• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of Florida
 Part I
 Part II. Crop report
 Part III. Analyses






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00059
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00059
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Part II. Crop report
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Part III. Analyses
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
Full Text





VoIume 31

ii


I I


Nuti#ber 2I1


FLORIDA

QUARTERLY


BULLETIN
OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


APRIL 1,. 1921


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTEURI
TALLAHASSEE FLA.


CONTENTS.
PART I-Optomism and the Future. Immigration. New Citizens
in Field and Orchard. Vitamies. Peanuts. Farm Suggestions
for 1921. Germicides. Potatoes. Beneficial Birds. Carpet
Grass. Cotton Values and Sttples. Best Varieties of Corn.
Best Varieties of Pecans. Florida as a Sugar-Producing State.
Avacados. Cause- of Soft Pork. Building Whitewash. Length
of Time Required to Cook Vegetables. Accredited and Tesed
Dairy Herds. Quaratine to Keep Out Black iFly. Pigs and
Boll.Weevels. Markets.: A Few Dont's For Prospective In-
vestors. Great Seal of the State. Directory of Organizations.
PART II-Crop Reports,
PART III-Analyses.

Entered January 81, 1903, at Tallahasses. Frir' .,; secoud-class
matter under Act of Cor.ger Jir.e, 1o00.
"Acceptance (or mailing at sp~, :0 r.', p:r'Er provided for
in Section 1108 Act of October : *' .'17..1 ed Sept. 11, 1918."
.THESE BUlEINS ARE ISSUED FRE TO THOSE itUfSTING THM
rr
T. J. APPLUTARD, STATE PRINTED
TALLAHAsaBU, FLORIDA.


/ i 1


I II I I I 1


i _


























COUNTY MAP a 1
O ERNAND R
FLORIDA K0
sHOWING SUBDIVI5IONS

A POL



00







4---.r 1- L 0 .
SANTAI I"01R1"L AtS30N c ^ I
'L J v A
9. OOSA IWALT0, '1


a.
^*iviwif











PART I



CONTENTS.

Optimism and the Future.
Immigration.
New Citizens in Field and Orchard.
Vitamines.
Peanuts.
Farm Suggestions for 1921.
Germicides.
Potatoes.
Beneficial Birds,-
Carpet Grass.
Cotton Values and Staples.
Best Varieties of Corn.
Best Varieties of Pecans.
Florida as a Sugar-Producing. State.
Avacados.
Cause of Soft Pork.
Building Whitewash.
Length of Time Required to Cook Vegetables.
Accredited and Tested Dairy Herds.
Quarantine to Keep Out Black Fly.
Pigs and Boll Weevils.
Markets.
A Few Don'ts for Prospective Investors.
Great Seal of the State.
Directory of Organizations.










OPTIMISM AND THE FUTURE ,


By W. A. MdcBB,
dn&io M er of. Agioultwre.
Superficial optimism may lead to no 'better results
than pessimism. Aircastles must have their foundations'
on ,the earth if they are to be inhabited.
Prosperity is always tracible to one of four sources
or a Pombination of them, viz.: agriculture, manufac-
turing, mining, commerce.
,Florida has, agriculture of a more diversified nature
than any other state in the Union.
Florida had manufacturing of a basic character which
must prosper if any('kind of manufacturing prospers. (
'Florida has mining that supplies commodities of inter-
national demand and permanent in character.
Florida has a substantial commerce, both domestic and
foreign. No matter what articles may, be depressed in
price if there are those which demand still keeps floating .
Florida has them. People may substitute one thing for
another in choosing the articles of consumption but they
can scarcely dodge Florida products. No matter haw. low
European exchange may go nor how little her people may
consume there is a world just to the south of us which,
Florida products can reach with less distance to travel ;
than from the other states or from other countries. South
America, Central America and Cuba were little affected'
by, the world war and are as good customers as they
ever were. Trade between South, America and Europe
has been seriously disturbed and they are ready to form
trade relations, with new customers.
Florida does not carry all of her eggs in one basket.
'If she gets a dozen baskets'-siashed she has another ,
dozen baskets to fall back on. The bottom' fell out 'of
cotton values and Floridas abandoned it for other things
-producing least crop last year in half at century. This'
is true not only with the variety of her products but it
is true with the seasonal chances of producing crops.
If one crop should fail it does n9t mean that a whole.,
year's work has failed as there are three more seasons
irn which to try other crops.








6

When Florida runs up the white flag there won't be
any other flags floating on the ramparts. Florida is un-
acquainted with bread lines and public soup houses.
Whatever prosperity is in store Florida will get her
share. So long as the human race lives they must con-
sume. Florida furnishes consumers with the material
wherewithal of life.
One cause -for much dissatisfaction on the part of
farmers manifest during recent months is that by some
strange alchemy the money the producer, received lost a
Considerable part of its purchasing power after he came
in, possession of it. In other words farmers are selling at
pre-war prices and buying at from fifty to a hundred
per cent above pre-war normal. This fact is emphasized
by the new Secretary of Agriculture, Mr. Wallace, in his
first statement to the public.
SFreight rates have not been lowered, farm labor is not
yet back to normal; iron, coke, factory wages and freight
'determine the price of farm machinery arid they have
not been reduced to normal. These things must be ad-
justed before the ledger of business can be balanced.
The general depression did not reach Florida for
months after other sections of the country were seriously
affected. It has not sensibly shaken realty values yet.
The depression will be lifted from Florida earlier than
from the country as a whole. This involves no miracle,
but is the result of natural law in the placing of varied
commodities on the market and receiving an influx of
money from investors who see the future of the State and
from sojourners of the seasons.
What I have to say on the .situation is not deducted
from superficial observation and limited acquaintance.
My ancestors on both sides have been Floridians for prac-
tically a century, and I-have been a student of Florida
affairs for fhe greater part of my life. Merely waiting
for something to turn up will not get us anywhere but
the things that nee4' changing should be attended to and
the future'holds itd rewards for those who make things
happen.
,I conclude with thb following lines which convey their
own message:










I'd rather be a COULD-BE,
If I could not be an ARE,
For a COULD-BE is a MAY-BE,
With, a chance of reaching par;

I'd rather be a HAS-BEEN,
Than a MIGHT-HAVE-BEEN by far,
i For a MIGHT-HAVE-BEEN has never been,
While a HAS was once an ARE.


IMMIGRATION.

Attention is called to the following inquirers who
have written to this office during the first three weeks of
March asking for information as prospective immigrants.
Multiply these fifty names by seventeen and we have 850
names of people who have voluntarily solicited us during
he last twelve months for information that will show the
opportunities that Florida offers to immigrants. Un-
derstand this list is augmented by thousands who write
directly to county commercial organizations and to realty
dealers. The Division of Agriculture and Immigration
has never had the funds to enlarge the immigration fea-
tures of the department as it should be. We cannot go
to the expense of collecting and publishing data and dis--
tributing it over the northern states where ample capital
and sturdy farmers are ready to enlist in the common-
wealth of Florida. The number of tourists who visit
State during the winter could be increased many fold By
judicious propaganda through the immigration division
if the funds for that purpose were available. Much of
our correspondence relates directly or indirectly to this
phase of the work already'but the most profitable field
for, future development lies in this direction by proper
expansion of departmental activities.










INQUIRERS' DIRECTORY.

Inquiries during the month of March, 1921, for homes
and farms in Florida:
Oilbeit E. Greenwod, Park Court, Alberta, Canada.
Mrs. H. D. Squiers, Victor, Colorado.
S. M. Lescourent, Kelowna, B. C., Canada.
lRene Vantrin, Eriksdale P. O., Manitoba, Canada.
H. W. Bigham, Box 54, Tulsa, Oklahoma.
Major Joseph S. Clarke, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania,
Box 57.
Mrs. T. A. Schoenfeld, Youngstown, Ohio, 1926 South
.Heights Avenue.
H. T. Budlong, Jamestown, Rhode Island.
-: E' G. Goldsmith, H arland, Indiana.
Mrs. Forest Groscos, r R. No. 1, Middletown, .Indiana.
: Stephen J. Siegel, .Auburn, Rhode Island, 61 Maiden
St., South.
S. C. Oathout,. Sioux City, Iowa, 914 Fifth St.
S. Si Storer, Atlanta, Georgia, 100 Lucile Ave.
A. T. Hepworth, Winnupeg, Canada, 508 Stradbr9oke
Avenue.
C.. H. Turner, Holyoke, Massachusetts, 214 Suffolk St.
W. G. Parsons, dambridge, Massachusetts, 14 Gorham
Street. /
B. Schoenian, Los Angeles, California, 2616 E. See-
ond St.
Sred J. Wiuler,, Sardis, Ohio, R. F. D. No. 2.
J. D. Hughlett, Alexandria, Louisiana.
J. E. DeLony, Jr., Tuseambia, Alabama,
J. F. Stewart, Dry Branch, West Virginia.
C. W. Van Tilberg, Columbus, Ohio, OCre B. & O. R. R,
E. Peace, San Francisco, Box 331.
F. H. Valentine, Washington, D. C., Department of
Commerce.
B. F. ,Huntsinan, DeKalb, Illinois.
Miss F. May Lyndon, Delavan, Wisconsin.
W. E. Rood, Halifax, Nova Scotia1,70 Bedford Row.
F. L. Bulkeley, Morqtown, Vermont.
E. 1. Yonaka, 1Mott, N. Dakota.
Dr. F. A. Pitkin, Dannemora,, N. Y.
Wm. H. Stanley, 1309 rGand Ave., Charles City, Iowa.
D. V. Gore, Larned, Kansas.'










Richard Hartmain, 103 West Evans Aenue, Pueblo,
Colorado i
Mrs. Fannie M. Hamilton, Peoria, Illinois, 1801' How-
ett St.
Jas. Z. Zbrnes; Leffs Bay, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.
W. H. Porter, Zephyrhills, Florida.
A. qC Dixon, Dayton, Ohio, R. R. No. 5.
F. F. Beard, 116 Brooklyn Avenue, Kansas City, Mis-
souri.
Ernest 'H. Toyn, 737 Erie Terrace, Toronto, 'Canada,
Gerrard St., E.
F. E. Warner, Kbyser, West Virginia.
J. iW, Fager, 730 Belville St.; New Orleans, Louisianar
Walter A. Kurtz, Chilton, Wisconsin.
-Miss Helen Weston, General Delivery, Port Artuuri
Texas.
W. I. Woodill, Toronto, Canada, 18 Vaughan Road.
d. W. Tedder, 188 Windson St., Atlanta, Georgia.
Thomas B. Catching, Barbourville, Kentucky.


NEW CITIZENS IN FIELD AND ORCHARD.

By E. T. MEREDITH,
United States Secretary of Agrizulture.
Durham Wheat, introduced in 1899 from Russia, now
produces a crop worth $50,000 annually.
Egyptian Cotton,, brought by the scientists of the de-
partment in 1901, has become the basis of the long-staple
cotton industry in the southwest, valued at $6,000,000
in 1917, $11,000,000 in 1918, and $20,000,000 in 1919.
Alfalfa, a native of central Asia, brought into the
Western States in about' 1854, has become in a generation
almost the basic crop, of the west, according to the re-
port.
The sorghums. are the basis of the great agricultural
development of the semiarid southwest.
Japanese Rices, secured in 1899, were the fouindato-ns
of the great rice industry of Louisiana and Texas.
The Washington. Naval Orange, introduced from Bra-
zil in 1872, makes up the bulk of the California; orange
industry, producing a crop 'valued at approximately
$16,000.000 a year.










Sudan Grass, introduced in 1919 from Egypt, is now
worth over $10,000,000 annually.
Feterita, secured in 1906 from Egypt, produced in 1918
a crop valued at $16,00q,000.
Over 1,00 "varieties of soy beans have been introduced
from China and other parts of the Orient. From these
the experts of the department have, after careful tests,
selected eight of the best varieties, which are now largely
cultivated and are an important element in the very
rapid increase in soy bean production.
peruvian Alfalfa, introduced in 1899, is by far the
most productive and valuable variety for the southwest.


WHAT ARE VITAMINS?
Florida Grower.

This is a question asked repeatedly since the impor-
tance of these compounds in foods has come into prom-
inence, but no definite answer has yet been given. In-
vestigation's by scientists at universities, agricultural
experiment stations and institutions for medical research
'have revealed much information regarding the function
of vitamins in body maintenance and building, and the
parts of the various foods in which they are to be found.
That vitamins are compounds absolutely essential in
the food, in order to maintain the weight of the body
and produce growth, has been definitely proved. The
lack of vitamins causes. deficiency diseases, so named
because they are due to the lack of something in the
diet. Vitamines are present and are needed in such small
quantities in the food that chemists have not yet been-
able to isolate them from the many other compounds
which are in foods. Forthis reason, we know very little
of the actual character of vitamins.
According to a statement by Dr. Carl 0. Johns, in
charge of nutrition work in the Bureau of Chemisty, U.
8. Department of Agiiculture, vitamins have been clas-
sified into three different types 'depending upon the func-
tions in promoting well-being and growth. The first type
is known as water-soluble vitamins, and these are nec-
essary in order to obtain growth from food.. Lack of
these causes beri-beri, which manifests itself by disease










of the nervous system and by other symptoms. These
vitamins are found in seeds, in green plants, in certain
bulbs, and fleshy roots and fruits, and in milk and eggs,
aq well as ,in certain organs in the animal body. The
seeds referred to include beans, nuts and other various
cereal grains. When cereals are very highly milled iA
order to obtain a very finewhite flour, large part of the
vitamins may be removed. Vitamins are lost when
rice is polished in order to remove the outer layers which
contain most of the vitamins. It is for this reason that
a diet consisting mainly of polished rice may cause beri-
beri, while unpolished rice does not cause this disease.


FAT-SOLUBLE VITAMINS.

The second type is known as fat-soluble vitamins, and
these are found in butter, eggs, milk, and in certain ani-
mal organs such as the heart, kidneys, and liver, and
to some extent in other fats as well as in green vegeta-
bles. They also exist in smaller quantities in certain
seeds. When fat-soluble vitamins are absent from the
diet' animals and man are subject to disease of the eyes,
which appears to be related to xerophthalmia and which,
if prolonged, may produce blindness.
The third type is known as antiscorbutic vitamines--
that is, those which prevent scurvy, which manifests it-
self by disease of the bones as well as in other ways.
These vitamines are found in oranges, grapefruit, lemons
and other citrus fruits, and in green vegetables such as
tomatoes, spinach and lettuce, and in eggs and raw milk.
The drying of vegetables frequently destroys the activity
of the antiscorbutic vitamins. The best source of vita-
mines is in the leafy parts of vegetables, and this is one
of the reasons why spinach, lettuce, and cabbage are val-
uable foods.











GREAT IDISCOV RY THAT PEANUT IS A COM-
PLETE PROTEIN, POSSESSING THE VITA-
MINES OF EGGS AND MILK.

Botanically the peanut is not really a nut;, but be-
1'ngs to the same family of plants of which the pea and
bean are- familiar examples. However, the peanut is
chemically a real nut in its composition.
-Niuts as a class are ricA in oil or fat an4 with few ex-
ceptions contain a large amount of protein. Most nuts
are'also- sweet, that is, they contain a small amount of
sugar, but starch cuts a small figure in nuts as a class.
Only a few nuts, such as the chestnut and atorn, contain
any considerable lot of starch.
The peanut differs from a few, nuts in another partic-
ular, which is a matter of great consequence to agricul-
ture, viz.: While true nuts grow upon trees or shrubs,
the peanut is there product of an-annual plant which may
be cultivated like any other farm product. With a suit-
able soil and the proper climate, the peanut produces a
generous return for the investment made. The average
yield per acre is sixty to one hundred bushels.
It is evident, then, tbat the peanut ranks very -high
as a food producer. Until recent years its value has
been little appreciated, but the humble peanut is rap-
idly rising in public favor. In the future it will each
year make a larger showing in the crop reports.
A discovery made quite recently in relation to the pea.
' nut is likely to add greatly to its prestige as a human
Food and ultimately will, without doubt, place it among
the great food staples of the country.
-In north China and Various other countries, where the
peanut flourishes, it has long held a prominent place in
the national dietary; but in this country its great value
has been so little appreciated that it has been scarcely
recognized as a food, having been eaten as a dainty or
luxury.
Although since the -writer, some twenty-five years ago
-intrbduced the crushed nuts, or peanut butter, into the
Bill 'of fare of the Battle Creek Sanitarium, the use of
the peanut in this form has rapidly extended and it has
found its way to many thousands of tables.










But the discovery, which has really placed the peanut
:upon a high pedestal among foodstuffs of the finest qual-
ity, has yet to be mentioned. It is the fact that the
protein of' the peanut belongs to a special class very rare
among the products of the vegetable kingdom, known, to
the chemist as "complete protein."
The complete protein is One which contains all the
elements needed for making any of the many different
kinds of tissue found in the human body. Very natu-
rally, these proteins are found in eggs, milk and meat,;
but they are not found in cereals or vegetables. It has
been known for some time that complete proteins were
found in the almond and a few other choice nuts, but it
is now known that the peanut, together with its cousin,
the soy bean, contains proteins of the very finest quality.
This discovery is of fhe very highest importance, since
it at once eliminates all necessity for worrying about
an adequate supply of protein out' of which to'build the
tissues of coming generations, 'no mater how remote.
It has long been evident that the world's supply of
meat'must ultimately fail, and eggs and milk will some
time become so high in price as to be beyond the reach
'of any except the well-to-do. The reason for this is the
large amount of ordinary foodstuffs required for that
production of a unit amount of meat, milk or eggs.
For example, according to Dean Henry, of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, it takes one hundred pounds of
food fed to a steer to make three pounds of beef; one
hundred pounds of food to chicken to, produce five pounds
of eggs or meat; the same amount of food to a milch cow
to produce more than eighteen pounds of milk.
As the population increases and agriculture is taxed
more and more to.keep up with the demands upon it, the
world will have to depend more and more exclusively
upon the products of the soil for human food supply.
SIt is true we have enough nut trees to make a reliable
and most economical source of supply for protein and
fats, .and, that of the very finest quality; but nut trees
are very slow of growth and nations would likely perish
of starvation before an adequate tree crop could be har-
vested, if this were its sole resource.
It is' certainly most comforting and reassuring, to know
that in the peanut, and we may add the soy bean, we
have crop foods by -means of which in a single ,season,








14


through the organized effort in the farming communities
of the Southern and Southwestern States, a sufficient
amount of fat and protein could be produced to more
than equal our annual production of meat and animal
fats.
Now that the high food value of the peanut is known,
its use as a food staple should be encouraged. The pea-
nut may profitably find. a place upon the bill of fare in
State institutions, prisons, reformatories, asylums and
hospitals for the insane, etc. One pound of peanuts is
equal in nutritive .value to three pounds of meat and in
ranging the bill of fare, may be made'to takelthe place
of three times its weight in fish, flesh or fowl.-Good
Health Magazine.


LOWLY PIBANUT HEgD LIST.

Peanuts were looked upon as one of the novelty crops
until a few years ago throughout the South, but they
have quietly and mekly spread and midtiplied until now
the lowly peanut can hold its head up with the best of
them. In fact, it would seem that it is about to crow
over all the rest of the staple crops in this section in
point of value. /
The United States Department of Agriculture Monthly
Crop Reporter placed the following comparative values
per acre December 1, 1919:

Peanuts Cotton Corn Wheat Oats
Virginia ........103.74 92.00 47.32 26.43 22.00
North Carolina'.. 100.04 89.76 35.15 19.80 12.00
Georgia ........ 61.50 54.42 23.20 27.62 23.00
Florida .......... 56.97 29.40 21.00 ..... 22.80
Tennessee ....... 77.35 54.30 36.11 19.98 21.39
Texas .......... 59.50 45.50 35.40 33.00 26.88
Oklahoma ....... 88.64 66,88 30.48 28.70 23.10
Louisiana ..... 78.74 32.20 26.25 ..... 22.00
Alabama ........ 39.24 42.46 23.06 22.05 18.90

Av. for above.... 73.91 56.32 30.89 25.27 23.56










Florida is raising a greater quantity of peanuts each
year and improving the yield and quality and a number
of peanut mills have been established in the State to
handle' the crops, part of which are used for feed and a
portion for marketable nuts. Those who have not inves-
tigated this easily grown brop should do so at once.


S THE NUTRITIVE VALUE OF PiA"T I HAY..

As the peanut is a leguminous plant, the hay made from
its vines is a much richer stock feed than that made from
grasses. The following shows the analysis of peanut and
other hays:
Protein Carbo. Fat
Peanut hay .................... 11.7 46.9 1.8
Peanut vines .................. 13,5. 36.3 15.1
Alfalfa hay .................... 14.3 42.7 2.2
Cowpea hay ....................16.6 42.2 2.2
Red clover hay ................. 12.3 38.1 3.3
Timothy hay .................... 5.9 45.0 2.5
From the tdble it is seen to have very nearly the same
feeding value as the best red clover hay. It contains
more than twice as much protein anfi nearly as much
carbohydrates and fat as timothy hay.
The value of peanut hay, however, does not depend-
altogether on its chemical analysis. If it is harvester,
stacked and cured properly, it is much more palatable
than the average peanut hay. The present value of hay
justifies farmers in taking precautions to cure' it prop-
erly, states A. P. Spencer, vice-director of the agricultural
extension division of Florida. If allowed to become too
ripe, sun burned, or to get one or two hard rains on it
after ripening, the leaves the best part of the hay, is lost
or will not analyze nearly as high in feeding value.
Peanut hay is palatable for all kinds of farm stock,
particularly dairy cows and young animals. When fed
to hard-worked animals, it should be done with caution,
It is highly recommended as a substitute for alfalfa meal
in poultry rations. Its use will reduce the feed bill, par-
ticularly where the poultry are confined. .










PEANUTS,

S, By DR. FRANK CRANE.

I sing the, Peanut.
It tastes good.
It is easy to raise.
It is cheap.
It is nutritious.
It is a substitute not only for cheese and meat; but' or
butter and other fats.
The Peanut, of co1l climes, together with the Qocoanut,
of warm climes, could come nearer feeding mankind than
all cattle, yea, all sheep and swine.
The Peanut, permit me to bludgeon you with the club
of science, contains per pound more protein than a pound
of sirloin steak, plus more carbohydrates than a pound of
potatoes, plus oneitbird as much fat as a pound, of butter.
Bring on your foodstuff that can beat that!
While you pay seventy cents a pound for your roast
beef to the bandit who hides behind the counter at the
delicatessen shop; and anywhere up to thirty million
dollars a cut for the same at the gilden den of thieves
where they take your money away from you to music,
you can get a sack of peanuts for five cents from the
street peddler.
The Panut.keeps well in any climate, and is good eat-
ing when the steak has spoiled, the potatoes are rotted
and the butter is rancid.
Eyery Peanut i' hermetically sealed in Nature's own
sanitary,l dust-proof, automatic covering and' you can
crack it with your fingers.
The Peanut can be taken directly, without feeding it to
animals and getting your nutirment by eating flesh and
blood.
The Peanut crop has grown faster than any other crop
in -the world's history. In 1910 there were 800,000 acres
in peanuts in the United States. Watch it grow; in 1916
the average was estimated at 1~,0,00000, in 1917 more than
2,000,000 acres.
Yield per acre is about thjrty-four bushels of nuts in
the shell; a;.good yield is sixty bushels, including a ton
of hay.
A bushel of peanuts yields a gallon of oil.








S. . 17 .

Ai acre of land can produce twenty bushels of wheat,
forty bushels of oats, or forty bushels of Peanuts; that
is,, 6ne hundred and eighty-six pounds of digestible pro-
tein iq the Peanuts as against one hundred and forty-
nine in the oats or one hundred and 4ftty-four in wheat.
In. fats it will yield three hundred pounds, while froni
the oats will come sixty-one and (.fm the wheat bit
twenty-four pounds.
SThe United States Department of Agriculture urges
the use of Peanut meal, mixed with cdrnmeal and wheat
floi., for griddle cakes, biscuits and muffins; also its use
as a e@real and in cakes, puddings, and soup, and as a
substitute for meat. -
Ootton is king, said the-South. And ,Corn is king, said
Sthq North. But the day of kings is passing.
.And perhaps the lowly peanut .ive cents a bag, is going
to do its part in making the world safe for democracy.

Slogan of the Agricultural Extension Division, College:
,of Agriculture, University of'Florida: "Two milk sows, .
two brobd sows, not less than, 75 purebred chickens, one-
,half acre in a home orchard, hand five stands of bees foir
every .farm and rural home in Florida."


FARM SUGGESTIONS FOR 1921.
,By C. K. McQuAnalR,
State Agest Florida Agrinouitural Etenswion Division.
CoN : It is not recommended that the Florida farmer
plant corn as a: money crop by itself. A liberal acreage
of corn to supply his bw4 needs has its legitimate place
Int any rational system of flaring in Florida. 'This
should be planted on well-prepared land and properly
fertili zed., Along with the 'orn always should be planted
cowp.as or velvet beans.
SwBrr PorATQs: This is a crop which has not been
properly appreciated in tPe South, With the perfecting
9f the sweet potato curing and storing house any farmer
should be able to build a small house on his own farm
and save his own potatoes. With good management there
2-Billetin










is no reason why sweqt potatoes cannot become a money
crop in this State. Certainly farmers are justified in
growing sweet potatoes, even as a food and feed crop.
PEANUTS AND- VELVwT. BEANs: These are profitable
crops and especially so if \we consider their soil-improv-
ing qualities. As a hog and cattle feed there is a big
point in favor of the bean, and the peanut is possibly one
of the best fattening feeds for hogs. As soil-improvers
these crops are almost essential to the farm and no ro-
tation system in the South should exclude them.
HOME GARDENS: Special. attention should be given
this year to the hope garden. The land to be'used for a
garden should be specially prepared and highly-fertilized
with farm manure. It should be convenient to the home
and well-fenced from hogs,' cattle and chickens. Some
plantings should be made in this garden practically every
week in the year and the cultivation should be regular
and thorough.
SYRUP: There are great possibilities in producing high
grade cane syrup in this State. It is suggested that more
attention be given to this crop. The price of syrup on
the farm is certain to be higher later than at present.
PORK PRODUCTIONc : -Florida is buying several million
dollars' worth of pork annually. Every farmer should
,have one or more sows and provide them with green,
growing crops and sanitary surroundings.
OTHER LIVESTOCK: With the reduction of cotton acrer
age there is going to be released a large amount of land,
in West Florida especially, that must either be abandoned
or planted to feed crops. The most economical way of
marketing these crops is by feeding it to livestock. Every
farmer, therefore, should strive to increase his livestock,
especially in good beef and dairy cattle, so as to have a
sufficient number to consume the# surplus, feed. on the
farm. Where advantageously situated, farm dairying will
unquestionably prove profitable. Livestock will not only\
pay a good profit for feed consumed, but will very mate-
rially increase the supply of farm manure, thus saving
the ferility that otherwise would be sold from the farm.
POULTRY: Florida is not growing anything like the
Poultry that is needed in the State, and it is recommended
and urged that much more attention be given to this val-
.iable branch of the livestock industry., It will pay.








19 i


,BO= CUIiPUR: The proper handling of a few hives of
bees upon every farm will prove both profitable and in-
teresting. These few colonies of bees will furnish the
farrier and his family with, an abundance of delightful,
nutritious food at the minimum cost and a ready sale
can be found always for any surplus and at profitable
price.


FLORIDA FARM SUGGESTIONS FOR APRIL.

CORN: The bulk of the corn crop of the State should
be planted by April 1Q.
If an early variety of corn has not been already planted
for May and and June roasting ears, it is advisable to
plant a few rows 6f Adams Early corn immediately.
While this is a field corn it is of fine quality and makes
excellent roasting ears. For the main roasting ear crop
S'towell's Evergreen is recommended to succeed Adams
Early. For still later plantings the Country Gentleman
is recommended.
Swa~r POTATows: The sweet potato crop should also
get attention the early part of April. Draws should be
ready for setting in the field before the middle of the
month. Set on newly made, well-rounded, four-foot beds.
If the weather is dry, do not wait for rain but set the
plants and water them for a couple of evenings. Each
morning after watering, a little\dry sand should be-
flipped over the wet places to prevent moisture evapA
ration.
PaNuTs: Peanuts of the running variety can be
planted from the middle of April till several weeks later.
The planting of the Spanish variety should be delayed
Sutil May or later, is this variety does best when planted
in a well-warmed soil.
2FALL PASTURBS: Now is the time to plant crops for
late spring and summer "cattle and hog pastures. -Sor
cowpeas,and sorghum about the middle of April aid af-
terwaird at two-week intervals for six or eight weeks. In
the May plantings about five pounds to the acre of Ger-
man millet seed, should be sown along with the sorghum
and cowpeas. This will give an excellent pasturage and
hay crops.










GaT AND OauaRn: The groye and orchard should
got particular attention at this time. Each grove, or or%
Schard is a tnit intsielf and owners should consult their
county agents wheziever'they have'any doubt as to 'best
methods of cultivation, fertilization, pruning or spraying.
STHE HoriE GARDEN: in the home garden a succession
of crops should be planted so as to maintain a supply of
fresh vegetables well into the summer months. Among
the crops recommended for the garden are beans, cant'a
loupes, collars, cowpeas, cucumbers, eggplant, Irish po-
tatoes, lettuce, okra, onions, parsnips, peppers, pumpkins,
iadisbes, squash, tomatoes, turnips, and watermelons.
Special attention should be given tq garden crops. It pays.

: .
GETTING A STAND.

Much of. the poor stands of crops farmers often get and
'.ich are charge14 to moles, mice and birds, are due to'
poor seed. Without a good stand, land, time, money,
energy and produce are wasted. We cannot expect to
olake as much, where we have only a half or a two-thirds
stand.
Seed that have been stored for months in the seedman's
:stroe or even in the farmer's and truckers' hands, are
liable to 'have lost their germination power. Some seed
depreciate more quickly than do others. Lettuce, for in-
sance, loses its ability to sprout more readily than corn.
Time 'spent testing seed is well spent, because it takes
Just 'as long to plant poor seed as it does good seed.
SStrange though it seems, small sed, such as turnip,
rape, cabbage, sorghum, cucumber, cantaloupe, and
squash, cab n be tested easily on & hot plate. The top df
the kitchen stove is as good a place as any for this. Those
that pop and jump are good; those that do not pop and
'ump'are not good. Count the' seed before placing them
op the stove, then count those that do not pop, which
should not be more than 20 out of 1QO, in any case.
If the seed are very small, such as lettuce, tobacco and
:mustard, count them out, spread on a damp cloth, roll
the co'th up and place-in a warm place and keep moist.
After a few days 'unroll those that nave, or have not
sprouted. At least 80 out of every 100 should sprout.









If tie seed are late, such as corn, beets ( carrots; pump ,
:ki: a ad Watermel6n, the "rag:doll" method of testing is.,'
recommended. Soak inwater a piece of cottn.'cloth about,
six inches wide and of the desired length and wring out
till moderately moist. Spread cloth out and sprinkle the
countedEseed onto it. Roll the cloth up and place it in a.
warm place. With a narrow strip of cloth connect the
doll with a' pail of water. This strip of cloth will serve
to ke4p, the "rag doll" moist, and thus cause the seed to
sprout, if good.
Seed may be planted 'in 'moist warm earth and the
young plants :counted -and the percentage determined,'bit ,
determination by this method. cannot be made as quickly
as by those methods mentioned above.


SEED TREATMENT FOR OAT SMUT.
WVet Method.-Sprinkle seed until thoroughly 'moist
with solution of 1.,pint of formaldehyde to 40 gallons of
water, shoveling over repeatedly to distribute moisture
evenly. Forty gallpios will treat 60 bushels.' Shovel into
a pile and cover with sacks, canvas or blankets for two
hours. o over night. Dry by spreading in thin layer and
stirring occasionally with rake. Seed may be sown when
dry enough to run freely through the drill, setting the
drill to sow about 2 pecks more pe? acre, to allow for
swollen condition' of grain. If to be stored fore several
'days or longer, dry thoroughly. Disinfect sacks, bin, and
drill, to prevent re-infection.
Dfy Method.-Mix 1 pint of formaldehyde with 1 pint.
of water and itse in small hand sptayer. Atomizer spray-
ers can be purchased for 50 to '5 cents. Spray the solu-'
tion on grain as this is being shoveled over, holding sprayer
cloes to grain and taking care that the miit is well dis-'
ttibuted. One stroke of the sprayer gives enough mist
for'each shbvelful of grain. One quart of solution will
trat 60 bushels. When all grain is treated, shovel into a-
pile, and carefilly cover for five hours as directed under
the Wit method. The grain iray be sown itnuediately'
afterO the treatment, or alblwed to air thoroughly and ,
store in disinfected sacks or bli'till tised.










THE MELONT APHIS.


SUniversity Agricultural News.

Even the first appearance of this insect indicates the
seriousness of its presence, when the words "much
dreaded" are used in accounts of its injury to water-
melons. Owing to their small size, the closest inspection
is necessary in order to see them.
There are two forms of this insect, the winged and the
wingless which occur throughout the' year. However,
the wingless form is most abundant and in size averages
about one-fifteenth of an inch in length; in color it varies
from light yellow in, the nymph stage to dark green in the
adult stage of its development.
Justas soon as the melon vines begin to run, -an occa-
sional plant will be found with its foliage curled up and
wilting, and underneath will be found masses of these
melon lice with their beaks'penetrating the plant tissue
'and sucking the sap of the plant. If allowed to multiply,
and its natural enemies do not prevent their increase,
they will conipletely ruin the melon, crop, about the tijne
the melons begin to ripen.
When only ,a few hills'are infected it is advisable to
bury these hills and thereby stop the insects spreading
to other parts of the field.
These little aphids thrive in the bright, warm weather
and also reproduce most rapidly under these conditions;
while their development is retarded very much by moist,
cool weather.
This plant louse is subject to the attack of several
enemies. The value of these natural enemies, of which
the ladybug beetle is a common one, is difficult to appre-
ciate,'for much of their work is frequently unnoticed.
SThe most important factor to be,observed in carrying
out the control for this pest is clean culture, by destroy-
ing the weeds and volunteer truck crops which may carry
the pest over from the winter to the spring crop. If
aphids are found on the- citrus trees growing adjacent to
the melon crop, these trees should be sprayed as soon as
the melons come up, as the aphids will migrate from the
trees to the growing melon crop.









CONTROL.
The following treatment is recommended by A. H. Beyer,
assistant entomologist 'Florida Experiment Station:
Use Black leaf 40 in the proportion .of 1 part to .1,000
to 1,800 of water. A good formula is the following: D;s-
solve whale-oil or other caustic, soap in 5 gallons of wa-
ter. If the water to be used for spraying is soft, use 2
or 3 pounds of soap, if 'ard use more. Add 2-5 of a pint
of Black leaf 40 and heat gently for 5 minutes. When
ready to use dilute-with water to 50 gallons.
In applying the spray use a nozzle with an elbow, afbd
be sure to spray the under sides of the leaves, because
it is there that the aphids are located.


SUGGESTIONS FOR CONTROL OF .WATERMELON
S ANTHRACNOSE.

The farmer who grows watermelons has no enemy more
serious than anthracnose. Where this disease secures a
firm foothold and where no efforts are made to dombat it,
thelosses are-enormous. However, there are very effec-
tive remedies for the disease which have meant grat sav-
ings already to Florida farmers. The Florida Experi-
ment Station and the Agricultural Extension Division
have long advanced this remedy.
This -best method of coniol is by spraying the vines
with 4-4-50 bordeaux mixture. If anthracnose spores or
germs are carried to healthy melon vines, they will be-
come diseased unless protected by a coating of spray
mixture, which prevents the germination of the spores
and the development of the fungus. Thorough appliga-
tions of bordeaux mixture will prevent the spread of the
disease and will help to control other diseases' of the crop
as well.
The following schedule will serve as a guide in knowing
just when to spray:
"Make the first application when the vines begin to
run.
"Spray the second time about one week after the first
melons have 'set' on the vines.








2t


"Make a third application about two weeks after the
second."
Should anthracnose Appear aAd the above schedule has
not been aued, ti .these eiiergehey measures: Spray
with bordeaux immediately and repeat the operation
about 10 days later. If rains are frequent at this time
a third spraying will probably be required.
Precautions to be observed:
"Unless necessary, do not work among the vines when
they are wet. -This is a good time to spread disease if
any is present.
"Select bright, sunny day for spraying, in order that
-the mixture will dry thoroughly.
"If possible, avoidspraying when the heavy bloom is
On, .as great care must Jbe taken at this time to avoid
breaking off blossoms with the hose.
"Order quicklime and bluestone (for making bordeaux) -
in advance. In an emergency hydrated lime, in amounts
of' a fourth to a half greater than quicklime, may be used.'
"Make the mixture carefully. If It contains more than
4 pounds bluestone to 50 gallons, the foliage may be se-
verely burned. Always use freshly prepared spraying
material."


Spray trees With limbeilphur and Black leaf 40 for
Iseb, thrips, red spider and mites.


INSECTICIDES.
The following information is furnished by the Ento-
mologist' t the State Plant Board, Dr. E. F. Berger:

S PrANT LICM.
o. Fr, plant lice, spray with tobacco extract, the odor of
which will disappear in about twenty-five hours after
application. Commercial tobacco extract should be used,
according to directions given on the package. If the to-
bacco extract used consists of the silphate of nicotine,
the nicotinee and water solution should have dissolved in
it, two to four pounds of soap to each one hundred gal-
lons of water-that is, proportionately.










* Home -ade tobacco extract may be madeby covering
tobacco dust, tobacco steMas,-in fact, any form of leaf
tobacco, r even smoking tobacco, with sufficient water-
no Imore-to cover the material in the dish. This may
be allowed to simmer over a low' fire for an hour, or al
lowed,,to stand over night. When ready to use, dilute
with ten parts of .water.
"MAT'" BnAfns (Laohnoesterna).

These beetles develop from the white grubs that are
frequently found in the soil. The'grubs feed on the roots
of plants, While the mature beetles feed on,the foliage,
They are considered very difficult to control. The sim-
plest remedy is to spray the trees or foliage attacked,
with Lead Arsenate, using "a pound, of Lead Arsenate
Powder, or two pounds of the paste, to fifty gallons of
water. To this mixture should be added two pounds, of
slacked .quicklime. The trees should'be thoroughly sprayed
with this so .that the poison gets on the under, 'as well
as the upper side of the leaves.
At times, the beetles can be -successfully collected by
suddenly jarring the tree, when they are most abundantly
present. A 'sheet or other suitable covering should be
placed on the ground under the tree tb receive the beetles
when they drop. The sheet or cloth should be quickly
rolled up to avoid their getting away; they are destroyed
by placing the sheet in a bucket, partly filled' with kero-
sene, or hot water.
Something dtn be accomplished by placing a lantern
or.iother strong light on. a block set in a tub, having an
inch or two of water, with some kerosene on the surface.
Very often a large number of the beetles can be caught by
such device; at other times they refuse to be trapped.


POTATO WART f)ISEASA ATTACK: TOMATO
PLANTS.
Recent. investigations made by the ignited States De-
partment of Agriculture on the control of the potato wart
disease, aEirbpeA~ trouble found in this country in 1918,
disclosed the fact that. this disease also attacks tomatoes.










Out of twenty-eight varieties of tomatoes planted in
wart-infested 'gardens in Eastern Pennsylvania in 1920
twenty-six were found to be susceptible to the diSease.
Wart'is'a very serious disease of potatoes, causing prac-
tically a total loss in badly infested soil. It attacks the
tuber, causing warty outgrowtlis, which may practically
cover or consume the potatoes. Its present known occur-
rence in the United States is confined to gardens in a few
mining villages in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Mary-
land, from which its spread is restricted by State quar-
antine laws. The disease attacks only the stems and roots
of the tomato plant, causing small warts. It probably
does not reduce the yield of fruit.
The importance of the discovery of the susceptibility
of tomatoes to potato wart lies in the fact that affected
tomato plants will serve to'cafry the disease over fr6m
year to year in the absence of potatoes and to introduce
it into new localities through the transplanting of to-
mato seedlings grown in infested soil. It is not yet
known definitely whether all varieties of tomatoes are
susceptible to the wart disease, but it is feared that such
may be the case. Other plants belonging to the potato
family are suspected of being susceptible to wart, and
some of these have been tested, but with inconclusive re-
sults, These tests will be repeated.


NEW BULLETIN ON IRISH POTAT6 FERTILIZERS.
Agricultural News-University.

SDo you expect to grow Irish potatoes this year? Have
you had any perplexing fertilizer problems in connection
With your potato growing heretofore? Are you interested
in potato -culture? -If you answer yes to these questions,
you should write to the Florida Experiment Station and
ask for a copy of Bulletin 158.
This bulletin tells 'of experiments and tests conducted
by B. F. Floyd and R. W. Ruprecht, fertilizer specialists
of the Experiment Station, in order to determine the best
'fertilizers for Irish. potatoes and which covered a period
of three years.










Most of\the tests were. conducted on the farm of F. M.
Leonard and Company (of Boston) at Hastings, Florida.
The tests were carried out under regular field conditions
and the part of the field on which the tests were made
was typical of the average potato fields.
Two experiments were outlined in the spring of 1918.
The purpose of/one was to study the results to be obtained
from the use of raw Florida phosphate and of acid phos-
phate as sources of phosphoric acid in fertilizers for Irish
potatoes, as compared with those obtained where no phos-
phate was used. The purpose of the other was to study
results to be obtained from the use of fertilizers con-
taining various percentages of potash in comparison with
those obtained where no potash was used. Both exlpri-
ments were conducted on identical soil and under like
conditions.
The following conclusions were drawn:
1. Soluble phosphoric acid was necessary in the early
stages, of growth to produce vigorous plants.
2. Raw rock phosphates failed to produce maximum top
growth.
3. Pebble phosphates in 1920 gave a yield that was
nearly as great as from acid phosphate.
4. Soft phosphate has not proven as good as the pebble
phosphate.
5, In absence of sufficient potash tubers did not reach
full size, and in extreme scarcity the normal growth of
the tops was also interfered with and certain appearances
characteristic of potash starvation developed.
Write for the bulletin and read all about the tests. It
is free for the asking.


POTATOES ASSUMING RANK AS AMERICAN
STAPLE FOOD.
With the continuing drop in price potatoes have re-
ceded from theiftemporary status as a delicacy and are
assuming their old rank as a great Ame4rcan staple food.
This is to be assumed from figures lately compiled by the
Bureau of ,Crop Estimates, United States Department of
Agriculture, which show that between harvest time and
January 1, this year, 285,172,000 bushels of tubers were
moved from the farms on their way to the table. This is
56,799,000 bushels more than left the farms in the corre-










spending period, of a year ago, or a half bushel additional
for every man, woman and child in the United States.
The potato crop of 1920 was the largest in the history
of the country, amounting to 430,458,000 bushel,, and
of these only 145,286,000 bushels were estimated as re-
mailing in the hands of growers and dealers January 1.
In 1919 the crop was 385,773,009 bushels and the amount
in the hands of growers and dealers January 1, 1920,
was estimated at 127,400,000 bushels.
When the potato crop, has been large, iVder normal
conditions, the stocks of January 1 have usually been
large, before 1918, the stocks of January 1 were commonly
about one-half of the crop in the total of the principal
northern potato-producing states. In the case of the
1920 crop, on the contrary, the stocks on the farm Jan-
uary 1 amounted to only one-third of the crop, and' were
smaller than the average of the three preceding years,
when the production was much less.
Statisticians po the department believe the greater
consumption of potatoes has been encouraged by the
drop in prices. For the entire country the average price
received by growers w4s $3.09 a bushel August 1; $1.85,
September 1; $1.35,. October 1; $1.18, November 1; $1.16,
December 1, and $1.06, January 1.


GOvERMiAtENT WILL MAKE SWEET POTATO
SYRUP.
Gulf States Farmer.
What may mean an important new industry for the
South and a market for the waste of one of its most inp-
portant farm products was given its initial impetus re-
cently in the decision of the United States'Department
of Agriculture to establish a production unit at Fitz-
gerald, Ga., for thp manufacture of sweet potato syrup.
The process for the manufacture of syrup from sweet
potatoes was worked out in the laboratories of the Bu-
reau of Chemistry by Dr, L C. .Gore. The syrup is rich
in sugar, of a fioe brown color and highly palatable. It
has been found to be valuable for baking, candymaking
and table purposes. Many persons think it equal to first.
AlsnaA cane srinM










While the product is a success from a laboratory stand-
point, the department is pot ini position to recommend it
to manufacturers until questions of the cost of commer-
cial production and. the, market value of the product,
Compared with cane,j corn and other syrups, is deter-
mined.
For this reason the project was turned over to the Of-
fice of Development, in the Bureau of Chemistry. Mem-
bers of the staff, ade a tour of the principal sweet por
tato centers of the South, where they found a wide-spread
interest in the project. Chambers of commerce, rotary
clubs and similar commercial organizations in a score of
cities although aware that the proposed plant was only
experimental, were anxious to secure it for their own
communiities. Fitzgerald was selected partly because it
has a large potato curing aind storing establishment which
promises a supply of material from the 1920 crop. A
site and building for the project were also available.
Equipment specially constructed by the department at
Washington -will be shipped- to Fitzzgerald immediately
and installed to be put in operation as soon as possible.
The possibilities of the sweet potato syrup industry
lie largely in the utilization and marketing of a part of-
the crop which heretfoore has not been practicable for
storage or shipment to the Northern markets. This re-
sults in the losses of a large percentage of- the crop annu-
ally. Potatoes that are too large or too small for table
use or for commercial canninga'ie as useful in syrup as
perfect ones.
The process, which was developed by Dr. Gore, has
been patented by'the Department of Agricultures for the
benefit of the public. The apparatus required is so simple
and comparatively inexpensive- that plants could be es-
tablished within' team-hauling distance of glowing cen-
ters, as is the case with :canneries.
This 'is the first project undertaken by the new Office
of Development., When the commercial possibilities of
tested it is the intention of the Bure.u of Chemistry to
establish : aiilar semi-compnercial plants -or the devel-
opment of other projects that have been worked out in
its laboratories.











EFFICIENT SWEET POTATO EXCHANGE
NEEDED NOW.
Progresive Famer.
Southern farmers should not wait yntil the sweet po-
tato comes into its own.. They should bring it int9 its
own. All over the South there are sweet potato selling
associations and sweet potato curing houses doing suc-
cessful business. They are demonstrating that it is pds-
sible to cure swet potatoes, to grade them and put out a
highly'marketable product that brings a big profit to the
grower. This is fine as far as it goes, but it is only a
start in the right direction- Instead of'each of these as.
sociatiqns working with others, they are now unconsci-
ously but really competing with the others in the market.
What' is needed more than any other one thing to put
the sweet potato on the market of the country is a fed-
eration of all the swet potato associations in the South
into one swet potato selling organization with central
.offices to keep in touch with the various local associations
throughout the South and to control the distribution of
the present crop. As it is today the individual associa-
tions or exchanges are following the markets with their
output, shipping first to New York on reports of high
prices there, switching west to Qmaha, again tk Cincin-
nati, and then overcrowding the Chicago markets with
each market'in turn going down owing to the increased
supplies. -
A central exchange with district branches ean keep in
touch with every association and inform each just where
to ship its output, keeping all'markets evenly supplied
and with. jst enough to keep the demand'at the highest
point. Such an association should be modeled along the
lines of the California Citrus Fruit Growers' Exchange.
It can be organized by community, county and state ex-
changes with the state exchanges federated into one cen-
tral exchange, or by district exchanges covering just the
sweet potato sections and: these federated. Secretaries
of sweet potato houses, county agents and others realize
the importance of this movement, and have some over-
head associations started, one at Atlanta. Farm bureau
officials and leaders would do well to push this plan to a








31

practical completion with some- definite source of reve-
nues in order to help sell this year's crop, which is re-
ported very large.
SThe salaries of the officials of the central exchange as
well as of the salesmen located in every market city/in.
'the country present a problem, but.these can be paid by
a very, small percentage assessed on eaph shipment haA-
dled through the exchange. An advertising fund should
immediately be started by the same method. In order 'to
get the machinery started local associations can well af-
ford to make advances to the central association. South-
ern bankers could not advance credit to better advantage
than to help this movement.
The swet potato market is capable of development and
the demand could be stimulated to handle any sized crop
the SQuth is capable of producing. Some of the large
commercial companies are seeing the possibilities in sweet
potatoes and are attempting to cash in on them. It will
be easier for the farmers. to organize their own selling
machinery, before these come in than it will later,


SUGAR CANE CULTURE.

By K. E. BRAGDON,
Cfuwnty Agent Bretiad Coumnty.'
Beforeplanting sugar cane is the time to make plans.
Some farmers plant cane direct from the preceding crop,
while others bed it for a number of weeks. Without at-
tempting to' advise whether or not it should be planted
in fall or spring, the following general suggestions are
given for the- benefit, of all:
DaAINAG.-Land should be thoroughly drained until
Sthe water table is at -least two feet below the surface of
the ground, even deeper in the case of muck lands. If
a certain plot can not be drained to this extent, it- may
be bedded up into lands wide enough for two or three
rows.
S'oIr PREPARATION.-The soil should be well plowed and
pulverized. If it is very acid, which :is seldom the case,
an application of lime should be given two or three weeks
before plantiig.










Smip.-Great care should be used in selecting canes
for planting that have not been frosted. If the buds are
dark brown or black when cut open, the seed stock should
be rejected. Canes should be cut into pieces containing
three or four joints. It should not be exposed to sun or
wind.longer than necessary.
'PrANTING.-.Furrows five feet apart apd 'abdut six
inches deep should be plowed off and the' canes laid in
the bottom and covered about three inches -deep. It is
well to, giye the lnd a light cultivation shortly after
planting to conserve soil moisture. Grass and weeds
must be kept down at all times, and cultivation should
Sbe kept up until the ground between the rows is entirely
shaded by the growing cane.
FEBTILIZING.-About two or tree weeks before active
growth starts, an application of from 300 to 7Q00 pounds
ofl high grade fertilizer to the acre should be made. Fol-
low this by a like application during the latter part of
,June. About 200 pounds nitrate of soda to the acre Jnay
bb added early in September, if the growth does niot ap-
pear thrifty.

; KUDZU.
By J.-B. THOMPSON,

fZorage C&ops specialist Agripultural Extension Division.
SIudsu is a rank growing perennial legume. On the
light saidier soils of Florida it has not returned large
yields, but on the heavier soils it. has produced satis fac-
forily. The crops on the Experimental Station farm of
1912 and 1914, as published in the annual reports for
those yeqrs, showed an average yield of a little more than
one and one-fourth tons cured hay an acre, and this on
:land that would have returned similarly light yields of
other crops. OQ good lands, and especially on the clay
soils', of the northern and western part of the State, three.
four, or more tons of cured hay an acre have been rei
ported.
Kudzu hay is highly nutiitious,, comparing favorably
in cn6position with alfalfa, clover, cowpeas and beggar-
weed.









Tiqx SuILo FACTs.
"How are you going to harvest that 1orn crop-by
way ,ofthe stalk, the shock, or the silot' irr. J. Kelly
Wright of the Missouri State Board of Agricultcrb'asks
this timely question, and makes the following statement
of "'en Silo -Faects.a"
D, Do not overlook the fact that the acreage of hay is
below normal this year...Although the quality of hay and
the yield per acre this year may be better- than in normal
seasons, the r6ighage supply from this source will fall
far short o fthe demand. Silage is a roughage. It is the
Best cheap roughage we have.
S2. By the use of silage. we can maintain twice the num-,
,er of live stock per acre.
3: I increased production when desired should, result
Sfrom increaed acre yields,
S4. The:man who does not measure acre yields in pounds
ofbeef, pounds of dairy products, or in pounds of:mutton,
etc., instead of in tons of grain and hay has not even
'begun to farm successfully. Beef can be produced more ,.
economically when silage f6~fts a part of the ration.
S5. By the use of silage in the ration, coarse, .dry iough-
;age in the shape othay or perhaps corn or fodder can be
utilized to a better advantage. The silage adds palata-
Sbhleness and" sueculentVy t the ration.: The beef. animal
surpasses all other animals oi'.the farm in converting
coarse roughage that would, if itself,'riot find a market,
into desirable market products in the form of juicy stea s
and roasts.
6. Economical production of, beef in the future will de-
pend largely uponeconomical handling of breeder and
Stockerr cattle, 'Good sheep rations for these classes of
cattle must include silage. .The sio, then, will play'an-,
important part inecoomieal production,9of beef. Silage
fed cattle are good enough for anybody to eat. Prevail-
i tg pBces of cattle, it seems, should be enough to' ce-
.vince'any man that a cheaper ration with lesp of high,
priced cor i desirable.,
-7. T'e larger the acreage in proportion to a'man's busi-
Oess ability the less need he will have for a silo, for the
Season that the greater the acreage the greater the amount
of rogghage and the more he can afford the waste.
3-Bulledn










8. The greater a man's business ability in proportion
$o his acreage the greater use he can make of a silo.
9. A silo lf4eet x 30 feet will hold about 100 tons of
silage, enough to. feed twenty-five head of stock such as
breeding cows, stock cattle, feeler cattle, fattening cattle
or- dairy ,cows, about 180 days$. It will take about ten
acres of corn averaging thirty-five bushels to the acre to
make this.-amount of silage.
-10. There is no "best" silo. Secure a silo that will be
dn keeping with other improvements already on the farm,
or in keeping with good improvements contemplated. A
good silo on a farm is a mark 6f prosperity and progres-
siveness.


I OW TO. MAKE TABLE GRAPES AVAILABLE
ALL YEAR BOUND.
New. varieties of 'fruit differing from those usually
found on the market are'always of interest. New varie-
ties of table grapes brought by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture from Europe, recently formed the
basis of a.midwinter demonstration of the keeping- qual-
ities -of these valuable sorts, new to the American vine-
yard industry.
The varieties used in this test, were introduced by the
Department of Agriculture; grown in the vineyards un-
der its direction near Fresno, Oakville, and Colfax, Calif.;
packed by its investigators; transported to its experi-
mental cold-storage plant at the Arling Farm near Wash-
ington; and held until midwinter, long after the holiday
season, with the result that at' least six new varieties of
potential commercial value have been demonstrated to
possess keeping qualities beyond any.hope which the in-
vestigators at the department entertained.
While repeated seasonal tests will be necessary fully to
determine the value of these varieties under American
conditions, the prospect of their proving superior in des-
sert'and keeping quality to the varieties now generally
grown appears excellent. In view of the profound changes
which the viticultural industry is now undergoing, the
lengthening of the consuming season for American-grown
table grapes is highly desirable to both producers and
consumers. The experiments under way indicate the







35

strong probability that by growing varieties especially
adapted to the purpose, and following packing, trans-
portation, and storage methods, which have been worked
out by the department, our markets can be supplied with
American-grown grapes of high quality for at least two
months later in the winter than is now the case.



INSECTS OUR FORMIDABLE RIVALS.
By DR. L. O. oWARDan, Mef, Bureau of Entomology,
United States Department of Agriculture.
The insects are our most formidable rivals in the strug-
gle for existence.
Economic entomology does not deal alone with insects
. which attack fruits and growing crops. It must deal with
insects that affect grains and foods in storage, that dam-
age our clothing, that kill our domestic animals and, too,
that carry disease to man himself, that eat up our wooden
buildings, and that honeycomb our books and implements.
We nAust fight them all along the line.
One of these insect enemies against which the Bureau
of Entomology has been directing a fight, is the 'angou-
mois grain moth, popularly known in this country as the
fly weevil.' It is primarily a pest of-wheat.and corn in
this country, but affects all cereal,.grains. It is partic-
ularly injurious in the Southern States, and does little
harm north of central New Jersey, except to cereals in
storage.
RUINs WHOI-':ROPS.
It is second to the rice, or bl4ck, weevil in its' capacity
to damage grain. Often entire crops of corn and wheat
are ruined. Wheat loses through moth attack about 52
per cent of weight. Corn loses from 12 to 24 per cent.
Bread made from affected grain is worthless. The moth
also eats barley, oats, buckwheat, sorghum, milo, rice,
beans, chickpeas, and cowpeas.
This is 'mentioned as an example of avoidable insect
Spests which the United tSates Department of Agriculture
not only teaches but assists farmers to avoid.
In the case of the angoumois moth, which works dam-
age to stored grain in regions where its propagation
among growing crops is prevented by the short seasons,








86

the department is u6ging farmers to fight, the pest system
matically by such measures and early threshing, proper
storage, and fumigation. It teaches them to take ad-
vantage of the weakness of the insect by fighting its fur-
ther spread.
It is only by constant and intelligent effort that man-
kind can overcome the ravages of insects of every kind
which attack .almost every substance on which he depends
for his livelihood and comfort. In this effort, the public
should take advantage of the services rendered by experts
of the Bureau. of F~ntomology and by other experts of the
department.

ANNUAL. INSECT l ILL ALMOST TWO BILLIONS.
By H., 0. BisHOP.
T'e Dearborn Independent.
According to a careful survey by the Bureau of Ento-
mology -of the United States Department of Agriculture,
the depredations of injurious insects cause an annual
nionetary loss to American agriculture' of the appalling
asm 'of $1,554,869.300. The loss has grown since the
foregoing estimate and is now reckoned at nearly two
billion, dollars.
:Were it not for the constant destruction of insects by
the birds of the United States, the damage to farm and
garden prodduts would, undoubtedly, be much greater.
The benflcial activities of birds is illustrated by the
fact that in some places where especial attention has been
paid to attracting and protecting birds the damage by
insects has become practically unnoticeable. A careful
estimate showsthat the grasshoppers destroyed monthly
-by a single meadow lark would consume forage worth at
the lowest valuation 50 cents. In the six months that
Smay properly be included in the grasshopper season, ther-
fore, each meadow lark prevents the loss of $3 from de-
vastation by grasshoppers. The amount saved by the de-
struction of other injurious insects must be fully as
great, so that a meadow lark may be fairly estimated to
destroy insects capable of causing damage of at least $6
i year.








*:1v


On account of its larger size, the. meadow lark is eon-
siderably above the average of our insectivtorous birds in
its capacity for destroying insects. The value of many
birds in preventing increases in losses from farm pests
crtainly can be estimated conservatively at $1 a year.
But to give some idea of the way in which the benefits
from the useful services of birds mount into large sums
when estimated in monetary terms, and at the same time
to be entirely on the safe side,, we may set the average
cash value of the destruction bo pests of agriduIture by
birds at the ridiculously low figure of ten cents a bird
each year. Numerous bird censuses have agreed in ar,
rivig at the.figure of two birds an acre as the normal
bird population of the country. On this basis there Are
each summer at least 3,806,500,000 breeding birds in the
United States. This takes no account of young)birds.
At the rate of ten cents each, the value of these birds in
'-reventing insect damage-is $388,650,000,- annually. iThe
,gjgrants that pass through the United States equal in'
number, if they do not surpass, the population of breed-
ing birds. hey .pend on the( average a month apiece in
their passage. during which time they feed upon our-in-
juriuos insects. Estimating the value ,of each of these
birds in proportion to the time they are with us at one-
sixth that, of the native species, we arrive at an added
saving of insect damage of $63,441,666, Which brings the.
total to more, than $444,000,000. This is a minimua es;
timate of the 'additional in sect damage the people of the
United States would have to endure were it not for kthe
beneficial services bf birds.
Yet, despite the valuable economic services performed
by our feathered, friends, they are slaughtered' in fast
number's, either to' provide a tasty meal,. or just-for the
sake of wanionlykilling something.
If the present small number of: birds in this country ,is
capable of destroying so many insects, thus preventing
enormous losses to growing food crops, it can easily be'
surmised 'how great would be the value of birds if their
numbers were largely increased through common-sensea
protection.,
pDr; Alberti Fisher, in charge of economic Investiga-
tions of the-.Bureau of Biological. Survey of the United
SSta'tes Department of Agriculture; investigated 'pellets
Found at "the roost of a long-eared owl and found the


; - ^ 4










remains of 95 meadow mice, 19 pine mice, ;15 house
mice,, five white-footed mice, three Cooper's mice, 26
shews, and 13 birds, pf which 11 were sparrows, .one a
bluebird, and the other a warbler. Eighty-six out of 92
stomachs examined by Dr. Fisher also contained mice.
The little screech owl, according to Dr. Fisher, is a dili-
gent mouser, also consuming grasshoppers, crickets, bee-
tles, cutworms, toads, scorpions, lizards, crawfish, frogs
and fsh. As many as 50 grasshoppers have been found
in one stomach, 18 beetles in another and .13 cutworms
in another.
An investigation oN28 stomachs of hawks disclosed
from five to 12 meadow mice in them. A few rats, house
mice, shews, and other small mammals also were found.
Among other insect destroying birds is the nighthawk,
or bull-bat, which breeds throughout most of the United
States and Cdnada, and winters in South America. It
is strictly intersectivorous, and hence does no damage to
crops.- The only charge that can be made against the
bird is that it destroys some .useful insects, but these
are greatly in the minority in its food. Nighthawks are
so expert in flight that no insect can escape. In their
caiacious mouths they sweep up everything from the
largest moths and dragon flies to the tiniest ants and
gnats, and in this way sometimes gather most remarka-
ble collections of insects. Several stomachs have con-
-tained 50 or more'different kinds.
Ants comprise nearly a fourth of the birds' total food.
These insects are genarilly annoying and often very in-
juriohs, especially on account of their damage to stored
products and because -of their habit of fostering destruc-
tive plant lice. More than a fifth of the nighthawk's
-food consists of June bugs and beetles. These are the
adults of white grubs, noted pests,-and even as arults
many members of the family are decidedly harmful.
Nighthawks are much less numerous than formerly,
.chiefly because of wanton shooting. They are given full
legal protection almost everywhere, and citizens should
see that the law is obeyed. The bird is far too useful and
attractive to be persecuted.
No bird is better known to country residents than the
bobwhite. The bird's cheery calls the year round form
part of the most pleasant associationsof country life, and







39


its ,eat :form arid harmonious coloration, and especially
its confijinfig habits, make it a general favorite.
Animal food, chiefly insects, comprise nearly a sixth, of
the bird's subsistence. From June to August, inclusive,
when insects are most numerous, their proportion in the'
food is about 36 per cent. The variety of insect food is
great and includes a nuxpber of the most destructive agri--
cultural pests. Among them may be mentioned the Col-
orado potato betle, 12-spotted cucumber beetle, bean leaf
beetle, squash ladybird; wireworm. Many beetle, corn
billbug, clover leaf weevil, cotton boll weevil, arthy worm,
h'bollworm, cutworm and chinch bug. The food habits 'of
the bobwhite undoubtedly are beneficial and the bird
should be maintained in numbers on every farm. This
is not to say that all shooting should be prohibited, for
the bird is very prolific., ut its numbers' should not be
reduced below what the available nesting sites and range
will support.: On the other hand the policy of absolute
protection recently adopted by one state, is not called
for by strictly economic considerations.
In food habits the house wren is entirely beneficial.
He nmay be said to live upon animal food alone, for an
examination of 88 stomachs showed that 98 per cent of
the contents was insects or their allies, and only two per,
cent was vegetable food, including bits of grass and sim-
ilar matter, evidently taken by accident with the insects.
Half of this food consisted of grasshoppers and beetles;
the remainder of caterpillars, bugs and spiders.' As the
wren is prolific, .frequently rearing in a season from 12
to 16 young, a family of,these birds must cause consider-
able reduction in the number of insects in a garden.
Wrens are. industrious foragers, searching every tree,
shrub, and vine for caterpillars, and examining every
post and rail of the fence and every cranny in the wall
for insects or spiders.
Examinations of the stomachs of 1,236 robins show
that 42 per cent of its food is animal matter, principally
insects, while the remainder is made up largely of small
fruits or berries. More than 16 per cent consists of-
beetles, about one-third of which are useful ground bee-
tles, taken mostly in spring and aitumin when other in-,
sects are scarce.- Grasshoppers make up about five per
cent of the, wrole food, but in August they comprise 17
per cent. Caterpillars form about nine per cent, while










of the rest of the animal food, about 11 per cent is made
~up, of various inject,I with a feiw spiders, snails, and
-bugs, with'a large portion of the beetles, are injurious,
and it is safe to say that noxious insects comprise,more
thani one-third of the iobin's food. -
The stomachs of 645 catbirds 'were examined and found
to contain 44 per cent of animal (insect) and 56 per cent
of vegetable food. Ants, beetles, caterpillars, and grass-
hoppers constitute three-fourths of the animal food, the
remainder being made up of bugs, miscellaneous insects,
and spiders. One-tlird of the vegetable food consists of
captivated fruits, or those which may be cultivated, as
strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries; but while we
debit the bird with the whole of this, it is probable-and
in the eastern and well-wooded part'of the country al-
most certai--that a large part is obtained from wild
'vines. The rest of the vegetable matters is principally
wild frqit, as cherries, dogwood, sour, gum, elderberries,
greenbrier, spiceberries, black lder, sumac, and poison
ivy. Although the catbird sometimess does considerable
harm by destroying small fruit, it cannot,, on the whole,
be considered inljunious, Opnthe contrary, in most parts
of the elintry it does' far more good than harm.
s even common species of swallows are found within
the limits of the United States, four of which have aban-
doned to- some extent their primitive nesting habits and
have attached themselves to the abodes of man.
Field observation convinces an ordinarily attentive
person that the food of swallows must consist of the
smaller insects captured in midair or picked froin the tops
of tall grass or weeds. This observation is borne out by
an examination of:stomachs, which shows that the food
is made pp of ina~ small species of beetles which are
nuch on the wing;' many species of mosquitoes and their
allies together with large. quantities of flying ants; and
a few insects of similar kinds. Most of these are either
inj*iious or annoying, and the numbers destroyed by
swallows are not only beyond calculation, but almost be-
.yond imagination.
The western bluebird, one of the most familiar and wel-
come of our feathered visitors; is a common inhabitant
of all the states east of the Rocky Mountains from the
uilt of Mexico. to southern C5anada. In the Mississippi
Valley it winters as far-north as Southern Illinois, and









in the East as far as Pennsylvania. It is one of the ear-
Hiest northern migrants, ahd everywhere is hailed as the
Harbinger of spring. Very domestic in haMtb, it frequents
orchards and gardens, and buids-its nests in cavities of:
trees, earnnies in farm buildings, or boxes provided for
its use.
SIt i evident that in the selection of its food the blue-
bird is governed more by abundance than by choice. Pre-
dacious betles are eaten in spring; as they are among the
first insectA to appear;bhut in early summer caterpillar
form an important part of the diet, and thes.are later
Replaced by grasshoppers. Beetles are eaten at all times,
except when grasshoppers are more easily obtained. As.
:far as vegetable food is concerned bluebirds are posi.
tively hainless. ,The only trace of useful products found
in their stomachs are a few blackberry seeds, and even
these probably belonged to wild rather 'than cultivated
varieties. Other seeds found were: chokeberry, juniper-
berry, pokeberry, partridgeberry, greenbrier, Virginia
creeper, bittersweet, holly, strawberry bush, false spike-
nad, wild sarsaparilla, siumac, rose haws, sorrel, ragweed,
grass and asparagus. This list shows how little the blue-
Sbird depends upon the farm or garden for food, and how
easily by encouraging the growth of such plants, the bird
may-be induced to live on the premises.
Two species of bluebirds inhabit the western states-
the mountain bluebird and the western bluebird.. In food
habits they are even more to be commended than their
eastern relatives.
Many other birds are equally as benfacial to agricultu,
rists' as. those mentioned above.
It's far better to cultivate birds than to assassinate
them.

THE IDEAL PASTORE' GIA'SS FOR FLORIDA.
Florijdi Grower.
The serious study of permanent pasturage adapted to
Florida climatic and soil conditions has only-been tsiken
up during recent years, probably due to the fact that sys-
tematic livestock production built on a scientific founda-.
tio, is of only recent structure in this t~Sate.
Carpet grass, (Axonopus 0m pressus) bears a!l the e:ar
marks of filling the bill as an ideal permanent/pasturage










grass adapted to average Florida. climatic and.soil con-
ditions. This grass, though of old introduction, has beeh
brought to public notice in a broad way only recently.
SThough of tropical origin, being introduced from the
West Indies, Carpet grass, is quite hardy throughout
Florida, being able to withstand winter cold as low as ten
degrees above zero, differing greatly in this regards to
Bermuda grass and therefore Carpet grass should furnish
much better winter pasturage as compared to Bermuda.
Carpet grass is very aggressive and spreads rapidly by
both surface runners and seed and under favorable con-
ditions will even crowd out Bermudd itself taking com-
plete possession of the field,/and still this grass (Carpet)
cannot be considered to develop the characteristics ef a
pest, as unlike Bermuda it does not produce underground
rott stocks and whenever necessity requires Carpet grass
can be readily eradicated by simply plowing it under.
Carpet grass grows to better advantage under poor con-
ditions of soil fertility as compared to the standby per-
manent pasturage grass, eBrmuda, and this wonderful
grass can, also withstand closer grazing and nmode tramp-
ling, as well. We maya lso state that as to palatability
Carpet grass may be considered. to 'be even superior to
Bermuda as it does not tend to, become as tough with age.
All kinds of, stock, including poultry, appear to relish
Carpet grass,
In the efficient and proper utilization of Florida low
pine lands of the'typical "flat-woods" type, we believe
That Carpet grass as a permanent pasturage grass is very
shortly to fill a very important place'in standardizing our
newly developing livestock industry of rapidly growing
importance. These flat-woods lands taken as a class
show fine to very fine compacted sands with considerable
silt, they usually retain and conserve soil moisture' un-
usually well for sandy soils and are-in every way from a
physical or mechanical standpoint perfectly adapted to
the successful growing of Carpet grass for permanent
pasturage purposes. '
Fire appears to be the only real enemy of Carpet grass
and we believe that if it was not for the common Florida
curse of annually burning off our woods, that Carpet
grass (Axonopus compresses) would largely replace our
hardy, fire-resisting native grasses and isedges, especially









Sin our,vast Florida flat-woods areas, as,our observations
in the field shows that Carpet grass through its aggres-
siveness, when protected from fire quite successfully com-
petes with practically all our forest floor growths with
exception of the saw palmetto and this latter growth can
be readily killed by simply "budding" (cutting out the
buds with a stroke of a grubbing hoe).
It is true that every successful livestock industry must
be built on a dependable, permanent grass pasturage
basis. Grasses are and always have been our best and
cheapest livestock feeds and permanent pastures the best
means pf meeting these needs of the livestock farmer.


CARPET GRASS FOR PASTURE.

Agricultural News, University.
Carpet grass is not a new grass to this country. It has
been grown in the South for nearly a century at least;
and is now one of the most important and most widely
distributed grasses in Florida. Its immense value to the
livestock, industry-of Florida and the South in general
has lately been given increased emphasis by the United
States Department of Agriculture, and a wide-spread
interest is evidenced by many inquiries concerning it.
The most important characteristic of this grass, and
the one that renders.it peculiarly fitted to Florida condi-
tions is its ability to establish itself on untilled lands,
says J. B. Thompson, forage crops specialist of the Uni-
versity of Florida. One of the most urgent. needs of the
Florida cattleman is a good perennial grass that may be
inexpensively established on cutover lands where'the
presence of numerous roots and stumps preclude the plow..
Carpet grass meets this need wherever soil and mois-
ture conditions/are right. It is not exacting as to type
of soil but requires a fairly good supply of soil moisture.
It thrives on much of our flat-woods lands and on loca-
tions that do not become too dry.
In planting sow at the rate of five or six pounds of
seed to the acre where the native grasses have been
burned off or closely grazed and keep constantly pastured
down. Seedings may be made at any time from April-
until July, providing there is an abundance of moisture.
On la ge pastures where its success is :ot fully assured,










it ij well to restrict seedings to -mall, select areas; and,
if. these are successful, seed wll be produced which will
be distributed by stock to other parts of the range.
Carpet grass makes its best growth in the open and
thrives best when subject to cose grazing and the tram-
ppling of animals. It provides a permanent pasture, and
'furnishes a relatively large amount of feed that is relished
by all classes of animals.


PRICES OF COTTON vs. PRICES OF COTTON
GOODS.

An investigation based upon supply and demand and,
the price of the manufactured product shows that raw
cotton is the cheapest commodity in the world today,
selling far below a fair price. Off grades are selling at
a price that means murder to the producer. We wish to
quote the following figures taken from the Textile World'
Journal, shawing' the range of price of three sizes of
combined yarns, taken semi-annually from June, 1914,
to December, 1919. The three sizes ar4 No. 40, 2-ply; No.
60, 2-ply, and No. 89, 2-ply:

1914 1915 i916
June Dec. June Dec. June Dec.
S2-4-0s .. ......$ .43 .38 .40- .50 .58 .85
2-60s ......... .55 .50 .52 .65 .75 1.05
2-80s .......... .75 .70, .72 .85 1.00 1.25

1 917 1918 1919
June Dec. June Dec. June Dec.
2-40s ........ .85 .90 1.00 .95 1.20 2.50
2:66s ....... .. 1.10 1.15 1.P5 1.20 1.55 3.50
2-80s ,1.........1.40 1.45 1.55 1.50 2.00 4.75

We wish also to refer to an address made by Congress-
man Tilson of Connecticut in directing the Federal Trade
Commission to ;investigate the /alleged profiteering of
cotton mills in the United States, which appears in a re-
cent issue of the Congressional Record. In this address
the following was brought out,
"It will be observed that the increase in price of, these
yarns from Junie, 1914, to June, 1919, according to the.









figures quoted above, is somewhat gradual, but from June,,
1919, to Decemb r, 1919, there isin every case a violent
jump of more than 100 per ent in the short space of six'
months. In the same six months raw cotton Advanced
only about 15 per- cent, and wages, the other principal
item in the cost of production, not more than a per cent."
Wewilsh to quote from a hearing before the United
States Senate held some few months ago in investigating
the high cost of living. The investigating committee was
composed of Senators Ball of Delaware, chairman; Ar-
thur Capper, Kansas; David Elkins, West Virginia; Mor-,
ris Sheppard, Texas, and Nat TB Dial, South Carolina.
"Exhibit before the committee showing the cost of cot-
ton in articles of merchandise apd the articles then being
com red. The following is the result:

1 piece of Ginghams ..,......."..... .25 4.54
,I piece of Voile ..... ..... ..... ..... 191% -.48
1 handkerchief .................. .'011 .25
2 pafr socks ....................... .04V '.80


SPECIALISTS TEST STRENGTH OF MANY COTTON
': V i-TJES. ,

Meady cotton is 5 per' cent more "wasty' than, Seat
Island, tests made by the Bureau of Agriculture, reveal.
Attempts to determine the relative strength of the Meade
and Sea Island cottons also are being made, but have\not
been completed, Resultsathus far obtained indicate that
in the higher counts the two kinds of cotton are approx-
imately of the same strength.
Tests conducted in Arizona indicated that Pima (Amer.
ican-Egypt) cotton stored 30 days or longer was from -
to 15 per cent stronger than that gi'nted inipediately
upon picking, depending upon the size or number'of yarn
spn. -
Tests conducted to determine the relative value of Pima
cotton grown, in California as compared with that in Ar-
izona indicated that Arizona cotton was from 7 per cent
to 20 per cent stronger than the California cotton, de-
pending on the number of arn spun.
Other tests indicated that soil, fertilized with ammonia










produced better cotton than that fertilized with acid
phosphate or sulphate of potassium, and that cotton
which had been infected by the pink boll worm was weak-
ened from 33 per cent to 50 per cent.


CORN VARIETIES TEST AT MIISSSSIPPI DELTA
STATION.
Progressive Farmer.
The.purpose of this circular is to give results of variety
tests with corn at Delta Branch Station for the past five
years.
The test each year was made on well-drained loam soil
of only average fertility. No fertilizer 'was used in any
of the tests, and all of the plantings were made during
the month of March.
The land each year was broken flat early in the winter,
and a few days before time to plant, it was thoroughly
disked and thrown into beds at one furrow with a middle
buster. The beds were then harrowed down and the land
was almost level, when the varieties were planted in al-
ternate. rows.
The corn was planted in rows, threefeetsix inches wide
and thinned to one stalk about twenty-four inches in the
drill and was given average cultivation.






CORN VARIETY TEST FOB 191831914, 1915, 1916 AND 1917


NAME

Cocke's -Prolific .........
New Era ...............
ENo. 1, U. S. D.A....
Jones' Prolific ..........
N. C. Prolific .............
Mosby (Delta Station) ....
Gturd Seed ..............
Batts ........ ...........
Vardaman ....... .......
Strawberry ..............
Munsol k ............. .....
Florida Flnt .............
Davis' -Poor Land ........
Hastings' Prolific .........
Boone County White ......
W elchel ..................
Square Deal ..............
Hickory King ............
Silver Mine .............
Rockdale .................
Deaming ................
Reid's Yellow Dent .......
Funk's' Ninety Day.
Tennessee Rod Co ......
Mosby (Carr) ............
Mexican June ............
Mexomer .......... .....
Mosby (Willis) .........
Diamond Joe .............
Pride of Nishna .........
Creole Flint .;............
Marlboro (Wannsmaker) ..
Mosby (Woodruff) ......... I
Marlboro (Phelps) .......
Champion Yellow Dent....
Champion White Dent .....
Harpeth Valley .........
Webb's Watson ..........
Queen of Nishna ..........
Red Masterdon ..........
St. Charles ..........
Brawnele Yellow ...........


1918 1914
Bushel I Bushel
Bank Per Rank Per
Acre I Acre.
1 42.5 8 82.0
2 -40.8 -7 31.
3 89.7 t
4' 38.1 1 87.7
5 36.9
6 35.7 4 31.8
7 85.7 ......
8 85.4 18
9 35:1 2- 84.6
10 33.6 ....
11 38.2 8 25.5
12 82.8 9 28.0
18 81.3 6 31.4
14 81.1 5 81.5
15 31.1 11 27.2
16 30.0 ...... ...
17 27.0 ....
18 25.0
19 24.7
20 24.7 12 26.2
21 28 .....
22 22.9
23 22.0 14 17.4
. . . . 10 27.2




..... ...... ...... ......




f ;- ; ,! ; .. .. ....::


1915 1916 1917 .
n BSuhel Bushel Bushel
Ran Per, Rank Per Rank Per
I Acre : Acre rAer


7
9
-12


2 36.3
4. 4.6..
11 25.7
8 33.2
....... .......
.:.... .......
1 "42;5




S -* '
14 2360
10 31.7
... ..: .....


85.6
88.7
88.6
83.6
33.3
82.0
25.6
24.3


.......(


1 ,


2

7


106


40.1
S.......


.......
39.1

.85.3


382.4


....... .......
. . . . .






.... 1.7.
12 81.3
8 "S8.0
4 27.5
5 87.4
8 34.8-
9 38.8
14 81.0
S15 81.0
16 80.6
17 80.0.


r


I
!


1I
,....

7

2 |


"3'
....... '




""iii i
.......



"""i'
.......






I 8


4

.
. .
.10


60.8 1 42.2
.... 5.8
....... 3 .7
81.8
47.6 87.5
........ 85.7
29.7
55.0 40,5
y..... 88.6
..... 31.8


29.1
....... 80.0
2481.8
89.8 81.,7
....... 25.4
....... 80.0


....... 23.3
....... 22.9
.19.7
A8.9 87.6
S. ... 5.0
...... 6.7
83.6
.. 83.3
81.8
....... 284
...... 24.8
47.1 42.5
... 87.5
87.4
49.0 41.9
..... .. 88.8
S49.7 40.8
........ 81.0
...... 80.
80.0
47.0 47.0
46.4 46.4


I









R 48

CORN VARIETIES THAT HAVE BRfiN TESTED.


Num


iank Name


1. Cocke's Prolific ................
2. Vardanman ,....... ..................
3. Tennessee Red COo ..................
4. Mosby (Delta Station) ..............
5.'- Jones', Prolific .......... ...
6. Hasting's Prolifi ....................
7. Silver Mine .... .. ...................

THnaES OR MoaM YVARs.


iber Years
Tested

5
5
3
5
S3]
4


Average Yield
Per Acre


OCeke's Prolific ...................
Vardaian .............. ............
Tennessee Red Cob .................
Mosby (Delta Station) ................
Jones' Prolific ...................
Hasting's Prolific ...............
Silver Mine .......... ............


42.2
40.5,
37.6
37.5
37.0
36.5
31.7


It will be noted from the foregoing tables, that during
the five years tested, Cocke's Prolific was first three years,
second one year, and third one year; also, that Yardaman
;was first one year, second two years; seventh one year,
and ninth one year.
SJones' Prolific was first one year, fourth two years.
Mosby was second one yea., fourth one year, si*th one
year, aid seventh two years.
In studying the table of the averages, it will appear
that of the varieties tested Cocke's Prolific should be the
Delta'planter'r flrst choice; Vardaman second, Tennessee
Red Cob third, Mosby fourth, while of the early 'corns the
Idwa Silver .Mine is undoubtedly the best.










YIELDS O VARIETIES OF PEOAiB AT THE '
GEORGIA I EXPERIMENT STATION, 1920.
The following table gives the reolts of thle yields of
varieties of pecans at the .Gebrgia Experiment Station for
1920, and the total yields of the same trees from 1914 to
1920, inclusive, which is the total pounds of puts each
tree has produced from the tim it began bearing until
the present date.
There was only about 25 per cent of a normal crop of
nuts set on the trees in the spring of 1920. This fol-
lowed by severe attacks of mildew, -blight, and the nut
weevil, caused almost a crop failure.
It will be observed that Money-maker tree headed
the list in total pounds of auts, and a Robson tree came
as a very close second. It might be well to mention,
however, that the Robson filled very poorly and thus has
no rank as a. choice variety. The characters and quali-
ties of. these varieties are-so well known that descriptive
-onotes here are unnecessary:

Lbs. Nuts Total Lbs. Tree Set
VARIro 1920 1914-1920 Jan.
Row 1-
1. .Alley ............ .. 78.65 1908
2. Alley .................... 73.22 1908,
3. Atlanta ............. ... 30.10 1908
4. Atlanta ............... ... 24.55 1908
5. Beverage Triumph .... .... 27.90 1908
6. Beverage Triumph ..... . 30.65 1908
'7. Mantura ...... ....... :... 13.30 1910
8. Mantura ............ ... 13.35 1910
Row 2-
1. Bradley ... ............ 107.30 1908
2. Centennial ................. 9.55 1908
3. Centennial ............ ... .10.78 .1908
4. Curtis .............. .... 36:30 1908
5. Alley ............... .... 17.60 1912
6., Teche ................ .... 9.70 1912
7. Frotscher ............ .... 68.36 1908
8. Appomattox ........... .... 38.15 1908
Row 3- \
1. Teche ................ 5.50 124.7 1908
4--Bulletin








.50

; Lbs. Nuts Total Lbs. Tree Set
VARIPY. 1920 1914-1920 Jan.
2. Teche ............... .... 83.80 1908
3. 'rotscher ................ ... 38.65 1908
4. Frotscher ............. ..... 37.10 1908
5. Teche ............ .. .... 82.90 1908
6. an Deman .................. 7.60 1912
7. Teche .................. 72.60 1908
8. Teche ................ .... 50.35 1908
Row 4-
1. Alley ................. .25 22.15 1912
2. Mobile ................ 9.50 32.01 1912
3. Jerome ................... 62.90 1918
4. Jerome ............ .... 67.92 1908
5. Mobile ............... 2.50 30.25 1912
6. Moneymaker ........... 1.00 106.30 1908
7. Moneymaker .......... 37.50 134.85 1908
8. Nelson ............... .... 3995 1908
Row 5-
1. Nelson ............... 2.00 75.35 1908
2. Pabst ............... 7.50 93.85 1908
3. Pabst .............. 9.00 80.20 1908
4. Pan American ............ 1.85 1908
5. Curtis .............. ..... 49.20 1908
6. President ............. .... 5.60 1908
7. Randal ..,............. 8.00 .92.35 1908
8. Rockville ................. .... 1908
Row 6-
1. Rome .................... 90.75 1908
2. Rome ................ 1.50, 61.96' 1908
3. Appomattox ........... 2.75 21.45 1910
4. Russell ............... .50 18.95 1908
5. Robson ............... 00 132.00 1908
6. Robson ............... .50 112.27 1908
7. 5an Saba ............. .... 68.25 1908
8. San Baba ................. 56.70 1908
Row 7-
1. Stuart ............... .... 5.86 1912
2. Stuart ................... 28.10 1908
3. an Deman ............ 1.50 25.00 1908
4. an Deman ............ 1.00 15.05 1908
5. Washington ............... 25 1908
6. Young ..................... 23.10 1908
7. Teche ............... ..... 44.35 1908










Lbs. Nuts. Total Lbs. Tree Set
VAIRTY 1920 1914-1920: Jan.
8. Unknown ............. ... 27.56 1908
Moore ................ .... 2.00 1916
Schley ............... 1.00 2.00 1916
H. P. STUOKEY, Direotor.


FLORIDA AS A SUGAPRPRODUCING STATE.


FACTS AND FIGURES SHOWING 'PossBIjITIES THERS0 OF
SYRUP AND SUGAR INDUSTRY.


[In submitting the following article to the Manufactu-
rers' Record, Mr. Jones write :
"I have traveled from Savannah, Georgia, .to the Col-
orado River of Texas, across the cane belt of Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, seek-
ing information,. besides reading books, bulletins, reports,
and talking with parties personally on the subject. The
more I have learned, the more I am impressed with the
wonderful possibilities of growing excellent sugar cane
and -he manufacture of the same into the very finest of
syrup and sugar right here in the State of Florida, and'
that, too, as cheaply and easily, perhaps, as elsewhere.
"It has been shown that there would have been a sugar
shortage, even if the great war had not occurred, if the
old rate of production had not increased, from the fact
that the production of cane and beet sugar was falling
behind the consumption, that is, not keeping up with the
growth and demands of population. Of course, the dam-
age to the business in Germany, Austria, Belgium and.
iFance makes the problem all the more serious for years
to come. Now is the time and opportunity, if not the ne-
cessity, or the United States to grow its own sugar. And
it can be proved that Florida can grow the very best of
sugar cane, and that it can be manufactured into the
very finest of syrhp and sugar, just as easily and as
cheaply as it can be grown and manufactured in Cuba,
Puerto Rico, Hawaii or elsewhere, and cheaper and easier
than it can be produced from beets in the best beet-grow-










ii i egion&. Therefore, I hope that what I have written
may, in some measure, aid in the development M the busi-
nesw here in Flovida."-Edditor Manufaotwrara Reoord.]

By T. H. JONES,.
'Inuaetriql Agest US. 4 .. R R, Co., Jacksonvile, Fla,.

~Vithin the limited region from Charleston, '. C., to the
mouth of the Pecos River of Texas, across MaeoA, Ga.;
Montgomery, Ala.; Jackson, Miss.; Alexandria, La., and
Austin, Tex., the average crop-growing season ranges from
200 to 240 days a year, about four-fifths of the(time, and
throughout most of Florida, along the coast of the Gulf
of Mexico aAd in favored localities in Arizona the aver-
age season without killing frost is more than 260 days,
according to the Atlas of American Agriculture. Within
this limited climatic area is. the sugar-cane belt of th'e
tUited States, and what is believed to be the very best
of it is in the State of Florida, According to Dr. Wiley,
ex-United States chemist, "Florida's climate is certainly
superior tothat of any other State for sugar production."
"The soils, are largely of a sandy
nature; sand soils are not suitable for producing wheat.
S* But they are well adapted for producing sugar
; nd'starch." "In 1 lorida it is more a question of, climate
than of soil, since, with a favorable elimate,. scientific ag-
-riculture will produce a crop from almost any kind of
soil." "By the development of these great industries,
sugar and starch-making, including table syrups, untold
wealth will, in the near future, flow into Florida." "From
by-products of the factories, immense quantities of castle
food can be obtained, both from sugar-cane and the starch-
producing plants. MTl4u a dairy industry can be estab-
lished in connection with sugar and starch-making, which
W il aLd much to the-wealth of the State." * "In
one particular industry Florida stands pre-eminent, and
that is, the manufacture of table syrup from sugar-cane."
A tour of inspection of the cane belt of South Carolina,
South Georgia and North Florida was made by Dr. Wm.
0. Stubbs, while director of the Louisiana Sugar Experi-
ment Station, who thus reported it:
"A recent visit, to the cane-growing regions of Southern
Georgia and Florida has convinced me of the adapa-
biity of thee sections to the successes l growing of s~g-









ar-cans ad the manu4actpre of sagtI when the itelligent
and progressive -practices of the beet sugar producing
countries, are universally adopted. Both the esqil and cli-
mate of this section are favorable to the growing of cane,
as evidenced by the splendid patches, sometimes increas-
ing to small felds or plantations, found everywhere
throughout this belt'. These numerous object-lessons,
demonstrate, beyond cavil, that if a progressive agricul-
ture be adopted, by which .the proper preparation of the
soil; fertilization and cultivation of the plant, together
with rotation, including some leguminbus crops, at short
intervals, be secured, that these sections can successfully
make sugar.and syrup in competition, with the world.
"The numerous samples of sugar-cane grown in these
sections aid forwarded to us last seasold show by analy-
ses to be greatly superior in sugar content to that grown
upon the alluvial lands of Louisiana. This increased
saccharine content is of vital importance to the manu-
facturer of sugar, and as soon as demonstrated'lby one or
two local factories, will cause capitalists from every di.
reaction to speedily erect central factories throughout the
belt for the purchase of cane and the manufacture of
sugar."
He further stated to a friend in a-personal letter: "I
was amazed to find the extent to which sugar-cane was
grown ad' the quantity of syrup annually made for the
market. .1 spent several days in the field and weighed
quite a number of, acres growing in cane, and to my as-
tonishment found 'the yields were from 16 to 85 tons per
acre, a nd all show a large superiority in sugar
content to those grown upon the alluvial lands of South
Louisiana."
Comparison of Georgia and Florida sugar-cane with
that of Louisiana, Hawaii and Cuba, as given by Prof.
R. E. Blouin of the Louisiana Sugar Experiment Sta-
tion, follows:
Percentage.
Solids. Sucrose. Glucose.
Louisiana canes ...., 10 to 19 7 to 17 1.00 to 2M.0
Hawaiian eanes ..... 17 to 21 '15 to 19 .30 to 1.90
Caban canes ........ 17 to 19 15 to 18 .30to 1.0
Georgia canes ...... 18 16 1.00
Florida canes ....... 18 16 1.00










Professor Blouin stated the average summary. to be as
follows:
Louisiana canes ......... ......... 12 per cent sugar
Hawaiian canes ................... 17 per cent sugar
Cuban canes ..................... 16 per cent sugar
Georgia canes ................. 16 per cent sugar
Florida canes ........ ............ 16 per cent sugar

State Chemist of Florida, R. E. Rose, says this:

"Any soil in Florida that will produce a fair, crop of
corn will make good sugar-cane; the richer the better.
Clay and marl subsoils are preferable, if well drained.
Flat pine land, with a clay subsoil, well drained And fer-
tilized, makes fine crops. The plant is peculiarly robust,
and easily cared for, subject to few disasters. It' will
stand degrees of drouth or flood fatal to all other crops.
No peculiar skill is required to cultivate it, as is the case
with beets: After years of personal observation and hav-.
ing consulted large numbers of practical growers, I an
justified in saying a total failure of a cane crop has never
been known. Anyone who can raise Indian corn can
grow sugar-cane. One man can easily attend 20 acres."
The people of North Florida, South Alabama and South
Georgia have been growing sigar-cane for years, squeez-
ing out the juice with common horse-power mills, boiling
it. down and making syrup therefrom. The State Chemist
has given an estimate of 20 tons per acre, making 30
gallons of syrup per ton, as a fair average for Florida
sugar-cane made in this common way, and selling at 30
cents per gallon pre-war price. I have talked with scores
of farmers that told me of producing from 10 to 25 barrels
of syrup per acre. They estimate the cost of making as
about 10 cents per gallon. A Mr. Clark of Calhoun Coun-
ty, Florida, said he madein 1911, 42 barrels of syrup from
three acres of cane, selling it for 35 cents per gallon whole-
sale, a total of $490, an average of $163.33 per acre gross,
or $116.66 per acre net. Mr. Baggott of same county
stated he made 105 barrels from seven acres of cane, ob-
taining 3500 gallons of syrup, which he sold for $1225, at
35 cents per gallon, which would average $175 per acre
gross, or $125 net; while a Mr. Hance, near Blountstown,
informed me he made 27 barrels, or 900 gallons, of syrup
A ,. . a








1- 55


from one acre of sugar-cane, selling it at 80 to 35 cents
per gallon, or in excess of $270 per acre gross, or $1.80 net.
It will be observed that the yield of the cane grown by
the above-named parties ranged from 15 to 30 tons per
acre. Leonard Brothers, near Apalachicola River and the
Jackson and Calhoun County lines, reported a crop of 45
acres in 1916, producing 750 barrels, selling at 35 cents
per gallon, or about $194 per acre gross; while Mr. Samuel
Leonard informed ne that their crop for 1918 on 50 acres
would give them 800 barrels of syrup, which they had
sold for 95 cents per gallon, over $25,000, which would
make an average of $500 per acre gross. One is given this
information on a tour through the cane belt of North
Florida, South Alabama apd South Georgia, until it be-
comes a matter of wonder that capital long ago had not
entered this rich field and aided in the development of
the syrup and sugar industry until it might have been
today not only sufficient to have supplied the needs of
the United States, but for the export demands of the
world.
The world's total export of sugar for 1913, before the
war, was 9,665,905 tons, while we consumed in the United
States in 1914, according to Government reports, 4,396,-
898 tons.
Dr. Stubbs, Director of the Louisiana Sugar Experi-
ment Station, not only stated that he found the sugar-
cane of North Florida and South Georgia to yield from
16 to 35 tons per acre, but also that-it made from 225 to
240 pounds of sugar per ton of cane. If the minimum of
225 pounds of sugar per ton be taken, with an average
yield of 20 tons of cane to the acre, the production would
be 4500 pounds of sugar to the acre. State Chemist Rose
of Florida has made a still more conservative estimate of
20 tons of cane per acre, yielding an average of 1.75 pounds
to the ton of cane, or 3500 pounds of sugar per acre.
From this it may be determined--that the United States
could have produced the crop of 1914 for its own use on,
about.2,500,000 acres of good Florida land, while for the
world's export it would have required the sugar that could
be produced on about 5,500,000 acres.
There are probably 125,000,000 acres of land in the cane
belt of the United States where sugar-cane can be grown
with varying degrees of success. About one-third of this
area is found in the .State of Florida, and the southern







I\- :.~ '; .8-

part of Alabma atd Georgia, which chemist have dis-
covered produces cane of the highest "sugar conenntd
This is also the 'great syrup-producing region where was
produced in 1918, according to State reports$ as follows:

Acres of Yield
'Cane. O als syrup Valued at
Florida ............ 16,318 ,3,354,874 $2,681,464
Georgia .......... 300 8750,000 8,477,000
Alabama ........ 81,800 9,519,000 6,993,000
Totals ........ .165,418 21,623,874 $18,161,664

The combined, average yield of the three States is 130
gallons per acre, while the average yield of each State
is as follows: Alabama, 116 gallons per acre; Georgia,
130 gallons per acre, and Florida, 205 gallons per acre.
Valueing Florida syrup at only 50 cents per gallon, and
it is worth nearly twice that now, and charging 10 cents
per gallon for making (and where is there another an-
nual crop that -can be grown at as low cost and as free
From failure), that will pay a State average of over $100
per acre gross and more than $80 net.
Where can "cut-over" lands be converted more rapidly
into sugar plantations and stock farms? Why are not,
more people growing cane in Florida if it is so profitable?
Simply because Florida has more land than people, and
'the thrifty farmer and syrup and sugar manufacturer has
not discovered, and worked this gold mine. Few know
that good "cut-over" lands can be purchased from $15 to
$25 per acre and converted so reasonably into a livestock
or sugar plantation.
Twenty-five years ago, when ten dollars' worth of al-
falfa was sold from an acre of Kansas land, wise men
said: "That is 10 per cent on $100 per acre, and the land
will eventually go to that price." Has not that prophecy
loig ago been fulfilled as to. good alfalfa lands in Kansas?
In Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa and other places having
long, cold winters, and not always an, assurance that the
annual crop will pay either $10 or $40 per acre, have not
their lands been sHiting from $1'00 to $400 per acre?
In comparison with other regions, what will possibly
be the ultimate price of these selected lands so peculiarly
adapted to the growing 6f sugar-cane and livestock, in this










geographically and climatically circumscribed area of the
United States Cane Belt?
-In the light of the evidence given and the experiments
and demonstrations made again and again .for many
years by numerous persons, both private and public, as
well as the published reports of State and the Federal
Government, does it, not seem that there should be some
wise get-together movement on the part of land-owners,
capitalists, State and .Government officials, that would
lead to the speedy development of this great sugar-cane
industry?



THIE AVOCADO,

By JOHN B. BACH.
The avocado, or alligator pear; is one'of the fruits that
can be grown in the semi-tropic climate of South Florida,
and holds out inducements for good profits when properly
cultivated. The winter-bearing varieties of which the
most prominent is the "Trapp" yields the best market
prices and last fall, in spite of the prevailing depression,
yielded handsome returns to the growers, particularly
about Christmas time.
One of the main reasons, for this is that a taste for the
avocado has the peculiarity of growing on one, after a
fondness for it has been acquired, and while it is a lux-
ury, its devotees feel that they must rave it regardless of
price and its patrons are among those who can affOrd to
pay for their indulgencies.

FOOD VALU .

Another reason is that it is a complete and nourishing
food, readily assimilated by the most delicate stomach.
The following analysis made by the Agricultural Depart-
ment, Bulletin No. 77, shows the' relative food value of
this.fruit in comparison with milk and/eggs, the two corn-
men articles of diet which compare most closely with it
in composition eand-digestibility.










AvocADo.

Water, 72.8 per cent.
Protein, 2.2 per cent.
Fats, 17.3 per cent.
Carbohydrates, 4.4 per tent.
Crude fibre, 1.4 per cent.
Ash, 1.9 per cent.

MILK (Cow)

Water, 87 per cent.
Protein, 3.3 per cent.
Fats, 4 per cent.
Carbohydrates, 5 per cent.
Ash, 7-10 per cent.

EGG (Whole).

Water, 74.7 per cent.
Protein, 13.8 per, cent.
Fats, 10.5 per cent.
Ash, 1 per cent.

No 1)ANGER FROM OVERPRODUCTION.

As it becomes better known on the market and more
widely distributed and the price comes down within' the
reach of the man of moderate means, it should take its
place. as a staple article of diet in such mannes as ba-
nanas are now used, in consequence there should never
be a glut in markets.
The food value of this fruit will always make a money
crop and there is little danger of, or loss from, over-
production. Suppose, for example, that transportation
facilities were to collapse and the markets closed to the
grower. His fruit would be wbrth just so much corn to
feed to his fown, hogs and cattle as.all animals take to
the avocado and exhibit almost as great a fondness for
it as human beings. It is stated that in the West Indies
that the dogs obtain a great part of their living from this
fruit and will quarrel over one as they do over a bone.
It is the only fruit that I ever knew a cat to eat and
relish, and when. the carnivorous animals pronounces in











its favor it is a pretty good indication that it is:a strong
food. It has been proved a boon to those affected with
dyspepsia as they can assimilate it when everything else
distress them. It possesses the .food value of eggs with-
out their constiuating tendencies.

CULTIVATION AND FRUIT KEEPING QUALITIES.

The avocado will' thrive on the same class of soil as
citrus trees, with identical culture and treatment and will
bear as soon and as \abundantly. After the middle of
November the "Trapp" avocado may be gathered at any
time and marketed and also like the' citrus can be held
on the tree for some months without deterioration. A
certain percentage of the fruit will drop from time to
time, due to hard winds and other causes, but these drops
will be found hard and sound and are available for home
use and local 'markets.
The fruit will keep from three to four days at ordinary
temperatures before they become mellow and soft enough
to eat and may be kept a week or more in an ordinary
refrigerator. Fruit picked in November has been kept
sound, in cold storage, without losing any of its flavor,
-until March.
SIn only two ways does the culture of the avocado differ
from citrus. The former will stand more forcing with
strong animal fertilizers, and when it reaches its pro-
ducing age, requires more fertilizer to supply its needs
and insure regular full crops. The avocado is more sus-
ceptible to cold than any of the citrus, even the lime or
lemon, while young. For this reason it is best to provide
for covering the young trees during cold nights, the first
two winters, which can easily be done by making a cheap
skeleton frame over the trees and sewing some burlaps
or grain saks to form a cover. Out in California they
have acres of avocadoes that are protected by oil or char-
coal grove heaters and if the same care were taken here
with them they could be raised well up towards the upper
part of the Peninsula of Florida.
One particular tree out in California has received wide
notoriety, a photo of it having appeared in several of the
papers throughout the country. It is such a money-maker
that its owners have had it insured against loss for (3,000,
and a portable shed is placed over it during the winter.










Pew iA Fnld t would ru e to -to C eh,expemne, but rea
saP able eane nb sed tdian if done ~e trees will, be
saved, or we can. take our ehane o, for if a severe freeze
eomes asong and eats or tree down to the ground, we
have the satisfaction of knowing that, like oar guava, our
grafted avocado will sprout out and bear fruit again two
years.
The avocado has fewer enemies thai the citrus, and
one good feature is that so far as we know, not an insect
that attacks citrus will touch the avocado and vfce versa.
Again the same insecticides that destroy citrus pests will
also destrop the pest of the avocado. The same fertilizer
answers equally well for both, with thde exceptions be-
fore noted, and when planted together the roots of each
seemed to agree well together. It is suggested'that a good
plan may be to plant every alternate tree in a citrus
grove an avocado and thud they may mutually protect
each other from, pests.
The avocado has a wider range of planting season than
most and we have already a series of varieties that sup-
ply fruit from July to March, 'ad we have good reasons
to hope that it will not be many years before we will
bridge over that hiatus and have fruit the year round.










EXPERIM WT STATION, WORK
IN TRYING TO ASOERTAi1 .BRE CAUSE OF
SOPF POBW.

STte State Experiment Station at Gainesville has been
carrying on some very interesting and instructive exper-
iments in an attempt to ascertain definitely the cause of
soft pork. It is the only instance where the live hog was
tested before treatment so as to show whether the soft
quality was inherited or superinduced by certain kind
of diet. The following tabulated data may be studied
by those interested:

SorF POBR STUDIES.
ogs Eleven Months Old.
44 Days+-March to April,, 1920.


Pig No.
and
sex.

Pig No.
and,
sex.

Pig No.
and
sex.


Gain in
Weight 44 Days
Lba. Lbs.

Gain i
Weight 44 Days
Lbe. Lbs.

Gain in
Weight 44 Days
SLbs. Lbs.


Lot I.-Peanuts.
3M. ..... ..135
-4F. . .... 110
7M. .......: 140)

Lot II.-Corn, Shorts
2'M. ........ 130
5M. ......... 100
6F. ......... 130


Melting point degrees F.
Start, Close. Change.


Melting point degrees F.
Start. Close. Change.


Melting point degrees F.
Start. Close. 'Change.


38.3 104.9
30.0 104.1
31.6 104.9


95 -9.9
98.6 -5.5
96.9 -8.0


and Cottonseed Meal.
35.0 102.7 111.7
33.3 99.5 106.1
43.3 100.0 103.1


Lot III--Corn, Shouts, Peanut Meal and
1M. ........ 155 61.6 98.7
8M. ........125 51.6 9.5
9F. ........ 75 33.3 95.9;


+9:0
+6.6
+3.1


Skim Milk.
102.0 +3.3
102. +5.0
103.4 +7.5










Bort POBR STUDIEs,
Hogs Eleven Months Old.
44 Days--April to June, 1920.

Pig No. Gain in
and Weight 44 Days Melting point degrees F.
sex. Lbs. Lbs. Start. Close. Change.

Lot I.-Corn, Shorti, Peanut Meal and Skim Milk.

3 M......... 173.3 73.3 95.0 102.3 +7.3
4 ........ 140.0 56.6 98.6 100.5 +1.9
7 M. ........ 171.6 48.4 96.9 102.2 +5.3

Lot II.-Peanuts.

2 M. ........ 165.0 1.6 111.7 106.8 +4.9
5 M. ..........133.3 16.7 106.1 109.7 +3.6
6 F......... 173.3 -43.0 103.1 99.5 -3.6

Lot III.-Corn, Shorts and Cottonseed Meal.

1 M. ........ 216.6 36.7 102.0 104.0 +2.0
8 M...... '.. 176.6 43.4 102.5 104.3 +1.8
9 F. ....... 108.3 20.) 103.4 107.6 +4.2


BUILDING WHITE WASH.

Slake one-half bushel of fresh lime with boiling water,
covering it to keep in the steam.
Strain liquid through a fine sieve and add seven pounds
of fine salt, previously dissolved in warm water; three
pounds of ground rice, boiled to a thin paste and stirred
in boiling hot; one-half pound bolted gilders yhiting; one
pound of white glue which should first soak in cold water
until swollen up, then melt over a slow fire, avoiding
burning it. All five gallons of hot water to the mixture,
stir it well and let it stand a few days covered up. When
ready to use the wash make it boiling hot, which can be
done over the kitchen stove or a portable furnace. A pint
will cover nearly a square yard. It is a very white and
durable wash for outside work. It is almost equal to
good paint.










LENGTH OF TIME rTO COOK FRESH VEGETABLES
'IN WATER.

Asparagus ........... ....... ......... 15 to 20 minutes
Beans (Lima, green) .................. 45 to 60 minutes
Beans, String ....................... Ito 3 hours
Beets, old ............................ 3to hours
Beets, young ......................... 45 to 60 minutes
Cabbage ............................. 20 to 30 minutes
Carrots ......................... ...... 20 to 30 minutes
Cauliflower ........................ .. 20 to 30 minutes
Corn, green ......................... 10 to 15 minutes
Onions ............................ 20 to 30 minutes
Parsnips ............................ 30 to 45 minutes
Peas, Green .......................... 20 to 30 minutes
Potatoes ........................... 30 to 40 minutes
Spinach .......... ................. 15 to 30'minutes
Squash .............................. 20 to 30 minutes
Turnips ........................... 30 to 45 minutes


TABULATION No. 3 SHOWS MANY ADDITIONS TO
GOVERNMENT'S ACCREDITED-HERD LIST

Weekly News Letter, January 5, 1921.

Accredited-herd list No. 3, recently issued by the United
States Department of Agriculture, is the official record
of progress in .tuberculosis eradication under the accred-
ited-herd plan. So extensive has the work become that
the list of accredited herds, together with summaries, re-
quires 52 printed pages. And this does not include herds
which have' passed one official tuberculin test with a view
to being accredited. Such herds are listed in two supple-
ments to the main list. Supplement 1, containing 98
pages, lists herds of the Ayshire, Guernsey, Holstein-Frie-
sian, and Jersey breeds. Supplement 2, containing 50
pages, includes once-tested herds of the Aberdeen-Angus,
Brown Swiss, Devon, Dutch Belted, Galloway, Hereford,
.Red Polled, and Shorthorn breeds.
TESTED HERDS INCREASE THREEFOLD.

Altogether, the number of accredited and once-tested










hesda is approximately three times as large as recorded
in Herd List No. 2, issue last year.
Accredited-herd List NO. (3, is ready for distribution,
a4w may be obtained on request from the Bureau of An-
imal Iadustry, United States Department, of Agriculture,
The two supplements were, ready for distribution after
Decepbet 15. Persons desiring either or both of the sup-
plements imay apply to the bureau.
Arranged according to number of accredited herds, the
various States cooperating with. the Federal Bureau of
Animal Idustry in bovine-tuberculosis. eradication are
shows up to June 30 in the accompanying table:

Accredited Onee-tested
State herdk free herds.
1. Minhesota ................ 494 994
2. Virgib a ................... -354 591
3. Wisconsin ................... 287 835
4. Pennsylvania ............... 261 639
5. District of Columbia........ 190 94
6. North Dakota .............. 172 936
7. Maine .................... 127 941
8. Indiana ................... 121 392
9., North Carolina ............. 105 1,045
10-Ohio ...................... 104 714
11. Maryland I................. 103 261
12. Michigan .............. 103 133
13. Tennessee................. 86 292
14. Kansas ................... 80 81
15. Illinois .................... 70 293
16. Vermont ..... .............. 63 1,343
17. Mississippi ................... 59 288
18. Kentucky ................. 55 270
19. Montana ........... ......... 48 97
20. New York ................ 47 186
21. Iowa ...................... 44 377
22. Utah ....................... 36 377
23. South':Carolina ........r ... 34 153
24. Alabama .................. 34 79
25. Oregon ................... 30 263
26. West Virginia ............. 29 763
27. Nebraska ................. 29 205
28. Louisiana ................ 28 153
29. New Jersey................ 28 21











tae 'h
30. FLORIDA .. ... ..
31. Massach tts ...........
32. Connectieut ...............
33. Washington ..............
34. S4utB Dakota'. ............
59. Arkaaas ...............
36. Delaware ................
37. Id~ho ..................
88. Georgia .................
3. .New JHampshire ..........
40. Miouri ..............
412, hode island ..........
42. Nevada ,.................
43. OkNa ma, *... ...........
4-4 Texas .. ......... .
45. Colorado ............ ..... !
46; Wyoming ................


roetited Once-tested
.erds.' free herds.


21
21
18-
16_
16
14
10
8
8
7
6
.5
1
1


Total ........,........... 3,370


.1,295
34
58 *
264
124
53
45
526
180

585
10
297
228
51
.2
1

16,599


QUARANTINE O -:ACCOUNT OF THE CITRUS
BLACK FLY.

The fact haa been determined by the Secretary of Agri-
culture, and notice is hereby given, that an injurious in-
sect, citrus black fly (Alourocanthus woglumr Aabby),,
new to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed
within and throughout the United States, occurs in Cuba,
the Bahamas, Jamaica, Canal Zone, Costa Ria,' India,
Philippine Islands, Ceyloa, and Java.
Nodw, tarefore, I. E. T. Meredith, Seeretary of Agri-
cultuze, under authority conferred by the Act of Congres
approved August 20, 1912, known as the plant quarantine
act (37 Stat., 815), do hereby leclare that it is neeessay,
in order td prevent the introduction of the citrus black
fly, to forbid, except; as provided in the rfles and ,egula,
tions supplemented hereto, the importation or entry i11to
the United States, from Cuba, the Bahamas, Jamaida,
Canal Zene, Costa Rica, India, Philippine Islands, Ceylon,
and Java,of friite and vegetables in the raw or anpi -
eseeed ,state and of plants wustd as packing material in
i SBulletin











connection with shipments of such fruits and vegetables,
or otherwise, and to forbid, except as provided in said
rules and regulations, the movement, from any port of
first arrival in the United States, of any railway car,
boat, or other vehicle coming to any such port from said
Countries.
On and after April 1, 1921, and until further notice,
the importation or entry into the United Stales, from
Cuba, the Bahamas, Jamaica, Canal Zone, Costa Rica,
India, Philippine Islands, Ceylon, and Java, of fruits
and vegetables in the raw or unprocessed state and of
plants or portions of plants used as packing material in
connection with shipments of such fruits and vegetables
or otherwise, except as provided in the rules and regula-
tions supplemental hereto, is prohibited, and. no railway
Scar, boat, or other vehicle coming to any port of first ar-
rival in the United States from said countries, shall move
or be allowed to move from such port except in accord-
ance with the rules and regulations supplemental hereto.
Done in the District of Columbia this 16th day of Feb-
ruary, 1921.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States De-
partment of Agriculture.
E. T. MEREDITH,
(SEAL) Secretary of Agriculture.

PIGS AND BOLL WEEVIL PROFITABLE.
A few'days ago Mr. C. C. French, Industrial Agent for
the Ft. Worth Stock Yards, was in my office and pre-
sented the following clipping from a livestock journal:
"Comanche, Texas, September 7.-This section'has one
farmer who not only has no fear of the boll weevil, but
actually turns it to an advantage. His name is W. B.
Sterling, and he lives near Blanket, about ten miles south-
east of Comanche. He says he has now about a half-bale
of coton to the acre matured, with good prospects for con-
tinued maturity. He has his farm fended into sub-divi-
sions with hog-proof fences. As soon as the boll weevil
begins to make its appearance he turns his hogs into the
cotton field. He has about 30 to 35 head of pigs big
enough to eat and range, and these pigs gather every
fallen form punctured by the weevil and knocks off the
punctured forms which still adhere to the stalk, They
actually fatten on the larvae thus devoured and seem to








67 *


be specially fond of the combined vegetable and, animal
diet.
"In addition to destroying the entire weevil crop, they
als6 loosen up the soil without the slightest damage to
the plant in their rigid cleaning up of the fallen forms.
Fields adjoining or adjacent to his farm, where no hogs
have been rangbd will not make cotton enough to pay for
the picking. (Mr.. Sterling is well known as a man of the,
highest veracity and integrity and his statement may be
absolutely depended upon as true.)"
In discussing the matter with Mr. French he decided
to make the trip to Blanket immediately for the purpose
of checking, up the story, and after making a thorough
investigation on, Septemb 27thy he reports the conditions
he found somewhat as follows: -In an adjoining field,
consisting of 12 acres, from 85 to 90 per cent of the ]tols
were punctured and the entire 12 acres would not make
more than two bales of coton. On the experimental, plot
of 23 acres where the hogs were allowed to range, the
cotton will make a half-bale to the acre and probably
more. Mr. French. states that he took up one stalk of
cotton with 52 bolls, none of which were punctured. The
herd of hogs consists of 3 sows, 6 kilts and 14 pigs. They
have been running in the patch ever since the first punc-
tared forms have fallen.
-AS a further evidence of the value of the pigs running
in the coton field. Mr. French found that where the pigs
slept at night near the barn and their watering place,
there were practically no punctured bolls; but in remote
parts of the field wherethe pigs range less frequently the
punctures pete more numerous. The cotton was in no
way damaged by the hogs. : Mr Sterling has been con-
ducting this experiment for the past 6 years, and has
found that it has given him uniform results every year.
I am passing this information on 'to members, of the-
Better Secretaries' Club'for I believe it is a momentous
discovery due to the fact 'that it is a very hard produce hogs at a profitable price and cotton under boll
'weevil conditions.:
I Have made arrangements with two'reliable farmer to
conduct this experiment to determine its value in this
section,
Yours very truly,
M. E. MELTON, 'ebretary.








Wit0Li8GAL PRICES OF Int SMD AS1iB, JAN. 8.
ticesa are or high quaUt4es of aeed'offered by seedemen. Obtviusel i. ijmpossible to give roes that represent the
same qeitty ancdortigi of seed ie eaho bf-the cities.
(In dollars Per 100 bs., except seed grains, Vhich are per bushel.-)








Red clover .... ....... .... 22.00 .00 24.50 21.60 22.50 24.00 22.25 22.50 25.00 20.00 20.00 58.95 42.05
Alsike lover ............. 28.00 81.25 275 27.15 30.00 26.50 26.00 28.00 30.00 .00 25.00 28.00 54.5 33.00
.001: s I : 16 I0018 0. & 0

CGr a' thy ....... ... 8.00 ..00 2 .6 5 824.00 22.25 227.0 25.00 20.00 23.B20.00 T23.00 13.96 42.86
Retp....l .ike aoe 1 800 18.00 81.0612752 18.00 10.00 24.50 16.00 18.50 30.00 5.00 2. 33.00
White clover ............. 55.00 58.00 82 .00 58.00 49.00 7.5 60.00 6.00.00 6.00 50.00 88.00 8 1.10 48.00
Crimson clover............. .50 7.00 8.2 00 .... ...... 8 ..... 1 .... 1.00, .... 12.5 20,50
Sweet Clover .............. ..00 14.00 8 .0 90 1.00 18. 10.00 1150 16.00 14.00 15.00 12.00 5.00 31.60 28.50
Alfalfa ......................00 5.00 21.00 20.00 21.00 17.00 18.001 2.0 8.0021.00 100 22.0 41.0 20.50
Leedeza e............... .. ............1.............. ..2...2..00 .................8.80 2450
Grasses:
Timothy ........... ..8.50 7.75 9.65 8.00 7.85 .00 7.25 7.25 7.65 8.00 9.50 .00 9.00 18.60 11.10
Redtop ..................... 1. 50 16.50 14.75 18.00 18.50 12.25 1450 18.50 14.00 18.50 1. 25. 2.00 21. 14.25
Kentncky bluegrass ....... .27.00 28.00 29.00 27.00 2..50 2.00 27.5 28.0025.00 1.00 28.0 3.00 2.05 22.25
Orchard grass .............. 14.00 14.0020.00 16.00 14.00 14.50 13.00 15.00 17.014.0017.50 .... 22.0028.85 27.00
Italian rye grass. ........ 6.0 6.00 8.00. ....... .0 80 ... .... 11.0 ... 12.00.. ...
Perennial (English) rye 0
grass ..... .......... 6.50 6.00 8.00 7.00 .... 900 7.00 8.00 8.0 .... 10.00 .... 12.00 . ....
Meadow fese ......... ... ...... .. ..... .....22.00 2.00 ....... 7.80 25.00
Bromus inemis .............20 .... .... ....... ..... .... ....11.00..... .... .... 20.00 18.00 81.50 23;50
Millets: .
Golden millet .............. .560 4.25 4 1.2 3.90 2.50 2.76 2.70 8.50.50 2.80 8.50 .... 8.00 6.85 5.50
Common millet ..............4.00 .... ................. 2.0 2.25 50 1.80 8.00 .... 5.00 8.70 4.25
Siberian millet ............. .... .... ....... ......... 2.50 2.25 2.50 1.80 2.50 .... 8.00 3.90 5.25
Hungarian millet ............ .4.50 4.50 ... 8.75 ......... 8.20 3.50 ........... ........... 6.t5
Japanese millet ............. 8. ... .... 5.75 .... ..... .8 .25 5.50 5 ..... 80.00 .......... 0 5.00
Broom-corn millet .......... ......... .. ............. 2.80 1.75 3.00 1.80 3.00......... 8.40 2.45'









Bower ("Vcane"') *1
mbew :.......... ... ... 8~1 ... .. .. .,; O 22 .... 1.75 2 ....5 .... 4.00
Ora sg ........... ..... .. .. .. ..... 1.85 3.00 .... 4 5 4.10
..'0: .. .. ..
am a oro ..... .... .... .... .... .... * *1.90 .. . 4.L0
.rafn sorghums: ..
affr ... 1.86 1.60 2.76 .... ... 3.75
.o .. 1.85 1.50 8.00 ... .... 2.895 3.60 -
eterfta .. .... ..... 1.90 8.50 9.50 4.25
E .aais gs ..... .. .. .. .. .5 4.50 5.d 8.50 5.00 ....10.0 13.85 14.25
S.. ......,.............. 7.50 7.50 8.50 8. O 8.50 7.50 7.25 8.QO 8.00 9.50 .... 6.0011.40 10.50
Hairy veteh ............ 1.00 10.00 14.00 13.00 15.00 13.25 15.00 18. .... 20.00 M.... 18.0 28.30 18.50
Common Vetbh ............. 5.50 5.00 10.00 .... .....-. 6.50 ........., ....1200 .... 5.0 10.75 8.26
Peas: C '-, .. ., .- I
lCanda fled pOe ..... .. 5 4.50 5.00 4.0 4.75 4.7f .4.00 4.25 5.-. ..... .. .... ... I -05 5.7-
o ,speas .. ,................. 4.50 ...0.... ... 4.50 4.00 4.00 ... .50 .... .... 8.40 5.75.-
Beans: -
By beans (southen)....... 00 8........... .. 4.00 t0 t.008 40.... ........ .. ...8.15 5.5
te B d beans.... . .. ... 6.00 .... ....... .... ... 7.00 ..... .... 8.50 ......... .0 0 .
Velvet beans ...... . . ... .... 8. ... . .10 4 5
Seed potatoes ;................ ... 2.5 8.30 .... 2.50 .... ..... .... 3.00 ... . 4.55 8.50
8e~4rarzn ................. C ..o 3 2.75
e St_,a ...... ...... ..... 4 *1.75 ". .... 3. ...... .0 ..... 3.... 0 2 .... 5 8.20 2. .5
ieed wbat e ... ......... ... 2 ........... .25 ... ....... 00 .. 2 .5 .
Seed oata .................... .95 2.50 1.45 .00 LO
e rv .....................4 .5 .... . ... ...1.95 1.8 2.10 2.
b ed fuc eat : '.... *. 5.0 1.60 : 1.85 1.70 1 .75 .. 3.10 .. .. . 1.90 1.85


*Northern town.
Sroder corn.










'70

COTTON SEED PRICE QUOTATIONS.
Week Ending Jan. 1.

Wagon
CITY. Car lots lots per
per ton ton
Chalotte N. C. .............................. $28 $20'
Canton, N. ................. ....... 20
New Bern, N. C. ........................... .......... 20
Smithfield N. ......... ................. .......... 20
Tarboro, N. C. .............................. 20 20
Abi eville, S. C. .................... .........20 20
Bishopvflle, S. C ........ .................. 20 20
Blakvlen C............................. 20 18
Camden, S. C............................... ......... .. 18
Dillon, S. C............. ................... 2 20
Greenville, S. C. ............................ ......... 20
Kershaw, S. C. .......................... ........... 20
Manning, S. C ................... .23 ....
St. Matthews, S. C.......................... 21 .....18
Summer, S. C. ......................... 20 20
Westminster, S. C........................... .......... 18-20
New Orleans, La. ........................ 24......
Shreveport a ............................ 18..........
Meridian, iss. ................................. 25 25
Alligator, Miss. ............ ...... .., 22-3 ...... ..
Coldwater, Miss. .. 20 .........
Como, Miss ........................... ..... 20 ........
reenville Miss ......... ................ 22-23..........
Greenwood, Miss. .......................... 22-23 ........
Holly Spigs, Mis. ...................... 20 18
Sard s, M iss .............................. 20 .........
Pontotoc, Miss .......... ........ .. 20 .........
West Point, Miss. ...................... .. 20 .......... 20
Brownsville, Tenn. .................... .... 21 ..........
Mem his; Tenn. .... ......................... 21-22 ......
Blythevlle, Ark ............. .......... 18-20 1-
Earle, Ark ................. ........ .......... 18-20 ..........
Edmonson, Ark.. ............... .............. 18-20. .. .
Forrest City, Ark ............ ............... 18-20 .$1
Jonesboro, Ak. .............................. .18-20 16
Newport, Ark. ........ .................... 1 18-20 ..........
Pine Blun Ark. ............................. 18-20 ..........
Search k. A ................................ 18-20 ..........
STeakana, Ark ........................... 18-20 16
Vincent Ark. . . ... 18-20 ..........
Walnut Ridge, Ark. .................... ..... 18-20 18-:18
Memphis, Tex ............... ; .......... ........... 17
Coleman, Tex ......................................... 15
San Marcos, Tex. ................... ......... .......... 15 .
Floydada, Tex .............................. ........... 15
Sweetwater, Tex. ...................................... -15
McAlester, Okla. ....................................... [ 12
PRICES OF FRUITS AND VEGEBTABLES.
JOBBING RANGE.
POTATOES, NEW YORK AND NORTHERN ROUND WHITES, SACKED,
PER 100 POUNDS.
New York .:.............. .189 -$1.65-1.70 $1.15-1.86 $5.70-5.85
-Bostonh ................. 132 1.40-1.50 1.25-1.40 5.25-5.50
Philadelphia .......:.... 4 1.50 1.00-1.20 5.20
Baltimore ............... 13 1.50 1.25 5.15-5.35
Pittsburgh .............. 52 1.65-1.75 1.35-1.45 5.65
Cleveland ................ 18 1.50-1.60 1.40-1.45 5.25-5.35
Cincinnati ............... 69 1.50 1.50 5.25-5.50
Detroit ................ 38 -1.35-1.40 1.25-1.35 5;15-5.25
Chicago ................. 347 1.20-1.30 1.20-1.25 5.20-5.35
St. Louis ................. 88 1.60 1.501. 5.2-5...85
Kansas ............. 164 ......... .......... I.O0









.71 '


ONIONS, EASTERN AND MIDDLE WESTERN YELLOW VARIETIES,
BACKED, .PEB 100 POUNDS.

New York ............... 76 $1.00-1.28 $0.75-1.00 $5.75-6.00
Boston ................. 21 .75-1.00 .75-1.15 5.75-.25
Philadelphia ............. 38 .90-1.00 .75-1.05 / 6.00
Baltimore ................ 1.00.1.10 1.00-110 5.76-.00
Pittsbprgh ............ 18 .65- .90 .65-1.00 ..........
Cleveland ............... 5 .60- .75 ".50- .75 6.25-6.7
Cincinnati ... ....... 14 .90-1.00 1.00-1.10 5.25-5.50
Detroit ....... ...... ..... 2 .85-1.00 .86- .90 5,25-5.50
Chicago ................. 16 .90-1.25 .75-1.0U 5.00-5.50
St. Louis ................ 21 .75-1.00 .90-1.00 ..........
'Kansas City ............. 99 .75-1.00 .75-1.00 -8.50

CABBAGE 'NEW YORK AND NORTHERN DANIAH TYPE, BULK,
SPER TON.
New York .............. ... 42 $18.00-20.00 $18.00-20.00 $90.00-100.00
Boston ................ 18 .75- 1.00 1.00- 1.25 5.25- 5.50
Philadelphia ;............ 10 12.00-15.00 8.00-15.00 75.00- 80.00
Baltimore .............. 14 14.00-16.00 15.00-18.00 9O.00-100.00
Pittsburgh ............. .46 12.00-15.00 15.00-16.00 90.00-100.00
Cleveland .............. 7 12.90-25.00 15.00-18.00 75.00- 90.00
CincinnaUt .............. 6 15.00-20.00 ........... ...........
Detroit ...... .......... 6 18.00-20.00 15.00-18.00...........
Chicago ......... ..... 42 15.00-16.00 14.00-15.00 50.00- 60.00
St. Louis ......'......... 18 .......... 25.00 .... .. ...
Kansas City ............ 241 1.00 1.001 4.001 4.50

CABBAGE; 'FLORIDA WAKEFIELDS, 11-2 BUSHEL HAMPERS.
New York ;.............. 41 $1.25- 1.50 $1.00- 1.25 $2.00
Boston ................ 8 .......... 2.50- 2.75 2.25
Philadelphia ...... ...... 18 1.50- 1.75 1.25- 1.50 2.25- 2.50
Baltimore .............. 23 1.60- 1.65 1.50- 1.75 2.50- 2.65
Plittburgh ............. 18/ 2.50| 55.00 2,001 2.25
Cleveland ............... 0 2.00- 2.15 2.00- 2.10 .........
C n nnat ........ ..... 11 ......... ......... 2.40- 2.50
Detrolt .................. 1 2 : ... .. ..... .. 4.25
Chicago ........ ....... 1 .......... .......... 2.50- 8.00
St: Lois ................ 0 80.00-85.00 85.0040. 65.00-70.00
Kansas Cit ..':....... 14 2.00- 2.25 2.00- 2.25 3.50- 8.76

SWEET POTATOES, NEW JERSEY DELAWARE, AND MARYLAND
YELLOW VARIETIES, BUSHEL HAMPERS.
New York .............. 25 $2.25-2.35 $1.75-2.00 $2.65-2.5
Boston ................. 10 2.0012.15 1.90-2.00 3.00
Philadelphia ............ 26 1.80-1.90 1.90 2.25
Baltimore .............. 7 1.75-1.90 1.75-1.90 2.25-2.40
Pittsburgh. ...-..... .. 28 1.85-2.00 1.75-1.85 2.40-2.60
Cleveland ................ 12 2.10-2.15 1.85-1.90 2.50-2.60
Cincinnati ............... 14 '2.00-2.10 1.90-2.00, 1.90-2.00
Detroit ................... 6 2,50 1.85-2.00 2.85
Chicago ................. 24 2.60-2.75 2.50-2.75 2.60-2.75
St. onuis ................ 7 1.65,1.75 1.90 2:0f
Kansas City ............. 16 1.75 1.75-1:90 1.65-1.75

CELERY, FLORIDA GOLDEN, SELF-BLANCHING, 10-IN. CRATES.
'New York ...... .......... 82 $2.50-2.75 $2.50-2.75 $3.50-8.75
Boston ........... ..... 5 3.00 2.75-3.00 ..........
Philadelphia ............. 501 2.75-8.00 2.75-3.25 8.50-8.7-
Baltimor ................ 16 8.25 2.75 3'.5018.65
Pittsburgh .............. . 17 2.7-3.00 2.65-2.90 8.00-3.25
Clevean ............ 12 8.00-3.25 8.00-3.25 8.50-4.00
Cincinnati ......... ...... 19 2.75 2.65-2.75 3.254-.50
Detroit ......... ........ 14 2.50-2.75 2.75-.00 ..........
Detroit ................. 14 2.50-2.75 2.75-8.00 .........
Chicago ................. .. 59 2.50-2.75 2.75-.00 .75-4.00
St. Louis ............... 5 .. ...... 2. -3.00 8.75
Kansas City ...,......... 17 ..... 2.75-3.00









ITS

APPLUs, NSrW QK ALDWINS, 21-2 INS.BI BLBS.
New York ........... 181 $5.50-5.75 $5.00-5.50 $9.00-9.50
BOstoP ............ 11 6.00 5.00-6.50 8.00-8.50
Paelpha .......... .00-5.75 4.75-5.00 8.00.8.75
Illiore ............... 5 5.50-5.75 4.75-5.00 8.00-8.25
tt burgh .......... 88 5.00-5.50 5.00-5.25 8.00-8.25
Cleveland ............... 28 5.50-6.00 5.25-5.50 8.50-9.00
CIc ati ............ 18 5.75-6.00 5.00-5.25 8.50-9.25
Detro ............... 12 1.25.5.50 5.00-5.50 9.50
Cie ........ 47 00-550 4.50-5.00 8.50-.00
St. =Oj .............. 29 5.50 5.25-5.50 7.00-7.50
_ats City ........ 4 ,7,54 5.00-5.75 5.00-5.75 7.00-7.50
APPEOBB, MrOElPHW8iE I*N BXTbA PANCY WINBSAPS, BOXES.
New York ............... -.$9.2,4.50 $8.50r4.00l $4.00-4.25
BOSton .................... 14 8.00-8,751 350-400 4.00-4.25
Plkdelpfla ............ 14 2,75-4.00 ........:. 4.00
ltimore .............. 2 .......... .......... 3.40-3.50
itftburgh ............... 6 .......... .......... ..........
fe*dlan ................ '4 3.75 8.50 8.76-4.00
t ....... ........ 2 .... .......... .......
Detrbit ................. 5 8.00-4.00 3.00-4.00 8.55-8.05
Chicago .................. 40 8.00-3.50 8.00-8.50 83.28.50
5ti Lonis 9......... .......... ........,
m City -:::S....,. 80 60-4.0O 3.50-4.00 i .7B-.66

A FEW DON'T FORB PROSPETI FLORIDIAPN.

(Florida Grower.)

D) 't expect to come to Florida and get rich quick
without capital, physical effort or experience.
Don't be misled by exaggerated statements concerning
Florida that are often found in booklets and aales liter-
ature. :
Don't under asy eiremastance biy land in Florida or
anywhere else before seeing it, or at least having it in.
spected aid passed. upon by someone in a position to
jadge. -
Don't forget that there is BAD land as well as GOOD
I.nd in Florida. Yonu ean't always judge land by the,
rice. Sonme is'Jigh at a dollar an acre, and some is a
b gain at 3iO or more.
1 Dn't put your entire savinlu in a piece of raw land, or
evening a growing sama or grove, and then find yourself
handicapped by haviig hi funds with which to improve
your property or carry on your necessary farm operations.
Don't be too hasty in selecting a location. Take your
"tiae and investigate thoroughly. Be sure you are satis-
fled before you buy.
Don't forget that the successful man must work for a









Skiing in florida as well as anywhere else. If you are
ilooling for a SOFT BSNAPi don't waste ear fare on a trip
to Florida. There are plenty of folks here ahlead'f you
in search of the same thing, anid i is as elusive as the
fabled Fountain of Youth.
Dowt imagine that citrus frits can be successfully
,grown everywhere in Blortda This particular crop, like
many -thers, requires- crtaj* oil and certain climaticc
conditions to produce profitable results. All citrus grow-
ers are not prosperous; many fail each year, but ihvesti-
gation always shows that there was a-speciflc reason for
each flivver.
Don't knock what you don't understand in florida, for
there are many wonders here the usefulness of.which ar
not al gys appreciated bytthe stranger.









CARLOAD PRICES OF HAY AND FEED AT IMPORTANT MARKETS, JAN. 8.
(In dollars per ton


_ _ _++ 4 _
S Commodity. o


M 9 W;


iA X.
Timothy-and clover:
No. 1 timothy ............
Standard timothy.........
No. 2 timothy ............
No. 1 light clover, mixed...
No. 1 clover mixed........
No. 1 clover .............
Alfalfa:
No. 1 alfalfa .............
Standard alfalfa ..........
No. 2 alfalfa- ..............
Prairie:
No. 1 Upland ............
No. 2 Upland .............
No. 1 Midland ...........
Grain hay ...............
Feed (Bagged).
Wheat bran:
Spring . .. . ... .. ... ... .
Soft winter .. ..........
Hard winter ..............
Wheae middlings:
Spring (standard)........
Soft winter ............
Hard winter ..............
Hard winter wheat shorts...
Wheat mixed feed........
Rye middlings .............


*86.00
*'388.90
82.00
.. .


37.00
88.50
87.)0
34.50
37.00
86.50
37.50
.38.00


85.50128.00
34.00 27.00
82.00 26.00
82.00 25.00
29.00 24.50
27.00 ....


82.00 35.00
31.00 34.00
30.00 32.50
31.0 388.00
30.50 32.50
80.00 .. .
.... ,35.50
33.00
.... 30.00


36.U0
36.00
36.00
35.00
38.00
37.00
37.00


81.90 29.00 27.75
... : 27.50 27.00
29.00 24.00 26.00
80.00 25.50 26.00
.... 24.50 25.00
.... 25.50 25.00
80.00 28.00 29.50
28,00 24.00 27.50
25.00 22.00 24.50
... 2 .00 ....
.... 17.50 ....



.... .... 32.50
29.50 29.50 38.00
.... 29.00 38.00
. .. .... 80.00
.... 11.50 35.00
80.00 31.00 34.00
.... 27.50 ....
.... .... 29.00


32.00 28.00


.... 26.00
.... 28.00
S... 0.00


.... 25.00

23.50....


.... 24.00
22.50 ....


t22.50
20.50
18.50
S21.50
19.00
t16.50
23.00
22.00
18.50
15.50
14.00
11.50




25.00




25.60
".....


26.00




24.00






48.00
t "










High protein meals:
Linseed ............ .......
Cottonseed (41. ) -........
Cottonseed (36%) .........
No. I alfalfa meal (medium);..
Gluten feed ................
Hominy feed.. .............
Ground barley ..............
Beet onlD .... . .. . ... ..


45.0045.004400 .... .... .. ... .42.00 41.30 89.50 48.00 40.00 40.00 48.5
42.00 .... 40.0 .... .... 2950 0 290 .... 38.50 .... 36.00 8.25
7507.50 37.50 8 5.50 .... 30.00 28.00 31.80 31.75 37.00 33.50 83,50 .... ...
89.00 .... 31.50 40.00 .... 38.00 2800 24.0028.00 .... 26.00 .... .... 23.00
56.28 55.00 55.20 5250 ... ..... ....51.0051.00 ..48.00 ., ..........
..... .... 36.00 .... .... .... 37.00 36.00 86.00 26.00 .... 82.00
4. 4 .00 4 4. 04. 45-00 46.00 4.00 .... .... 44.00 46.00 .... 45.00 .........


tHay. qunottlons represent average of cash sales at these market ts. *targe bales. Nominal.


...;..
88.00
86.00


42.00










.THE GREAT SEAL OF 'tEt .STATE OF FLOtplA<

ARmS:-The sun in his splendor rising over a highland
in the distance, a cocoa tree, a steamdboat on the
water, and an Indian woman scattering flowers in
the foreground.
Mo OT :-In God we trust.

SYMBOLISM.

The sun in the emblem of Glory and Splendor.
In heraldry its meaning in "absolute authority."
The highlands and water are typical of the tSate, and
the steamboat of-its coinmerce and progress.
Flowers are the symbol of hope and joy, and the Indian
scattering them shows the influence of the Indian Nation
over the State.
The cocoa or palm tree is the emblem of victory, justice
-and Royal horor.

THu STABS FLAG.

The State Flag shall be of the following proportions
and descriptions; depth to be three-fourthb'length of flag.j
The Seal of the State, of diameter one-third of the
flag, in the center of a' white ground; red bars, in width
one-eighth the length of flag extending from each corner
toward the center to the outer rim of the, Seal.

TaB &rATz S aiD.

The Seal of the State of Florida shall .'b the size of
the American silver dollar, having in the tenter thereof
Aa few of the sun's rays over a highland in the distance
Sa cocoa tree, a steamboat on water, and an Indian female
scattering flowers in the -foreground, encircled by the
I words "Great Seal of the tSate of Florida; in God we
trust."

STATS Ftowu.


SThe State Flower is the Orange Blossom.










OFpiItAbL DIBBOTQRY.
of the
AGRICOU/IUBAL, HORTICULTURAL AND LIVE-
STOCK ORGANIZATIONS OF FLORIDA..

FABaMBrs' UToN, owrFOBRIoA:

Prebideat, J. L. Shepard..............Pomona, Fla,
VlcerPresident, N. Wells....... .......Gai~piville, FPa.
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Ella Shepard.. ,.Pomona, Fla,

S*Azr Exwcu'navuCOM:.ox iatTn:

H, P. Peterson..................... West Tocoi, Fla.
L. M. Rhodes...'.. .............Jaeksonville, Fla.
H L., Shearer.......................... Ocala, Fla.

FLO IDaml Paax BMkmV:

President, L. M. Rhodes...........Jadksonville, ItF.
Vice-President, Reed Cury ..............Tampa, Fla.
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Ella ghepar .. .,.Pomona, Fla.
ExucrTiv Co a : -rur:

L. S. Harvard.......... ............Live Oak, Fla.
L:. P Pike.........................Blanton, Fla.
Misp TIene Randle............ ,...Gainesville, Fla.

THE FLORI DA S'TATEB ETIOJ RBAL SOCIETY.
AT '. .. Qpr ca-s:

President,H.-Harold Hume..... .Glee $aint Mary, F a.
Secretary, ,Bayat'd F. Floyd.,,. .,.... ....ainesville, Fla
Treasurer, W. S. Hart...............awks Park, Fla.

*t 'oxacuT BE LOkMITTr;

P. a:, Rolws.. ... .. ... ...........Gaineyville, Fln.
SE. S. Hubbard.............,.... .. Federal Point, Flai
L. D. Nies.................. .Lucere Park, Fla.











FLORIDA STATE BEEKEEPERS' ASSOCIATION.

President, J, W. Barney ......... .....Bradentown, Fla.
Vice-President, J. K. Isbell. ,. ...... .Wewahitchka, Fla.
Secretary, K. E. Bragdon................. Cocoa, Fla.
Treasurer, J. R. Hunter... .......Wewahitchka, Fla.

BOARD OF MANAGERS:

J. W, Barney................... ....Brandentown, Fla.
R. C. Boswell......... ..............Wilson, Fla./
Hafford Jones ....... ................ ... Tampa, Fla.
K. E. Bragdon............................ Cocoa, Fla.

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION.'
President, Alf R. Neilsen....... .West Palm Beach, Fla.
Vice-President, August Van Eepoel......... Tampa, Fla.
Second Vice-President, J. C. Moore..... Tallahassee, Fla.
Third Vice-President, L. Majewski...... Monticello, Fla.
Fourth Vice-President, H. S. Pennock..... .Jupiter, Fla.
Acting Secretary, L. W. Traer.Box 360, Jacksonville, Fla.
Treasurer, V. C. Johnson...............Dinsmore, Fla.


FLORIDA STATE SWINE GROWERS' ASSO.
OIATION.
President, Burdett Loomis, Jr.e............. Pierce, Fla.
First Vice-President, L. S. Harvard.,..... .Live Oak, Fla.
Second Vice-President, J. F. Caldwell..... Bartow, Fla.
Third Vice-President, W. M. Gist.........McIntosh, Fla.
Foutrh. Vice-President, L. H. Wilis.' ..... .Evinston, Fla.
Secretary, Will'M. Traer............. Jacksonville, Fla.
Treasurer, H. H. Simmons........... Jacksonville, Fla.

CATTLE RAISERS' ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA.
President, G. Murphy.... ......... Bradentown, Fla.
First' Vice-President, C. E. Crum....... .Bushnell, Fla.
Second Vice-President, A. L. Jackson... Gainesville, Fla.
Treasurer, U. A. Lightsey.................Bartow, Fla.
Secretary, Sam Summerlin.... ..........Kissimmne, Fla.







79

ExacruT CoMMITTrE:

F. N. Burt....................... DeLeon Springs, Fla.
C. F. Raulerson......,................. t. Pierce, Fla.
McQueen Chaires ............. ...... Old To Fla.
A. L. Jackson, .... ..... ......... Gainesville, Fla.
W. L. Graddick....... ..............Jacksonville, Fla.
HE. A. Nicholson.............................Mims, Fla.
-Rube Redding........... ............... Ocala, Fla.
H. T. Lykes...'...........................Tampa, Fla.
E. 0. Flood......................... Lakeland, Fla.
R. L. Hyer...........................Orlando, FIla.
W. F. Ward...........................K .icco, Fla.
G. B. Skipper........ ...... ........... Bartow, Fla.
H . Partin...,.......................Kissimmee, Fla.
J. M. Roach........................ ...Williston, Fla.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
W. A. McRAB..................... .....Commissioner
T. J. BROOKS... ....... ........... ...... Chief Clerk

~OOnDENBs NOTES OF COORESPONDENTS BY DIVISIONS:

WESTERN DIVISION :-As a general observation the un-
isually mild winter encouraged early budding of trees
and sprouting of all field vegetation. The pleasant weather,
encouraged plowing, although the usual cool wave about
Easter checked things the last week in March.
Farmers have been more in doubt as to what to plant
than for many years. The prices of various crop are
not sufficiently encouraging to lend-zest to planting. Cot-
ton reached the old-time "hard-time" price of ten cents
middling with, the'result that the acreage will be consid,
erably reduced. Sweet potatoes, sugar cane, oats and rice,
will be increased, in acreage. Peanuts will have approx-
imately the same acreage and velvent beans will be in-
creased. Onions; cabbage and watermelons promise to-
hold their.own. Corn is still the staple reliance for feed
and pastures will be used asmueh as ever for both beef
and dairy cattle.
NORTHniN DiSIONsI:-This division, which has pro
duced the greatest part of the cotton of the State, will
greatly reduce the cotton acreage considerably. Tobacca










-of the open" field cultivyatien is down in' price, but the
Shaded tobaccos will be planted to about the usual acre-
age unless the trouble with the plants in the beds which
has recently developed, proves to be "wild fire 'and se-
ribusly discourages the growers. The Departient at
Washington has' investigators at work, but at this writ.
ing no report has been made. Sugar cane and peanuts
will be grown as money crops on about the usual scale.
Dairying is holding a strong position in farm industry in
this section.
.Noa~r fsT DxIVIaoN:-Sea Island cotton has been.one
of the leading crops of this section but the' rvages of the
boil weeve. and the low price has caused the farmers to
abandon it-to a great extent. The acreage of other crops
is about the same as last year. Trucking and forage for
dairy cattle will be increased in the vicinity of Jack-
sonville.
COEilTRAL DIVISION:-There is no marked change in the
Sacreage of the various props of this division. Irish pota-
Stoes were doing well till after the middle of March when
.blight appeared and gave grave concern. The extent of
its damage cannot be ascertained at this date. Truck-
Sing are somewhit discouraged by the high freight rates.
Celery has been'splendid in yield and prices good.
SSotUTirmN DIVISION:-This section has perhaps' ieltt
the general depression less keenly than any other because
of-the ready cash spent there by the regular season's tour-
Sists. Developnient is going on rapidly and on, a large
scale. Large. groves are being planted and increased
acreage brought under cultivation. Citrus fruits in full
bloom give promise of abundant yield and trucking is re
ceiving its usual attention.
G~(Nim A IrmtAMas:-The labor situation is rapidly re-
adjusting itself and the impossible prices which farm
labor has been costing the farmerand which lead so many
away from the farm are now veering to the level of the
price of farm products. The stress of labor condition in
the cities is redistributing the labor supply to theaod-
vantage of the farming industry. The purchasing-power
of the money' which thb farmer gets is slowly increasing,
but it is has not yet reached the point of an equitable
exchange. Awaiting a final readjustment the farmer
holds the vantage ground of being able to 'produce .his
food kt home.



























PART II.

CROP REPORT


*'' *i
i -
I j









83

REPORT OF CONDITION AND ACREAGE OF CROPS FrQ AQUAb T~IB
ENDING MARCH 81, 1921.


I'. Sea |
Upland Island .
COUNTY. |Cotton Cotton CornI Millet-

West ii Area Acreage Area
Ba .................. 100 .. 110 .
Calhoun .............. .. .. 125
Ba0 110
Holmes ................ 50 .. 100 -100
Jactson ............... 20 .. 80 20
Okaloosa ... ........... 10 .. 60 ..
Washington ............ 50 ... 125 .
Dlv. Av. per cent .... 46 .. 100 60. K
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............... 10 100 ..
Hamilton ... .......... 100 100 100
Jefferson .../. .....,.. 60 .. 120
teon ................. 70 .. 115
Liberty ............. ... 80 100 ,
Madison ............. 95
Taylor ................. 0 60 O 50 5 0
DiV A*, per cent ... 54 62 7 50.
Northeastern, Di f4ion.
Alachua ............... 25 40 90
Clay ... ......... ...... oo00
Columila ........... ... 1 95 95 "
Dual .................. .. 100 100
Putnam ... ............ .. .. 90
Suwannee. ............ 20 20 100 .
Div. At.' per cent .... 50 52 986 1,100
Central Division. _
o Brevard ............... .. ..
Flagler ............... .. 15 80, 20
SHrnand ............. .. 100
Lake ................... .. .. 100
Levy .................. 100 100
Marion ................ .. .. 125
Orange ............... .. .. 95 10
PeOWa .............. 100 6
Semlno6e ............... .. .. 100 .
Volupla ............. .. .. 100 i 1O0
Div* Av. per ceOt .... . 15 98 I 60
Bouthern Doaivion.
Dade ................. .. .. 100 .
DeSeto ........... ...... .. .. 100
Palm Beach ..;......... .. .. 125
St. Lle .............. .. .. 90 100
DlI. Av. per cent .... .. .. 104 100
State Av. per cent... 50 48 77










84

astRbfonEt; bli Cbstidf A> Ae iaglfA--entinued.

M an SWar JrprN0
I Buo I '
COUNTY. OGte Matee (one

aster DBisim. A -ss ,.. Aoreg I.. Aoreage

110 100 .
a ;.......... 50 I00 00
'Wali& ton ........... 1000 . .... 75... ,,
*D Av. per t. 0 86
Neorte o ..... ,
(^ Ial1.'. '.....1.1 I 120 I- : *. I loti I AQ


SfaI oi...... ........'100 IO

liberty .. ..; ..!...,.-..i. < 100
Madison .............. 95
Tayldr ................. 20


D ..; Av. per .nt.. ,.
T~nothesterl..misonm


I "1 '1 I .


100
90
100
100


...99 1 . 97 I 7..,


a ................. 100 11 100
efbin 100 10 100
uval ................ 100 .. 100
TP tnhi ............... 25 80
; uwahpe... ........... 9. .. 90 8
:I#p.-Av. er c8t ..-. ,100
B a,.- -.., ......, .. ,-, .. ,50
"':": ":1:: :::: 'i I 2ir
H .;:;: ;:;; ..00 TS 100
.Lake ....;..... .... .30 125
Leo .....:............. 100 t 90 1 ,
Marion ................. 125 f.t 75 50
Orange ............. 50 .. 75
Polk ... ... ... .. 7 70
' ie ............ ,I 105 1?9
Volu i& ................ l00 100 110 *..
D 78, 100 .103 ,
erc .


PueAl ..B ............ ::
St. Luile ............ ..
DIv. Av. ber c6 ..1. ..


7fR ATv ner.S.nt. ., S


~11 i0o
S90 11..


10o
110


. 1


"


I


.:67 ...11 .


s 8 ,,1 .... '- .













REPORT OF


CONDITION AVD ACRIiAOEL-CopzUdnud.


1 1 Toba~co
Broom Open
%Oru Sorpbnm Kaffir Corq Field
Wesuz Dita"lcjz. I AargeaOS lAfeage A aeage A go
I i100


Uolmes 8
Jackson ...... S 0.
Okalbosa ...... .... 90
Washington .. I
Div. Av. per pept.... 80w


Liberw t
Gadeden .............. I .
effern .............. 100
Leon. *....: ..... .... 90-
Liberty .. ...... ..... .
Madiso ... ..... ...i. 0
Taylor ........ ........ .. o 0


Div. Av. per cent.... ..


90
~i '~


87 .. 1 7


Northeastern Dit'teon.
Alachua ............... .. "
Clays .............. .. ,
Duval ............... .. .. .
Putnam ............ ..
Suwannee ..... :.. ... I 0 0
nDivm . p... e Ct ... .95. . 90 I

BrVwarq .. ... ....... .. *' **
Bern n o.,A ..er t**** ** ,
Lake ***. .*20.. .*** .. . 0 .. ..
Flagley ... .. ......... 1 .
Hern&ndo *....,,...,. i*
arin ... ~..... ...... .. ..
OLevag .................. 60 .
Mariona ..... .... 15
Osceola
Polk .................. .. 60 .. .
Semlnele .............. .. 100 ..
Volusla .'...... ...... 110 ., .
Div. 4'. per e9t .... .. 59 .. *.
Boiauthk Nfaates.
Dade ................. .
DeSot ............... ...
Palm ch .......... .
St. I 1e .........../.. .. 20
Di Av. per et .,..: 120 -,;
State Av. pe nt ... .. 8


]











\ 86


REPORT OF (ONDITIION AED ACREAGE--Continued.

STobacco | ,/
Under SWeet
COUNTY. Shade Rye Rice Potatoes
WetMtst D4iAiaJtA I Anragoe I Aereaod I Aoreaae I Aoreaae


I


SDiv. Av. per cent ....
State Av. ner cent. .. I


.... 100 102
105 82 96 108


Bay ................... .. 100 110
Calhoun ............... .100 100
Holmes ................ .. 100 90 110
Jackson ............... .. .. 40 90
Okaloosa ............... .. 90 90
Washington ............ .. I .. 100 125
Div. Av. per cent .... 100 "87 104
Northern Division.
Gadsden .............. ,100 100 100 120
Hamilton ............ .. 100 100 100
Jefferson ............... 120 120 120
Leon .................. 100 100 100 115
Liberty ................. 100 100
Madison ........ ...... 115 105 100 100
Taylor ..:............. .. 80 100 120
Div. Av. per cent. .... 105 101 103 110
Northeaster Division.
Alachua ............... .. 95 90 100
Clay ..... ............ .. .. .. 110
Columbia .................. .. .. 105 100
Duval ................ .. 100 100 100
Putnam .............. .. 80 90
Suwannee ............. .. 90 90 95
Div. Av. per cent .... .. 65 95 96
Central Dvision.
Brevard ............. .. .. 100
Flagler ................ .. 20 100
Hernando.............. .. 100 100
Lake ........ ......... .. .. .. 100
Levy .......... .. .. .. 150
Marion... 25 .. 125
Orange .................. 50 .
Osceola ................ 115 150 100
Polk ...................
Seminole ............... 50 00
Volusia ............... .... 100 110
Div. Av. per cent .... .. 63 84 105
Southern Division.
Dade ................. .. .. 100
DeSoto ................ .. .. 100 100
Palm Beach ........... .. .. 100 100
St. Lucle .............. .. .. 110












REPORT OF CONDITION AND ACRBAGE-Continued.


SField I
COUNTY Peas Peanuta
I I


Cassava


Velet
.Biewa s


Western Division. Aoreage I Acreage | Aoreg Acregge


Bay ................. 100
Calhoun .............. 100
Holmes ...............
Jackson .............
Okaloosa .............. 60
Washington .......... 100
Div. Av. per cent ...: 90


-I ;


110
100
100
80
100
100


1 98


100


* 4/10. '.
100
105 ..
90
100


* 97 '


Northern Division. ,
Gadsden .............. 100 90 .. 100
amiton.............. 100 100 100
Jefferson ............. 100 140 .. 150
Leon ................. 100 120 .. 100
Liberty- ............... 100 \.. 100
Madison ....;........... 110 100 .. 100
Taylor ................ 90 100 .. 100
Div. A. per en .... 100 121 .. 107
Northeastern Divston. '
Alachua ............... 100 75 120
Clay ................... 100 100 i00) 100
Columbia .............. 110 90 .. 100
Duval ............... 100 90 .. 100
Putnam .............. .. 60 .. 00
Suwannee ............ 95 80 .. 100
Div. Av. per cent .. I 105 83 100 / 97
Central Divia.on.
Brevard ...... .......... .. 100'
Flagler .... .\..... 40 .. 20
Hernando ............ ... 10 50
Lake ................. 90 75 100 100
Levy .................. 85 100 100
Marion ................ 50 75 100 '
Orange ..............
Osceola ................:: 110 125 1 15 -
Polk ............. ... .. .
Semaole ............... 60 20 60
Volusia ............... 0100 100. 109
Dly. Av. per cent .... 79 96 88 82
Southern Di~vison.
Dade .................. 100 90
DeSoto .............. 100 100 50 100
Palm Beach .......... 75 90
St. Lucie .............. 110 00 ; 105 110
Div. Av. per cent .... 1 i77 97
State Av. per cent .... 95 94 90 ,92











S PAT OF VompIT0oy AyD ACWGTppijipfl.

Cq IiNTY Cabb a e Irish Potatoes
-ltdb ~'Tond4tion'

.as ...l ........... **e
:H9las .............. ; 1.15 100 100 95
,' Jackan ............... -80 75 80 70
Okalooia ...... ....... 60 60 70 7
Washington" .......... .... .. "
Div., Av. per cent .... 91 87. 90 87
'Nothern DIviason.
'.tI.-8aeas ................. ou W- uu iUu i, UU
o .......... ... ... 0, 0
.::::::::::::on .6 o . 9O
Liberty .. .... . . :
Madl~b .... ...........
Taylor ... ......... 8 160
SDtv. Av. per cent .... 125 100 98 97
Northewsteem Disiotn.
1a 1 1-e a '. ".. ". . '. '... o 0 .. .
lay ... 00 .00 100 U .00
Cbluma a ........-......: 100 .100 '
Duval ..............,. 105 100 90 90
Putnm ................. 75 70 90 90
suwkpnee ............. .. 7.. 70 90
SDlv. Av. per cent ,... 82 92 i 80 94
; a s .........______. _______- 110
" Oe:,i/:l: D IS IO .*00. ,
.lagler ................. .. r 1
lerqipdo. ............. . 200 100
Lake.........120 100 85 9
Levy .... ............ .. 100 98
Maro ................ 50 80
Mal" 5 20
OraRge ............. 5 20.
Lev : : 1000
, Oacebla ............... 90 90 110 100
Polk ..........4,........ 90 85 5 85
Semlriole .............. 75 100 100
voiAi ... ............ 11 110 goo 100
Div. Av. per cent .... "80 86 101 97
Routhorm Diaqst. "
Vaiege ..;...-.. .. ....... I .i)...v- *.....- *... .
Desoto .................. T 4 60
Palm Beac ........... 25 75 1
St. TAde ............, 110 100 1p 0010
Dip. A4v. er cent ..,. 91 76 94
SState Av.)per cent,.... '91 9- ""91 88











PIDPORT O' CONDITION A( P AGB&AGil-
1' o~~ 1e... ev ToM noes
SWesters Division. '., Acreage Owt0 i Acreage t Oo to
H ol .. .............. .. .. 100 100
Oafl9 E .... .. ....... .. .. .

Wasb1nigt~n *,,,...,
O se n ., . ...... .. .. .0 .0. 0'


ealr .... .. ... ...... .. .. .. 100 90
DIy. Ai. per cent .... '.. 100... '


Jerff ehon D' 100
L, on a. :: ::. :' :. 90
Liberty .,.. ..... .
Madisoh .________ 100



Clay ...:..... ... 1100
Corimba ..;:....... .100 '90
Dual .. ... .,.. .. 100 ,95
Putnam .-'....... ... .. .. .. ,
Suwasne ............. ..
Div. AV. per cent ...I 85 94
Igefttral Didatosr __'
Brevard .0....."...\... 10f 100 6 100"
Fla ler ............ .. .. 4
He nando ............ .100 1
Lake ................. .. 10 100.
Levy 0 sor
e0y ......... ....... .. .. 80
M a'rion ............ ........ .. 75 ,.

Po:lk.......,f o
semgBole .,.....,...... 10 0 0 75 100
Voln*1k 1__
Totu0 iL .. ? ....... ... .. 100 100
Div. A: per cent ... 70 98 82" 8
B ther Di.. ,_ '


rD e j o.... ........ ... ,
De oto .............
St.Pal each ..;....:::::
st. imee .. ...........


200 100


175 1 9

100 96


Div, Av. per cent .... o60 :00 7T : 91.
State Av. per cent .. .. 'lB 87 go










:.-90

REPORT OF CONDITION AND ACREAGE-Continued.

COUNTY. Cucumbers English Peal

Western Divison. I Aoreage I.Condition Acreage I Oondttion
Bay.. ..............
Calhoun............ 100 100 166 160
Helmes ............... 100 95 110 100
Jackson ...............
Okaloosa .............. *
Washington ............ *
Div. Av. per cent .. 100 97 105 100
ZNorthern Division.


Gadsden ............... .. \
.Hamilton... ....... ...
Jefferson ............... ... ..
Leon .......... .... 95 8
Liberty ............ .. .. .
Madison .......... .. ..
Taylor ................ .. ..


Div Av per cent 95


I I-------1- I I


80 1


Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... 80 90
Clay ................... 100 90 100 100
Columbia .............
Duval .................. 100 o 100 10
Putnam ............... .. ** **
Suwannee ............. .. ***
Div, Av. per cent ... 93 90 100 1.00
OeOtrac DCiision.
Brevard ............... **
Flagler ................ .. .. 40
Hernando .............
Lake..... l.. 66 l6 30 30
Levy .................. 100 100
Mariln ................ 150 80
Orange ................. 85 70
Osceola .............. 80 70 95 95
Polk .. ........... 70 65 75 80
Seminole .............. 80 100 80 100
Volusia ................ 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ../. 8 96 86 57 69
Southern Dtivison.
Dade ... ..... I........ i.
DeSot* ............ 100 4 4
Palm Beach ........... 50 75 100 ,110
St. Lucie ............. 100 90 100 100
Div. Av. per cent .... 83 88 80 83
State Av. per cent .... 93 88 85 88












REPORT OF CONDITION A)D ACR.AGE-tConutned.

COUNTY., Beans (String) Beane (Lima)
'W erM Division. Aoreage 'onoditio I Aoreage Conditi
Bay ..................
Cohoun .............. 100 1006 100 100
Holmes .............. 100 100 ....
Jacks6n ............... ..
Okaloosa ............... .. ..
Washington.............. .. ...
Div. Av. per cent ... 100 00 100 1 00


Northern Diva~to.
Gadaden .............. 120 100 .
Hamilton .............. .
Jefferson ..............
Leon ............. .... 100 90
Liberty .. ............. .
Madison ............. .
Taylor ............. ..
Div. Av. per cent .... 110 I 95. .
Northeastern Division .
Alachua ............... 75 100 50 95.
lay ........ ......... 100 100 100 100
Columbia .............
Duval .............. 100 100 100 90
Putnam ............... ......
Suwannee ....... .... .. ..
Div. AV. per cent .... | 91 11 00 83 95
Central Division.
Brevard .......... .. ..
Flagler ........ .. .. 4 40
Hernando .............. 100 100 .
Lake ................. 125 100 .
Levy .................. 50 80 ..
Marlen ............... 100 100 .
Orange .................
Osceola ............... 1 166
Polk .................. ..
Seminsle ............... 85 100 100 100
Volusia ............... 100 100
Div. AV. per cent ... 83, 90 100 100
Southert Ditos.


ae ................ 1UU ..
DeSoto ..... ..... 0 50
Palm Beach ............ 100 125 100 I12
St. Lude ........... 110 100 100 100


Div. Av. per cent .... 90 94


State Av. per cent .... I 95 s95


l 100 110


95 -1 fn













REPORT OF CONDITION AND ACREAGE--Continued.

COUNTY. Lettuce. omaine.

Wesitrs Divisin. I 4arran Q0qn41i4t1 1, M. eg I jQondi
... 100.
Calhoun ............ 100 100
Holme ..... .. -. ** ..
Jackson ....... .......**
Okaloosa .............
Washington ........ "
Div. AV. per cent .... 100 100
NorthWa atistoaW"' "".*.. '. ..


fiae u .......... ..... ... .. i
Hamilton ........ "
Jefferson............. ..
Ldio ....::........... 1oo 100
Liberty ...............
Madison ...............
Taylor ................ .. .
SDiv. Av. per cent .... 100 100 I
Northeatern Division.
Alachuna ............... 50 90 "'":.
Clay ............... ..
Columbia ..........
aDunal.......... ..... 100 100 100 0.
Pnt nm ............ ..*
Snwannee ............. .. *
'Div. Ay. per cent ... 75 05. .100 90
0sst@ DCeiassin." ____ i_ _
rat :::;::::.:::::: *3 6 *3 40
Levyrd ................
Flagleron ... ....... ... .. 4 40.

HOrande ..............
Lake. ................... 6 70 1 "
Levy ...................
Marion ................
Orange ................. ..100 .1
Oseeola ............... 85 90
Polk.................. 60 75
Semnole ............. 100 100 100 100
Volunsa ....... .... 0 1 00. ..
DP.1 Ay. per cent .... 73 / 8 67 71
$"a pWs l. w m6. 1


Defoto ...........:.'.
Palm Beach ............
St. LUcle ..............


I I-I


Div. Av. pe eent. .... 98 ) 9 100 100
State Av. per eent ..... 89 95 89 1 87













R DEO 0S 1 eOeNbVm N AND AIfBSAo-Cointnue4.

COUNTYi . Eggplants Peppers
Western viton. A reaga I odiftt .o .AoCea. I .0di.
Bay ... ...... .. .
Ct hoan .. ..... ...... 1006
Holmes .,.:.. ....... ..... .; .
JakalO a .. ............. .. .. .


orthern -. .ton.. ; ., .. .:" .."L "" ""...
Osmddl .-... ..... .. ,.. ;
ele von e ........ .. .. .. .. 0 .


Liberty ... .. ;. .... ... .. ... .:
Gadsden .. .... ....


Madzit n ... .... ....... .. ..
Leon 90.



M 02100 .. .0 I.
Alae ld. ...... .;*..... . 70 S5 65 100 ,
Clay1 .....,...."..... 100 95 o I

Coln-vW .......:...... .. i
Putnam .. .. ... ..... 0. 4
8uWa0ee0 ............ .. 1

DIv Av. per cent .... 90 95 76 81
Cren"av4 Diviesonft _ _

lagler ........... ... .. .... ..
Laer ,a do *.. *.... .. . 7 "
aLeve ..............,. .. 50
OLevy .... ............. .. .


Polk ,.. O '
8enilfl e : .....;.... 60 O 100 I
VoSlirs a ............... 4. OU 10I 110 110
^Mv. Ay. aer cent..... 6 78' 6 7
goutorm Dtton. -
thade *..... ........... 90 95 900 '
DeSo'te ..... ;..... "" ; 8 ," 7

Palm' Bah 40 50
St. acie ..... ...... '10 100 .
at. AT. EE.... e
State Av. per cent ... 84 84 82 87













REPORT OF CONDITION AND ACREAGE-Contiined.

COUNTY. Celery Beets

Western Division. Acreage Condition I Acreage I condition
Bay .................. .. ..
Calhoun ................ ... 0 .
Holmes .............. ..
Jackson ............... .. *. 1.
Okaldosa .............. .. ..
Washngton ........... .. ... *
Div. Av. per cent .... .. .. .
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............
Hamiltn . ........ \ ..
Jefferson .............. ..
Leon .................. .... B 80
Liberty ............... ..
Madison ............... ..
Taylor ................ ..0 60
DJv. Av. per cent .... 7.. .. 7 75
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. ... 5 85 100
Clay ...............1... 10 100 100
Columbnia ............. [ [ .*
Duval ................. 100 95 100 100
Putnam ............... .. ..
Suwannee ............. .. .* .. 1
Div. Av. per cent .... 100 97 95 100
Central Division.
Brevard ..............
Flagler ............... 80
Hernanda ..............
Lake .............
LeVy .. ................ .....
Marion v............... .. ..
Orange
Polk ..................
Semln6ae .......... .... 105 100 1o0
Voluelt. ........,, ..... 110 100 100 100
Di. ATv. per gent ... 1.10 100 7o8 7 80
BSouthern Division.
Dade ..../.............. 85 95 .. ..
De~oto .".............
Palm Beach ........... 100 110 100 100
St. Lucle .............. .. 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ,.... 92 102 100 100
State Av. per cent .... 100 99 86 88










. 95 '

AIRPORT OF CONDITION AKN ACREAGEI-Contlnued.

\ COuqKT. Onionu Watermelons

Western Divfion. I Abreage COondfion Areage Oond4rIton.
Bay .................. 100 1006 00 100
bo ............... 100 10 100 100
Holmes ................ 110 100 100 100
Jackson ... ............ .. 80 70
Okaloosa .............. 75 90
Washington .......
Div. Av.,per cent;.... 97 I 95 91 92
Northern Division.
iadsden ... .... ......
Hamilton ..... : ....... 100 100 /-
Jeffersoa ,......... .... .. ... 125 100
Leon ;... 1100 110 95.
Lbrty.............. 100 95
Madison ............. .. 50 45
.Taylor ............./. 80 i80 75 65,
Div. Av. per cent.... i 93 9 93
Northea8ters Divitfon.
Alachua ..... ......... 40 95
Clay ..................... 1.0 10 110 100
Columbia ........... 75 70
Duval. .... ....... 100 i0b 100 95
Putnam ................ 80 80 o
Suwanpee ........... .0 90
Dir. Av. per cent .... 93 98 75 72
Oent al' ivsip
BIevard ................ 5 100
Flagler ....... ....... s 15 40
Hernando .......... ... '100 100 75 90
Lake...... ;........... .. .. 100 95
Levy 9................ .. 90 90
Marion .............. .... 60 75
Orange ....... .,....... ,5 15 45 60
O0ceola ............... 90 90 125 95
Polk ............. .:.... .. 100 90
Semineie ...... 60 100 75 ; 100
Volusia i 120 100
DIv- Av. per cent .... 52 67 80 85
Southern Ditvlion.
Dade .... ; .8.0..... .
DeSoto-...............
Palm, Beach ............ 75 1I0 100 100
t,. Lucie ...... ...... 00 1 0 110 100
Div,: A. per, cent .... 78 .86 98 98
State Av. per cent ..,. 88 87 86 85













OOeBT OF COSDITIOX a&r ACa BAEi C-atltihbd

COUfNTY, Catlbtaupes Strawyert'es

, Wb,~eef Sir4Oi. Aerp.. e Gi Wfich Aned (0iMaffhS
IBay .......... 100 10... 100 100
Calholiti .Io............ lO 1) 100 95
Holmas ........; .. .... .. .,
Jackpon ........ t .. .. .. .
Okaloata .. ......... j. *. .
Washington ........... '
Dir. AT. er cet .... 105 100 10io 9*
No ,..er- Diision.
Gadsden '............ ..
Hamiltoi .. ..... i... .. ,
Jeffereil ...... ......
Leon .............. 16 80 80 a 75
Mdaist .... )... .... .
aylov .. .p .. _. .. _. ... .0 S. ., ..


Alachli ........ ..... 25 7z -
Clay ............ 100, I 100 90
ColtinA Si ....... a..... I .. I I I ' ,;-
Duval ..,. .. 00 100 95
Putnam ..............
Buwaee .* ** **
DiPE Av. fler cent, .,. 5 S3 1 S



Lakev. .... .... .... .. ., .
Levy ................. 10 3
Marlosl .., ..... .... . ..
0 80 30 ,
Volkut ............. 100 10

v. Ao. per aet .... I
4.gott?erSItmenro, ^ni 1.11;--....g '<-*


Dade .................
DeSot0t .\...i... ..
aP,lm B1Ach ..... h n... i
St. Ldtd ... .... c .....
Dive Av. per ce8l ..,i
Btaide Av eIr ceUM .


1U0 95
70 78
*


1.) *8 821
3Ia


I


c-- -- ~ZiEl--~l-


. . . . . .












SPORT 017 OFNDITIOp ABS ACIBAGEI-Continued.


COUNTY.


Orange Lemon Lime.
Tree Trees Trees


G ca -


Calhoun s ......."...... 100 ,100
Holmes .......... ..
Jai tson ............... 80 .. ..
Okaloosa .... .. ... .....
Washington .......... ... ...
v. Ay. pe -cent ..... 93 L160 .. 10
o-e" s0o


uaaes en ........:......
Hamilton ..............
Jefferson ...........
Leon .... ..........
Liberty ..........
Madison ...............
T: ylor ......... ....
Div. Av. Der cent ...


90
i I0 ''
, '80


Wortheastersm .Divisaon.
Alachua ............... 100.
Clay .................. 100 100 100
Columbia............
D val ................ 1 .
Putnam ............... 100 -
Suwannee .............
Div. Av. per cent 100 100 .. 100
Ventral Division. -
revard ............... 110 '
Plagler ...... ........ 100 100, 100
Hernando .............. 110 .. 110
LAke ............... 115' 10 100 100
Ley ............. .... 100
Marion ............... 100 5
Orange ................ 100' " -o
Osceola. ........... ... 95 5 5 85
Polk ............ 90 65 0
Seminole .............. 90 '. 90
Volusia ............... 110 .. 110
Div. Av. per cent ... 102 91 76 88
* southern Divison.-


a .Ue .................. u 0u 75 9
DeSoto ............... 100 90 .90
Palm Beach ........... 10 1 75 110
St. Lucie ............. 90 95 95 98
Div. Av. per cent .... 96 85 85 98 n
State Av, per pent s.... 95 94 80 96


er r4


f


r~~ I~~





'`"~

,f











98

S'REPORT OF CONDITION AND I ACREAGE--Continued.


S COUNTY. Bananas IPineapples Mangoes Grapes

Western Div. Oondition \ Condtion | Condition Condition
Bay ................. .... 100
Calhound ............. ....
Holmes ............... .......
Jackson ............. .... .. 60
Okaloosa ............ .... .. 75
Washington .... ...........
Div. Av. per .cent .... ... 78
Northern Division.


Gadsden .............. ..
Hamilton ............
Jefferson ... ........
Ledn ..................
LiT erty ............... ..
Madison ...............
Taylor :..............
I iv. Av, ,per cent .... I


1 80

100


.. .. 90


Northeasternly Division.
Alachua ............... ... .. 100
Clay .................. ... ....
Columbia ............. .. ..
Duval ................ .. .. .. 100
Putnam ............... .... .. 90
Suwannee ....... ... ......... ..
Div. Av. per cent .... .. .. .. 96
Central Division.
Brevard -................ 100 ...
Flagler ................ 100 ....
Hernando .............. 100 ..
Lake ............. ..... .. ..
Levy .................. .. ..
SMarion .............. ...
O' range ........... .. .. 80 .. 10
sceola ..... ......... 90 .. 80
Polk .................. 75 .. .. 80
Seminole .............. .. .. 60
Volusia .............. .. .. .. 100
Div. Av. per cent .... 94 85 72
Boptthern Division.
Dade .................. 80 60 75 ..
DeSoto ............... .75 75
Palm Beach ............ 100 100 100
SSt. Lucie .............. 95 80 80 80
Div. Av. per cent .... 91 56 82 80
State Av. per cent .... 92 70 82 83










.99

; REPOR OF CONDITION AKN~ ACREAGB--ontinued.


COUNTTY GaRvas Pears Peaches Pears

Western'Div. Condition I O6ndition condition I Condition
Calhoun .... .. 95
Holmes ..........:....
Jackson ............. .- 6 20
Okaloosa ............. .. *
Washingtop ........... ..
Div.-Av. per, cent .... . .. "85 60
Northern Division.
Gadsden ........... 100
Hamlton, ........... 100
Jefferson ........... W
Leon ..................
Liberty ................ .
Madison ......... ..... *
Taylor ................ .. .
Div. AV. per cent .... ,.. '9.0 60
.Northeastern Division.


Alachua ................. .. u10 .
Clay ............ ..... .
Columbia ............. .
Duval ............... ..100
Putnam ............... ... 90
Suwannee ............ *. **
ni. A e, r en 96 95


U l. 1. k . . I -- i
Central Division.
Brevard ............... 100.
Flagler -.............. 90
Hernando.. ............... 0 160i
Lke- 100 i 90
L ake ............... ." \ o
Levyi.................... 100 90
Marion 2............... 20
Orange .......... ..... 80
Osceola ........ ...... 100 98
Polk i80
Seminole 100 50
Volusia .10010

Div. Av. per cent .... 95 .. 82 174
Southern Division.
Dade .......k......... .75 80
DeSote ; ................ 100 100 ..
Palm Beach ........... 100 100 .. .
St. Lucle ............. '80 80 ....
Div. Av. per cent .... 89 0 100 ..
State Av. per cent .... 62 90 92 72




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs