alein in niiirogen) 5.(11 er unit
Potash ............................... .. Il. per unit
Witli o uniform allowance of s.!.S0l per ton f'or mixing
and ha'.i iig.
A unit is \\wiity Ipounds, or 1 per cent. of toll. We
tinil llhis to be lhe easiest and quickest method of cal-
ulbitinii lie \ale1 of fertilizer. o illustrate ihis. take
'(,o example. ii fertilizer whicli analyzes as follows:
Available PhIosphoric Acid...li.22 per cent.x 1.i-s !l.::
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid... 1.50 per cent.x .411 .11)
Anmmonia ................. :.42 per cent.x 5.011- 17.111
Potash .................... .*.23 per cent.x 3.00- 9.!)
Mixing and bagging........ .................... 3.50

Commercial value at seaports.................. $40.22
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid... S per cent.x $1.50-$12.00
Ammonia ................... 2 per cent.x 5.00- 10.00
Potash ..................... 2 per cent.x 3.00- 6.00
Mixing and bagging ............................ 3.50

commercial l value at seaports ................. $31.50

The valuations and market prices in preecding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.









78

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JULY 1, 1921.


MATERIAL.



Dissolved bone black......
High grade acid phosphate.
High grade acid phosphate.
Low grade acid phosphate.
Hardwood ashes ..........
Hardwood ashes .. -......
Hardwood ashes ..........
Nebraska potash ..........
Muriate of potash ........
Sulphate of potash ........
Sulphate of potash ........
Sulphate of potash ........
Double manure salt ......


Manure salt ..............
K ainit ...................
K ainit ..................
K ainit ...................
K ainit ..................
Nitrate of potash .........


COMPOSITION.


-. N P 4


116
17
16
14





. .


....




2
3
1.5,
27
50
48
50
52
26


... 20
.... 15
.... 14
.... 13
.... 12
.. 15


. .. $ 30.00
... 25.00
24.00
23.00
.... 30.00
32.00
... 28.00
.. 00.00
.. 86.00
.. 144.00
.... 147.00
.... 150.00
90.00
.. 50.00
.. 32.00
.... 30.00
.... 28.00
26.00
18 105.0'0


j.



r


i











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERITILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JULY 1, 1921.-(Continued).

COMPOSITION.

MATERIAL. T

5 t

Shrimp scrap ............. 4 .... 1 7 55.00
Cotton seed meal.......... 2.5 .... 1.5 7 38.00
Sheep manure ............ 1.5 .... 3 2 35.00
Goat manure .............. ....... 3 1.5 35.00
Ground Tobacco stems .... .... .... 9 2.5 50.00
Ground Tobacco stems ......... 8 3 48.00.
Ground Tobacco stems .... .......7 2.5 44.0
Ground Tobacco stems .... .... .... 6.5 2.51 40.00
Baled tobacco stems .... ... 4.5 2.5 42.00
Tobacco dust ................ .... 2 2 40.00
Steamed bone meal ........ 8 116 .... 3 54.00
Steamed bone meal ....... 8 14 .... 3 52.00
Raw bone meal ........... 5 U16 .... 4.5 55.00
Low grade tankage ........ 4 8 .... 6.5 44.00
Medium grade tankage .... 4 8 .... 8 48.00
High grade tankage ...... 3 3 .... 10 54.00
Dried blood .............. .... ...... 16 80.00
Nitrate of soda ................ .... . 18 68.00
Sulphate of ammonia ...... .... ..... 25 85.00
I I









80

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS, .
JULY 1, 1921.-(Continued).

COMPOSITION.

MATERIAL. Y

a

Castor meal .............. .... ... ..... 6 44.0
Castor meal .............. . .... . 48.00
Fish scrap .............. .. .... 9 00.00
I I
Fisi scrap ................ .... . .....11 00
Fish scrap ............... ....... 1: 71.01

Terms: 30 days's net, or 5% discount for cash in 10
days. The charges by reputable manufacturers for mix
ing and bagging any special or regular formula are $3.50
per ton in excess of above prices.












NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
JULY 1, 1921, FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMMONIATES.


Ammonia sulphate, bulk, f. o. b. works..
..................... per 100 lbs.
double bags, f. a. s., New York.. 100 lbs.
Blood, dried, 16@17 per cent. ammonia,
f. o. b. New York .............unit
Cottonseed meal, 7 per cent. ammonia,
f. o. b. m ill .................... ton
Fish scrap, dried, 11 per cent. ammonia
and 15 per cent. bone phosphate, f. o.
b. factories .................. unit
ground, 11@12 per cent. ammonia, 15
per cent. bone phosphate, f. o. b. Bal-
tim ore ....................... unit
wet. acidulated. (i per cent. ammonia, 3
per cent. phosphoric acid, f. o. b. fish
factories .................... u it
Hoof meal, f. o. b. Chicago ........... .unit
Soda, nitrate. spot. .......... .. .100 ls.
futures .....................1(100 lbs.
Tankage. ground or screened. New York.
............... .unit
11 and 15 per cent.. Chicago .... unit
0 and 20 per cent., Chicago.......unit
concentro lel. 1 lo 1 .1 per cent. ('hi-
cago ......................... unit
blood. Chicago .................unit
garbage, Chicago ................ ton
unground. New York............. uniT


2.00 @
2.25 @

3.00 @

27.50 @


3.00 &


3.50 &


2.25
2.50


Nominal
1.75 @ 2.10
2.50 a, 2.55
2.60 @ -

2.35 & 10
2.00 & 10
2.00 & 10


1.75
3.00
5.00
2.20


n--Bulleti











PHOSPHATIB.


Acid, phosphate, basis 16%, bulk......
..........................per ton. 11.50 @ -
Southern ports ..................... 11.00 @ 10.50
Bones, rough, hard, f. o. b. Chicago..... 26.00 @ 27.00
soft, steamed, unground, f. o. b. Chi-
cago ........................... 16.00 @ 18.00
ground, steamed, 11/4 p. c. ammonia
and 60 p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b.
Chicago ........................ 22.00 @ 25.00
do., 3 and 50 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago.... 25.00 @ 26.00
Raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and 50
p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. Chicago. 30.00 @ 32.00
bone meal, f. o. b. New York........ 30.00 @ 35.00
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
1p. c., f. o. b. mines ................. 5.00 @ 6.00
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 75
p. c., f. o. b. mines................. 8.00 @ 9.00
Florida land, pebble phosphate rock, 77
p. c., f. o. b. mines................. 10.50 @ 11.00
Florida high-grade phosphate hard rock,
77 p. c., f. o. b. mines........ per ton 11.50 @ 12.00
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c.....
.... .................... .per ton Nominal
75 p. c. ................... ....... 8.00 -
70 p. c. ground ...................... 7.50 @ -
unground ....................... 6.50 @ -

POTASHES.

First sorts .....................per lb. 10 @ 11
Kainit, actual weight..........per unit 65 @ 70
Manure salt.................. per unit 65 @ 70
Muriate, 80@85 per cent., K. C. L., bags.
.........................per unit 90 @ 95
90@95 per cent., basis bO per cent.,
bags ................- ....per unit 1.35 @
98 per cent., basis 80 per cent., bags..
........................ per unit 1.70 @
Nebraska fertilizer, in paper-lined cars,
f. o. b. works............. per unit Nominal
Sulphate, 90@95 per cent., basis 90 per
cent., bags................ per unit 1.45 -











STATE VALUES.


It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The -State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or de-
cline.

They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.

The question is frequently asked. "What is Smith's
Fruit iand Vine worth per ton Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis. the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash mayl be determined
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
materials to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well-known materials of tie best quality.

State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on bad
hills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collections.
The "State value" is simply that price at which the va-
rious ingredients necessary to use in compounding a fer-
tilizer or feed can be purclias.lr for rash in lon lots at
Florida seaports.

These price lists published in this Bulletin, with the
'"Siate values," are nominal.











COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED STUFF
FOR 1921.

For the season 1921 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotations January 1st.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

$2.00 per sack of 100 lbs., $1.12 per bul., 5( lbs.

To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.

A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.

,Protein, 5e per pound. ................ .. .... S.) per unit
Starch and sugar, 2c per pound .......... .40 per unit
Fat, 5c per pound....................... 1.00 per unit

Ex.Aii.i: No. 1:

Corn and Oats, Equal Parts:

Protein .......................... 11.15. x1.00, .$11.15
Starch and sugar.................. (i4.ix .40. 25.8 i
Fat ............................ .20x1 .00, .2

State value, per ton ................ $42.21

EXA.MPLM No. 2:

Corfn:

Protein ......................... 10.50x1.00. $10.50
Starch and sugar .... ......... .. 69.60x .40, 27.84
Fat ............................. 5.40x1.00, 5.40


State value, per ton ...............


$43.74









85

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.


NAME OF FEED.



Maiden Cane Vay .....

Natal Grass Hay ......

Para Grass Hay.......

Rhodes Grass Hay....

Beggarweed Hay .....

Kudzu Vine Hay......

Cow Pea Hay.........

Velvet Bean Hay......

Velvet Beans ........

Velvet Bean Hulls.....

Velvet Beans and Hullsl

Cow Peas ............

ISoy Bean Meal.......

Cotton eed ..........

Cotton Seed Hulls.....

Bright Cotton S'd Meal

Dark Cotton Reed Meal!


28.60

36.70

31.201

41.10

24.30

32.301

20.50

29.70

7.00

27.00

10.70

4.10

4.50

23.20

44.40

9.40

20.001


a f
il

PI 1^d -
4 & t-
0. 4; J


11.60

7.40

8.00o

7.70

21.60

15.90

13.00

14.70

21.00

7.50

19.40

20.80

48.401

18.40

4.00

38.62

23.151


42.40

39.20

45.Z0i

36.80

35.10

33.00

45.90

41.00

53.10

44.60

50.60

55.701

27.50

24.70

36.60

28.60

37.101


2.60



1.601

1.30

4.10

1.60

4.20

1.70

5.40

1.60

4150

1.40

6.40

19.90

2.00

7.80


4.20

5.00

6.20

6.60

4.00

6.80

7.50

5.70

3.60

4.30

3.50

3.20

4.40

3.50

2.60

5.80


5.501 5.00











AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA
STUFFS.-Continued.


NAME OF FEED.



Corn Grain .......... 2.10

Corn Meal ........... 1.90

Hominy Feed .......... 4.00

Corn and Cob Meal.... 5.80

Ground Corn Shucks.. *30.20

Ground Corn Cobs.... I 30.00

Oats (grain) ......... 9.50

Rice (grain) ......... 0.20

Rice Bran ........ .... 9.50

Wheat Bran ......... 9.00

WTheat Middlings ..... 5.40

Peanut Kernel ....... 2.60
Peanut Meal (with- I
out Hulls) ........ .. 5.10
Peanut Feed (includ-
ing Hulls) ...... 23.401

Peanut Hulls ........ 56.601

Peanut Vine Meal..... 29.60

Dry Jap Sugar Cane.. 26.201


M)



g p. +_3
- m i


* (~ c +4


10.50

9.70

10.50

7.50

2.80

3.00

11.80

7.40

12.10

15.40

15.401

26.401

47.60

28.40

7.301

9.90

2.30


69.60

68.70

65.30

70.80

54.60

56.60

59.70

79.20

49.90

53.90

59.401

17.501

23.70

27.00

18.90

38.40

62.60


5.40

3.80

7.80

3.10

0.60

0.70

5.00

0.40

8.80

4.00

4.10

44.90

8.00

11.00

2.601

6.30

1.50


FEEDING


1.40

2.60

1.20

1.90

1.60

3.00

0.40

10.00

5.80

3.20

2.20

4.90

5.50

5.50

6.60

2.80











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.


To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by ............. 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by.............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139.
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 1).081
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by.. 2.33
For instance, you buy 95 per cent. nitrate of soda, and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by '0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiva-
lent to. then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214, and you
get 18.99 per cent. the equivalent in ammonia.
Or. to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (KgO), multiply 90 by 0.681. equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K20).

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.
Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the re-
spective laws, including rules and regulations and stan-
dards, by applying to the Comissioner of Agriculture,
or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly Bulletin
of the State Department of Agriculture should also be
made to the Commissioner of Agriculture, or State Chem-
ist. The bulletins of the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station can be had by application to the Director,
at Gainesville.
The form of letter for transmitting special samples of
fertilizers or feeding stuffs as shown in the rules and reg-
ulations is adopted and must be explicitly complied with
in order to obtain a legal certificate of analysis.













COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred
Total
Ammonia Phosphoric Potash
Acid
Nitrate of Soda......... 17 to 19 ......... .........
Sulphate of Ammonia... 21 to 26 .......................
Dried Blood ............ 12 to 17 .......................
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1 to 4 ............
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap........ 6 to 11 3 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal........ 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13 to 17 1 to 2 1 to 2

PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred

Ammonia Available Insoluble
Phos. Acid Phos. Acid
Florida Pebble Phosphate ............ ............ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ........... .............. 30 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 3
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to S 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 1 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3

POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
Pounds Per Hundred

Actual Am'onia Phos. Lime
Potash Apid
Muriate of Potash ...... 50 to 62 ......... ..............
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 ........ .................
Carbonate of Potash ....] 55 to 60 ......... ................
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 .................
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag.] 25 to 30 ......... ......... ........
Kainit ............... 12 to 13 ......... .................
Sylvinit ................ 16 to 20 ......... .................
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8.........1 1 to 2 ........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 ......... 1 to'1% 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 3 to 91 2 to 4 ......... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.50 0.30 0.30
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.50 0.60 0.25 0.30
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.60 1.00 0.35 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.50 0.75 0.50 0.70










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
SPECIAL-FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. GORDON HART, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. ) FOR WHOM SENT.

!4 1 .
.. g. 5 <
F IA


Complete Fertilizer, Sample A.. 5546 11.05 7.70

Complete Fertilizer .......... 5547 8.65 11.83

Fertilizer ..................... 5548 10.35 7.80

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5549 11.621 7.651

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5550 12.02 6.75

Fish Scrap No. 2 ............... 5551 10.42 11.25

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5552 11.12 6.20

Fertilizer (Sample No. 2-M).... 5553 10.12 5.39


2.05 9.75 4.80 1.78 Standard Growers Exchange

1.52 13.35 3.00 5.16 G. L. Huxtable, Orlando.

1.251 9.05 4.80; 1.18 Palmer Turst, Sarasota.

1.701 9.35 5.15 3.50 P. Robinson, White City.

1.40 8.15 4.80 6.24 F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

1.95 13.20 9.82 ..... Henry Witte, Sanford.

0.80 7.001 4.82! 5.641Henry Witte, Sanford.

5.16 10.55 4.95| 3.74|Mrs. I. M. Starke, Beresford.


, Orfando.










Fertilizer (Sample No. 1-A).... 5554

Fertilizer ................ 5555

Fertilizer ..................... 5556

Complete Fertilizer ............ 5557

Complete Fertilizer ............ 5558

Commercial Fertilizer .........5559

Mixed Fertilizer .............. .5560

Complete Fertilizer ............15561

Fertilizer ..................... 5562

Fertilizer .................... 5563

Goat Manure .................. 5564

Fertilizer ..................... 5565

Nitrate of Soda................ 5566

Fertilizer. ..................... 5567

Fertilizer ..................... 5568

Aciald Phosphate ............... 5569


8.84

12.65

11.65

7.50

7.08

9.95

9.13

11.03

10.15

7.65

1.50

5.58



18.75



18.43


6,9215.76 6.25 0.44 Mrs. I. M. Starke, Beresford.

1.75 14.40 5.63 5.52 The Citra Fruit Co., Ft. Myers.

2.00113.65 5.35 U6.16 The Orange River Fruit Co., Ft. Myers

4.50 12.00 4.44 3.04 M. L. Floyd, Quincy.

8.17 15.25 4.37 2.76 M. L. Floyd, Quincy.

0.85 10.80 3.25 5.04 E. S. Larkin, Dade City.

1.021 9.15 4.00 4.74 W. T. Kemp, Quay.

1.37 12.40 5.00 5.36 Andy Johnson, Orlando.

1.70 11.85 4.60 5.56 P. B. Armstrong, Terra Ceia.

3.15 13.80 2.90 4.28 The Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto.
9
0.101 1.60 1.76 3.80 H. T. Lane, Lily.

1.02 6.60 3.80 4.70 J. E. Fugate, Alachua.

.... ..... 18.90 ..... W. R. Haygood, Oxford.

0.35119.10 ..... .... G. M. Sims, Madison.

. .... .. 19.86 G. M. Sims, Madison.

0.07 18.50 ........ B. L. McKeithen, Vernon.


.




I


SPECIAL FERTILIZE?; ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.


Phospheric Acd


NAME, OR BRAND. S FOR WHOM SENT.
a a a .
U

13 _ _ _ _


Fish Scraps .................... 5570 9.15 9.70

Mixed Fertilizer Ne. 2......... 5571 9.87 8.97

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1......... 5572 6.55 5.68

Mixed Fertilizer No. 3......... 5573 15.87 6.45

Fertilizer ....... .............. 5574 8.35 9.75

Fertilizer ..................... 5575 11.10 9.05

Fertilizer ..................... 5576 11.57 9.05

Crab Scrap ................... 5577 ..... 1.77

Fertilizer ..................... 5578 14.05 10.50

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5579 0.75 0.30
I


12.00

10.62

6.85

7.65

10.25

9.95

10.10

1.87

11.10

1.05


4.94

5.00

5.70

11.02

2.54

2.72

0.50

2.00

1.28


Frank Meisch, Sanford.

F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

F. F. Dutton, Sanford.

Astca Investment Co., Tavares.

H. A. Wilkerson, DeFuniak Springs.

F. E. Wilkerson, DeFuniak Springs.

W. S. Smith, Palmetto.

J. C. Smith, DeFunlak Springs.

0. O. Helseth, Vero.










Special Mixture No. 383 ........ 155801 6.72 8.40

Fruit and Vine................. j55811. .451 7.477

Fertilizer No. 583............... 5582 1:3.9)5 9.07

Fertilizer No. 483.............. 5583 9.00 ;.l13

Orange Tree Manurv........... 5584[ 7.12 9.45

Fertilizer ..................... 5585 !.40o 7.07

Complete Fertilizer ........... 5586 i11.57 8.30

Fertilizer ..................... 5587 1 1. 05 8. 6

Fertilizer ..................... .. 5588 9.0; 10.i65

Fertilizer ..................... 5589 15.95 11 .75

Fertilizer ..................... 55!0 6.8O 7.90

Fertilizer ..................... 5591 7.62 12.( 1 1

Fertilizer, Sample No. 2........ 15592 8.57 10.35

Fertilizer, Sample No. I......... 55931 8.42 10.60

Fertilizer, Sample No. 3........ 55941 8.00 10.50

Fertilizer, Sample'No. 4....... .5595 00 10.10


0.35 8.75

0.87 ,8.32

11.80 9.87

0.77 9.0|

1.70111.15

1). 6 7. 67

l.1O 9I. 10

5.65(14.30

0.25 10.90

0.80) 12.55

5.75,13.65

1.12 23.20

3.55 12.90

3.30|1:;.90

3.50 14.00

3.60 13.70


2.771 3.24 Armour & Co., Jacksonville.

2.77 8.601Armour & Co., Jacksonville.

5.12 :1.40 Armour & Co., Jacksonville.

41.201 3.321Armour Co., Jacksonville.

3.81 4.70 Armour & Co., Jacksonville.

4.33 1.76 Miss Hammond, Ft. Pierce.

4.35 5.20 G. L, Huxtable, Orlando.

3.201 6.20 Monroe & Stephens, DeLand.

3.40|10.20 Ponce DeLeon Growers, Indrio.

1.55 1.76 W. E. Whiddon, Graceville.

3.30 10.40 Standard Growers Exchange, Ft.
Myers.
4.96 0.16 J. A. Scarlett, DeLand.

4.95 4.78 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

5.15 5.60 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

5.20 4.98 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

5.00 5.24 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.


-~-----------











SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2...............

Dried Blood No. 3..............

Acid Phosphate No. 4..........

Fertilizer, no Potash, No. 5.....


Complete

Complete

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


12.00

0.67

1.17

7.80

5.15

6.00


Fertilizer ............ 5602 8.95

Fertilizer ............ 15603 8.60

..................... 5604 8.27

No. 5................ 5605 7.77


Phosphoric Acid.




.! 0


18.05

10.34 1

9.30.

6.20

10.95

9.65


2.851 8.101


0.15118.20

L3.75 24.09

0.40 9.70

1.15 7.35

2.07 13.02

4.05113.70


FOR WHOM SENT.


2.88 10.16;G. M. Locke, Terra Ceia.

..... 50.52 H. Levine, Orlando.

24.60 ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

15.20 ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

..... ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

5.00 ..... H. Levine, Orlando.

3.20 5.02 Sol Wittenstein, Orlando.

3.12 3.72 W T. Higman, Orlando.

5.40 0.60OG. S. Hollingsworth, Arcadia.

5.301 4.84 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.


---~-










Fertilizer No. 6................ 1 06 7.97 9.50

Fertilizer No. 7................ 5607 7.40 9.20

Fertilizer ..................... 5608 17.57 7.62

Fertilizer No. IV .............. 5609 9.77 8.40

Fertilizer No. III............... 15610 9.47 6.80

Fertilizer No. II................ 5611 8.60 9.10

Fertilizer No. I................ 5612 8.75 9.00

Fertilizer .................... 5613 7.77 10.80

Fertilizer No. 2.............. 5614 7.75 8.85

Fertilizer .................. ...5615 13.35 7.25

Fertilizer No. 1................ 56161 8.30 9.45

Complete Fertilizer ............156171 8.02 8.63

Fertilizer ..................... 5618 5.60 8.23

Fertilizer .................... 5619 10.87 7.65

Fertilizer .....................15620 8.65 11.60

Mixed Fertilizer ............. 15621i 5.55 7.65


4.20 13.70,

4.20113.40

2.05 9.67

0.25 8.65

0.50 7.30

2.50111.60

2.17 11.17

5.00 15.80)

1.35 10.20

4.35 11. 60

0.35 9.80

1.27 9.90

0.12 8.351

5.60 13.251

0.75 12.35'

0.05[ 7 70


5.001 5.48 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto

5.00 5.58 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

0.90 3.10 E. L. Wartman, Citra.

3.821 3.00 M. Klein, Orlando.

2.75 5.00|L. Wichtendahl, Orlando.

3.95 3.91 S. J. T. Seegas Orlando.

2.80 5.54 S. J. T. Seegar, Orlando.

4.30 6.35 Messrs. Fuzazzi Bros., Valrico.

4.50 0.38 The Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto.

4.45 3.00 Mrs. I. M. Starke, Beresford.

2.80 4.90IThe Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto.

1.401 4.84IJ. H. Dillard, Orlando.

3.90 4.401M. E. Lafollette, DeLand.

5.08 5.141John W. Kerr, Ft. Pierce.

1.95 4.941Kirkhuff & Crouter, Bradentown.

::.781 4.88 Mr. Lafollette, DeLand.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALSES, 1921.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. GORDON HART, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by Inspectors Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1901.
Deficiencies greater than 0.20% are distinguished by Black Face Type.
I Phosphoric Acid.

'a* 'd BY WHOM AND
NAME OR BRAND. o .S WHERE
0o5 0o MANUFACTURED.
l ] I I 4 uoi
iz3 .:3 = S
- - ^ ------
Special Mixture Truck.......... 2(692 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 2.00U 8.00 4.00..... The American Agricultural
S iFound..... 5.871 8.52 3.65 12.17 4.00 ..... Chem. Co., Jacksonville.
Bradley's Orange Special....... 2693 Guaranteed 110.00 .800; 4.00112.00; 4.001 3.00 The American Agricultural
I Found..... 10.22 8.83 4.79'13.80 4.40 3.54 Chem. Co., Jacksonville.
I I I I
Seminole Corn and Cane Grower 2694,Guaranteed 12.01 8.00i 0.501..... 2.50| 3.00 Wilson & Toomer Co.,
Found..... 12.60 8.18 1.2 10.00 3.101 3.36 Jacksonville. '
Florideal Grower .............. 2695 Guaranteed 12.00: 8.00 .0 .....1 4.00 2.00Wilson & Toomer Co.,
j Found .... 8.75;10.80', 4.0014.80 4.431 2.36 Jacksonville.
W. & T.'s Seminole Fruit Manure 2696Guaranteedll2.00i 8.00 1.00 ..... 3.001 5.00( Wilson & Toomer Co.,
Found..... 12.77, 8.351 3.75 12.10, 3.40: 5.80 Jacksonville.










Special Fruit and Vine......... 2697 Guaranteed 10.001 8.001 3.00111.00; 3.00 5.00|The Gulf Fertilizer Co..
II Found..... 8.701 8.60' 3.75 12.35 3.401 5.36| Tampa.
aI I I
. Goulding's 4% Potash Compound 2698 Guaranteed 12.00 8.00 0.50 ..... ..... 4.00 The American Agricultural
Found..... 4.53 7.97 0.10 8.07 ..... 4.74 Chem. Co., Pensacola.

*Goulding's Vegetable Compound. 2699 Guaranteed 12.00 8.00 0.50|..... 4.00 4.00|The American Agricultural
Found..... 6.77 12.57 1.2513.82 3.40 2.00 Chem. Co., Pensacola.

Gold Medal Acid Phosphate..... 12700 Guaranteed ..... 16.00 2.00 ..... ..... ....t Alabama Chemical Co.,
I Found..... 7.10 18.08 0.17 18.25 ..... ..... Montgomery, Ala.
Rex High Grade Guano.........2701oGuaranteed 1000 10.00 2.00 ... 2.00 2.00 Alabama Chemical Co.,
I Found..... 10.97110.531 1.32 11.85 2.10 2.30 Montgomery, Ala.
Bradley's Sea Fowl Guano Spe-12702 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 3.0011.00 4.00 3.001The American Agricultural
cial Mixture ................. Found..... 11.37 9.80 4.50 14.30 3.95 3.42 Chem. Co., Jacksonville.
Cherokee Grower .............. 2703 Guaranteed 12.00 9.001 0.50i..... 4.00 ..... Wilson & Toomer Co.,
Found...... 8.72 9.00 3.40 12.40 5.05 ..... Jacksonville.
Vegetable ..................... 2704 Guaranteed 10.00 7.001 1.00 ..... 4.00 6.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
S Found..... 8.42 7.271 0.85 8.12 3.82 5.98 Jacksonville.
Green Brand Very Early Trucker 2705 Guaranteed 12.00 9.00' 1.00 ..... 5.001 3.00 The Coe-Mortimer Co.,
Found..... 10.80 9.651 1.70 11.35 5.20 3.42 Jacksonville.
Gulf Celery Special............. 2706Guaranteed 10.00 5.00] 1.00 6.00 6.00 5.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
Found..... 10.92 6.05| 4.40 10.45 5.55 5.80 tampa.
_____________I_ I _____ _____ __ I____I___I










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1921-Contlnuea.


Phosphoric Acid.
o
BY WHOM AND
NAME, OR BRAND 5" S d B WHERE
g 5g 0 3 MANUFACTURED



.......... I


No Potash Special No. 4........

Goulding's Fish Guano..........


Goulding's Standard Meal Fer-
tilizer ., ........... .........

Bradley's B. D. Sea Fowl Guano


Goulding's Fish and Bone.......


2707 Guaranteed
FIound.....

2708 Guaranteed
Found.....

27091Guaranteed
Faund.....
2710 Guaranteed
Found.....

2711 Guaranteed
Found.....


10.00 2.00.. 4.001
12.50 1.7514.25 3.58

11.00 0.50 ..... 2.00
10.80 1.0711.87 2.65

8.00o 0.50 ..... 2.00
9.481 0.27| 9.75 1.99

9.00| 0.50 ..... 2.25
9.321 1.30110.62 2.75

8.00 0.501....' 2.00
9.02 1.25 10.27 2.20
I Il


.....IThe Coe-Mortimer Co.,
.... Jacksonville.

1.00The American Agricultural ,
1.56 Chem. Co., Pensacola. o

2.00 The American Agricultural
2.74 Chem. Co., Pensacola.

3.00 The American Agricultural
2.981 Chem. Co., Pensacola.

4.00 The American Agricultural
4.32 Chem. Co., Pensacola.












DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1921. B. JAY OWEN, Asst. Chemist.
Implies Taken by State Chemist and State Inspectors Under Sections 1. 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1906.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.



NA~E. OR BRAND. E 1 r NAME AND ADDRESS OF


J z o


Nutro Stock Feed.............3254 Guaranteed
Found.....

Ideal Horse and Mule Feed.... 3255 Guaranteed
Found.....

"Hunter" Horse and Mule Feed ,32561Guaranteed
Found.....

White Mule Stock Feed........ 3257Guaranteed
Found......

Vertex Dairy Feed.............3258Guaranteed
Found.....

Sun Brand Cotton Seed Meal... 3259 Guaranteed
IFound.....


- S || .


15.50 9.50 ......
9.29 10.67 60.12

5.00 10.00 .
8.42 9.04 60.19

14.00 9.00 .....
8.38 9.95 61.78

15.00 9.00'......
13.77 10.42 53.04

8.00 24.00 ...
8.54 23.91 44.32

15.00 36.00 ......
8.951 38.361 30.21


3.50 ......
4.35 4.83

2.50 ......
3.87 5.60

2.00 ......
3.68 4.53

2.00 .....
3.09 6.87

4.501 .... .
4.731 6.45

5.00 ......
6.68 6.81


MANUFACTURER.


The Corno Mills Co., St.
Louis, Mo.

Sugarine Co., Incorporated,
Owensboro, Ky.

Grain Belt Mills Co., South
St. Joseph, Mo.

The Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
Memphis, Tenn.

Sugarine Co., Incorporated,
Owensboro, Ky.

A. C. Westervelt & Co., Mem-
phis, Tenn.










OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1921.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Clover Leaf Fancy Brown
Shorts ....................

Pure White Middlings or Shorts


PIGM EAT ................


Plymouth Scratch Feed.......


Wheat Bran (with Screenings
not exceeding Mill Run).....

Golden Sweet Mule Feed......


Arab Horse Feed...............


Sunbeam Dairy Ration........


V

is s'in



3260 Guaranteed
I Found .....


Found .....
. 32621Guaranteed
Found ....

.3263 Guaranteed
Found.....
13264 Guaranteed
Found.....

S3265 Guaranteed
Found.....

3266 Guaranteed
Found.....

3267 Guaranteed
Found.....


6.001
4.691

7.001
5.50

8.00
7.90

5.00
2.76

9.50
9.22'

18.00
15.66

15.00
10.03

12.00
10.97


16.00
16.14 58.52

18.00 .....
22.52 49.15

9.00 ...
10.06 68.56

14.50 ......
16.25 51.00

9.00 55.00
8.38 55.54

10.00 ..... .


20.00......
17.06 53..31


4.00
4.17

5.00
4.50

5.00
2.99

2.50
3.51

4.00
3.88

2,00
1.94

2.00
2.76

3.00
3.24


4


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.


...... [Akin-Erskine Milling Co.,
3.80 Evansville, Ind.

...... Igleheart Brothers, Evans-
4.23 ville, Ind.

...... The Ubiko Milling Co., Cin-
5.571 cinnati, Ohio.

...... Grain Belt Mills Co., South
1.71 St. Joseph, Mo.

...... Standard-Tilton Milling Co.,
6.51 St. Louis, Mo.

...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
6.40 cago, Ill.

...... M. C. Peters Mill Co., Oma-
4.98 ha, Neb.

...... The Ubiko Milling Co., Cin-
5.37 *cinnati, Ohio.


t




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