• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of Florida
 Part I
 Part II. Crop report
 Part III. Florida oysters; saccharin;...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00057
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00057
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Part II. Crop report
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Part III. Florida oysters; saccharin; commercial values of fertilzers and feeds; and analyses of fertilizers, feeds, and gasolines
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
Full Text






o'ume 30


Ntnber 4I


-FLORIDA.
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


OCTOBER 1, 1920

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE FLA.
Part 1-Blioraphical Sketch of T. J. Brooks, Chief Clerk
Department of Agriculture. The Agricultural Fu-
ture of Florida. Federal Farm Loarf Banks. In-
crease In Wealth of Various Counties. Florida
Climate Compared With Pleasure Resorts. Pro-
ductivity of Florida Soil Illustrated by Statistics.
Staff of.Eictension Division of University of Flor-
ida. County Home Demonstration Agents, Direc-
tory of County Agents. Legal Fence for Florida.
Florida State Fair and-Exposition. Average Prices
Received by United\States Producers. Mileage by
Courities of Improved Roads.
Part 2-Crop Report.
Part 3-Florida'Oysters, Regulations for Packing arfd Ship-
ping. Saccharin, a Prohlibted Drug, Substituted for
Sugar, Commercial Values of Fertilizers and
Feeds. Analyses of Fertilizers, Feeds and Gaso-
lines.
Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee. Florida, as second-lass
matter under Act of Cong o"' ,f June, 1900.
"Acceptance for m1 n4ng at of postage provided fer
in Section 1103, Act of Oct y ., authorized Sept. 11, 1918."
TrSt w'" 5 11E ffaa To iSE Mf SIfSTIe TIft
T. J. APELYARD, STATU PaINTBR
TALLA-eSSBs, FLORIDA.
aM -1


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COUNTY MAP .

FLORIDA4
SHOWING PUBSDIVIMON -A


















PART I


Biographical Sketch of T. T. Brooks, Chief Olerk, De-
partment of Agriculture.
The Agricultural Future of Florida. -
Federal Farm Loan Banks.
Increase in Wealth of Various Counties.-
Florida Climate Compared with Pleasure Resorts.
Productivity of Florida Soil Illustrated by Statistics.
Staff of Extension Division of University of Florida.
County Home Demonstration Agents..
.Directory of County Agents.
Legal Fence for Florida.
Florida State Fair' and Exposition.
SAverage Prices Received by United States Producers.
Mileage by Counties of Improved Roads.











BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF T. J. BROOKS,
6HIEF CLERK DEPARTMENT OF AGRICOI TURI


'Mr. T. J. Brdoks takes the place of Chief Clerk of the
Department of.Agriculture, which was filled for more than
-thirty years by the late Henry S. Elliot.
Mr. Brooks was reared on the farm in Tennessee, where
She lived until after his majority. After completing High
School he received his literary education at the Southern
Normal University. He returned to the farm, teaching
School at intervals, until he became connected with the
organization of the farmers. He was connected with'the-.
Farmers' Union, both State and national, for years;
represented farm organizations before numerous commit-
tees of .congress on legislative matters vitally affecting
agriculture; formulated the bill whichh resulted in th6 es-
,tablishing of the National Bureau of Markets, and made
the first address on the subject ever made before a Com-
mittee of Congress.
He was a member of the faculty of the Mississippi Agri-
cultural and Mechanical College for six years as head
of the Department of Markets and.Rural Economics.
He was appointed by President Wilson as biennial dele-
gate to the International Institute of Agriculture at Rome
in 19i3, and served with Dr. A. C. True, of Washington,
D. C., Director of States Relation Service, and Professor
Pugsley, of the University of Nebraska, the other dele-
gates. The same year he traveled through ten countries of
Europe studying agricultural problems, as a member of
the American Commission.
He hasbeen general manager of ,.Florida corporation
for some time with headquarters in Jacksonville. He is
thb author of a text book, "Markets and Rural Econo-:;
mics,"'pnd the "March of Intellect."











THE AGRICULTURAL FUTUREOFFPLORIDA

By T. J. Brooks, -
Chief ,Clerk Department ofLAgriculture

The future agricultural possibilities of Florida are
-great, and as farming interests advance and prosper all
'ether interests will flourish in proportion.

COMPARED "WITH SOME EgIOPIAN NATIONS

A better conception of the magnitude of the natural re-
,-sources of our State can be obtained from a comparison
with some of the nations of Europe, The figures are in-
-round i umbers.
SArea Pop-"Per
Country. Square Miles. iPopulation. Sq. Mile.
Belgium .... 11,400 7,500,000 -' 653
Holland ........ 12,500 6,200,000 '493
Denmark ....... .15,500Q 2,800,000 178
Switzerland ...... 16,000 4,000,000 240
Florida ....... .54,600 1,200,000 22
SFrom the above we have approximately the following:
With four times the area of Belgium, Florida has one-
,sixth of the population.
With four times the area of Holland, Florida has one-
fifth of the population.
With three and a half times the area of Denmark, it
has -one-half of the population.
With three and a fourth times the area of Switzer-
land, it has one-fourth the population.
It has far more lands redeemable by drainage than'Hol-
land has reclaimed by her dykes and canals. It has
millions of acres similar to the great plain that extends
from Holland through the heart of Germany, and far
into Ruissia-supporting its teeming millions of people-
It has no barren waste of rocks and mountains as has
our Western States, or Switzerland, Norway,- Sweden,
Scotland, Japan, and other densely populated countries
06f-the world.











SIZ* AND PRbDUCTION

Florida -has 35,111,040 .acres; in actual cultivation
-1,636,983; leaving not in actual cultivation 33,474,057
acres..
Suppose 20,000,000 acres were added to the cultivated
area-which will yet be done-and produced crops to the
annual net value of $50.00 per acre, it would add $1,000,-
000,000 to the annual crop value of the State.
The total assessed value of real property for 1918 was
$233,756,566, and for personal property $69,815,509, mak-
ing a total of $303,566,075. According to the State Bu.
reau of Markets the total crop value for 1919 was $131,-
000,000.
During the past three and one-half decades, the pop-
ulation of Florida has increased 400 per cent. The FiA-
teenth Biennial Report recently issued gives the number
of pieces of mail matter sent in reply to inquiries as over
;54,000.
The Federal government has maintained in Florida ex-
periment stations to test forty thousand plants from
foreign countries. There are thirty-three county demon-
stration agents at work in the State, and the same num-
ber of home demonstration agents.
Fifteen thousand men are engaged in the fish industries
of the State.
-Florida shipped 66,792 carloads of fruit and vegetables
last year, consisting of over two hundred different farm,
garden and grove products.
Livestock, dairying and poultry products amounted tQ
$26,0,000,0.
The number of native and introduced trees of Florida
is two hundred and eighty, and the number of different
kinds of birds of the State is three hundred and fifty.
and of fish 650. The flora of Florida is so extensive that
no one as yet has completed a comprehensive work-on it.
At the International Exposition held in Kansas. City
with forty-five States competing, Moore Haven, Fla., took
the sweepstakes prize, money and silver cup for the great-
est and finest display of agricultural and horticultural-
productions.
A- Florida Poland China sow won grand championship
at the International Livestock Show in Chicago in 1919.
Marion County getting it.










The counties of FloridE spent in three years, ending
September, 1919, $17,085,432,86 on roads and bridges.
The State has splendid hard-surf ce roads. The mileage:
will be doubled in a few years. Good roads bring in
enough new investment to more than offset the .cost
of construction. This is especially true of counties just
being developed. ,
Some people think of Flqrida as an orange orchard,
a lake or an everglade. The greatest acreage planted
to any one crop in the State is grain-cbrn. Practically
the entire northwestern section is adapted to general
farming, which includes corn, hay, peanuts, tobacco, velvet
beans) cowpeas, kudzu ,oats, .rape, sugar cane, eorghuml
pasture grasses, cotton, livestock and fruits. It is the
northwest-portion of the State that produces most of the
feed tuffs. VThe muck lands of the State-which are not
copnned to the everglades-are splendid lands for. corn,
cane, vegetables, etc. They were once the bottoms of
lakes and are very rich in plant food when brought under
scientific. cultivation as thousands of acres amply testify.
The 17,0),000 bushels of corn produced in 1917 could be
easily quadrupled by bringing under cultivation splendid-
,grain lands by drainage in counties where corn is already
Grown.
The peanut is the second largest crop of the State.
The production in 1918 being over fivemillion bushels. The
velvet bean has grown in favor, and the crop is about
2,000,000 bushels a year. Kudzu is coming in for a
share in the leguminous vines, producing large yields of-
excellefit forage. The beggar weed is a splendid.legumin-
"'us plant that furnishes splendid grazing and hay. The
present crop of sweet potatoes will exceed 4,0 9|00
bushels.. Last year's crop of tobacco was 4,000000 pounds.
Peanuts 3,402,000 bushels;
SFlorida now has four grain elevators, located at Ma-
rianna, Jacksonville, Greenwbod and Tallahassee, and
one is -rojected at Moore Haven,, near the Everglades.
Some of these handle velvet beans, ,owpeas, peaiiuts and
cotton seed in the same manner as corn.
,The value of exploits passing through Jacksonville isd
more than $8,000,000, $1,000,000 of which was pe nut meal
*and mixed feeds. The naval stores and lumber exported'
'through Key West in 1919 amounted to $2,000,000 each.
Pensacola, Apalachicola, Tampa and Ft. Myers are tkh











larger ports for the west coast, furnishing ocean trans-
portation to and from all great markets. Key West,
Miaminand Jaksonville on thesouth and east are ports
where Florida products are interchanged'with the ports
of the world. Miami is growing like a magic city in some
great gold-mihing district. It has increased its popula-
tion 400 pef cent. in the last few years.
The Everglades are being drained 'where three million
acres of muck which nature has been preparing in her
laboratory during countless aeons of time a soil and
humlts, waiting the plow, the sunshine and showers to
yield a harvest sufficient to support more people than
- are now in the State. The swamp regions of the State
have sufficient elevation to drain and at less cost than
the baked planes of the West can be irregated and when
this is done who. can measure the future agricultural
possibilities of Florida? What has been done is only a
faint indication of what will be done. All the things
herein mentioned and* more are prophesies' of what is
to come. With a bountiful supply of hlnmous in peat-
lands, with almost a monopoly on phosphate, and unlim-
ited 'lime rock, what is to hinder the making ef the agri-
cultural future of this land of sunshine, -rain and two
to four crops a year? The State has almost a monopoly
of the finest fuller's earth of the world. This is needed
in refining oils. Dehydration will help to utilize all the
perishable fruits and vegetables that now waste for want
of scientific curing and preserving.
Heralds these of a coming day when Florida's products
will find their way to every port where the banner of
civilization waves.
"You have seen the flushing of the skies at morn,
Foretaste of glories yet unborn,
Whose birth the angels sing the while--
That is her smile."










FEDERAL FARM LOAN BANKS

SDuring three years the Federal Farm Loan 'Banki
loaned $346,616,041 to 125,003 farmers, and twenty-eight
JTu nt Stock Land Banks loaned $79,111,532 to 8,315 farm-
ers. Thus 133,318 farmers were enabled to mobilize their
credit and secure cheap money on long-timn loans from
March 27, 1917, to April 30, 1920. The rates were 5,
51/ and 6 per cent., running from five to thirty-five years,
payable by the amoirtiation plan,
.The Federal Land Banks had approved applications
for loans on hand for $41,966,961 to 16,390 farmers when
the operation of the system was halted by a-suitinsti-
gated -by the Farm Mortgage Breakers' Association of
America against the constitutionality of certain features
of the law. The contention being that Congress had ,no
power to establish government banks and that the. tax-
exemption feature of the Farm Loan Bonds is uncon-
stitutional.
-he case wai argued in Kansas City, Mo., Iast'fall be-
fore the United States District Court and dismissed. An
appeal was taken to the United States Supreme Court.
It was argued there in January, 1920, and in April a
new hearing was ordered. This. cannot take place until
this fall, and a decision is not likely before January,.
1921.
The money which farmers borrow through this sys-
tem is not government money but is secured by the sale
.of land-mortgage bonds in the open market. Pending the
decision of the court there must inevitably be a doubt
about the bonds being exempt from taxes, thus rendering
the sale' of bondsaat the same rates secured before the
fIling of the suit impossible, and the sale was discon-
Minued. Immediately interest rates were raised by pri-
vate money lenders and bankers from 1 to 4 per cent. on
firm loan
SRecognizing the need of capital at low rates to operate
lfafming Congress passed a joint resolution and the
President signed it on May 26, 1920, authorizing the
Secretary of the Treasury-to buy Federal Farm Loan
'bonds to 'provide funds for making loans approved by
the banks up to March, 1920. This Act provided between
twenty-fve and thirty million dollars, which was hoped
would tide over till the decision of the Supreme Court.











The outstanding bonds sold under this law constituted
only 2 per cent. of the tax-free securities of the-country.
The others are State and municipal bonds and certain
issues of government securities. Congress nov has the
power to tax all these bonds. Why single out Farm Loan
bonds for taxation and leave over $15,000,000,000 of other
securities untaxed?
The writer is familiar with the struggles that brought
about the Federal Farm Loan law, as-he was one of the
American COmmission which studied rural credits in
Europe prior to the enactment of the law, and was also,
one of many who appeared before committees of--Con-
'gress which had charge of the bills introduced on the sub-
ject. There is not only a need for long-time rural credits-
based on land but there is need for short-time rural credits
based on personal property.
Large projects for land development financed by com-
panies are bringing in many thousands of acres; but'
this will not take the place of the small farmer who
operates on small capital and builds a home which con-
stitutes the unit for a substantial and permanent rural
civilization,-









12


SAFE TO INVEST IN FLORIDA

Investment in Florida lands is notonly safe but very--
pro4table. We take the following figures from advance
sheets of the Feleral census of 1920. Comparative figures
on counties not included here could not be given because
of changes in county lines (r of recent organization,
and reports have not come tn on all the counties to date.
Increase in value of farm hands during the last ten
yearn:,


County. Percentage o
Polk .. ............................ .
Hernando ........ .......... ...... .
Pasco' .......................... ....
Sumpter ..................... .. ..
Brevard .............. ..........
a Levy ....... .. . ...... .;. . ....
Lake ................. .............
Marion .......,.....................


if Increase.
616.3
294
243.8
153.9
149.6
128
.109.
80.2


New counties, where development is in its infancy, offer
wonderful opportunities for investors. Hundreds of
thousands are being made by judicious buyers in various
counties where citrus orchards are being planted. Buy-
ing up raw lands, clearing, plowing and setting to good
trees and: then selling to those who want young orchards,
offers one of the most profitable and perfectly legitimate
business projects of the time.. Counties and cities that
have sprung on the map as by magic are only weather-
vanes pointing the way in other counties. They are the
timekeepers of progress inviting the daring, industrious
and progressive to rich fields of harvest. The most back-
ward counties of today are only new eldorados inviting
you to come'and "grow up with the country."
FI











FLORIDA CLIMATE COMPARED WITH THE PLEAS-
URE RESORTS OF THE WORLD

Does the climate of Florida justify the claim that the
State will support a dense population of thrifty and
prosperous people? Yes.
Florida's isothormal zone is the equivalent of that of
thriving and populous parts of the Southern Hemisphere.
It is the equivalent of those countries where the great,
civilizations of the ancients flourished.
The following table illustrates what we mean. The
figures represent a ten-year average for each season:

TABLE OF TEMPERATURES-AN AVERAGE OF
TEN YEARS


Name. -- Winter.
Pau, France .... 42
Pisa, Italy ...... 44
Nice, France .... 48
Jacksonville, Fla. 56
Rome, Italy ...... 49
Cairo, Egypt .. 54
Malaga, Spain ... 55
Algiers, Morocco. 55
Los Angeles, Cal. 56
San Diego, Cal... 56
Naples, Italy ...: 58
St. Augustine, Fla..58
-Tampa, Fla. ..... 61
Palm Beach, Fla.. 67.
Miami, Fla. ...... 67


Spring. Summer.:
54 70
57 73
55 71
69 81
58 74
70 80
58 78
66 77
59 69
61 65
58 70
68 79
71 81
73 81
73 82


Fall. Annual.
58. 56
62 59
62 60
70 69
62 60
72 70
60 65
62 66
66 62
65 61
64 61
69 68
73 72
77 75
78 75


The foregoing figures on temperatures in foreign coun-
tries are from the climatic works of Dr. P. C. Remondine.
Those for America from the Government Weather Bureau.
Approximately a million people visit Florida annually
which shows what is thought of her climate for the colder
months andi our summer temperatures cause no sun-
strokes as occur each summer season in the Northern
States.











PRODUCTIVITY OF THE SOIL OF FLORIDA AND
VARIOUS OTHER-PARTS' OF THE UNITED
STATES, ILLUSTRATED BY STATISTICS
By Roland M. Harper,
Geographer, Florida State Geological Survey.
In modern times, especially since labor-saving machin-
ery and commercial, fertilizers came into use, and the
adaptation of crops to soils has beeniwarked out scien-'
tifically, soij fertility has had very little to do with agri-
ciltural prosperity. In practically every county in the
United States there are now many successful farmers
who would rather live where-they are than anywhere
else. In the long run the income and outgo from farm-
ing (or any other business) just about balance, so that
-in any region the difference between the receipts and ex-
penses of the average successful farmer is just enough
Sto pay him for his time, and the value he puts on that
is determined largely by himself, or at least by the prw-
vailing standards of his community.
If poor soil was any disgrace the Danes would have
very little to brag about, for Denmark is. a country with
very sandy soils; but nevertheless agriculture is its lead-
ing industry, and its farming practices are a model in
many respects for the rest of the world. The farmers
there import large quantities of grain to feed to their
animals, and export approximately equal values of butter
and bacon (but not much milk, which contains consid-
erably more mineral matter than butter does). In that -
way they can constantly improve the soil without buying
any commercial fertilizer at all (though they .And that
it pays to buy a little for certain crops), for the grain im-
ported is pretty rich in mineral matter, such as phos-
phates, while-the butter and bacon contain very little.
_It is-useless to deny-or to get excited-when any out-
sider points out-that the average soil of Florida is below
the United States average in natural fertility, and per-
haps below that of any other State; but as stated above,
and as will presently be shown more plainly by means
of statistics,'that has very little to do with farm profits.
In value of crops per acre Florida is above the average
for the whole country, and if surpassed by only a few
S-tates, and .those few are much more densely popu-
lated.











In the following pages the principal expenses and re-
ceipts of farming in various parts of Florida and in 24
other States, as computed from the returns of the U. 8'.
census of 1910, are tabulated in detail. There are of
course-quite a number of minor expenses and sources of
revenue-that have never been returned by the census, but
they balance each other to-a considerable extent, and are
*usually much less important than those tabulated, any-
way. There are also some limitations in the accuracy
of the statistics, such as the fact that the amount of im-
proved land is that for the census year, while the ex-
penses and receipts are for the year preceding, and also
that the census does not always make adequate allow-
ance for'the amount of crops, etc., consumed on the farms;
but these ought to affect all-regions about alike, and not
materially affect the comparisons. It would also be de-
sirable to have statistics less than ten years old, but the
complete returns of this year'p census, as far as agricul-
ture is concerned, may not be available for several months
yet, and the figures for 1010 will illustrate the general
principles just as well.
For Floridajthe results are given for several different
natural divisions separately, to illustrate the great di-
versity of our State, but for the 9ther states (some of
which are quite diversified also) only state averages are
used. At the head of the first table similar statistics
for the-whole State of Florida are given, as far as avail-
able, for four different censuses, and in the second the
whole United States is treated the same way. The states
selected for illustration include all the New England
states and all the southeastern states, and several of
the more fertile in other parts of the country. Most of
those omitted do not differ remarkably from some of those
included, or have crop values any higher on the average
than Florida's.



































































MaWp showing natural divisions of Florida as at present understood, in,
cluding several so located with respect to existing county boundaries that
they cannot very well be treated statistically. 'The name of those too
small to be named on the map can be found in the accompanying text, or
in the Sixth Annual Report of the Florida Geological Survey, where the
same number" are used for those in th nrth-r -r;t of the State.











Florida can be-readily divided into twenty-five or thirty
natural geographical regions (which is more than any
other, state has, with the possible exception of Texas,
which is considerably larger), differing in soil, topog-
raphy, vegetation, etc., and correspondingly in popula-
tion and agriculture. All that were known at that time
were described briefly by the writer in the Third Annuaj
Report of the Florida Geological Survey, published at the
beginning of 1911, and those in the northern half of the
State more fully in the Sixth Annual Report, fouryears
later. Some of them, however, are too small or narrow
to get any satisfactory statistics for, and others cannot
be treated very accurately in this connection, for the
county is the unit in agricultural census returns, and
Florida counties iare still pretty large, averaging about
1,000 square mile each. (The Legislature will have two
or three opportunities to make the counties fit natural
regions better-before the next State census). It should,
therefore, be constantly borne in mind that the con-
trasts between different regions shown in the table would
be still greater if the county boundaries coincided more
closely with natural boundaries.
The regions treated statistically, and the counties se-
lected to illustrate them, are as follows. (The numbers
correspond with thode on the map):


.-Bul.









18 '


1. Marianna red lands.:-Jackson.
2. West Florida lime-sink region.-Holes. ,
7. West Florida pine hills.-Calhoun, Escambia, San-
ta Rosa, Walton.
9. Apalachicola flatwoods--Franklin,. Liberty.
10.. Middle Florida hammock belt.-Alachua, Coluln-
bia, Jefferson, Madison,- Marion.
11. Tallahassee red hills.-Leon.
13. Wakulla hammock region.-Wakulla.
15. Gulf hammock region.-Sumter, Taylor.
17. Peninsular lime-ink rregion.-Citrus, Levy, ASu-
wannee.
18. Peninsular lake region.-Lake, Orange.
19. East Florida flatwoods.-Baker, Bradford, Clay,
Duval, Nassau, St. Johns.
20. East Coast strip.-Brevard, Palm Beach, St. Lu-
cie.
21. Hernando hammock belt.-Hernando, Pasco.
23. West Coast hammocks.-Manatee.
24. South Florida flatwoods.-DeSoto, Lee, Osceola.
26. Miami limestone region.-Dade.
28. The Keys.-Monroe.
X he counties not listed here are either those established
Since 1910 or those which are so nearly equally divided
between two or more regions that statistics for such coun-
ties would not be typical of either. In some cases, how-
ever, most of the farming in a county is concentated
in a region that covers not more than half its area (for
example, Jackson, Leon, Jefferson, Brevard, Hernando,
Manatee),-so that we can use the statistics with some'
confidence.









STABLE i.
Statistics illustrating soil productivity in FVorida at different timesad in different regions. (All figures
represent dollars and cents).
Expendi ures per Value per
acre' imp moved land acre impwrped

i c.
g4) a r


W hole Stafe, 1879-80 ................. ............. .. .* *** *. ***** ....... \ ...... 1 .54
Whole State, 1889-90 .............................. ** .76 ...... 10.54
WholeState, 1899-1900 ............... ............. 7.06 .97 .. ... .50 _. 10.70
lhole"State, 1909-10 ............................... 17.84 2.78 20 2.00 1.00 20.00 3.99
SMarianna red lands ............................ 9.19 .71 .11 .8T .15 13.50 2.98
2. West Florida lime-sink region ................... 8.62 .39 .10 .30 .40 21.60 5.24
7. West Florida pine hills ...................... 9.21 .75 .15 .79 1.01 21.10 6.95
9. 4palachicola flatwoods .... ................... 3.80 1.23 .12 60 .86 18.70 6.11
10. Middle Florida hammock belt. ..................... 9.99 1.42 .11 0 .23 12.70 2.51
11. Tallahassee re4d hills ............................ 10.81 1.10 .12 .9 .1 8.65 1.88
13. Wakulla hammock country ...................... 3.56 ,.25 .08 .0 .06 6.37 1.52
S15. Gulf hammock region .......................... 13.08 3.53 .17 1.8 .85 21.10 3.97
17. Peninsular lime-sink region ................... 7.17 .71 .16 .02 .24 11.26 3.08
18. Peninsular lake region ......................... 41.80 10.20 .25 8.84 4.63 49.70 6.48
19. East Florida flatwoods .......................1.. 15.55 3.10 .40 .1.98 \ 1.71 25.80 7.28
20. East Odast strip ................ ............... 94.80 30.10 .57 !27.90 6.:1 137.00 6.02
21. Hernando hammock, belt ....................... 19.66 ,, 2.75 .19 1.44 1.64 21.10 5.40
23. West Coast hammocks ......................... 76.86 18.45 .64 13.25 .30 88.60 7.18
24 South Florida flatwoods ...:................... 35,08 9.43 .65 7.98 23 0.60 8.90
26. Miami limestone region ......................... 69.38 23.50 .72 26.60 8. 0 100.50 4.66
28. The Keys ................. ................... 55.41 5.22 1.94 .07 .9 34.40 1.08









S20


It Will be seen at once that high-land values, large ex-
peinditures and valuable crop yields go together, irrespec-
tive of soil conditions There is no onie unit of measure-
ment for soil fertility; but by almost any test that can be
applied the. soils of regions 1, 10 and 11 are above the
State average in natural fertility and 18, 20, 24 and 26
-below, and yet the reverse is true of their crop yields.
There iZ hardly a poorer soil in the world than the old
dunes ofthJ.east coast strip, but they are largely planted
in oranges andpineapples, and that region has the highest
land and crop values in 'tbeState, several timesthe aver-
age for the United tSates. -Thia represents the nearest
approach in Florida to the intenfive~ ~ fa ng of Europe,
China and Japan. Curiously enough, there `'ee,~ fifteen
Japanese farmers in Palm Beach County in 19)6 (ad
only one in the rest of the State), and their land was
worth more per acre than that of the white farmers. The
census.tells nothing about their expenses and receipts,
but it is safe to assume that they got a little more out
of each acre than the whites did.
Syme people seem to think ,that the efficient farming
ana other evidences of high civilization in South Florida
must be due to the large number of settlers from the
North. Since -1880 the census has not given the number
of immigrants from other states for areas smaller than
states, except the larger cities, but in the light of the
returns from presidential elections it is pretty certain
that Northerners are not and 'never have been in the
majority in any county or region in Florida. Further-
more, it is believed by sociologists that emigrants from
any, region are less efficient, than the average of those
who stay at home (for a man who is. successful usually
has little incentive to migrate), so that it is extremely
improbable that the prqeence of a few "expatriated"
northern farmers would be enough in itself to raide the
efficiency of farming far above the United States average.
In fatct it is thought that the. most successful farmer in
South Flokida are those born either in Florida or some
other Southern state, such as Georgia. For those from
farther a~aya re likely to find conditions too dififeent
from what they have been accustomed to.
ThiN-hypothesis of northern immigrants also falls far
ahort of explaining why,the 1909 crops of Georgia were
w'rth abbut 40 per cent,' more than th~se of Pen iylvania,










which had about the same improved acreage and nearly
three times as many people, a little more than those of
Kansas, which had more than double the improved acre-
age, and nearly as much as those of Ohio, which had over
50 per cent. more improved land.
It might be supposed also that the rather low crop
yields in Middle Florida are correlated with the large
proportion of negroes there. The census does not give
complete statistics of the agricultural operations of the
two races separately, but it does give (in a volume on
negro population published late in 1918) the acreage and
yield of cotton and corn for white and negro farmers in
mbst counties in the South, and there is comparatively
little difference between them. This fs bound to be so,
for if a white man and a negro both have similar land
on neighboring farms it is necessarily assessed at the
sameavalue per acre, or practically so, and if the negro
did not make nearly as much per acre as the white man
he could not pay his rent or taxes, and would have to
give it up. The significant difference between the two
races is that the negro has simpler tastes and therefore
requires fewer acres to supply his wants.
The principal factors which have favored the develop-
ment of such intensive farming in South Florida are
probably' good railroad connections with -the large north-
ern markets, and especially the mild winters, which give
that section an advantage over all the rest of the coun-
try in raising early vegetables, strawberries, etc., and in
making more than one crop a year on the same land.
These advantages are practically independent of soil con-
ditions.
The next table illustrates a number of extreme condi-
tions different from any found in Florida, but confirms,
the general principles already set forth. It treats, the
whole United states and twenty-five selected states in
the same manner that the regions of Florida are treated.
in Table 1, except that cash. and board compensations of
laborers are combined to save space, and columns are:
added for percentage of improved land and for value of
crops per acre in crops.
The percentage of improved farm lahd (relative to total
area) is a very good index of soil fertility, except where
rit is limited by the presence of large cities, mountains
or swamps, or where the region' is newly settled, or so-










arid that very little land can be cultivated, without irri-
gation. ; Practically all arid soils arx'rich (if they do
hot go to the extreme of being too strongly alkaline), but
in the West most of the arid land is too far from rivers
or too high up ever to be irrigated by any method now in
common use, so that the percentage of improved land'in
all the Western States is low.
The-percentage of improved land could not be given
very accurately for the regions in Florida already de-
scribed, on account of the lack of correspondence between
county boundaries and natural boundaries. For example,
Leon County was 23.9 per cent. improved in 1910, but.
that means nothing, for the red hills in the northern part
are about half under cultivation, while the sandy southern
part is probably not 5 per cent. improved. There is less
error in the statistics based on the number of farms or
improved acres, though, -for those are so much more
numerous in the northern than il the southern part that
the averages represent the red hills very well. And it is
indeed conceivable that the average size of farms and
value of-products per acre-might be nearly the same in
different parts of the county, however the proportion of
improved land varies.
The value crops, for the whole country -and the several states is
taken bodily from one of the census -tables, but it is not
given directly by the-census for areas smaller than states,
and could not be ascertained for the several regions of,
-Florida without laborious computations.
The ratios between expenditures for feed and value of
,animal products on the one hand and improved land on
the other mean very little by themselves, but their ratio
to each other and to the figures in the columns immediate.,
ly preceding them is quite significant
It is hardly necessary to explain that all the figures4n
Table 2 except those in the first column represent dollars
and cents. Not being carried out to mills, values less
than half, a cent (which occur' in onlthree places) are
represented by 0.




S, + TABLE 2.
Statistics illustrating soil prductivity in the United States at different times and in 25 selected states.

Expenditure in
previous year, per Value per acre
S '0 acre improved, for improved land
STATES, ETC. !o
El "0 Labor l g Animal
Sboard fertilizers eed a Crops products
c_______________________________"o a inclu_______ ,ded)e e Cp p
Whole united States, 1879-80 .................. 15.0............. 10........ .77
Whole United States, 1889-90.................. 18.8 ....... ...... 0.11 ...... ...... 6.90
Whole United States, 1899-1900 ........................ 21.8 15.57 0.86 0.13 ..... 7.66
Whole United States, 1909-10 ........ .......... 251 32.40 .36 0.24 0.63 16.30 11.2 6.20
,190o-10 L i- -


Alabama .................................... 29.5 10.46
California ................................ 11.4 47.16
C nnecticut ................ .................. 32.0 33.03
Florida .................. ...................... 5.4 17.84
Georgia .,.................. ...... ............. 32.7 13.74
Illinois ..................................... 78.2 95.02
Iowa .... .................................. 82.9 82.58
Kansas ..................................... 57.1 35.45
Kentucky .................................. 558 21.83
Louisiana ................................. 18.2 17.99
Maine ............................ .......... 12.3 13.73
Massachusetts .............................. 22.6 36.69
Michigan ....................... .......... 34.9 32.48
Mississippi ...................... .. 80.4 13.69
New Hampshire ........... .............. 16.1 13.70
New Jersey ............................... 37.5 48.23
New York ................................ 48.7 32.13
North Carolina .................... ... 28.3 M5.29
Ohio ........................................ 73.7 5 .34
Rhode Island ........ ..................... .. 26.1 33.86
South Carolina .....i........................ 1.2 19.89
Tennessee .................................. 40.8 18.53
Vermont ......... ............... 28.0 12.52
Virginia ...................... .... .... ...... 8.8 20.24
Wyoming .............................. ..... 2.0 10.41


U.I U.'I
4.39 0.19
6.96 1.98
2.97 2.00
1.07 1.37
1.29 0.02
0.84 0
0.69 0
0.85 0.09
3.17 0.38
2.39 )1.80
10.39 1.69
1.49 0.07
0.80 0.30
3.63 0.55
6.15 2.37
2.78 0.48
1.05 1.39
1.35 0.22
9.88 1.88
1'.77 2.4
0.78 0.11
2.91 0.35
1.35 '0.70
4,92 0


U.4Z
1.11
5.48
1.00
0.33
0.50
0.63
0.60
0.28
0.72
3.08
9-33
0.44
0.44
4.62
3.29
1.99
0.36
0.33
9.40
0.30
0.33
2.92
0.85
1.20


20.40
36.90
20.65
22.20
17.90
14.95
10.60
20.80
21.00
19.85
41.50
17.33
22.60
19.30
33.30
20.80
22.30
18.80
40.50
26.40
17.05
18.40
30.25
'12.44


14.90U
13.45
22.80
20.00
18.45
13.30
10.65!
7.17
9.70
14.65
16.651
27.40
12.60
16.35
17.20
22.30
14.10
16.20
11.90
22.05
23.30
11.10
16.85
10.15
8.00


2.69
6.12
14.85
3.99
2.42
7.59
S9.60
5.78
5.51
2.33
9.18
23.60
7.05
2.72
13.65
12.37
9.60
3.72
8.10
22.80
2.28
6.56
13.50
5.05
18.20


,,-,,~~~~~ ,,,,,, .,.


I I


I


I


I


I I


I


,










As before, a general correspondence between expendi-
tures and reecipts can be observed throuhgout the table,
regardless of soil fertility, which is indicated, pretty well
by the first column, when certain limitations are borne ir
mind. The increase in improved land in the whole coun.
try in forty years is due mostly to the settling up of the
West; and the proportion is lower than it would be other-
wise in New Hampshire on account of mountains, in
Florida and Louisiana on account of swamps and marshes,
in southern New England on account of cities and fac-
tories, and in western Kansas, Wyoming and California
on account of lack of sufficient water to irrigate all'the
l9nd.
Illinois' and Iowa, the most fertile of the Eastern or
non-irrigated states, are good illustrations of the draw-
back of ligh land values. The expense of fertilizing there
is practically nothing, and labor is not a large item either
for the land is mostly so level and free from rocks that
it can be cultivated with heavy machinery; but com-
petition for the use of such land puts its price so high
that'the interest on it at any reasonable rate would ex-
ceed all the other expenses listed,-and therefore the profits
per acre are no greater than on Florida's sand. The
reason that farmers in the prairie states' generally have
better houses, more automobiles, etc., than the average of
those in the Sbuth and East is not that they make any
more profit to "the acre (for they often make less, as the
table shows), but that they usually cultivate more acres.
Many of the more prosperous farmers in Florida operate
on a similar scale,- though, and have equally high stand-
ards of living, and the nature of the soil does not hinder
them.(
Attention should. be called to the fact that both, tables
show apparently a considerable increase in expenditures
and receipts per acre in Florida and the whole country
\between 1899 and 1909. This, however, does not indicate
increased intensity of farming so much as a mere rise in
prices. -According to the Thirteenth Census (Vol. 5, p.
535, also Abstract, p. 363) the price of all crops in the
United States, for the same units, was just about two-
thirds higher in '1909 than in 1899; and the effect of in-
creasing population added to the shrinkage of the dollar
made the average value of farm land and buildings just
about double in the same period'. About, ten years ago










there was a great outcry all over the country about-the
high cost of living,' but very few people traced it to its
main source, which -seems to have been simply the in.
creased production of gold in'the Klondike region and
elsewhere, beginning near the end of the last century.
The discoveries of gold in California in 1849 boosted farm
prices all over the country in much the same way; dnd
at the present time prices of nearly everything all over the
world are the highest ever known, on account of the in-
flation of currency necessitated by the recent great war.
(At the census of 1870 currency in the United; States
was inflated about 25 per cent. as a result of the Civil
War, but it returned to normal a few years after that.)
When the returns of this year's census are/all in it will
probably be found that farm prices are at least double
those often years ago, and it will take considerable
study to determine just how much, if any, farming has.
increased in efficiency during the decade. The recent
report that Florida's crops last year were worth $65 an
acre, or over three times what they were in-1909, may
indicate that Florida has made more progress than the
rest of the country.
Another point to bear in mind is that the figures given
in the foregoing tables represent the averages of many
farms, some barely making both ends meet and, others
making large profits; and in such matters as size of
farms, value of land and buildings, yiela of crops, etc.,
usually about two-thirds of the farms in a given county
or state are below the average, and some far above. Con-
sequently, although it is obviously impossible for all or
evezi a majority to rise above the average of their com-
munities, any -individual with sufficient ability and am-
bition can put himself in the uTpper third, and there is
Practically no limit to what he can accomplish, regard-
less of what sort of soil he has, provided he does not
attempt a system of farming wholly unsuited ,to the
locality;
Every region'on earth has its advantages and dis-
advantages, but the opportunities in Florida, for those
who know how, and appreciate having plenty of i'oom
and a genial climate, are at least as good as in any of
the older and more thickly settled States. Farming may
seem a simple business to those who see illiterates making
a success of it, but it is really very complex, and a










e--man who has spent his life on a farm, even .if he has
no book-learning whatever, has accumulated by observa-
tion and through the precepts of his elders a vast fund of
-information about soils, weather, crops, domestic ani-
mals, insect pests, and marketing and, other economic
problems, to say nothing of human nature. A newcomer
who has this sort of information, gained in a region not
too different from that to which he removes, or has mas-
tered the fundamental principles by long and careful
study of what has been written on the subject, or has
sufficient capital to support him a-few years while he is
gaining the necessary experience or to hire a competent
person to supervise his farming operations, can succeed
anywhere in Florida; but one not thus equipped is taking
a considerable risk.
SAn interesting result of the intensity of farming that
prevails in some parts of Florida may be that such re-
gions will soon have a denser population than some of the
-fertile wheat regions of the West,. whereone mnan can
easily work a hundred acres, and where one farm often
occupies a whole section of land; and Florida's influence
in the councils of the nation will then-be correspondingly
greater. Right now there are several counties in Florida
that have more people to the square mil9 than Iowa
(which had 82.9 per cent. of its area improved in 1910),
and they are not all city counties' either; Gadsden, with
,85 percent. of its population rural and only 23 per cent.
of its land improved, being one of them. And Alachua,
Bradford, Columbia, Hamilton, Holmes, Jackson, Jeffer-
son, Leon, Madison and Suwanee all had denser popula-
tions in 1910 than the state of Kansas, with its 57.1 per
cent. of improved land.. In such a state as Iowa no fur-
Sther extension of :agricultureA. possible (the improved
area decreased a little between 1900 and 1910, probably
on' account of the growth of towns and cities), and the
population can only increase by changing to a more in-
tensive'system of farming or.going more into manufactur-
ing.










27


EXTENSION DIVISION UNIVERSITY OF-FLORIDA,--
P. H. ROLFS, DIRECTOR, GAINESVILLE.

0. K. McQuarrie, State Agent, Gainesville.
A. P. Spencer; Vice Director and'District Agent, South
Florida, Gainesville.
I W. Jenkins, District .Agent, Central Florida,
Gainesville.
H. G. Clayton, District Agent, North and West Florida,
Gainesville.
R. W. Blacklock, Boys' Club Agent, Gainesville.
E. F. DeBusk, Assistant Boys' Club Agent, Gainesville.
J. M. Scott, Animal Industrialist, Gainesville.
N. W. Sanborn, Poultry Specialist, Gainesville.
Ralph Stoutamire, Agricultural Editor, Gainesville.
A. A. Turner, Local District Agent (colored), Talla-
hassee.


COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS
COUNTY NAME ADDRESS
Alachua .......... Miss Irene Randall ...... Gainesville. -
Browwrd .......... Mrs. A. H. Peay ..... .. Ft. Lauderdale.
Calhoun. ........ ..Mrs. Grace F. Warren.... Blountstown.
Citrus ...........Mrs. Mary B. Brooks .... Inverness.
Columbia ....... Miss Marie Cox. ........ Lake City.
Dade ........... Miss Genevieve Crawford.. Miami.
Dade, Asat. ..... Mr. Nellie A. Bush ....... Goulds.
De Soto .......
De Soto, Asat.....Miss Beulah Pipkin ..... Wauchula.
Duval ..........Miss Ellen Lenoir ...... Chamber Commerce.
Jacksonville.
Escambia ...... Miss Margaret Cobb ..... Pensacola. Court House
Annex.
Gadsden .......Miss Ruby McDavid .... Hinson.
Hernando .. Miss Ora Herndon ....... Brooksville.
Hillsbord ......Mrs. Edith Young Morgan. Tampa, City Hall.
Hillsboro, Asst. ....
Jeferson .....Miss Posey Taylor ......Lloyd.
Lee .............Miss Margaret Bureligh Ft. Myers.
Leon .......... Mrs. Mary S. Russell .... Tallahassee, 884 St. Augus-
tine St.
Madison .........Miss Edna Smith .......Madison.
Manatee .......Mrs. Ivie Turnbull .......Brandentown.
Orange ......... Mrs. Nellie W. Taylor ... Orlando.
Osceola ........Miss Alibna Smith ......Kissimmee.
Palm Beach ....Miss Elizabeth Hopkins ..West Palm Beach.
Pasco ..........,Mrs. Harriet Ticknor .... Dade City.
Pinellas ,.......Mrs. Anne J. Campbell ..Clearwater.
Polk ............ Miss Lois Godbey .......Bartow.
Putnam ....... Miss Floresa Sipprell ....Palatka.
St. John .... Miss Anna E. Heist ..... St. Angustine.
Santa Rosa .....Mrs. Winnie Warren Mc-
Ewen .............. Milton.
Suwannee ........Miss Alice Dorsett .... Branford.
Tarlor ....... Miss Pearl Laffitte .... Perry.











DIRECTORY OF COUNTY- AGENTS
COUNTY. NAME. ADDRESS.
Alachua .... C. D. Gunn ... Gainesville
Bay ........... .( E. Mead .... Panama City
Bradford ..... J.'O. Traxlef .... Starke
Brevard ....... K. E. Bragdon.. Cocoa
Citrus ........ R. J. Dorsett.... Inverness
Columbia ..... H. A. MODonald. Lake City
Dade. ......... J. S. Rainey..... Miami
DeSoto ....... J. M. Tillman.... Arcadia
Duval ...... .. W. L, Watson.... Jacksonville
Escambia .... J. Lee Smith..... Pensacola
Hernaindo ..... Jas. Mountain .... Brooksville
Hillsboro ..... R. T. Kelley..... Plant City
Holmes ..... J. J. Sechrest:... Bonifay
Leon .........R. I. Matthews .. Tallahassee
Liberty ......... W. W, Turner .. Bristol
Madison ..... C. E. Matthews... Madison
Manatee ..... W. R. Briggs... Bradentown
Marion ......... W. A. Sessoms... Ocala
Okaloosa .... R. J. Hart...... Laurel Hill
Orange ........ C. D. Kime...... Orlando
Osceola ...... Leo H. Wilson... Kissimmee
Palm Beach ..... .R. A. Conkling... West Palm Beach
Pasco ........ F. G. Merrin .... Dade City
Polk .......... Wm. Gomme .... Bartow
Putnam. ...... H. R. Tribble.... Palatka
St. Johns ..... J. G. Clemons ... St. Augustine
St. Lucie ....... A. Warren ...... Ft. Pierce
Santa Rosa ..... J. C. Sechrest ... Milton
Seminole ..... C. M. Berry ..... Sanford
Suwanee ...... D. A. Armstrong. Live Oak
Taylor ........ L. R. Moore..... Perry
Volusia ....... W. E. Dunaway.. De Land
Walton ........ J. W. Mathison.. DeFuniak Springs











LEGAL PENCE FOR FLORIDA

So many inquiries have come to the department-as to what
constitutes a "legal fence" that we are herewith insert-
ing a section from the Statutes on this pbint. Any fence
not coming h"p to these specifications may be said to be
S"illegal"--that is, it does not meet the requirements, and
is the same as no fence in the eyes of the law. This does
not apply to counties that have the "nokfence" law.
"1233. Requirements of Fence.-All fences or enclos-
ures of land shall be substantially constructed, whether
with rails, logs, posts and railings, iron, steel, or other
material, and not less than five feet high, to the extent
of two feet from the ground there shall not be a space
between the material used in the construction of any
fence greater than four inches.
"Provided, That when any fence or enclosure shall be
made with a trench or ditch, the same shall be four feet
wide; and in that case the fence shall be five feet high
'fr7 m the bottom of the ditch to the top of the fence." y
See Sedff f 3.234 to 1240, bearing on other phases of
this question. GentL Statutes of Florida.
Most lawyers have the al Statutes and would
allow reference to that book. .
t











FROM THE EDITORIAL BUREAU, FLORIDA STATE
FAIR AND EXPOSITION, JACKSONVILLE, FLA,

The Florida State Fair andi Exposition, which will be
staegd in Jacksonville November 18-to 27, will far surpass
any previous fairs in Florida's history. Elaborate plans
are being made by the management, to. accommodate tre-
'mendous crowds, as the indications are that- all attend-
ance records will be smashed this year. As usual, the-
railroads and other transportation lines have offered re-
duced rates from all points in Florida, as well as neigh-
boring States.

Here are some of the high lights of the, Florida State
Fair and Exposition-scheduled for Jacksonville, Novem-
ber 18 to 27:
Finest display of agricultural.and horticultural prod-
uicts ever exhibited in the State.
Million-dollar livestock show, setting forth the tremen-
dous strides Florida is mkaing in this new and .
tant industry. i
Display of thoroughbred swine, demo 'ting the pos-'
sibilities of hog raising in Flo-'
Complete exhibit of the k performed by the boys'
andgirls' clubs of -State. "
E hibit airy cows, showing that in four years
Flooa has entered the dairy State class with both eet.
IThteresting exhibit of work being accomplished by the
negro race in all lines of activity, including agricultural,
horticultural and varied industries.
"Greatest poultry show ever staged ii Florida.
A rabbit show that will rank with the best in the
country.
Made in Florida exhibit, a graphic demonstration of
Florida's industrial progress.
Women's achievements, a comprehensive display that
must command instant attention.
Apiary display, automobile show, display of farm im-
plements, weather bureau exhibit, new government ex-
hibit, good roads exhibit, Canadian government exhibit,
and many others impossible to set forth here ebcause of
lack of space.
With practically twenty counties assured for space in
the county exhibit building, the 1920 Florida State Fair











and Exposition, which will be staged in Jacksonville No-
vember 18 to 27, will offer Floridians, as well as visitors
from neighboring and distant States,,the finest and most
comprehensive display of agricultural and horticultural
products ever exhibited under one roof in the State's his-
tory. -
A visit to this building will give the visitor in one aft.
,ernoon more reliable informtaion concerning the re-
sources, climate and topography of Florida than could be
obtained in a thirty-day tour.
The exhibit will be a revelation to even the life long
resident of the State in its portrayal of the resources and-
the unrivalled richness and variety of Florida's pro-
ucts.
A rearrangement of classifications this year allows
counties, 'essenlialty agricultural, and this refers to the
northern group, to compete in the class in which they are
best fitted, while those producing principally citrus fruits
will compete in the horticultural division. The counties
falling in the latter are the southern group. No one coun-
ty, however, will be permitted to exhibit in both classifi-
cations.'
The fair association is confident that at least 25 counties
will exhibit this season. A year ago only 17 counties
competed for the grand prizes, consequently it can be'seen
that the exposition this season will far surpass any State
fair ever held in Florida.
Those counties which have either contracted for space
or promised to come in include Escambia, Walton, Jack-
son, Holmes, Gadsden, Leon, Madison, Suwannee, Bay,
Bradford, Alachua, 4Marion, Citrus, Putnam, DeSoto, St.
Lucie, Palm Beach, Duval, Dade, Nassau, anrd Columbia.
A number .of others are debating the question and will
likely decide in the affirmative.
This array of the State's richest counties indicates the
State fair has at last arrived in its own-a truly repre-
sentative State exposition.
.The prizes offered in this competition, as well as in all
other departments, are worth NmiJning. In fact, the pre-
mium list shows that the fair in this respect is on .a
par with all great fairs held in the United States.
1Y









AVERAGE PRICES RECEIVED BY/UNITED STATES PRODUCERS.

S (Compiled by U. S. Depdtment of Agriculture July, 1920.)
Prfce articles quoted below as let b 6 month are averages of reports of county crop reporters, weighted according to
relative importance of county and State; 15th of month prices are averages of returns from a list of about 7,000 country buyers;
State averages are weighted according to their relative importance to obtain the United States. averages. '



IAte. a a : a


1911; June 1.. .. .. 86 55.1 3f. 78.8 77.9 70.1 68.3 98.7225.0 187.5 12.88 14.6 20. 4.5 11.0
.1912 June 1.. ...... 1 .510255.8 91.1 86.1 84.8 119.7 115.0 205.0 118.4 16.22 11.0 24.8 16.7 11.1
1913 June 1............ 82.7 60.6 86.0 52.7 64.1 70.8 55.2 92.0 115.8 97.6 10.55 11.5 25.5 18.9 12.0
1914, June ............. 84.4 75.0 40.0 49.1 64.4 79.0 71.3 94.2 136.8 141.0 11.64 12.4 22.8 1T.A 12.5
1915, June 1 ........... 11.5 77.9 51.3 62. 98.1 86.9 50.8 96.7 169.5 90.4 11.16 8.6 24.8 1666 18.2 C
1916, June I............ 100.0 74.1 42.1 59.6 8.8 87.0 98.8 83.4 176.5 105.4 11.47 12.2 26.5 19.0 18.5 b
1917, June 1............ 24.5 160.1 69.9 119. 188.0 183.7 274.0 149.4 298.8 157.2 14.68 20.2 85.0 81.1 17.5
1918. June 1 .......... 202.5 152.5 78.1 185.4 187.6 191.0 75.5 148.8 -638.6 158.2 17.13 27.4 88.6 29.8 20.0
1919, June 1............ 22.4 171.2 71.2 10.2 148.7 165.6 121.4 173.7 389.3 237.3 23.80 29.5 49.1 88.6 25.7
July 1............ 222.0 176. 70.9 108.4 188.6 160.8 128.4 159.8 444.1 197.7 21.73 81.1 47.2 8.8 25.2
Aug. 1.............. 217.2 191.2 75.8 118.7 149.7 165.9 192.8 167.9 540.6 174.7 20.16 82.5 48.2 89.8 25.9
Sept. 1............ 20.7 185.4 71.7 1 .6 188.3 159.8 187.5 175.4 517.5 162.0 20.52 30.8 49.7 41.0 25.7
Oct. 1............ 209.6 153.9 68.4 11l 185.8 162.0 164.2 154.7 438.2 171.1 19.79 81.8 51.5 44.7 24.2
Nov. 1............ 218.2 1 68.7 117.1 129.8 151.0 152.8 143.9 882.8 182.8 19.86 6.5 56.0 54.0 22.9
Dec.1.......... .215.1 1349 71.7 120.9 184.5 147.4 161.4 183.8 438.9 186.8 20.15 85.7 80.0 61.9 22.8
1920. Jan. 1............ 281.8 140.4 78.2 180.2 152.8 150.7 178.6 138.2 433.6 213.8 20.55 35.9 61.8 64.8 29.6
Feb. I........... 185.7 146.8 82,7 187.1 154.5 154.9 217.6 156.6 456.5 214.7 21.76 86.2 57.8 56.9 24.1
S Mar. 1............ 228.8 148.5 84.5 129.8 145.0 155.7 248.5 172.2 472.7 281.8 22.81 86.2 55.9 46.6 25.4
Apr 1............ 234.0 158.6 90.7 140.0 156.1 163.1 295.6 185.8 455.7 260.1 22.94 37.8 56.1 88.8 26.8
My 1............ 251.8 169.6 98.8 146.4 188.1 168.8 398.6 205.2 448.2 285.5 24.22 87.7 57.6 87.4 27.4
June 1............ 258.8 185.2 102.9 148.3 188.9 I0.2 421.3 216.6 421.1 297.0 24.85 87.2 58.5 -87.0 27.2








AVERAGE PRICES RECEIVED BY UNITED STATES *PRODUCERS.-(ContinuedT.)
SHay


-a0 a I
a A
D S d *] ci / S I
1911 Ma. .. ..... ............ ......5.72 4.59 5.68 4.51 5.74 14.7 44.54 146 1.88 1.2 2.17..........
1912, May-15 ..................... ....... .. .79 5.86 6.28 4.74 6.16 17.8 45.63 144 2.98 1.77 2.52...............
1918, May 15 .............................. 7.45 6.01 7.17 4.91 6.66 16.3 54.80 145 1. .87 218 .... ...
914, May 15 ................ 7.60 6.3 7.59 4.87 6.49 7.2 59.85 189 205 1.53 2.1 18.46 12.58 10.26
1915, May5 ............................. 77 6.13 7.85 5.54 7.2 22.0 58.29 183 2.53 1.03 2.98 14.74 18.79 9.58
1916, May15............................ 8.7 6.73 8.08 6.66 8.49 28.0 60.98 184 1.0 1.28 8.56 14.50 12.52 10.56
1l'May 15 18.72 I 8.701.0.48110.15 12.51 48.7 72.78 188 .5 .9 8.4 15.81 18.94 17.92
1918 May 15. .15.84 10.38 11.62 12.32 15.39 58.2 84.11 186 3.23 1.85 6.67 20.40 18.80 27.84
1919, y 15 ........................ ..... 18.00 10.84 12.11 10.93 14.4 48.0 93.43 129 4.97 2.30 4.19 27.27 25.39 2382
June 15 ........................... 17.80 10.20 12.40 10.34 1.8 50.5 93.84 127 4.68 2.84 4.9 27.50 25.48 2.89
July 15 ....................... 9.22 .96 18.8 9.5 13.09 51.8 94.51 127 4.23 232 4.25 24.22 22.02 20.15
S Aug. 15 .................. .......... 19.30 9.82 18.43 9.06 12.91 52.2 94.72 125 3.78 2.26 4.30 28.89 21.58 0.72
S8pt. 15....................... .... 15.81 9.02 13.9 8.69 12.25 1.3 93.42 110 3.08 1.95 4.86 28.65 21.74 20.89
Oct. 15 .............1............... 18.88 8.65 12.87 8.46 11.47 5 .6 93.43 114 2.88 1.96 4.27 28.04 21.17 20.56
Nov. 15.. 1......................... .386 8.65 12.65 8.35 11.45 51.0 9&.27 113 2.74 2.12 4.42 22.90 21.61 21.683
De. 15... ..................12.66 8.63 12.67 8.53 11.85 51.6 95.54 113 3.49 2.46 4.41 28.11 22.60 22.95
1920, JL. 15....................... ....... 18.6 8.99 12.89 9.34 12.91 53.3 94.42 118 4.31 2.81 4.70 24.59 28.78 24.13
Feb. 15 ............................ 18.62 8.98 13.12 9.97 14.08 52.5 95.27 123 '5.05 3.07 4.47 25.49 24.94 24.41
Mar.' 15 .............. ,............ 3.. 3.59 9,08 12.98 10.25 14.17 51.5 94.94 127 5.25 8.26 4.32 26.75 26.18 24.68
Ap 15.............. ................ 13.78 9.20 12.72 10.66 14.63 51.3 95.36 131 5.59 8.44 '4.41 27.99 26.98 24.57
a 15............................ 18.44 8.97 11.69 10.34 14.26 50.3 94.56 182 6.75 2.38 4.36 29.92 28.81 25.68











AVERAGE PRICES RECEIVED BY UNITED STATES PRODUCERS.- (Continued.)



SoI
ElD
u W S l g 8

1 1 I | |
U t o U H
o ~ to to
to u. to, U t : 0 t


1911, May 15...................................
1912, May 15...................................
1913, May 15...................................
1914, May 15 .................................
1915, May 15........... .... ... ................
1916, M ay 15...................................
1917, M ay 15...................................
1918, May 15 ........................ ...........
1919, May 15 ...................................
June 15 ...................................
July 15 ...................................
Aug 15............................. ...
Sept. 15..................................
Oct. 15. ...................................
N ov. 15...................................
Dec. 15....... .............................
1920, Jan. 15 . . ..........................
Feb. 15 ....... ........................... .
Mar. 15.. .................................
Api. 15 .................................. .
May 15 ...................................


.... 12 .46]
.. 19.21
8.21 21.88
6.77 23.56
7.01 22.07
10.70 37.91
8.85 55.61
10.09 68.16
12.13 63.831
11.79 63.80
1,, -.' I 1|
II 4 1.1: -"I
12.34 62.13
14.90 66.95
15.23 72.65
16.68 69.07
16.60 69.88
19.57169.54
21.43 67.18
21.80!68.71
22.40169.88


81.. .... . 25.93131.08 . 20.9 4.8 ...
83 ........ 30.18 32.28 ... 37.2 4.9 1.09
53 ......... 24.59 31.23.... 13.4 4.7 1.08
85 ......... 28.08 32.98 .... 21.8 5.1 1.10
75 2.02.... .28.41 31.54 8.9 10.9 4.8 1.07
101 1.49 0.58 25.97 35.72 14.69 12.7 4.6 1.15
252 2.93 1.88 44.19 45.62 19.65 .... 7.2 1.84
206 2.83 2.11 42.41 56.21 23.52 8.2 1.85
152 2.92 1.74 48.66 63.40 20.17.. 7.2 2.02
106 3.44 1.74 47.54 63.06 19.59 7.7 2.19 o
119 3.43 1.76 47.14 64.77 19.32 .. 8.2 .....
124 3.10 1.77 49.28 71.72 18.44 8.1 ....
154 2.69 1.54 49.58 74,08 18.02 56.6 8.3.
162 2.61 1.40 47.70 72.58 16.6 ... 8.1 ....
161 2.71 1.34 48.32 76.16 17.55 77.0 9.1 ..
163 2.81 1.44 48.79 78.57 17.63. ... 9.1...
163 3.13 1.37 50.23 79.39 16.78 .... 9.9 ..
123 3.72 1.39 51.13179.79 17.0 ... 10.5 2.35
130 3.94 1.30 51.95 79.70 17.39 .... .11.2 2.58
145 4.21 1.45 55.26178.87 19.04 10.9 2.92
146 4.84 1.54 58.69178.74 20.0 ....11.2 2.93








IMPROVED ROADS.
Total Mileage by Counties-Information Obtained from Various Sources.
Prepared by State Road Department.


CONSTRUCTED.


C'S
COUNTIES C '
") 8
Alachua .... a






]Bread ord ....................
Br ard ................... C
<0 02 00
0 Pe02 I
Alachua ................... ..... ..... ..... ... 24
Baker .................... .
Bays .................... ..... ..... .

Bradford .................... ..... .
Brevard ....................... ..... ....
Broward .................. .... ........ ..... 25 112
Calhoun ................... ..... ..... .... ..... .. .. ..
Citrus ...................... ... . .. .. ...... 58
lade ...................... ... .. ... 1... 4 8
Columbia ................ ... 2 6 ... .....
Du al ...................... ..... 1 235
DeSot.o 21 . 11
Duval ......-.... : .r ....[ 8 6.. 21' 41


32
..... 33
..... 15|
86 .....j


36
..... 18
..... 12

101 95
114 ., 101


UNDER CONSTRUCTION.,










2 3
57 ..... 20 ..... ..... 20
3 ..... 27 ..... ..... 27
33 .. ..... 27 ,.... 27
15[ ..... ... ..... .... . .
91 ..... . ... .. .. ... ....
137 ..... I ..... I ..... I ..... ....
32 ..... ..... 12 ..... 12
93 ..... ..... .
2 .... .. ...
320 ..... ... .. ... .. .. ..
161 ..... ..... 201 ..... 20
2161 ..... 151..... I..... 16










SIMPROVED ROADS--(Oontiiued.) .
Total Mileage by Countles-Information Obtained 4om Various Sources.
' Prepared by State Road Department.'

/ ; CONSTRUCTED. UNDER CONSTRUCTION.



COUNTIES I c
........ '... ....... . . ... .. .... ..... 1j /5 . ... .. ... .. a1' 1


...... .... .. .... .. ,
_ *w DI. e4 '' h __ C O O-'
rEscaiba .... ...... .... ... ........ 1... 154 .....1..... ... ..1 .
Flagler ... .. ...... .... .. .... .... .... . ..... ...... .. 18
Franklin ....... ... ... .. ..... .. .. .. ... .. .... . ... ... .. .. ..
.Ga4sden. ........ .. 921.. 14
liamilton ....'.. ..... ........ 3 3....... ...... ........ .......
Hernando .................. ... ..... ..... ... 25 ... .. 42 67 ... ..
Hillsborough ..... 3 ..... 20 ..... --70 15 68 ..... ..... .... ..... ..
Holmes, ........... ........ .... 1 4.'.... 14
Jackson ....... ............... ............... ........ 752 752 ..... ..... ..... ...... ..
Jefferson ,................... .... . . .. ..... .... 75 75 .. ..... ..... .... .
LaFayette ...... .... ..... .. . . .... .. 9 .. ..... ., ,,. .....
-Lake ... ...,. ;.-.. ...... .. ..... .. 1 ..... .... .. ..... .
Lee. .. ........... ......... ..... ..... .... 12 ..... 54 40 106 .. .... ... ...... .. .









Leon ....... ................ ... .. .... .
Liberty ................. ..... ..... .....
Levy .................... ..... ..... .. .. .
Mad4ison ................... .... .. ...
Mpnatee .............................., 44
M arion ..... .. .............. ..... ..... .....
Monroe ...................... ...
Nassau ................... .. .... .
Okaloosa .......... .. .....
Okeechobee ............... ......... ...
'O ange ...........:............ .....
Osceola .......... ......... 28 ..... 25
Palm Beach ................. .....
Pasoo ...................... ..... .
Pinellas .8................... 0 8 ..
Polk ....................... ..... 320
Putnam ................... 20 ..... 11
St. Johns .................. 46...... ....
St. Lucie ...................... .. ...
'Santa Rosa ;................ .... ..... .....
Seminole ............ ..... 40 ..........
Sumter ...............................
Suwannee ............ ...............
Taylor ..................... ..... . .
Volsia ..................... 28 2 18
W akulla ................... ..... ..... .....
Walton .................... .. ... ... .....
Washington ....................


..... 14


..... 76


..... .....



145 55
16 20
34



..... .....
21



"38 .....

.. 6
*... .. .


..... 141






... .. 5

..... 25

28 20
..... 43
12 .....

21 15

35 9
... .. 14
..... 10
...... 28
..... 56
.... 18
85..
.... .....
..... 112
..... 30|


124
14
42
-49
86
105
4
.43
35
5
81
53
248
79
126
320
67
46
65
14
56
28
561
56
137
6
112
30
,943


..... .....| ..... .....
..... ..... ..... .....
. ... 0.. ..... ......
.. ... ...... 6 .....
S... 16 .... .....
..... 2 .... ...
..... ..... ..... .....
2 12.










..... ..... 19 ..... ....
..... ...... ..... .....










..... 2... .. i






6 .1941 112 11


Totals .... ............. I 480 5131 355j 670 6031 2,3061 4


313

















PART II.
CROP REPORT











DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.
Following arg the subdivisions of the State, and the
counties contained in each:


Western Division.
Bay, Okaloosa,
Calhoun, Santa Rosa,
Escambia, / Walton,
Holmes, Washington-9.
Jackson,
Northern Division.
Franklin,, Leon,
Gadsden. Liberty,
Hamilton, Madison,
Jefferson, Taylor.
Lafayette, Wakulla-10.
SNorthewstern Division.
Alachua, Duval,
Baker, Nassau,
Bradford, Putnam,
Clay, St. Johns,
Columbia, Suwannee-10.
Central Division.
Brevard, Orange,
Citrus, Osceola,
Flagler, Pasco,
Hernando, Pinellas,
Hillsborough, Polk,
Lake, Seminole,
Levy, Sumter,
Marion, Volusia-16.
Southern Division.
'Broward, Monroe,
Dade, Okeechbbee,
DeSoto, Palm Beach,
Lee, St. Lucie-9.
Manatee,


/ -,









> 43


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

W. A. McRae, Commissioner. T. J. Brooks, Chief Clerk.

ConmEsned Notes of Correspondents, by Divisions.

Western Division.-Reports indicate -fairly average
condition. ]arly crops were good and later ones suffered
from excess of rain. Tobacco was cut without damage,
and the price waa.quite satisfactory. Corn was damaged,
and cotton even more so, by too much rain. Pastures have
been most excellent all the season, and-livestQckcondi-
tions correspondingly- good. The rains now' having-
checked, we may expect a full yield of fall'crops. Pea-
nuts promise a splendid yield.
Northern Divisip7.-The entire northern division, of
the State, from Jacksonville to Pensacola, has had very
similar climatic conditions, with similarresults.
Northeastern Division.-This division suffered' -even
more from the excessive rains.than those above mentioned
-for the reason that the coutmtfy does-not have the nat-
ural drainage that the more northwestern division las.
But the Irish potato crop was over a hundred per. cent
and the prices good.
Central Division.-Corn was damaged by rains, and.
caterpillars are seriously damaging sweet potatoes, cow
peas, and velvet beans in'some sections. The l.te, cool
spring affected the fruit crops in some sections. However,
a good yield of citrus fruit is indicated and livestock in-
terests are thriving.
Southern Diision.-Increase in acreage in this divi-
sion i's remarkable. The yields of citurs fruits and sugar
cane are indeed promising, and a fine vegetable crop may
be expected.
Wool and stock hogs are slightly below last year.
This year's production for the State will probably ex-
ceed last year's-of peanuts, sugar cane, Irish and sweet
potatoes, rice and tobacco; but somewhat smaller of corn,
velvet beans, sorghum, and the amount of hay saved for
winter feeding. The production of upland cotton prom-
ises to be above last year, or about twenty-two \thousand
bales. The estimate of the United States is about thir-
teen million bales.













/ 44

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS,
FRUIT AND FRUIT TREES FOR QUARTER ENDING SEPT'-80,
1920, AS COMPARED WITH SLME PERIOD LAST YEAR.

COnTY AfAflfa Avocado Pears


Proesvotffvl ]Prospeoctve


W~etern Divieo ,n I Condition Yield ( londittion Yield
Uecambia ..... .... ..
'BHolnes .............. ..
Jackson ....... ....... ...
Okaloosa ..............
Santa Rosa ........... ..
Walton ...........
Div. Av. per cent. ...... .. ..
orthe Division.
'-Hamilton
Jefferson ............
LaFayette ........... 90 90
l n ... ... ........ ....
T 1ylor .... ........... .. .. .. ..

Dv.. Av. per eqnt. ... r 0 90
NortheasterR Divisaona _Dison
lachua ...............
Bradford .............. ...
Clay .... ...... ..
Columbia ............. ..
Nassau .... .. .. .
mjtnam .............. .. .. ..
R a Johns ............ .. .. ..
Suwa nee .........
DI A,. p er, e ..... _______ ___. ._____
entral Division.
Lrevard .............. .. .- .... -
Ctru ... ....... .. ..
Sillaborough .....;..... .. ... 100
Lake ... ..... .
Marion ................ .. .. .. .
Orange ............... .. ..
Osceola ................ .. .. 40 80
Pasco ................. .. .
Polk ................ .. .. .. ..
Seminole ......... ... ..
Div. AV. per cent. ...... .. . 70 25
Soutber. Divsios. I,
Dade. ... ......... ..... 110 10

Monuro.e . ........
Palm Beach ....... ... 100 100 90 100
St Lue ....... ...... .... 90 110
Div. Av. per cent. ........ 100 100 9 100
State Av. per cent, .... 9 95 82 62


* % I


,it











45

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.-

COUNTY Bananas Broom Corn
SProspective Proapeovve
Western Division I UondMiton I Ypeldi- Condition _Ye'd__
Bscambia ............ .. .
-.Holmes .. .......... ..
Jackson .............. .... ; ....
Okaloosa .............. ..
Santa Rosa .............
W alton ............. .. .. ..
Div. Av. per cent. ... .... .. ..
Northern Division.
Gads n ;.;......"........ .... ..
Hamilton ............ .. .. ..
Jefferson .............. .
LaFayette ............. .. .. .
Liaison. .......... .-
Taylor :.............. ..
Di. Av. per cerit... ......
Northeastern Division.
Alnchua .............. .. .. ..
Baker .............. ...
Bradford .......... ... ..
Clay .................. .
Columbia ... .........
Nassu ............... .... .. /
Putnam ............ .
St. Johns ............. .
Suwannee ............
Div. Av. per cent...... .. ___.
4Veatral Division. -
Brevard .. ........ o. 90 ... ..
Citrus ................ ...
Hillsborough.......... 90 50 .
Lake ................. ..
Marion ............
Orange ............ 100 100
Osceola .............. 90 75 ..
Pasco ................ .. ..
Polk .................. .. .. .
Seminole.............
Div. Av. per cent ....... '92 79 ..
Other Divit ....
Dade ................. .I 00 00
Deote ............... 100 90 105 105
-Lee ............... 80 80 ..
Monroe ............... .... ..
Okechobee .......... 75 80 .
Palm Beach ..... ... .. .. .. ..
St.' Lcie ............. 05 90 ..
Div. Av. per cent. ..... 90 88 105 105
State Av. per cent .... 91 88 105 105











S 46


1 REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE Y1T LD--'Continued.

COUNTY I Oawava Corn
| ~Prospective jj'roapeotife
Western Diviaion -oondition Yield Condiation YeZd -
Escambia ........... .. 100 120
Holmes ........ ... .. .. 90 95
Jackson .*. .......... ... 100 100
Okaloosa ............. .. 85 90
Santa Rosa ........... .. -00 100
Walton .............. 100 100
Div, Av. per cent. ...... .. .. 96 101
NortLern Lvison. .
Godsden ..,...5........". .. 75 75 -
Hanilton. .... ....... .. .. 85 80
Jfeerson ...... ... .. .. 90 90
LeFayete ......... ... 7. 75
Leon .................. .. 125 125
Madison ............. .. .. 75 5
Taylor ................ .. .. 75
Div. Ay. per cent. ..... 86 86 !
ortheasterm Divdsone.. ,.-


Alacnua ...........
B .aker .
Bradfoerd ............. 100
Clay ................ .
Columblia ..............
Nassau ...............
Putnam .............. 100
St. Johns ............
Suwannee ............


S 100


-106


80_ 80
100,, 75--
100 10oi
100 100
100 125
75 75
75. 70
60 50


I I I


100


85 83


0estral Dv oi__n. _______
:Brevrd ............. .. so-- 80
Citrus ....... ...... 90 75
Hlllsborogb ....... 80 80 60 60
Lake ................ 75 100 75 50
Marion ............. 75 100 60 70
Orang O............... 100 100 100 100
Osce. 15.............. 1 40 60o 50
Pasco .............. 90 100 80 90
Polk ................ 70 80 75 80
Seilnole .............. .... 90 -90
Dtv. Av. per cent.. .... 72 86 77 755
Southern Div.aeon. '" ,
Dade ................. 1 1.I+ 5
DeSoto .. ...............100 9 100 11
Lee ;......... ....... 0 70 80 7
-Monroe ............. .
,Okeechobee ........... 80 8 7 75
-Palm Beach ........... .. .. 100 0
'at. Lucle .............. ....
-Dtv. Av. per cent. ...... 88 80., 91 105-
State Av. per cent. ...... 85 89 87 90


--DMiV Av nor p ent











47

BBPORT OP CONDITION AND PROSPflCTIVD YIBLD-Continued.

COUNTY, Dasheens Feld Peas
- Prospectie IProspetivfe
Western Dvision \ Oondition [ iProel Condve ton [ Yed _
Escambia ............ .. 80 100
Holmes ............... 8 80
Jackson .... ........ .....
Okaloesa : ............. .... 80
Santa Rosa ........... .. .. 100 100
Walton .... ........ .. .. 100 100
Div. Av. per cent. ...... .. .. 88 92
Northern Division.
Gadsden '.......... .... 100 100
Hamilton ............. .. .. 100 100
Jefferson ............. .. ..
LaFayette .............. .. ..
Leon ..... ............. .. 80 90
Madison ................ 80 80
Taylor ............... .. .. 90 90


fllv. Av. npi. tent. ...I i.


I 92 92


Alachua .............. .. 1 100
Baker ...............
Bradford .............. 0 80 1 1
Clay ......... ......... 80 80
Columbia ...... 105 105
Nassau ............... 00 110 90 85
Putnam ............... 100 100 50 50
St. Johns .............
Suwannee ............ ......
Div. Av. per cent. ..... 9 9 88 87
central Division.
Brevard ............. -85 85 5- o
Citrus :.... .... .... .. .... 90 100
Hillsborough .......... ..80 80
Lake .. ...... .. 100 90
Marion ............... .. 90 80.
Orange .. ..
Osceela .................... 75 75
Pasco .............. 80 9 90 110
Polk ................. .... 75 90
Seminole ..............
Div. Av. per cent. ...... 82 87 87 89
southern Division.
Dade .................. 100 100o
DeSoto .............. 100 100 1900 100
Lee .................. 90 9 90 90
Monroe ............... .. ..
Okeechobee ........... ..
Palm Beach .......... 100 800 100 100
St Lucie ............. .. .. 85 125
Div. Av. per cent. .;.... 96 -168 \ 94 101
State Av. per cent. .... 91 105 90 92














PORT ,iO CONDIRXON 4ND) PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY G- ua Grapes
W te ~ IPros eot ote t Prospfeouce
WeYlate Dlo(ito Condition | gont Ymed
Escambia- .............. 100 100
Holme ............... 95 90
Jackson ....,.......... ..
Okalooa ..............
Santa Rosa e........... .. > 60
W alton ........ _........ .. **
Div. Av. per-ent ...... .. ., 90 88
Wortherms Dto,...


Jefferson ........... . .
Lafayette .....:: ... ..::: : 160 i i
Leon ................. .
Madison ............... ....
Taylor ....... ........ .
Div. Av. per cent...... 100 100 75 75
iNortheastern Divison. ______


Alachua .......:..... ..
Baker ................
Bradford .............
Clay .................
Columbia ..............
Naseau ...........i.
Putnam ..............
SSt. Johns .............
Suwannee ............. .


S.


Central Disio*. .


Brevard .;..... ........
Citrus ..... .........
Hillsbrough .............
jake .......... .....
Marion ........-;......
Orange ................
O sceola.................
Paso ...............
Seminpele .............
ntiv Ar. nor cent........


75
2006
100
100
80
90
I-


-poniters -DsM~s; o.. -.i


DeSotp ............ .
Lee I.................
Monroe ...............1
Okeechobee...........1
PalmBeaoh .............
St. Lade ..............
Div. Av. per cent......


.90
'95

900


100
75
200
-90
120
80
90


95
100
90
100
100


100 100
100 100
100 i66
3100 100
70
70 70
84 84


50
80 .



100
75


75
80

100
80
110
60


.75 1


80


100


s96 98 L 90 .. 90


0a44 A.- a I 01* -l- A '82


Di A er cent


I


~R ~I


I


acl~ ~n rar run, 101


0 88 a 82









49 -

RBPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD--Continued.

COUNTY Grape Fruit Trees Japan. Persimmons

,| Proepective Prospeotive
Western Division Condition Y field Conditions Yield
Escamhbia ............. .. .. .. -
Holmea ........ .. .... ..
Jackson .............. ..
Okaloosa ..............
Santa Rosa .......... ...
Walton ..............
Div. Av. per cent. ..... .. ____
Northeastern Divifson.
Gadsden ........ ....... .. .. .
Hamilton .............. . .
Jefferson ............
LaFayette ............ .. .. 75
L.eon ..... ....... '. .. *
Madison ........... ... ...
Taylor ................ .. *
Div. Av. per cent.. .. .. \75 75
Northeastern Divtston.
Alachua ...........
Baker ...:......... 1 00
Bradford ......... .. .. 1i00 100
Columbia .......... ... .. I
Naa.. ............... 166 90
Putnam .............. 125 125
St. Johns ............. .. 100 100
Suwannee .............. .. .
Div. Av. per cent...... 125 125 100- 08
Central Division.
Brevard .............. 80 ..
Citrus ................ 80 O
Ullsborough .......... 100 58 50 50
Lake ................. 90 75
Marion ............... 90. 60
Orange ............... 100 90 100 100
Osceola ............... 40 50 90 75
Pasco ......... .... 50 70 .. o ..
Polk ................ 5 5 75 5 70
Seminne................ 85 85 ..
DiT. Av. per cent..... 79 71 79 73
Southern Dtvision.
Dade ................. 95 ..
DeSote .............. 90 65
Lee .................. 75 60 75 75
Monroe ..... .........
Okeechobee ............ 80 80 70 75
Palm'Beach ........... 95 100 .
St. Licle ............. 95 85 .. .
Div. Av. per cent ...... 86 : 82 2 75
State Av. per cent. ..... 97 98 a81 80










50

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YTIBLD-ontlnu d


Ss .for forage Koaffr orn


Escalb ia .............. Ib.. --- -- "
Jackson ...... ... ... .... .
Santa Roea ...... .... 100 100
Okaloo .............. 100 100
Walton ................ 100 100
Div. v. er cent...... 96 96 .
Nort em Dime on. " --'"
Hamilton .............
Jefferson.............
Lafayette ...........,. 160 100 _^
eon ................ 100 100
Madisn ..............:.
Taylor ................ 106 106


Alachua ............... .. .. ..
Baker .............
Bradford .............. 100 100
Cl ...... .........00
Colmbia .............. ..
Nasea ................ 12 0 80
Putnam .............. 109 00 00 ..
St.John .. ........-.. 9 9
* suwne .....2....... 0-9 -9
Div, Av er cent.. .... 101 7 108 90 80
Brevard ............... .; 11 1
Citrus .. . ......
Hillaborough .......... -80 o80
Lake ......... ........ 7 75 .
Marion ................ 95 110 "
Orangez-................ 100 -100 100 1
Oseola .............. 20 80 45
Pasco ................. 100 110 100 100
-Polk .................. 80 80 ..
Bemnole ............... 80 .80 I .. ,.


TII. A~ ,~r ..m I 9 I --


Dade ................. .. ... < '"
DeSoto ............... 100 100 10 100
Lee .................... '5 T7f 0 60
Monroe ....... ........ .
Okeechobee .......... 8-- 85 g.
Palm Beach ............ 100 100
St. Lucie ............. 100 100
vDi. Av. w,pent .... -92 98 80 80
State Av. per cent..... 94- 9 6 7 -8-4 82


--


I. 80 I QT













REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD--Continued.

COUNTY Lemons Tee Lse Trees
Wetr Pros eo,4ie ~ +Prospeotve
Western Desons j,-god..o, + YfeM ..I o.... fon ri
Eacambia.......... ..
Holmes .,.............
Jackson ............... .. ..
Okaloosa .............. ....
Santa Rosa ....... .. .. ..

,Dlv. AT. per ceht.......
Walton ............... .. "
adsn .. ......... .

ffr v on er ce...... ... ...
LaFayette ...............
LaFayette ...... . .. ...
Leon ................. ..... ..
Madison ............... ........
Taylor ................ .. .. ..
Div. Av. per cent...... ... ...

Baker ............ ... ... .. .. **
Bradford .............. .
Clay ................. .... .
Columbia .............. ....
Nassau ...............
Putnam ................
St. Johns ............. .
Suwannee ............. .. ***
Div. Av. per cent...... "-'
Oentral 0Dvi"son.
Brevard ............... -0 50 50 50
Hllsborough........... 90 0 9) 90
Lake ................... ..
Marion ................ ..
Oseofla.. ...:::::::::::::::: 6
Pasco .................
Polk ................... .. *
Seminole ...............
Dv. Av. per cent...... 80 75 7 67
Houthera Divson. -
1 100.o0 0l-
DeSoto ............... 80 5
Lee ...... so ......... 85 75
Monroe .0......... ... 6 100 100.
Okeechobee ........... 75 75
Palm Beach ............ 75 75 60 50
St. Lucie ............... ... 90 8
SDiv. Av. per cent. .... 86 89 88 82
State. Av. per cent..... 88 82 80 I7










52


REPORT QF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNT., -4. 9~. ilo Maie-


Western Divi8aon_ Io 04ti0t4on yIu e Oodi tiaon ti_ _
Escambia ........... .. .
Holmes .......... ... ..
Jackson ,. .. ... ..
Okaloosa ': .. .. .. .. .
Santa Rosa ............. .. ..
Walton ............... ..
Div. Av. per cent......
Northern Division.
Gadsden .............. .. ..
Hamilton.............. ..
Jefferson ...... .....
LaFayette ............ '
Leon...............
Madison ............... .. ..
Taylor .............. .
Div. Av. percent...... ..
Tortneadern Dtifston.
Alachua ............. .. ..
Baker ...... .......... .. .. .. ..
Bradford ................. .. ..
Clay .......... ...... ...
Columbia ............ .. ....
Nassau ........... .... ,. .
Putnam ........... ...
St. Johns ............... .
Suwannee............ ..
Div. Av. per tent....... ..
Central D ,isioe. .
BrI vard ............... .. ....
Citrus ............ ... .. ..
Hillsborough ............ 100 2 ..
Lake ...-.............
Marion .............. ..
Orange ................ .. ......
Osceola .... .... ....... .. *. .. .
Pasco ................. .
P olk ..................
Seminole .............. ...
Div. Av. per cent...... 160 25 .. .
Houthrn t FDiviftow


DeSoto..............
aaee ...............

Monroe ......... ..... ..
Okeechobee ............
Palm Beach ..........
St. Lucie ...........
Dit. Av. per cent......
Stata Av. ner cent.....


VJO -J.LU-
100- 100
60 1 60


-.- I-1-------------*I


88 90 85
94 57 85.


Lou


85
85


State Av per cent .....


ruv
70


'












53

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD--Continued.

S INotUsve Natal
*COUNTY Hay Grass Grass Oraoe Trees


Western Division


aProsxect el Proseeo tta
Condition r feld condition Ye


Escambia .............. 0 .. 90 75
Holmes. .............. 100.. *
Jackson ............... 100 .
O aloosa ........ -..... .
Santa Rosa ............ 100 .
Walton ................ 100- 85 90
DivA. per cent...,... .100 .. 87 82
Norterm Division.


Gadsde ............... 100 .
Hamilton ............. 90 ...
Jefferson .... ........ .
LaFaette ........... 100 .. ..
Leon" .........."......... 150,
Madison:. .............. 105 105 100 10
Taylor ............... .100 75_ 65


T~4., A., .~rn.n. .ln t 1O I 105


87 82


Norteeswter DivtsMon.
Alachua ...............
Baker.................. 100 90 9
Bradford .................. 100 50 60
Clay ................. 90 85 90 100
Columbia ................ .
Nassau ................ g o 6
ru m....................150 [ 10 12
p 100 100
t Jh ns .............:::. 100100
'Suwannee ......... ...... '
SAv. vper cent ...... 104 85 86 95
central Dvfson.
Brevard ............... 75 7
Citrus.... ...........: : 0 75 80
Hisboroagh ............. 60 100 90
Lake .............. 50 75 90 75
Marion............... 95 90 90 120
Orange ................ 100 100 120 140
Osceola................. .95 80 90 90
Oscela 5 95 110
Pasco ................ 100 1295 125
Polk ............; .... 7 125 15
se oi;ole: i....... ... .. 0 80855___ __
DIV. AI. r cent...... 1 71- 75 94, 99 .
Sant3ere S a-t.. 100 100 100,
D ad et ........ ....... 100
Lee .................. 98 95 90 80
Monroo. : ...............
Okeechbee"............... 100 80 75- 75
Palm Beach ........ :... 91
St. ucie ......... ... .. 95
Div. Av. per cent....... 98 93 91 88
l9tate Av. per cent..... 96 89 89 89


t












54

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Peanuts Pastures

SProspective
Western Division. Condition Yield condition
Escambia -.'................... 90 110 100
Holmes .......................... 90 85 100
Jackson ......................... 100 110
Okaloosa ........................ 65 70 100
Santa Rosa ...................... 100 100 100
W alton .......................... 90 90 100

Div. Av. per cent ................ 89 94 100
Northern Division.
Gadsden ........................ 90 90 100
Hamilton ........................ 100 100 100
Jefferson ....................... 90 100 100
LaFayette ....................... 100 100 100
Leon ............................ 100 100 100
Madison ........................ 100 100 100
Taylor ......................... 85 85 100
Div. Av. per cent. ................ 95 96 101
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ......................... 90 90 100
Baker ........................... 100 100 100
Bradford ........................ 100 100 90
Clay ............................ 85 75 90
Columbia ........................ 110 110 100
Nassau .......................... 100 125 125
Putnam ......................... 100 125 125
St. Johns ....................... 100 100 100
Suwannee ....................... 95 95 90
Div. Av. per cent. ................. 98 102 102
Central Division.
Brevard ......................... .
Citrus .......................... 85 90
Hillsborough ..................... 100 100 75
Lake ................. ......... 75 75 100
Marion .......................... 85 100 95
Orange ........................ 100
Osceola .......................... 60 50 80
Pasco ........................... 95 110 100
Polk ............................ 80 85 80
Seminole ........................ 90 90 90

Div. Av. per cent. ................ .. 84 88 90
Southern Division.
Dade .......................... 100 100
DeSoto ........................ 100 100 100
Lee ............................. 85 85 85
Monroe ...................... .
Okeechobee ...................... 25 25
Palm Beach ...................... 100 100 95
St. Lucie ............... ......... . .. 85

Div. Av. per cent. ................ 82 82 91

State Av. per cent. .............. 90 92 97













55

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued


COUNTY


Western Division. Conduit
Escambia .................
H olm es .......................... 85
Jackson .................. .......
Okaloosa ......................... 90
Santa Rosa ....................... 90
W alton ........................... 100
Div. Av. per cent............... 91
Northern Division.
Hadsden ..........................
Hamilton ........................ 100
Jefferson ......................... 90
LaFayette .. ............. .... 100
Leon ................. ..... 110
M adison .........................
Taylor ........................... 75
Div. Av. per cent................. 95


Condition


Northeastern Division.
Alachua .......................... 85 85
Baker ............................ 125 125
Bradford ......................... 90 90
Clay ............................. 90 90
Columbia ....................... 100 100
Nassau ........................ .. 100 90
Putnam .......................... 75 75
St. Johns .................. . I 125 115
Suwannee .......................I 60 60
Div. Av. per cent................. 94 94
Central Division.
Brevard .......................... I
Citrus ........................... 75 100
Hillsborough ...................... .. 80 .
L ake .............................
M arion ........................... 85 100
Orange ...........................
Osceola .......................... 90 90
Pasco ........................... 95 100
Polk ............................. 70 65
Sem inole ......................... . . I
Div. Av. per cent. ............... 83 1 89
Southern Division.
D ade ........................... 1
DeSoto ......................... 1 1
Lee ............................ 85 85 80
Monroe ..........................
Okeechobee ....................... 8 80
Palm Beach .................. .
St. Lucie ........................
Dit. Ar. per cent ................ 88 93 90

State Av. per cent.. ........... 90 93 90













56 8.

REPORT OF CONDITION AND TPROSECTIV i YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Sea Isltad Ctto ... gar 0ime.

Wa1 Iodo Propeottl Prospective
;ptreita JJivtIo 1 0onOdioat Y4f14 I C oniUtfon VoiedU
, Eseambia .......... ... oo100 100
Holmes. ..,...,.. .... .. ... 90 90
Jackson .............. .; 90 90
Okaloosa .............. / 90 90
Banta Rosa .......... .. -. -100 100
'Waltoni .- :....;...... .. 100 100


a den ............. 00 i5
Hamilton ............. .::5 75 100 100
Jefferson, .............. .. .. 80 90
LaFayette* ............ 90 90 85 85
Leon .... .......... .. .. 100 r00
SMadion ............... 80 80 100 100
STaylor .............. 85 85 85 85
sA r er .... 82 91 98

Alachna ...................-s
Baker ................. 0 90 125 12
Bradford ........... 100 100
Clay ........... 75 60 115 115
Columbia ............. 125 125 100 100
Nssau ............... 100 75 125 126
utnam .............. 100 100 100 10Q
hn ............. 10 100
w ee ............. 50 45 9Q : 90
Di.A er cent. .... ... 92 8 105 105 -
Centra Dwefoe%.
iBrevard ............... .. .. 70
Citrus ................. 100 100
SHIllsborough .......... 75 75 60 60
jLake ................ .. 90 125
SMarin. ................ .. 80 100
1 Orange .......-........ .. .. 100 100
Osceola ................ .. 90 100
Pasco ..... ........... 90 90
Polk ............... 75 75
Seminole ............. .. .. 5 95 .
Div..per cet, t...... 75 75 85

!Deeto ............... .. 90 110
,Lee .;........'.......... .. o 90o 0.--
Monroe........ ..
, Okeeehobee ............ .. 90 90
Palm Beach .... ...... 100 150
St L cle ............ : .
Div. 'Av. per cet. .... .. 94 08
State Av. per cent. .... 83 74 4 99















. REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Sorghumm BSeet-Potatoes

Western Division I Uondition o Yiield [ ondition |P s eld

Escambia ............ 100 100 100 100
Holines ................ 85 80 95 98
Jackson ............... .. 100 110
Okaloosa .............. 95 90 90 100
Santa Rosa ............ 100 100 .100 100
Walton ...I........... 100 100
DiPl Av. per cent...... 95 92 98. 401
Northern Dision.
Gadsden ............... 0O 75 90 100
Hamilton .............. .... 100 100
Jefferson ....... .... 85 90
'Laayette............: 100 100
Leon.................. 100 100 100 100
Madison ............... 100 100 110 110
Taylor .............. 100, 100 90 90
Div. Av. per cent ...... 95 94 96 90
Northeastern Division. __
Alachua................... 1 00 100
Baker ................... 150 150
Bradford .............. 100 100 100 100
Clay ........ 100 100 110 110"
Columbia .............. 100 100 105 105
Nassau ................ 100 110 -75 100
Putnam ............... ... 80 80
St. Johnis .............. 150 150
Suwannee ... ......... 80 80 90 80
Div. Av. per cent..... 96 98 107 108
Tentra D ision.
Brevard ............... .. .. 80
Citrus ......... ........ 100 200
'Hllsborough .... ... ". 100 00
Lake.. ......... ........ 85 100
Marion 9.......0 125 85 100
Orange ................ 110 110
Osceola ..........1..... 5 15 75 60
Paolk .. ......... 80 75
Seminole .. ..: : i 9 95 90 90
Div. Av. per cent ...... 67 78 91 1 92
Southern D vsion. r


Dade .......... .....
DeSoto .:.... .. ........
Lee .......... ........
Monrop ................
Okeechobee ............
Palm Beach ...........
St. Lucie .............
Div. Av. per cent......
State. Av. per cent.....


166 90
80 80



90 85
89 89


100 105
80 80
.75 75
90 100
85 95
88 92
96 98













BzPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued..

COUNTYT Sov Beiano UpI anl Ootto*

|I Prospeotive Prospective
,freters Dl4tsion Oondo tion \ Yieldi Condition Y0eld
s bia ............. .. 75 25
Holmes ................ .. .. 40 85
acton .............. .. .. 100 110
Okaloosa ......... ; .. .. 35 60
Santa Rosa ............ .. .40 50
Walton ............... .. .. 50 50
Div. Av. per cent ..... I .. 7 55
northern D stion.
Sadasden .............. ..
Hamilton ............... .. 100 90
Jefterson ............. .. .. 60 60
LaFayette ............ .. .. -90 90
Leon .................. .. .. 60 50
Madison ............. .. ,. 80 80
Taylor ................ .. .. 75 70
Dit. Av. per eint. ...... .. I 78 I 73*
AortheasteMr D4 on.
Alachua ....;...... ..
BEger ................ .. .. 15
Bradford .............. .. .. 40 80
Clay ................... 50 50
Columbia ............. 120 120 130 180
Nassau ................ 100 90 100 75
Putnam ............. ...
St. Johns ............ .. ..
Suwannee ............ .. .. 50 50
Div. A; per cent ...... 110 105 87 82
DesrrOW Dvie on.-
lreard ..............
Citru ............... . .. .
hillsborough .......... ..
Lake ................. ..
Marion .... ...........
orange .. ............. .. .. .
Oseceola ............... 40 20
Pasco .... ............ .
Polk ................... 8 80
Bemlnole .............. .. ..
r. Av. per cent. ...... 62 6
p :...... .. 85
Dea oto ................ .. .
Lee ............
Monroe ..............
Okeechobee ............ . 1 15i
Palm -Beach .. ..... .. ..
St. Lucie ............. .. .. .. ,.
Div. AV. per cent. .... .. .. 15 15
State Av. per cent. .... -89 77 59 56













REPORT OF CONDITION AND PBOSPBCTIV TIULD-Continued.

Veloet Bea"

Western Divisos C odi Pro ds


scamba .......................... 100
Holmes ......................... 100 100
Jackson .......................... : 110 120
Okaloosa ......................... 100 100
Santa oa .................. ... 100 100
Walton .......................... 100 100


Div. Av. ner cent.


S101 I 103. 1 .


Northern Dnvi va --
Gadsden .......................... 100 100 oo
Hamilton ........................ 100 100
Jefferson ......................... 90 95
Lafayette ......................... 100 100
Leon ................. ....... 100 "100
Madison .......................... 100 100
Taylor .......................... 75 75
Div. Av. per cent............... 95 96
Northeastern Diteton.
Alachua ............... ........... 100 o ..
Baker .......... ........... 100 100
Bradford ......................... 100 100
Clay ...... .......................... 110 110
Columbia ......................... 110 110
Nassau ...................;...... 125 125
Putnam .......................... 100 100
St. Johns ........................ 100 100
Suwannee ..................... 95 95
D v. Av, per cent........ ....... 105 105 I ..
Central Dfenon. -
Brevard .................... ...... 7 75 ..
Citrus ......... .... ........
Hillsborough ...................... 100 100
Lake ............................. 100 100
Marion ........................... 95 90 ..
Orange ........................... 100 100..
sceola ............ .............. 85 75
Pasco ............................ 100 100
Polk ............................. 75 75
Seminole ........................ 90 90 ..
Div. Av. per cent.............. 91 89 ..
Southern Dvolats.
Dade ............................ 100 100 ..
DeSoto .......................... 100 100
Lee .............................. 85 85
Monroe ................ ...******
keechobee ..................... 10 100 .
Palm Beach .....................
St Lucie .......................... 90 9
Div. Av. per cent................ 95 9 ..
State Av. per cent ................ 9 -7 98 **



















PART III.
1. Florida Oysters, Regulations for Packing and Shipping.
2. Saccharin, a Prohibited Drug, Substituted for Sugar. _
3. Commercial Values of Fertilizers and Zbeds.
4. Analyses of Fertiliers, Feeds, and Gasolines.











METHODS OF HANDLING APALACHIOOLA
OYSTERS.


A. M. HaNRY.
The oysters are all gathered from the numerous beds,
or bars, in Apalachicola Bay, which are from one to
twelve miles from Apalachicola. The oyster are all
gathered by means of hand tongs. It takes a, boat from
one to three days to gather a load of oysters, depending
on the size of the boat,-weather conditions and the quan-
tity or quality of the oysters on the various bars visited.
During the present season, 191819,-the oysters have been
unusually poor and variable in quality. As many as
twelve bars may be visited before obtaining a load,
although very often the boat obtains its load at the first
bar. After being unloaded it may be as long as three
days before the oysters are all shucked. Thus an oyster
may -be out of the water from a few hours to a week be-
fore it is shucked.
The shucking houses are equipped with- a number of
stalls for the shuckers, a strainer for draining the oysters
before measurement, a skimmer for washing them on,
galvanized and tin containers for cooling and shipping,
and a refrigerator for keeping the shucked stock in; and
all the houses are supplied with city water, which on
analysis in.1909 showed 0.0519 per cent. of mineral mat-
ter, mostly salt. The strainer and skimmer are con-
Etructed-of galvanized material with holes about 0.5 inch
in diameter and about 2 inches apart. The sanitary con-
veniences of the houses are all similar, and while not ex-
emplary are not objectionable; althoiigh the practices of
the workers could be. greatly improved from a sanitary
viewpoint. Each shucker is equipped with a gallon
bucket, a thin-bladed knife, a hammer, and a breaking
block.

The shiucker breaks off the edge of the' shell at the end
opposite the hinge with the hammer on the breaking block
and after cutting the muscle from the shell with,the knife,
he drops the oyster in the gallon bucket, which has been
filled about a quarter full of tap watef before begm-
ning: When the bucket is full of oyste6 the shucker










pours them on the strainer, where they are drained for a
few. seconds. and are measured in a gallon cup; from
which they are poured on the skimmer, where they are
washed with a stream of water from one to three minutes.
Up to this point the method is the same for all the shuck-
ing houses, but from here the procedure differs.
The best method of handling from this point is in' use
:by only one house. Here the oysters are run from the
skimmer into five-gallon tin containers that are packed
away in cracked ice in the refrigerator in order to
thoroughly chill until the next day or longer. They are
,prepared for shipment from the refrigerator by draining
for a short time in a galvanized colander dipper with
perforations about 0.2 inch in diameter, and 0.5 inch apart
in order to free them from the separated liquor. The
oysters are then packed. in the fve-gallon one-way con-
tainer and put in the shipping crate, which is well iced.
The did of the tin container is fastened on by driving
hails through the rim of the lid and ithe top of .the can.
Another house uses the same procedure except the oysters
are cooled by being put in large galvanized tubs, capacity
about twenty gallons, which are placed on blocks of ice in
the refrigerator.
' The remainder of the houses run the oysters from the
skimmer into g1rge galvanized containers and chill by
putting blocks of ice, twenty to fifty bounds, in the con-
tainer with the oysters. i These containers may then be
left in-the shcking.room or, put in, the refrigerator. If
these b}Ceks of ice melt before the oysters are to be packed
for shipment more ice is added. The oysters are stirred
up several times during the day in order that all may
,come in contact with the ice Some of the firms ship the
same day the oysters are shucked, so that the oysters are
not in contact with the ice and water longer than ten
hours and usually not longer than four or five hours. One
house states.that on cold days no ice is used. A number
of the houses may keep the oysters in the tubs with ice
for four or five days. One house% has a subsidiary about
eight miles from Apalachicola, where the sanitary con-
ditions are deplorable and sewerage contaminated water
is used for putting into the containers into which the
oysters are shucked. These oysters are not washed here,
but are put into galvanized .containers and carried to







685


,Apalachicola by auto at the end of the day. There
cracked ice is added to the oysters and allowed to remain
in contact with the ice and water until the afternoon of
the next day.
The shipping containers are all supposed to be water
tight. The containers used are five and ten-gallon galvan-
ized returnable containers and one, three and fivegallon
supposedly non-returnable tin containers. The Ahucking
houses and also the agent of the express company com-
plains that these containers are returned unnecessarily
dirty; The non-returnable tin containers are used re-
peatedly by some houses and as they are fastened by
driving nails through the side of the can and the lid,
after the first time there area number of-holes through
which the) Separated liquor from the oysters can leak out
and water from the melted ice leak into the container.
The agent of the express, company complained that the
firms using..e tin containers were continually making
-claims for shortage caused by the leakage of the separated
liquor through these nail holes in the can and also possi-
bly by.the nails working out and allowing the lid to come--
off and spill the oysters and liquor.
Apalachicola Bay is almost landlocked and has only
three narrow outlets into the Gulf of Mexico-with the
'Apalachicola River flowing into the north side of the Bay.
The Apalachicola River 'is a typical southern stream,
bringing down red clayey mud from its head waters with
tributaries near its mouth of clear blue limestone streams
and the dark brown streams red with 'organic matter
from sandy soils and swamps. Owing to these facts and
the additional fact that floods in the river occur at no
particular or regurlar season; the water in Apalachicola
Bay is very variable. Samples of water have been taken
from over a certain bar at similar tide conditions at the
same season of the year that varied from 01J3 to 4.22 per
cent. of salt. Likewise samples of oysters taken from this
bar under similar conditions as the water 'samples have
varied from 0.01 to 2.67 per cent salt and 13.87 to 24.84
per cent. total solids. There is also a big variation in the'
composition of the oysters on the different bars owing to
fhe-amount of foods brought by the currents and th%
variation in the variety of oyster. 'Samples of oysters
from the different bars taken at the same time have varied
from 16.54 to 24.84 per cent. of total solids.
5-Bnul.








The following table of analyses of samples of
ence in the methods of handling.


oysters from the packing houses show differ-


MEATS LIQUOR :Composite

NO. DESCRIPTION OF SAMPLE. r to


2316 Samples taken immediately after commer- 63.7 80.12 11.39, 19.88 3.57 9.84
2322 cial washing 63.0 78.51 11.24 21.49 3.22 9.42
Average -63.4 79.32 11.32 20.68 3.40 9.63
2317T Samples of above after 24 hours in re- 61.2 89.48 11.99 10.52 4.00 11.15
2323 frigerator and drained ...__61.6 88.25 14.08 11.75 5.32- 13.05
Average -61.4 88.87 13.04 11.13 4.66 12.10
2326 Samples taken im-mediately after commer- 62.2 75.54 10.55 24.46 2.96 8.69
2330 cial washing 63.9 75.94 10.58 24.06 3.10 8H.
2310 58.6 75.84 15.00 24.6 3.09 12.12
Average 61.6 75.77 12.03 24.23 3.05 9.89
2327 Samples of above after 4 hpurs soaking 64.0 66.60 9.32 33.40 2.50 7.04
2331 with water and rained ____ 62.8 77.26 11.67 22.74 2.76 9.64
23111i 56.7 85.12 13.17 1.88 3.29 11.70
Average ......61.2 76.33 11.39 23.67 3.18 9.46
2324 Samples-taken immediately after commer4 62.6 77.90 10.32 22.10 2.67. 8,63
2332 cial washing ................. 61.8 84.30 13.51 15.70 3.75 1- 11.98







ANAYLSIS OF SAMPLES OF SAMPLES OF OYSTEhbS-(Continued.)
SMEATS.. LIQR Coiposite.

N1 DESCRIPTION OF SAMPLE. 0


23281 6-6 .. -2--- 2.6 76.13 110.28 23.87 2.55 8.43
23181 46.6 87.40 15.47 12.60 4.42 14.07
2312 W__ _...__ _. 60.8 77.46 11.30 22.54 3.30 9.50
Average ---_-- ...- 58.9 80.64 12.18 19.36 3.53 10.52
2325 Sampes of above after 24 hours' soaking 66.3 78.07 9.55 21.93 2.72 8.55
2333 with water and ice and drained -.-._ 71.6 81.14 8.48 18.86 2.51 7.35
2329 ..... .. -61.9 73.64 10.39 26.36 2.72 8.12
23191 -- -. 51.3 78.35 14.83 21.65 3.84 12.46
23131 ....__- ----- 60.9 73.29 10.02 26.71 2.84 8.23
Average -..~.... --- 62.4 76.90 10.45 23.10 2.93 .8.84









As shown by the above analyses where no ice or, water
was added to the oysters after washing and the oysters
were kept over night so that the water from washing
and the leakage of the oyster could separate; the av-
erage amount of liquor in the stock prepared for sale at
the time it would have been ready for consumption was
11.13, per cent. after standing in contact with ice for
four hours 23.67 per cent.; and after standing in con-
tact with ice for one day -23.10 per cent. Doubtless the
amount of draining at the -time -f preparing for sale in-
fluenced the liquor content considerably.

However, .- is possible, and is being done commer-
cially, to ship Apalachicola oysters that will not con-
tain more than 15-per cent, of free liquor, -

The per cent of total solids in the meat of the oysters-
after commercial preparation and washing, standing over
night and draining of free liquor, varied from 10.09 to
15.00 per cent.; while some that had stood in contact
with ice and water were as low as 8.48 per cent. The
washed "ysters on standing over night gave a gain of 15
- per cent. in the amount of solids in the meats; while the
washed oysters on standing in contact with ice and water
for four hours lost 6 per cent. of the solids in the meats
-'and on standing in contact with ice and water for one-
day the loss in solids in the meatswas 14 per cent. The
wide variation in 'the per cent. of total solids in the
meats shows that this data does not give any:indication
about the treatment of th- oysters; but the difference in
letting the oysters stand in contact with ice and waters
and without ice and water certainly shows that this
caused the adulteration of the oysters by the addition of
Water which shows up in the excess of free liquor usually
after shipment. On account of the extreme freshness of
the water and oysters when the lot of sample-was taken
no leaching of the contents of the oyster is shown, but
wouTd doubtless have -been shown had ,the oysters con-
tained the normal amount of salt. When figured on the
basis of total solids in the whole lot of meats and liquor
this shows up more surprisingly as the gain in solids on
standing without ice for a day is 39 per cent. while stand-
ing in contact with ice the loss is 16 per cent.












In the way of improvements it is suggested that more
attention be paid to the sanitary practices of the shuck-
ers, that a perforated bucket be used for shucking into
instead of a bucket with fresh water in it. On account
of the variability of the water on the beds the use of tap
water for washing is not objectionable. Experiments have
shown that the loss in solids of the oysters by the pres-
ent.methods of washing varies from almost nothing up to
5- per cent. However, it is suggested that the washing
be as short -as possible to cleanse the oyster and the
water be as cold as practicable to make it. It is sug-
gested that all cans before shipment be sealed, that the
one-way tin container be used altogether and not be re-
turned. Until the use of the galvanized shipping con-
tainer is discontinued it is suggested that better methods
of cleaning and sterilizing it be adopted by the shucking
houses and it is also recommended that this association
adopt a resolution asking the Railroad Administration
and.the American Railway Express Company to require
that all returnable containers of oysters as well as milk
and cream, be required to be -thoroughly cleansed before
being returned to-the originalshipper.
April 1, 1919.


OFFICE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE,
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.
September 15, 1920.
At a conference of the National and Florida Food and
Drugs Officials-held in the. office of the Commissioner of
Agriculture at Tallahassee on the 9tb. instant, it was
decided to adopt proper uniform methods of preparing for
shipment Florida oysters and to iiaugurate plans for the
prevention of the shipment of adulaterated or polluted
oysters in order to comply with the National and Florida
Food and Drug Laws, Rules and Regulations governing
the shipment and sale of oysters.
At this conference it was decided that a convention
be called of all individuals, companies and corporations
interested in the packing, preparing for sale or shipment,
or the shipment or transportation of oysters in interstate
or intrastate commerce, to meet .for consultation and











instruction in accordance with National'and State Laws
governing the packing and shipment of oysters and to
prevent the shipment or sale of adulterated or polluted
oysters.
THEREFORE, for the purpose of such consultation
and instruction in order to preserve the reputation of
Florida oysters for excellence of quality and freedom
from p6lution or adulteration,. and to protect, the in-
dustry from the sale or shipment of adulterated' r polut-
ed oysters, a convention of all parties interested in the
gathering, packing, shipment or transportation of oysters
in interstate or intrastate commerce is hereby called to
meet in the office of the Commissioner of Agriculture
at Tallahassee, Florida, at 10 o'clock a. m. on Tuesday,
October 5, 1920.
Representatives of the following are requested to be
present:
All individuals, firm or corporations in Florida pack-
ing'or shipping oysters. (
The Unjid States Bureau of Chemistry.
The Florida Food and Drug Control Officials.
The Florida Food and Drug Inspectors.
S he Florida Atate Board of Health.
City Health Officers.
Inspectors of State.and City Health Departments.
The State Shell Fish Commissioner.
Deputy State Shell Fish Commissioners from-the oys-
ter-bearing areas bf the State. I.
The Express Companies transporting fish and oysters.
It is earnestly requested that representatives of all
the above--packers or shippers, food and drug officials,
State and city health officers, State and city food inspec-
tors and express companies-be present in order that
the law, rules and regulations may be fully discussed
and explained. Proper methods of packing and trans-
porting will be explained in order that the National
and State Laws may be complied with and that adulter-
ated or polluted oysters may not be packed or shipped
contrary to law, and to the detriment of the industry.
W.. A. MeRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.











SACeHARIN
A DRUG PROHIBITED BY NATIONAL AND STATE
FOOD AND DRUG LAWS-
BEING SUBSTITUTED FOR SUGAR
IN FLORIDA.


By A. M. HENRY.


Saccharin, a deleterious and harmful coal tar drug,
owing to the high price of sugar recently and the cupidity
of the manufacturers of saccharin, has been substituted
for sugar in numerous kinds of sweet foods by a consider-
able number of manufacturers of such foods. Soda foun-
tains, bottlers of soft drinks, ice cream manufacturers,
candy makers and bakeries haye been the principal offend-
ers using saccharin in place of sugar in such goods as soft
drinks, ice cream, candies, pies, cakes and numerous other
articles of sweet food. Owing to the perishable nature of
such foods the local manufacturer, who purchases sac-
charin from the jobber or manufacturer of saccharin un-
der a false statementthat it is lawful to use it, has been
malde the sufferer along with the consumer, who not only
is cheated out of the food value of the sugar for whicW-
the saccharin is substituted but is also given a dose of a
harmful and deleterious coaL tar drug at the same time.

The following remarks by Dr. Charles H. LaWall,
Chemist of the Pennsylvania Food apd Drug Depart-
ment, are very apropos:

"Saccharin in foodstuffs has -only one argument in its
favor, i e., it cheapens the cost of production. This, how-
ever, is no advantage to the consumer, for when it is used
in canned foods the goods are sold at no lower price
at retail, with the exception of one product alone, and
that is the bottled soft drinks oi cheap sodas and 'pops.'
So far as these products are concerned, I think their
very cheapness makes them doubly dangerous, and feel
sure that many cases of sickness in the poorer districts












of the city are caused by this same saccharin in the soft
drinks which are so freely consumed there. As authority
for this- opinion I would refer you to Dr. Edwin Rosen-
thal, of 517 Pine street, who has an extensive medical
practice in the section of the city where these adulterated,
soft drinks are largely sold and who has upon more
than one occasion expressed himself emphatically as un-
hesitatingly condemning them.

"Saccharin is a synthetic or artificial product made
from toluene, one of the fractions of coal tar. This fact
alone- need not necessarily be taken as an argument for
its condemnation, but it is quoted, to show that it has
no -chemical relationship nor anything in common with
sugar, for which it is used as a substitute. Chemically
it is known by the terrifying name of-ePthosulphamido-
benzoic anhydride, and the history of its discovery, or
rather the discovery of its intense sweetness, which Was
purely accidental, is one of the most interesting in chem-
ical literature.
"Saccharin, besides being a sweetener of 550 times the
intensity of sugar, is a substance having a marked pre-
servative action, and thus fulfills a double function,
which makes it all the more desirable to use, from the
standpoint of those manufacturers who look to profits
*regardless of the health of the individuals who consume
their wares. As an antiferment, or preservative, it is
credited with'being more harmful than sodium benzoate,
salicylic acid, or even sulphurous aaid.
"When used it not only exerts a detrimental influence
upon, certain functions of the body, but it cheats the or-
ganisms out of a, valuablle food produot-sugar. Sugar
has a high and definite food value; saccharin has none.
-Therefore the use of saccharin in food products cheats
the consumer out of a valuable constituent which the
system craves and to which he is justly entitled.
"A number of European chemists and physiologists
have investigated this subject thoroughly and have re-
ported adversely.concerning its action. Dijardin Beaui-
mete states- 'The- se of saccharin in foods presents'a
danger to thIe pubic health. Saccharin is-not a food, but
a medicine.' The committee of the Seine Council express-











ed the same opinion. Sollman; a well-known American
authority, states: 'Saccharin has the properties of the
coal-tar group, and is therefore 'antiseptic and irritant.
It is sometimes given in fermentative dyspepsia. Its
long-continued use interferes withL digestion, and may'
lead to nepklhtis (kidney disease),.
"Mathews and McGuigan state that 'saccharin acts-as
a protoplasmic poison and restrain the salivary and
pancreatic ferments.'
"Based upon the results of the many investigations
which-have been made, and for the purpose of controlling
or prohibiting its use in food products, France, Italy-aAid
Portugal prohibit its importation, the academies of Mad-
rid and Rio de Janeiro declare its addition to foods a
dangerous adulteration, and its importation into Bel-
gium has been restricted.
"While it has been largely used as an artificial sweet-
ener by diabetic patients who dare not take sugar, it is
always used wader the advice and control of a physician,
and that they (physicians) are beginning to question the
advisability of even such a limited use is shown by the
fact that in the recently published edition of the Phyi
sicians Manual of the United States Pharmacopoeia and
National Formulary this statement appears: 'Saccharin,
should he used, if at all, u ith care. If physicians must
be careful in using it, it certainly cannot be a safe article
to permit the use of in food products.
"Finally, the Referee Boaed, the same body which per-
mitted the use of sodium benzoate in foods, inpApril,
1911, decided against the advisability of permitting the
use of saccharin in foods. The U. S. Department of Agri-
culture, therefore, has issued decisions toathe effect that
while saccharin may be used in food especially prepared
for diabetics, and as a drug, it is not permissible to us&M- ,
ordinary food products even, when declared upon' the
label" '
The use of saccharin in foods is prohibited by both
the National and Florida Food and Drug Laws by the
following provision which is identical in both laws:
"In Case of Food-If it contains any'added poisonous -
or other added deleterious ingredient which may render
such article injurious to health." "










Under the National Food and Drugs Law, the follow-
ing regulation: has been adopted by the Secretaries of
Agriculture, Treasury and Commerce and Labor:
"It having been determined that saccharin mixed-with
food is an added poisonous and deleterious ingredient
such as is contemplated by the Act, and also that the'
substitution of saccharin for sugar in foods reduces and
lowers their quality, the Secretary of Agriculture will
regard as adulterated under the food and drugs act foods
containing saccharin which, on or after April 1, 1912,
are manufactured or' offered for sale in the District of
Columbia or territories or shipped in interstate or foreign
comiperce ,or offered for importation into the United
States."
Under the Florida Food and Drugs Law the following
regulation has been adopted by the Commissioner of
Agriculture and State Chemist:
""It having been determined that saccharin mixed with
food is an added poisonous and deleterious ingredient
such as is contemplated by the Act, and also that the
substitution of saccharin for sugar in foods reduces and
lowers their quality, foods containing saccharin are adul-
terated under the Pure Food and Drugs Law."
-Samples of foods taken from the following dealers and
manufacturers have been. found to be adulterated by
the addition of saccharin and consequently in violation
of either or both the National and Florida Food and
Drugs Laws. In no case has the 'dealer. or manufacturer
exhibited a guaranty signed by the wholesaler, jobber,
manufacturer or other party residing in the State of
Florida from whom he purchased such article to the effect
that the same is.not adulterated or misbranded within
the meaning of the Food and Drugs Law, designating
it, which is necessary to protect himself and his goods
from prosecution under the law. The National Law has a
.similar provision for the protection of the innocent dealer
vho availshimself of it by requiring the signed guaranty
from the person from whom he purchases. The verbal or
printed assurance of the agent is no protection to the
dealer or manufacturer of adulterated or misbraided
goods.











NAME AND ADoRDE OF DzAIna. OAss oB PRODUCT.

Key West Bottling Co., Key West, .. bottled soft drinks
Cola-Nip Bottling Co., Miami.. :... .ottled soft drinks
Pinapa Bottling Works, Miami........ 1 ottled soft drinks
Coca-Cola Bottling Co., Sanford. .... bottled soft drinks
Lime-Cola Bottling Co., Quincy..... Bottled soft drink-
Bra-Nola Bottling Co., Milton........ Bottled soft drinks
Chero-Colai Bottling Co., Tallahassee. .Bottled soft drinks
Bay Bottling Works, Panama City.... Bottled soft drinks
Lime-Cola Bottling W'ks, Pensacola.. bottled soft drinks
Gainesville B'tling W'ks, Gainesville.. Bottled soft drinks
Coca-Cola Bottling Co., Titusville.... Bottled soft drinks
Lake City Bottling Co., Eake City.... Bottled soft drinks
A. Lucignani, Key West....... ...Fountain soft drinks
First Street Drug Store, Miami... .Fountain soft drinks
Palm Parlor, Gainesville...........Fountain soft drinks
City Pharmacy, Jasper............ Fountain soft drinks
Joes Smoke House, Sanford...... ... mountain soft drinks
Orlando Pharmacy, 'Orlando........ Fountain soft drinks
Nethel Ice Cream Parlor, Key West .......... Ice cream
Stiting Ice Cream Co., Daytona. .. ,-. ......Ice cream
Dywer's Bakery, Lakeland .........;...iBakery products
LaFayette Candy Co., Tampa .................Candies
Yates Grocery Co,, Tallahasseel ...... .Hpey Boy Cordial
Pendleton & Collins, Tallahassee... .Hpney Boy Cordial
Tallahassee Fruit and Grocery Co.,
Tallahassee ......................Honey Boy Cordial
Capital City Grocery Co.,
Tallahassee .................... Honey Boy Cordial
Geo. Shaheen, Tallahassee. .rown Red Grape Beverage















TALLAHASSEE, FLA., Oct. 1, 1920.

In addition to the foreging compiled by A. M. Henry,
Food and Drug Analyst, I add the following taken from
the report of the hearing before the Secretary of Agricul-
ture, the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of
Commerce and Labor, issued December 16, 1911.
Conclusions of the Referee Board of Consulting Scien-
tific Experts.
"The conclusions reached as a result of the individual
investigations are given in detail in the separate reports
herewith presented, together with all of the data upon
which these conclusions are based.
"The main general conclusions reached by the Referee
Board are as follows:
(1) Saccharin in small quantities (0.3 gram per day
or less) added to the food is without deleterious or
poisonous action and is NOT INJURIOUS TO THE HEALTH OF
NORMAL ADULTS, SO far as is ascertainable by available
methods of study.
(2) Saccharin in large quantities (over 0.3 GRAM per
day, and ESPECIALLY ABOVE 1 GRAM DAILY) added to the
food, if taken for considerable-periods of time (especially
after months), is LIABLE TO INDUCE DISTURBANCES OF DI-
GESTION.
(3) The admixture of saccharin with food in small or
large quantities has not been found to alter the quality or
strength, of the food. It is obvious, however, that the
ADDITION OF SACCHRIN TO FOOD as a substitute for cane
sugar or some other form of sugar MUST BE REGARDED AS
A SUBSTITUTION INVOLVING A REDUCTION IN THE FOOD VALUE
of the sweetened product, and HENCE AS A REDUCTION IN
ITS QUALITY.
[Signed] IRA REMSEN, Cha/irman,
RUSSELL H. CHITTENDEN,
JOHN H. LONG,
CHRISTIAN A. HERTER,
ALONZO E. TAYIOR,
Referee Board of Consulting Scientific Experts."









FOOD INSPECTION DECISION 135.
SACCHARIN IN FOOD.
"At the request of the Secretary of Agriculture, the
Referee Board of Consulting Scientific Experts has con-
ducted an investigation as to the effect on health of the
use of saccharin. The investigation has been concluded,
and the Referee-Board reports that the continued use
of saccharin for a long time in quantities over THREE-
TENTHS OF A GRAJM per day IS LIABLE TO IMPAIR DIGESTION;
and that the addition of saccharin as a substitute for cane
sugar or other forms of sugar-reduces the food value of
the sweetened product, and hence lowers its quality.
"Saccharin has been used as a substitute for sugar in
over thirty classes of foods in which sugar is commonly
recognized as a normal and valuable ingredient. If the
use of saccharin be continued, it is evident that amounts
of saccharin may readily be consumed which will, through
continual use, PRODUCE DIGESTIVE DISTURBANCES. In every
food in which saccharin is used some other sweetening
agent known to be harmless to health can be substituted,
and THERE IS NOT EVEN A PRETENSE THAT SACCHARIN IS A
NECESSITY in the MANUFACTURE OF FOOD PRODUCTS. Under
the food and drugs act articles of food are adulterated if
they contain ADDED POISONOUS or other ADDED DELETERIOUS
ingredients WHICH MAY RENDER THEM INJURIOUS TO
HEALTH. Articles of food are also adulterated within the
meaning of the act if substances have been mixed and
packed with the foods so as to reduce or lower or in-
juriously affect their quality or strength. The.findings of
the Referee Board show that SACCHARIN IN FOOD IS SUCH
AN ADDED POISONOUS OR OTHER ADDED DELETERIOUS INGRED-
IENT as is contemplated by the act, and also that the sub-
stitution of saccharin for sugar in foods reduces and
lowers their quality.
"The Secretary of Agriculture, therefore, WILL REGARD
AS ADULTERATED under the food and drugs act FOODS CON-
TAINING SACCHARIN which, on and after July 1, 1911, are
manufactured or offered for sale in the District of Co-
lumbia or the Territories,' or shipped in interstate or
foreign commerce, or offered for importation into the
United tSates.
FRANKLIN MACVEAGH, Secretary of the Treasury.
JAMES WILSON, Secretary of A1,lroiualtni,.
CHARLES NAGEL, Secretary of Commerce and Labor."
WASHINGTON, D. C., April 26, 1911.











t BRIEFS SUBMITTED BY THE BUREAU OF
CHEMISTRY.


STATEMEaNT BY H.W. WI uY, CHIEr.

December 6, 1911.
The Secretary of Agriculture. r
Sir: In response to your request for a; review of the
statements made beforee the three Secretaries in, regard to
validating the tse of saccharin I beg to inform you thai
I. have asked Dr. Bigelow and Dr. Kebler to prepare briefs
o'6this subject. These briefs are appended'
My own opinion in this matter has -ever changed.
Saccharij-is in its name afraud and to the, great majority
of people in this country it means sugar. For this reason
.alone, if there were no-other, it should be barred from the
foods of the country. Saccharin is always used for the
purpose of fraud and deception and conceals inferiority
bylproducing in a food product a sweet t nte not due to
sugar, which 'naturally produces this tdste. For this
reason it is clearly to be excluded from *,oods under the
food and drugs act. Saccharin, too, is i undoubtedly a
substance which of necessity must be injurious to health.
In addition to-the material summarized by Dr. Bige-
low and to the opinion of the Referee Board, I beg to
call your attention particularly to one of the statements
in Dr. Folin's paper, i. e., THAT SACCHARIN WAS EXCRBTOD
FROM TNESKIDNEYS UNCHANGED. THE CONtrINUID POURING
OF A FOREIGN BODY OF THIS KIND, WHICHr MUST HAVBVERY
ACTIVE.PROPCRTIES, THROUGH THE DELI.CAIT1 CEIL OF THE
KIDNEY t CAN NOT -.'AIL IN TIME -TO PRODUCE SERIOUS DIS-
TURBANCES OF FUNCTION AND EVEN FATAI DISEASE. That
'andd the other'reasons which have been so ably presented
by many authorities are sufficient to convince me beyond
any reasonable doubt that the use of saccharin in,any
quantity is necessarily injurious.
The argument that it may be used in. mall quantities
ii the el1d, familiar one which adulterators and those
who seek to adulterate have used from th6 very beginning











of things. If we admit ,one injurious substance in small
quantities we cannot with any justice exclude any other.
If this principle is acted up6n and becomes valid by au-
thority of law we cannot with any consistency object to
any small quantity of borax, benzoate of soda, benzalde-
hyde, formaldehyde, sulphate of copper, salicylic acid, or-
coal-tar dyes, or any other of the deleterious bodies which
the debasers of food have used and are using today. The
argument of small quantities has absolutely no ethical,
logical, or legal foundation and is most dangerous. The
result of admitting the justice of this argument and act-'
ing thereon would be to validate under the high authority
of the law the use 9f small quantities of dangerous and
threatening substances and thus intrench the practice of
adulteration firmly under the protection of the law. To
more dangerous concession to the interests seeking to
debase and adulterate and misbrand food products could
be made.

It is with earnest feelings as to the correctness of my
demand that I urge upon yon and the other Secretaries
as strongly as I can the importance of refusing in any
way to condone the use of saccharin in foods after the
period which has already been fixed, i. e., January 1,
1912.

In the hope and the expectation that this will be the
final action of the three Secretaries, I am,

Respectfully, [Signed] H. W. WILna,
Ohief.
From Brief of Dr. W. B. Bigelow, Assistant Chief, and
Chief Division of Foods:

"The counsel for the manufacturersasay that invalids
and CHII4~pB consume less food THAN NORMAL ADULTS and
hence, even if 0.01 per cent. of saccharin were added to
all food, they would consume less saccahrin than the
amount given above. In this connection it must be borne
in mind that WHILE INVALIDS AND CHILDREN CONSUME LESS
FOOD they are likely to CONSUME MORyBWEETENED FOOD
THAN NORMAL ADULTS/ aSd THEY ARE ALSO MUCH MORE
SUSCEPTIsBL TO THI'TOXIC BEFHEBTS O SACCHARIN."










It will be conceded that soft, or sweetened drinks, ice
-cream and similar sweetened foods, are most largely used
by children and young people, whose craving for sweets is
a natural demand by their growing bodies, which is satis-
fled only by sugar; and is not provided by saccharin, a
drug having no food value.

United States Dispensatory, Twentieth Edi-
tion: "Saccharin (Benzosulphinidum.) It has a
slight local irritant action, and, according to
the6-eferee Board of the U. S. Bureau of Chem-
istry, doses of more than 0.3 gram per day are
liable, if used. over periods of time, to impair
digestion."

Materia.Medica Pharmacy and Therapeutics,
Potter, Tenth Edition: "Benzosulphinide (Sac-
charin.)-It is used as a substitute for sugar in
the food of diabetics -and subjects of hepatic
disease'&iid corpulence; also to cover the taste
of nauseous drugiand as an internal antiseptic
in cases of cystitis with decomposing urine."

Practical Therapeutics, Hare, Sixteenth Edi-
tion: "Saccliarin Physiological Action-Upon
the circulation and similar vital functions sac-
cahrin has no effect, but Plugge has proved it to
retard the action of all the digestive ferments,
and to be in consequence not devoid of evil effect
on diabetics whose digestion is impaired."

Modern Materia Medica and Therapeutics,
Stevens, Fifth Edition: "Bentosulphinidum (Sac-
cahrin is chiefly useful as a-substitute for sugar
when the latter is contraindicated,'as in diabetes
mellitus. UTed too freely, it has a retarding in-
fluence on digestion and general metabolism."

S Medical Ohemistgy and Toxicolog, Holland, -
Second Edition: "Saccahrin-Toxicology. It re-
tards the action of the enzymes in the digestive -
fluids and also those of the blood and tissues. To
a certain extent it depresses general metabolism."











The preceding quotations from modern mtkorities"
should convince the most sceptical that saccharia, a
most potent drug, an antiseptic, a preser1ative or anti-
ferment, in other words an antidigestive, is not only a
fraud under the Food and Drug Lamw as it is no1 a
food, but also that it is used as a substitute-for sugar,
-one of theM most valuable, if not the most valuable, food
known.

It is used principally by invalids, children and young
people, who by nature are fond of sugar, a natural crav-
ing of the body for the necessary carbohydrates to pro'
mbte the normal growth of the body and repair the waste
of the invalid weakened, or childhoods intense bodily
activity.

It is to be hoped that parents and guardians of chil-
dren, physicians and nurses, will demand fitheir State
and national officers, legislative, administrative and ju-
dicial- a strict enforcement of the law prohibiting the
sale of adulterated, poisonous sor deleterious foods .
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.

- -


6-SUa









82


NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT QCT.
1, 1920, FERTILIZER MATERIALS..



AMMoNIATBs.

Ammonia, sulph., bulk, f. o. b. works...
.... ...... ...... ..... er 100 lbs 5.5( 5.60
double bags, f. a. s. New York... ... 5.80 @ 8.95
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia and
14 p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. fac-
tories ............. ..........7.50 & 10
wet, acidulated, 6,p. c. ammonia, 3 p. c.
phosphoric acid, f. o. b. fish factory,
if made ......... ....... ...... 6.50 &. 50
Ground fish scrap, 11 to 12 p. c. ammonia,
15 p. c. B. P. L., f. o. b. fish factory,
ton .... ....................... ..100.00 @ -
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. Chicago,
ground ......................... 7.00 & 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ........................ 7.00 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ......... ............... 7.00 & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago, 14
to 15 p. c .................... .... 7.00 @ 7.25
blood, f. o. b. Chicago ........... 7.50 @ 7.75
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago.per ton 16:00 @ -
Hoofmeal, f; o. b. Chicago. '..... .% unit 6.75 @ 7.25
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York .............. ........ 7.50 @ 7.75
Tankage, New York ,................ 7.00 & 10
Nitrate of soda........ .per 100 lbs. 3.M0 @ 3.55
futures ........................ 3.65 ( 3.75
Cottonseed meal, 7 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
mill ... ........... ....per ton 45.00 to 45.50









83


PHOSPHRATES.

Acid phosphate, basis 16%, bulk. .per ton 21.00 @ -
Southern ports .................. 21.50 @
Bones, rough, hard .................... 30.00 @ 32.00
-soft steamed, unground .... ........ 38.00. @ 40.00
ground, steamed, 14 p. c, ammonia
and 50 p. c. bone phosphate...... 40.00 @ 45.00
do., 3 and 50 p. c .............. 45.00 @ 50.00
raw, ground, 4\p. c. ammonia and 50
p. c. bone phosphate........... 60.00 @ ,62.50
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c. f. o. b. mines ................ 10.75 @ 11.25
Florida land pebble-phosphate rocky 75 p.
c., f. o. b. mines............. 11.50 @ 12.00
Florida, land pebble phosphate rock,, 77
p. c., f. o. b. mines. ............. 13.50 @ 14.00
Florida high-grade phosphate hard rock,
77 p. c., f; o. b. mines.......... ...... 14.50 @ 15.500
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c...
......................per ton 15.00 @ 15.50
75 p. c ............per ton, 2,240 lbs. 11.00 @ 12:00
70 p. c. ground .................. 10.50 @ 11.00
unground .................... 9.00 @ 10.00
POTASHE'.
American fertilizer, potash, in paper-lined
cars, f.-o. b. works..........per unit 2.25 .@ 2.30.
Muriate of potash, 80@85 per cent. K. C.
L., bags ...................per unit 2.40 @ -
Muriate of potash, min., 90@95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags........... 2.40 @ -
Muriate of potash, min. 98 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags............... Nominal
Sulphate of potash, 90@95 per fent., basis
90 per cent., in bags........per unit 3.00 @ -
First sorts potashes. ............ per lb. 15 @ 17








84
:. "i _. -

MARKET PRICES OE CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS. AT FPIORIDA SEAPORTS,
OCT. 1, 12r0-

?iMPosmTION

IIEBRIAL


Inv 75 9 -0


Dissolved bowe black. f16
High grade acid phos-
phate ......... .;I 6 6
bow grade acid phos-
phate ............ 14
SHardwood ashes..... ....
Hardwood ashes.... ....
Domestic potash,.........
-Nebraska potash.... .....
Sulphate of potash.... ......
Manure salt......... ...
Kainit ............ ......
Nitrate' of potash..... .....
Shrimp scrap......... 7,
- Cotton seed meal..... 2.5]
Sheep manure... ..,.. 2
SGoat manure........ 1
Ground tobacco stems. ....
Steamed bone meal... 8
Raw bone meal...... 5
SLow grade tankage... 4
Medium grade tankage 3
High grade tankage.. 1.5]
Dried blood......... ......
Dried blood......... ....
Nitrate-of soda....... .....
Sulphate of ammonia. ......
- Castor meal ............


.. ...










14
17
8
7
3..5






.. w .


3

25
281
50
20.
12
15
1
1.5
3.5
3
8


.,''....

*. . ***,

*. .. *


...... $34.00

...... 28.80

23.50
..... 1.00
..... 28.00

...... 98,00
......180.00
...... 70.00
... 45.00
18 130.00
4 75.00
7 78.00
2.2 40.00
1.5 35.00
3 66.00
3 65.00
4.5 70.00
6.5 78.00
8 92.00
10 110.00
14 157.00
16 164.00
18 95.00
25 137.00
6.5 70.00


Terms: 30 days net, or 5% discount for cash in 10 days.
SThe charges by reputable- manufacturers for mixing
and bagging any special or regular formula are $8.50 per
ton in excss of above prices.-


Lill. .....








85

STATE VALUATIONS

(Based on commercial value Oct. 1, 1920, at Florida
factories inton lots for cash, f. o. b.)
Available Phosphoric Acid............ 9c a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. ... .. 2c a pound
Ainmonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). 38e a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20)........ 18c a pound

If calculated by units:

Available Phosphoric. Acid .............. $1.80 per, unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. 0.40 per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen).. 7.60 per unit
Potash .............................. 3.60 per unit'

With a uniform allowance of $3.50 per ton for mixing and
bagging.

A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a'ton. Wt
find this to be the easiest and quickest Tmethod for caleu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.. 6.22 per cent x $1.80 = $11.20
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid..1.50 per cent x 0.40 0.60
Ammonia .......... ...... 3.42 per cent-E. 7.60 25.99
Potash ................. 3.23 per cent x 3.60 11.63
Mixing and bagging.......................... 3.50

Commercial value at seaports............. $52.92
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid...8 per cent x $1.80-$ 14.40
Ammonih ............. .2 -per cent x 7.690- 15.20
Potash .....................2 per cent x 3.60 7.20
Mixing and bagging........................ 3.50

Commercial value at seaports.............. $40.80

The valuations and market prices in precedingillustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.








86' I
8TATE VAUES.
SIt- is not, intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactui-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stgk feed-at-the
date of-issuing a Bulletin, othe:opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or de-
clige.
They aye compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked, ."What is Smith's-
Fruit and Vine worth per ton ?" Such a.question cannot
he answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
'available phosphoric acid and potash rmay be, determined
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
materials to compound al ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to upe in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Floridaseaports.
These price lists -published in 'this. report, with the
i"StAte values," Oct. 1, 1920, are nqminal.










FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.
^- /
To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by... ......... 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by.......... .. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by...... ..... 1.214
Nitrate of soda intd nitrogen, multiply by........ 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by....... ...... 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into :actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by. 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by. ... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply.. 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply.. 1.466
COlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (,20) by.. 2.83

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. nitrate of soda, and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent; by 0.1647; you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiva. -
lent t., then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214, and you
get 18.90 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent, carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K2O).








88 -

AVEARAGE -COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDITN
STUFFS.



NAMEE OF FEED.



Maiden CaneHay..... 28.60 .11.60 42.40 21.0 4.20

Natal Grass Hay.... 36.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00

Para Grass Hay ..... 31.20 8.00 4570 1.60 .6.20

Rhodes Qirass Hay..;. 41.10 7.70 86.80 1.30 6.60

Beg rweedH'ay. .. 21.60 35.10 4.10 4.0a

Kudzu-Vine Hay ..... 32.30 15.90 '33.00 1.60( .6.80

Cow Pea Hay......... 20.60 13.00 45.90 4.20 7.50

Velvet Bean Hay..... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70

Velvet -Beans .....;.,.. 7.00 21.00 53.10 5.40 3.60

Velvet- Bean Hulls... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30

Velvet Beans and Hulls 10.70 19.40 50.60 4.50 3.50,

Cow Peas....A..,. 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.20

Soy Bean Meal. ..... 4.50 -48.4O 27.50 6.40 .40

Peanut Vine Meal. .... 2960 9.90 38.40 6.80 6.8

Cotton Seed. ........ 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 8.50

Cotton Seed Hlla.. 44.40 4.00 38.0 2.00 $ .

Bright Cotton s'd Meal .46 8n.S 7,S89 8.










AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS-(Costinued).


NAME OF FEED. I S -I



fark Cotton Seed Meal 20.00 23.15 37.10 6.50 5.00

Corn Grain............ 2.10 10.50 6-9.60 5.40 1.50

Corn Meal. .......... 1.90 9.70 68.70 ~380 1.40-

Hominy Feed......... 4.00 10.50 65.30 7.80 2.60

Corn and Cob Meal.... 5.80 7.50 70.80 3.10 1.20

Ground Corn Shucks.. 30.20 2.80 54.60 0.60 -190
Ground Corn Cobs.... 30.00 3.00 56.60 0.70 1.60
Equal parts, Corn in
Shucks & V'lv't Beans 16.03 12.56 53.71 2.32 4.33

Oats (grai) ...... .... 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.00 8,00

Rice (grain) ....... .. 0.0 7.40 79.20 0.40 0.40

Rice Bran............ 9.50 12.10 49.90 8.80 10.00
Wheat -(grain) ....... 1.80 11.90 71.90 2.10 1.80

Wheat Bran.... ...... 9.00 15.40 53.90 4'.00 -5.80

Wheat Middlings .... 5.40 15.40 59.40 4.10 3.20

Wheat Mixed Feed,.. 7.80 16.90 54.40 4.80 530

What Ship Stuff..... 5.60 14.60 59.80 5.00 3.70

Dry Jap Sugar Cane.. 26.20 2.30 62.60 1.50 2.80











vSTUFFS-(Cotitinubed).



NAMB OF ION DD. "



Peanut ulls .... 56.60 7.30 18:90 2.60 5.50

Peanut, with Hulls. 16.40 20.40 16.40 36.2 4.10

Peanut Kernel .... 2.60 26.40 17.50 44.90 2.20

Peanut Meal (with-
out fulls) ...... 5.10 47.60 23.70 8.00 .490

Peanut Feed (in-
S luding Hulls)... 23.40 28.40 27.00 11.00 5.50










COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF.FEED
STUFF FOR 1920.

For the season 1920 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to'purchasers, quotation Oct. 1st.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values, the price qf corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:
$3.25 per sack of 100 lbs., $1.82 per bu., 56 lbs.
To find-the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20, pounds (1%) of a ton.
Protein, 6.8e per pound.......... ......... $1.36 per unit
Starch and sugar, 3.1e per -pound........ .62 per unit
Fat, :6.8e per pound.................. 1.36 per unit

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

Corn and Oats, Equal Parts;
Protein ........................ 11.15 x 1.36, $15.16
Starch and Sugar.............. 64.65 x .62, 40.08
Fat ......................... 5.20 x 1.36, 7.07

State value, per ton................. ... $62.31
EXAMPLE NO. 2:
Corn I
Protein .......................10.50 x1.36, $14.28
Starch and Sugar...............69.60 x .62,, 43.15
Fat ............................ 5.40 x 1.36,' 7.84

State value, per ton..................... 64.7T









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
ER. ROSE, State ChenUiit SPECIAL FERTILBAZR ANALYSES, 1920. GORDON HART, Assista t ChemiSt.
Samples Tagen by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


PhospborlcAcid.

4 . '!ORWHIOMi=NT.
NAME, OR BRAND. .06
0~ go
f ~ a
.4_


Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 5 ................
Commercial Fertilizer .........

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ......................
Fertilizer No. 21131 ............

*Fertiliser ..........'........
FtiL r .....................


2.30 13100

8.15 15.50

6.40 14.35

1.87 10.25
1.90 9.25


0.65 11.32

2.00 .655


4.55 4.1 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

4.23 4.92 Manatee Fruit Co, Palmetto.

3.96 3.06 Lake' Nursery Co.; Leesburg.

-4.18 5.16 S. B. Hull, Oakland.

4.32 5.00G. E. Nolan, Orlando.

..... ...... Borax 0.026 %, C. M. Berry, Sanford.
I-
4.82 3.58j. F. Jfuxtable, Orlando.
3.41 10.88 Standard Growers' b Fxehal i, gi t
My*..








mlood *-eo and PqNtk..,.....
Fertilizer No. 6................

Fertilizer ........... ..".
Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................
Fertilizer ......................

Castor Pomace ................

Mixed Fertilizer ..............
SMixed Fertilizer No. 1 .......
Tankage No. 2.................


87 18.11
888 8.10
5869 8.35
5370 8.42
5871 q.72
5372 6.75

537313.67
5374 .6.90
5375 7.90

5376 11.22
531712.02


1 .65S


0.76 9.\70 2.40 2.236ThI9 Oi dyi Mites.
4.85 15.50 3.58 2.82lManatee Fruit Co., Plmot. /
1.20 9.30 3.05 4.52 Mrs. I. M. 'Starke, Beresfoir.

2.32 10.62 4.20 3.78 A. D. Symonds, Orlando.
7.50,15.92 3.30 5.28 Anderson & Wilson, Oriando.
1.07 101.00 2.40 5.22 A. C. Cecil, Orlando.

6.17 14.62 4 05 40,SO ocaee Fruit Co., iocatee.

0.05 0.55 6.35 1.04. J. J. Bolly, Sanford.

1.70 9.17 3.92 3.14 Tropical. Vegetable Co., Sa.nord.
1.25 6.70 5.87 4.54 Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

.75 8.40' 9.44..... Joseph Cameron, Sanford;









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
rERTILIZER SEgTION,
R. 3 ROSE, State Chemist OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1920.' 6RDON HART, Assistant Chemist
Samples Taken by Inspectors Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1901.
Deficiencies greater than 0.20% are distinguished by Black Face Type.

Phosphoric Acid.
'd- BY WHOM AND -
NAME, OR BRAND. o WHERE
.Z -.0 MANUFACTURED.
41 4
Cd 1 0


Exchange Special Fruit Mixture 2594 Guaranteed 10.00
SFound..... 1'3.22

No Brand .................... 2596 Guaranteed 18.00
Foun d.. .2 .12

Strawberry 3% Special ........ 2596Guaranteed 5.00
SFound..... 10.85

Good Cotton. Seed Meal ........ 397 Guaranteed .....
I Found...'. 8.12
I -I I i


8.00 1.00..... 4.00 2.00 Exchange Suipply Co.,
9.10 3.00 12.10 4.12 3.361 Tnmpa, Fla,,.
9.00 0.50 ..... 2.00 3.0 s-.vannah G.uno Co., S.a-
2 -0.95 10.15 -2-.80-vanhiah, Ga.
6.00 1.75 .... 4.00 3.00 0. Painter Fertilizer
6.88 2.57 9.45 4.15 3.1 C., Jacksonville, Fla.

.... .... .... 7.00 ... ..entral- Cott.n Oil Co., Ma-
... .... ..... ... con,: Ga.


_









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY,
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1920. E. PECK GREENE, Asst Chemist
Samples Taken by State Chemist andState Inspectors Under Sections 1, 2 and 13, Act Appraved May 24; IH.
Deficlncies Greaterthan 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND,



Over the Top Horse and Mule
Feed ............. ...........

Unkle Pat Horse Feed ........

Tip Top Molasses Feed ........

Big Bill Horse and Mule Feed..

Just Dairy Feed .............

Sho-Me Horse and Mule Feed..


I, ... .
I -



3093 Guaranteed 15.00 10.00 50.00
Found..... 13.68 9.87 47.79

3094 Guaranteed 12.00 9.00 59.00
Found..... 13.06 9.06 52.46

3095 Guaranteed 15.00 9.00 55.00
Found..... 17.42 10.39 51.13

3096 Guaranteed 6.:00 10.00 55.00
Found.....13.72 10.52 52.67

3097 Guaranteed 12.00 24.00 42.00
Found.. ..10.92 24.44 40.671

3098 Guaranteed 15.00 9.00 45.00!
Found..... 13.19 9.205 ,57B0


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURERS.
d U__________


2.50 ...:..
2.61 9.55

2.00 ......
2.16"- 6.48

2.00 ......
1.88 7.34

2.50 ......
2.08 7.21

4.30 ......


2.00 ......
1.641 6.35


South deorgia Millina Co.,
Valdosta,, Ga

Aunt Patsy Poultry Feed
Co., Memphis, T.enn.
National Milling Co., Macon,
Ga.

The Hammond Co., Inc.,
Lauriniburg, N. C ..

Just Mills, Nadhville, Tenn.

Excello Feed Milling Co.,4
SSt. Josepi, Mo.


I


I









OFFICIAL FEED STUFF A NALY6E, 1920.-GCmatthed.


NAMX0, OR BRAND.


1horto Mixed Peed ............ 109

globe Cornm Gluten Feed....,.. 3100

Fourex airy Ration.......... 3101

Cotton Seed e(al .. .......... 3102

krak A. Jakf Horse Feed ..4...3103

Mim Sweet Feed...... ....... 104

l-Fd6 -orse e .ed ............ 8106

Dandy Special Horse and 'Mule 8106
Feed ....................


i,a
ii


Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found ....

guaranteed|
Found....

Fomad.....

Guprenteed

Guaranteed
Found.....


4 -,


13.00
14.39

23.00
29.84

20.00
21.20

36.00
38.56

'10.00
9.27

5.25
9,.42

1-.00
11.05

9.50
10.00


64.4t7

51.00
44.84

52.00
46.36

27.00
28.39

55.00
57.00

50.00
59.64

59.00
'P7.8f
5`.00
,61.26


2.25
-2.47

1.00
3.77
.i




2.00
2.22

2.006
1.70

2.Q0
2184

2.50
2.161


NAME AND ADDRESS OF /
AANUFACTURIR.


.. Cohen's Auotion Reuse,
2.10 Jacksonville, Fla.

....Corn Producs, Refining Co.,
6.60 New York; N. Y.

...... The Ubko Milling Co., Cin-
6.77 cinpati, O.

aylor Commission Co., At-
"6.B0 -Zlats P&
....., The Superior Foad Cq.,
5.15 Memphis, Tenn .

..... The Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
4.85 Memphis; Tenn.

".. G. .Patteson f C.., MMe
5.40' ''phis, Tenn.

.... e Ti:a mmond Co., Laurin-
9.45 burg, N. G. ,
*:< ^,, ^ .


1'


_ L ~ ~


t -








iAJ1.grax R. & M. Kie ......... 21Q7jGuarteed15.00 9. 60.00 1. 0 .... Altocoru ]Aiing TCo., 9 t
F ~ 12.7, 10.06 47.17 2.07 9.211 St. Louis, Ill.
Gotten good Meal.........*eara 2.a1 ge. 0 0 00.oo0 6: ...... The New Orlovan Ex;port
Found ....8.5536.5-1 1.07 40Go., Say.s ~ Ga.







DEPARTMENT dF AGRICULTURE- DIVISION OF CHEIISiTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. -iL SECTI6N. EI. TCASLER, AssL Chemist.
SPECIAL GASOLINE ANALYSIS, 1920.
Samples Taken by Citizens Under Act Approved June '4th,' 1919.
Deficiencies Below Standard Are Distinguished by Black Face Type.

.0 *s^ sP s( ') '
SE ,. = I NAME OF MANUFACTURER
w H SENT IN BY AND PLACE TAKEN
'. jO a0 ,Q z

Florida JNot Not
S tdard I.... Aboe 20 50 90 95 Above
,( Ad noted __ 60 225 ;.';.,
3 Gasoline i9.3 55 33 '64 .91 97 22 Gulf Refning Co. Gulf Refining Co., .acksonville.
4 Gasoline 59.1 56 31. ,63 91 97 2$7 | Gulf Rfining Co. Gulf Refijnng Co., JackoTville.
5 Gasoline 58.6 57 37 7, '93 97 224 Gulf Refin.ig Co. Gulf Refining Co., Oilando.,
6 Gasolfahe 59.3 ,57 37 70 92.5 97 223 Gulf Refining Co. Gulf Refining Co., Orlando.
7 Gasoline 61.2 50 32. 68 ,90 96 224 Sherrill Oil Co... Island Refining Co., Pensacola.
8 Gasoline 61.4 54 33 64 91 97 223 Island Rfin'g Co. Island Refining Co., New Orleahs, La.
S9 Gasoline 59.8 51 32 68 93.5 97 214 Gulf Refining Co. Gulr ReflningCo., Jacksonville.








DEPARTMENT OF ACRICULTURE--DIVISION OF' CHEMISTRY
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. 01. S(ECTION. E. T. CASLER, Asst. Chemist.
OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920
Samples Taken by State Inspectors Under Act Approved June 4th, 1919.
Deficiencies Below Standard Are. Distinguished by Black Face Type.


0 SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
0 qS INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN



Florida Not Not .
Standard Above 20 50 90 95 Above
SAdoptd 60N 225 _

767 Gasoline[ 57.9 51 ] 26 58.5 91' 97 224 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Macclenny.
768 Gasoline 57,9 52 23.5 56, 90 97 225 1E. M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Macclenny.
769 Gasoline 58.0 53 23 56 90. 97 225 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co:, Macclenny.
770 Gasoline 57.9 50 26 58 91 97 224 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Macclenny.
771 Gasoline 59.4 53 37 72 94 97 218 E. M. Johns.... The Texas Co. Macclenhy.
772 Gasoline 57.9 53 23 56 90 97 223 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co. Macclenny.
772 Gasoline 59:1 54 35 70 93 / 97 221 W. S. McLin.... Standard Oil Co., Jasper.









i/- OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920-Continued.
J s ,


*oo
~. *fQ
-"~,ILO
j RPbd$;IE


V
0

I..
8^


SENT IN BY
INSPECTOR


NAME OF MANUFACTURER
AND' PLACE TAKEN


i'orido-r I -
Standard Not Not
Adopted Above 20 50 90 95 Abo,
60 0 225


62.

52

54
53

48

52

51

51

52


26

33

37.6

39

42
25

26
26

25


so
93

93.5

94-
93

91

91

90

90


223

216

217

'218

219

i2ss

222

226
225
t225 1


W S. S McLi.... Standard Oil CO., Live Oak.

W. S. McLin.... Gulf Refining Co., Live Oak.

W. S. McIAn... The Texas Co., Live Oak.

W. S. McLin.... The Texas Co., Tallahassee.

W. S. McLin.... Gulf Refining Co., Tallahassee.

E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Alachua. .

E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Alochua.

B. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., High Springs.

E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., High SprinW.


0 U


a


,774

775

776

777

778

779

780

781

782


Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline


r ,




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