• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of Florida
 Part I
 Part II. Crop report
 Part III. Rules and regulations,...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00056
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00056
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Part II. Crop report
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Part III. Rules and regulations, and analyses
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
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        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
Full Text






Volume 30 / Number 3



FLORIDA

/QUARTERLY


BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


JULY 1, 1920


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE FLA.

PART I-Biography of H. 8. Elliot, Deceased June 24, 1920.
Some Principal Fibre Bearing Plants of Florida. Live
Stock-Outbreaks of Cholera by Counties from July 1,
1919 to June 30, 1920. Number Hogs Treated by Months,
Same Period; Tick Eradication. Destroy the Rats.
Federal Forecast of Wheat and Corn Production Shows
Increase.
PART II--Crop Reports.
PART III-Rules and Regulations, Analyses.
Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee. Florida, as second-rlass
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.
"Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for
in Section 1108, Act of October 8, 1917, authorized Sept. 11, 1918."
Experiment Station. fr oye w St I uMIsn#C TI
T. J. APPLBtARD, STATM PRINTER
TALLAHAnBBBE FLORIDA.
^ ^ .^




























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PART I


Biography of H. S. Elliot, Deceased June 24, 1920.
Some Principal Fibre Bearing Plants' of Florida.
Live Stock-Outbreaks of Cholera by Counties
from July 1, 1919 to June 30, 1920. Number
Hogs Treated by Months, Same Period;
Tick Eradication. Destroy the Rats. Fed-
eral Forcasts of Wheat and Corn Production
Shows Increase.


.7, *'. a.-. *' -_..












TO THE READERS OF THE QUARTERLY
BULLETIN:


On account of the death of my Chief Clerk, Mr. H. S.
Elliot, who was also Chief Clerk of the Division of Agri-
culture and Immigration, and who was entrusted with
the work of getting out the Quarterly Bulletin, this issue
of the Bulletin will appear a few days late.
I am sure the readers of the Quarterly Bulletin will
overlook this under this condition, and we hope to have
it appear on time at the end of the ensuing quarter.
Very respectfully,
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.



H. S. ELLIOT.

The Department of Agriculture announces with sor-
row the death, on June 24th, 1920, of Mr. H. S. Elliot,
who had long been associated with this Department as
its Chief Clerk.
In view of the long, faithful and efficient service ren-
dered, and the influence exerted in shaping and in de-
veloping the work of the Agricultural Department by
Mr. Elliot, the Department deems it appropriate and fit-
ting that a short sketc* be given of his life and his work
with the Department, and also in some small but earnest
way pay tribute to the splendid service rendered to the
people of this State by a devoted, unselfish worker and
profound believer in a great agricultural Florida.
Henry S. Elliot was born in Nashville, Tenn., Feb-
ruary 22, 1848. The greater part of his boyhood was
spent on the home farm in Green County, Tennessee. He
attended Colonel Lee's School at Asheville, N. C., -where
he was at the outbreak of the Civil War. The young lad,
together with others, ran away from school in 1862 and
joined the forces of the Confederacy. He saw active
service under Jackson and Lee in the battles of the
Wilderness, of Seven Pines, of Spottsylvania, and was
with Lee's forces at the close of the war.


'A ...\.


~~u.i.rraurnii.lrril I..~., .i..u,










School was resumed after the war, and in 1868 Mr.
Elliot developed the usual wanderlust of young m'an-
hood and traveled through the extreme north section of
the United States and through Eastern Canada. In 1869
he went to Savannah and became connected with the
drug business in that city. He came to Florida with his
parents and brothers and sisters in 1872. The journey
was made to Florida by private conveyance, driving
through by way of King's Ferry on the St. Mary's River.
The family established themselves at Gainesville, Fla..
As a young man Mr. Elliot traveled over practically the'
entire State, making numerous journeys with horse and
buggy or on horseback. In this way he became familiar,
at first hand, with the agricultural, topographical, geo-
logical and other characteristics of the State. He was
well versed in the principles of Geology and was an ex-
pert in quick and accurate classificatioil of soils. His
memory for places, dates and circumstances was remark-
able, and it was'largely these traits and talents, together
with his deep interest in the agricultural welfare of his
chosen State, that became of such great value in his
work for Florida at a later time.
In 1876 Mr. Elliot was parried to Miss Sallie Cotten,
of Tallahassee, and thereafter made Tallahassee his
home.
*Early in 1889 Mr. Elliot became connected with that
branch of. the State Government which is now known as
the Department of Agriculture, but was then the De-
partment of Lahds and Immigrafton. Immediately upon
taking up his work he realized the necessity of expand-
ing and broadening the Department in order that it
could become of real service in developing the agricul-
tural resources of the State. He prepared the bill, which
was promptly enacted into law by the Legislature, creat-
ing the Department of Agriculture, creating the office of
State Chemist as a branch of and under the direction
of the Department of Agriculture, and the Bureau of
Immigration, also.under the direction of this Depart-
ment, By this law the administration of the Depart-
ment was vested in the Commissioner of Agriculture.
'The powers and duties of the Department were greatly
broadened and enlarged, with ample provision for hand-
ling the many branches and the extensive work of that








7

Department of the State Government having to do with
the most important and essential industry of the State
and of the Nation-agriculture.
Mr. Elliot was peculiarly fitted by training and study
for the work which he performed. He had a broad
knowledge of the manifold aspects of the practical side
of the subject, and was an authority on the economic
questions and considerations affecting the welfare of
agricultural pursuits. As a statistician and compiler of
agricultural data, and in forecasting crop conditions
and yields, his work was of great value and was accu-
rate and trustworthy. Another characteristic which
may be mentioned, because developed in a remarkable
degree and as bearing in another, way upon the subject
of agriculture, was his ability for observing and inter-
preting signs of the weather and of accurately forecast-
ing weather conditions.
The work done by Mr. Elliot in his more than thirty
years of service for Florida is of lasting value to the
people of this State. His reward is the reward of service
well performed. In his death the State loses a valuable
citizen, a devoted worker for its welfare, a firm believer
in the great possibilities of Florida, and a man of the
old type, not now common to our present time.




SOME PRINCIPAL FIBRE-BEARING PLANTS OF
FLORIDA.

The fire-bearing plants capable of successful and profit-
able cultivation in this State are in great variety, com-
prising practically, if not quite, all the fibres (or an
equally good substitute for them) that are imported into
the United States annually. The United States-partic-
ularly the South-is probably the largest consumer of
long fibres in the form of jute, used in handling the cot-
ton crop and its products, of all other countries in the
entire world. It is also the largest consumer of long
fibre in the form of binder twine, used in harvesting and
handling of the grain crops of the country, and in manu-
facture and use of certain kinds of bagging, rope, twine,
etc.











In Florida, climatic conditions, such as temperature,
humidity, regular supply of moisture, and also soil, favor
in the highest degree, the growing of these plants to as
great perfection as that of any country in the world.
This statement is fully confirmed by the unqualified suc-
cess of repeated experiments throughout a period of
sixty-odd years. Indeed, there are many of them that
need no experimenting, their natural and perfect adapta-
bility to soil, climate, and every other condition, being
demonstrated by the unfailing and vigorous growth made
in their wild, uncultivated state.
Following is a list of the fibre plants which thrive in
Florida, with a brief description of them and their uses,
as far as known:

AGAVE SISALANA-SISAL HEMP-HENEQUEN
PLANT.

This is used for the same purpose generally as Ma-
nilla Hemp. The plant is found growing in nearly all
parts of Florida south of the 28th degree of latitude, and
it frequently matures as far north as Jacksonville, and
as far west as the Apatachicola River. As it does not
stand very cold weather, it would not be safe to plant it
commercially north of the line above mentioned. The
plant was, introduced into Florida in the year 1836-37
by Dr. Henry Perrine, who had formerly been United
States Consul at Campeachy. He had obtained a grant
of land from the United States for the purpose of intro-
ducing and experimenting with tropical plants. This
.grant of land -as located a few miles south of Miami,
and is known a the Perrine Grant. He was never able
to carry intojeffect his project, as he was killed by the
Indians in the Indian Key massacre in 1840.
The Agave Sisalana will grow and thrive in nearly all
varieties of Florida soils, but it is generally believed that
the poorer sandy soil is best adapted to the cultivation
of this plant, because of the superiority of the fibre over
that grown on rich soils. The life of the plant in which
it yields profitably is about fifteen years. It is easy of
cultiation and very inexpensive. It has no known ene-
mies, .nd is unaffected by drought or excessive rainfall,
and requires no fertilization.










SANSEVIERIA-BOWSTRING HEMP.

This plant is found growing in nearly all parts of
Florida, principally in gardens, as an ornamental plant.
Its value as a fibre-producing plant is not generally
known. It is commonly recognized as Rattlesnake Lily
or Spotted Lily; makes rapid growth in suitable soil;
spreads rapidly; and completely takes possession of the
soil :in a short time. The plant has been known and
.prized in India from remote antiquity under the name
of Murva. The Sansevieria abounds on the coast of
Guinea, around Ceylon, and the Bay of Bengal, extend-
ing even to the coast of Java and China. The plants are
easily propagated, and grow with ease, practically taking
care of themselves. Of the several varieties, the Sanse-
vieria is the best to cultivate for fibre. The fibre is cap-
able of bping manufactured into anything-from the heav-
iest cordage to the finest fabric for dress goods, and is
considered equal to many of the finest silks in beauty
and fineness of texture. It grows with perfect ease and
success in the same latitude as Sisal Hemp, and can be
grown safely much further north. It is one of the most
valuable of all the fibre-bearing plants, and is thoroughly
adapted to the soil andclimate of Florida.

BROMELIA SYLVESTRIS-WILD. PINEAPPLE.

This plant is -found growing abundantly in Mexico,
Central and South America and the West Indies. It
thrives upon poor, barren, sandy or rocky soils, grows
rapidly, and produces leaves as much as twelve feet in
length. The leaf is identical in shape with the pineapple
leaf. The plant is propagated by suckers, as is the pine-
apple. Except as an experiment it has not been grown
on Florida soil, but it succeeded perfectly. The length of
the fibre makes it very valuable, and of superior strength.
It is much lighter than hemp, and said to possess a
greater average strength by four times than hemp.

PINEAPPLE FIBRE.

Cultivation of the pineapple began in Florida about
fifty years ago on the keys of the East Coast, near Bis-
cayne Bay: Production continued to increase until it hns
become one of the most profitable and important of the


I 9










Florida fruit industries. It is now grown on the keys
and East Coast from Biscayne Bay, north to upper In-
dian River, in Lee, DeSoto and Manatee Counties, the
Lake region of Polk County, in Hillsborough, Orange
and Osceola Counties, and also other parts of South
Florida.
It is generally understood that the leaves of the plant
contain a fine fibre of great value, and is even now being
used in the manufacture of various fabrics. Thousands
of tons of these leaves go to waste every year that could
be utilized for valuable purposes. After the fruit has'been
removed, the leaves of the pineapple are of no value to
the plant, and using them for fibre is utilizing a waste
product for a valuable purpose. In a report by the
United States, we find the following;
"The fibre of the pineapple is very soft and fine, the*
filaments being quite flexible and resistant. In the' Eost
Indies, where the pineapple was introduced .as early as
1600, the fibre is extensively used in the manufacture of
a delicate fabric called pina, as well as for cordage. Pina
is considered to be more delicate in texture than any
other known to the vegetable kingdom."
The fibre is long, exceedingly fine, and of great strength;
the natural color is whitish-blue, or flaxen, but is, sus-
ceptible to dyeing processes. It is also adapted -to the
manufacture of various yarns and webs, and a beautiful
silk-like fabric has been produced therefrom. Undoubt-
edly the pineapple plant could be cultivated for its fibre
alone, but when the value of the fruit is considered, in
addition, at once it becomes most valuable to commerce.
URENA LOBATA-FLORIDA JUTE.
This plant is indigenous to Florida soil and climate,
and is found growing wild and uncultivated in nearly,
every portion of the State. It is commonly known as
"Caesar Weed," and termed by some people "French
Cockle Burr." This plant produces an excellent fibre,
which is found in the bark of the plant, and belongs to
that class known as bast fibres, such as jute, ramie etc.
The fibre is long, firm, soft, nearly white, with a silken
lustre. In the opinion of competent judges, it will make
an excellent substitute for flax. This plant, in common
with many other Florida weeds, grows up in the early
spring and summer months and dies down in the fall. As
a fibre-producing plant it is one of great merit.










BOEHMERIA NIVEA--2AMIE.

This plant was first introduced into the United States
from China about the year 1855. It is said to have been
cultivated in China and Egypt over four thousand years
ago, and that fine fabrics were woven of its fibre at that
time. This fact is proven by the discovery of Egyptian
cerements used in the wrappings of mummies. It has
also been cultivated in Japan, Java, Borneo, Sumatra,
and the East Indies, whence it has been introduced into
other countries during the last century. Ramie is also
known as China grass and Cheva grass, although it is not
a grass. -
For about thirty-five years those interested in, and
engaged in thd textile industries, had been endeavoring
to, find a process by which the plant could be utilized
for factory purposes in this country, instead of having
to rely upon the far East for a supply. Widespread in-
terest was taken in efforts to invent machinery for decor-
tication and processes for degumming. Machinery, at
first thought to be perfect, failed in final tests, but now
the inventor's skill has overcome all difficulties, and per-
fect working machinery is 'located in a number of places.
The plant is a coarse perennial, producing a great
number of hollow stems, about as thick as the little
finger, and are cut when four or five feet high. Once
established, it grows for twenty years or more, yielding
several crops a year in the most favorable latitudes. It
is propagated from divisions of roots or from rooted
joints of the stems, produced by layering. Five thou-
sand roots will plant an acre. After that the plant
springs up from the roots everywhere. After the second
year no cultivation is needed, and an abundant supply
of young plants is always at hand. A start may be made
with seed. but slips and cuttings, when obtainable, are
to be preferred.
Rich and light sandy loam soil is,best adapted to ramie,
but it also flourishe son alluvial soil. The preparation of
the soil is important. Before planting it should be plowed
to a depth of twelve or fifteen inches, and left fallow
until the herbage turned under has time to decay. The
fertilizing elements needed in addition to, the decaying
vegetation are potash, soda, and phosphates. The plant-
ing can be done from March until the end of October,
but in the hot season care must be taken to mnoisten




k 1 tt ''.,'i *'-r_ 7 '' ^ i- ^ -4 ^ t. a A *' ,;'-'l 51.-,*^"l s -;;-. y t 'c i











the ground well during the first two weeks after planting.
During the first year the plantation must be kept clear
of weeds. The rows should be three feet apart, the
plants needing to be close together in order to produce
straight stalks without any branches.. The stalks grow
from six to ten feet high, fifteen to twenty in a clump,
bearing on the upper portion large leaves, which are
white on the under surface. From the base underground,
runners are sent out a long distance. There is little
chance for weeds after the second year; then cultivation
may cease.
If the land is poor and thin it should be top-fertilized
with muck or ordinary compost, or other nitrogenous
manures, each winter in December or January. It is not
an exhaustive crop and on a good, deep, rich soil, will
thrive many years without manure. The leaves of the
plant contain a large amount of potash and if allowed
to remain on the ground, or turned under, act as a fine
fertilizer. In the Gulf States ramie has been grown
in an experimental way, and in a large variety of soils,
from the light, sandy uplands to the rich, alluvial Lou-
isiana bottom lands. The medium light soils, however,
have given best results. In Florida, where it has been
tested for fifteen years, the medium, light drained up-
Slands have yielded best results; but any good soil that
will produce other crops successfully will also be good
for ramie, if it be-well drained.
The fibre of ramie is very handsome, resembling silk,
and is exceedingly strong. Its strength is twice as great
as flax and hemp. It bears washing better than any other
textile, becoming whiter than hemp or flax. When proper-
ly worked it has the luster of silk to the extent that it is
used for many articles,.such as dresses, fine passemen-
teries, portiers, plush, or as an adulterant in silk manu-
facture, etc. Ramie is more hygienic than flax, hemp,
or cotton," and its use is recommended in hospitals for
dressing wounds.
It does not decay in water, and for this reason is in
great demand wherever resistance to the atmosphere and
water is needed. With ramie, or "vegetable silk" as it
has been called, valuable combinations are being made
with cotton, wool, flax and silk. This fibre will doubt-
less enter largely into wearing apparel of the near future,,
and the growing and manufacture of it may be expected











to take rank among the leading industries of the Southern
States. Especially should it.be so in Florida, where
natural conditions are most favorable and where ramie
is destined some day to become a leading source of
wealth. Now that machinery has been invented for the
perfect extraction of the fibre from the plant, there is
probably no crop that can better be grown, with proper
management, or made more profitable with so small a
cost of labor as ramie.

OTHER FIBRE PLANTS-INDIAN MALLOW.

There are numerous other fibre plants of possibly equal
value, indigenous to this country such as Indian Mallow,
whose bark yields a fine and dark fibre. The plant
grows in almost every yard and stable lot, coming up
spontaneously, and grows vigorously to a height of three
to five feet.
BEAR GRASS.

Bear Grass, one of the palmetto family of plants, sup-
plies a fibre from the long leaf that for fine cordage
or combining in the ipanufacture of ordinary fabrics has
no superior. It grows in immense quantities, in its wild
state almost over the entire State.
AGAVE MEXICANA.
Agave Mexicana, or Century Plant, is of the same fam-
ily of plants as Agave Sisalana, or Sisal Hemp. Its
fibre is in the leaves, like the Sisal Plant, and has to be
extracted and treated in the same manner. The fibre is
coarser than the Sisal and not so valuable, but can be
grown in almost all of the eastern and southern parts of
the State.

SPANISH BAYONET OR YUCCA PALM.
Spanish Bayonet or Yucca Palm is useful for the medi-
cinal properties of its berries as well as for the fibre'of
the leaves, the quality of which almost equals the pine-
apple fibre. The plant grows in great abundance in every
section of the State, and is unaffected by the coldest
temperature known in Florida.









14


Palmeitto (Saw Palnftto) iN a well knwh n ahnt that
grows in eVery sectin of FlMXida, vc'oveing literally mil-
lioun of aices, therefore, pacetially inexhat1itible. 'e
fibre, like th BSpaiish Bayonet, is in the leaf, and i' its
eqiial in quality. This bI also true Of Bear Grass. All
are adapted to the same method of d-ec6ttication, and r'e
said to.yield to treatment easier than Sisal Hemp. The
fibre is da'pted to the nAme purposes as the 4iihapp le and
the other palmettos and in addition has yielded writing
paper,-stationery of finest quality, being equal in every
respect to the Vry best quality o~ linen paper.

OK RA.
Okra, the palatable vegetable made famous in connec-
tion with "gumbo," a favorite dish in the Southern States,
particularly in the Carolihas, Georgia, Florida and the
Gulf Coast country, contains in its bark a fibre of great
strength and firmness.

COTTON.
Cotton, the plant supplying the downy fibre that has
yielded covering for man throughout the civilized world
for centuries, also contains in the plant itself, a fibre
of unusual strength and firmness. This, and the okra
plant have only been experimented with to a limited ex-
tent, but the existence of the fibre, especially in the cot-
ton plant has been known for many years. Extraction
of the fibre is perfectly feasible, and undoubtedly would
be profitable.

PINE LEAVES.
The leaves from the pine trees of the forests furnish a
*fibke that has been used successfully in the manufacture
of course fabrics such as bagging in which 'cotton is
wiapped when baled. Vast quantities of this material go
to waste'every year, which should be 'employed in some
useful piirposte -approximately, sixty million yards of
this material are used every -oyear in wrapping the cot-









15

ton crop alone, and if pine straw will make satisfactory
material for the purpose, it would seem the height of
folly to import jute from India. There is money in this
industry to those who engage in it.
Now.that the necessary machinery for the working up
of these various fibre plants has been invented, and
proven successful, the fbre plants can lie cultivated
profitably by farmers in the section of the State where
the several varieites of the plant are adapted. Prospec-
tive homeseekers, looking for a more congenial clime in
w)dch to prosecute husbandry, have the assurance
that cultivation of fibre plants will not only be found
remunerative but attended with less,difficulty and anxiety
than the crops of a more rigorous latitude, while the man
with capital seeking profitable investment will find in
the fibre industry, unexceptionable inducements for the
investment of his capital. There is no question but that
the business will prove highly remunerative and satis-
factory.











16


LIVE STOQK.

A brief summary, given below, on the work of hog
cholera control will show conclusively that Florida is a
swine-growing State and that our farmers and stockmen
are awake on the question of caring for their hogs.
Outbreaks of Cholera by Counties from July 1.. 1919,
to June 30, 1920:


COUNTY. 44


Suwawnee ....... 1 .1 1 ... .. I. .. .. 1 1 2 1 7
Jefferson ........ 1 2 4 1 . 1 1 .. 2 13
Madison ..... 1 5 3 4 5 2 3 10 42
Santa Rosa ...... 1 3 5 2 1 .. 1 .. 2 1 31
Liberty ......... 1 .. . ........ 1 1 2 2 7
Gadsen ....... .. 4 1 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2 10
Wakulla ...... 2 .. 7 2 .. 2 4 2 19
Leon ............ 13 2 5 2 5 2 8 2 4 49
Baker ........... 1 1 2
Hamilton ........ 4 4 1 7 .. 2.. 20
Duval ............... 2 1 4 6 1 1 5 2 4 9 7 ..42
Columbia 3 1 1 4 1 4 2 3 3 3 1 26
Jackson ......... 9 11 14 9 2 6 6 2 1 6.. 66
Bradford ...... 9 5 2 .. 1 2 1 .. 2 ..28
Polk ............ 2 .. . 2 .. . 1 2 .. . 2 9
Marion .......... 2 3 4 6 3 3 6 3 1 6 4 1 42
Osceola ......... 4 1 .. ... . . .. .. .. .. 5
Hillsboro ........ 1 5 4 3 1 5 .. 12 14 16 7 68
Desoto ....... . . 7 1 11
Holmes ......... 2 .. 1 1 .. 4
Washington ...... 10 14 2 7 2.. 1.... 1 2 .. 39
Alachua ...... ... 1 5 1 1 5 3 6 4 9 2 2 39
Pasco ............ 2 5 9 .. 2 10 7 11 1 .. .. 47
Citrus ........... .. 2 5 12.. 1.. 2 2 1 1 127
umter ......... .. 2 5 2 4 4 2 7 7 1 5 5 44
Pinellas ......... . 2 1 3 ......... ..
Escambia ....... .. 2 6 3 .... 1 2 5 1 20
Lee ........1.... .. 1 .. . . .1 .. .. 2
Nassau .......... .. .. 6 3 .. 3 1 .. .. .. 4 .. 17
Bay ... .. 2 1 2 .. .. .. .. .. .. 5
Hernando ......... 4 1.... 11 1..... 17
LaFayette .......1 3 .. 1 .. .. .. 2 8
Lake ......... 5 39 16 12 22 2 3 .. 1 1 ..101
Orange .......... 2 .. .. 2 .. 1 1 .. 1 2 1 .. 10
Volusia ............ 9 10 2 ... 3 1 1 2 ..
Ley ........... 1 ... ..1. 2
Taylor .......... 2 3 2 1 2 2 1 833
Seminole 1 .. .. .. .. .. 1
Franklin ........ .. .. . .. .. 1 . .. .. ..
Brevard ......... . .. ... .. .. .. .. 2 .. 1 8
Okaloosa ...... . .. .. .. .. 2 2 .
- Putnam ......... -.. .. .. .. . 1 1 ..
St. Johns ....... .... .. ... 2 2.. 4
Walton .......... .. ... _. . . _. .. .. 1 1.
Total ......... 1 93 11611261 97 80 42 58 62 75 70 86 45 95










17


Number of hogs treated. by months, from July 1, 1919,
to June 30, 1920:
iF'ed. Asst. | Pract. I Non- I
Month. Vet. St. Vet. I Vet. Grad. Laymen. Total
July ..... 1,416 4,856 10 374 4,041 10,697
August ..,. 1,162 4,986 427 634 2,619 9,828
September 1,726 3,115 683 391 3,234 9,149
October ... 1,618 5,611 253 242 729 8,458
November :. 746 2,599 96 203 220 3,864
December .. 622 2,783 227 58 54 3,744
January .. 1,601 5,803 523 69 392 8,388
February . 1,390 6,547 209 413 451 9,010
March .... 2,676 9,601 416 1,069 3,893 17,655
April ..... 2,492 9,054 508. 563 4,435 17,052
May ...... 1,601 6,853 340 187 4,254 13,235
June .... 1,4751 7048 307 287 1,799 10,916
Total ... (18,5251 68,8561 3,999 4,490 26,1211 121,991


TICK ERADICATION.


Progress of Tick Eradication in the State of Florida
for the month of June, 1920, through the co-operation of
the State Live Stock Sanitary Board, County Commis-
sioners, farmers, cattlemen and the United State Bureau
df Animal Industry.
PRELIMINARY WORK-VOLUNTARY DIPPING.
Number Vats con- Vats
Cattle structed previously
County. Dipped. this month constructed
Alachua ............... ...... 0 68
Baker ............. ..... .0 8
Bay i............. .... .. .. .0 10
Bradford ................. 0 28
Brevard .............. ...... 0 36
Citrus ............ .. ...... 0 16
Calhoun .................... 0 14
Columbia ................. 0 22
Clay ................ ...... 0 10
DeSoto ............. 13,900 2 92
Flagler .......-........ ..... 0 1
Franklin ................. 0 6
Hamilton ............ 1,195 2 19
Hernando ................ 0 9
Hillsboro ................... 0 76
Holmes ........... 2,000 0 30,
Jackson .......... ........ 0 100
Jefferson ................. 0 10
Lafayette .......... .......0 23
2--Bul.


*1.'''. 4










18

PRELIMINARY WORK-VOLUNTARY DIPPING.
(Continued)
Number Vats con- Vats
Cattle structed previously
County. Dipped. this month constructed
Lake ..................... 0 58
Lee ................ ....... 0 25
Leon ..................... 0 62
Levy ..................... 0 10
Liberty ........... ...... 0 8
Madison ............ ...... 1 20
Manatee ............. ..... 0 21
Marion ............. ,760 2 79
Nassau .................. 0 26
Okaloosa ............ .... O0 1
Okeechobee .......... ...... 0 9
Orange ................... 0 51
Osceola .................. 0 67
Pasco .................... 0 23
Pinellas .................. 0 10
Polk ............... 16,869 0 74
Santa Rosa ................ 0 28
Putnam ........... ...... 0 10
Seminole ........... .... 0 23
St. Johns .................. 0 8
St. Lucie ................. 0 23
Sumter ............ ...... 0 21
Suwanee ............ 5,025 2 30
Taylor ............. ....... 0 21
Volusia. ..................... 0 46
Wakulla ................... 0 2
Walton .................... 0 30

Total ............ 41.749 9 1.364


SYSTEMATIC WORK.


COUNTY. S I SI
w.. zi ~~z r z. 0 .- ,S 8
Duval .... 1,012 1154 44 72 968 10,772 0 67
Eseambia .. 722 5,909 683 5,758 89 151 0 71
Gadsden ..2,664 14,129 ,492 13,515 172 614 0 48
Washington 2,506 25,021 2,389 24,224 118 787 0 49
Total ..6,904 56,598 8,608 44,259 1,297 12,326 0 235


w w


T J










19

FINAL WORK.
Palm Beach 63 4,932 57 4,837 24 123 0 10

SUMMARY.
Total number of' Number of vats con-Number of vats pre-Total number of
cattle dipped. structed this month.vlously constructed, vats available.
103,274 9 1,609 1,618

The following articles appeared in the Florida Times-
Union, under date of July 15th, and are given here at
this time because of the importance of the subjects they
cover, i. e.: "Tick eradication and the abandoning by
Armour & Co., Jacksonville, of the Interstate Stock
Yards", which were operated by them in connection with
their packing pljnt:

THE WORK OF TICK ERADICATION.

So mush does the future prosperity of the cattle in-
dustry in Florida depend upon the total eradication of
the cattle tick, in other words, the elimination of the
fever propagating tick and the removal of the govern-
ment quarantine upon Florida cattle that if all the cattle
owners of the State could be aroused to a sense of what
they owe to themselves and to their State there would
hardly be vats enough to accommodate them with all the
1,678 that have been built-there should be about 5,00q
of them. So, long as. no cattle are allowed to leave this
State's confines except for immediate slaughter-unless
they are from the very few coufities whose enlightened
inhabitants have made a determined onslaught upon and
routed the tick from within their borders-just so long
will cattle fr6m all the rest of the State bring the lowest
possible prices in the great markets.
If the State Supreme Court pronounces the local op-
tion compulsory tick eradication law constitutional, as it
is expected to do in the case appealed from Escambia
county, in twenty-nine counties of the State the work
of systematic dipping may be expected to begin in ear-
nest and the remaining counties will rapidly fall in line.
As the cattle of Florida, dairy and other, number over
a million head the number of dippings, once every four-
teen days, may be expected to increase enormously if the
law is upheld. It certainly would if the Legislature could
be induced to pass a compulsory law applicable to the


~ ~ ...; ~~ ~.;J ,;i ~w











whole State. We believe this will be done as soon as
the Legislature can be brought to perceive the wisdom of
restraining those who for their own shortsighted, selfish
ends persist' in keeping the State in the list of those to
which the United States *pplies the quarantine law.
Florida should he producing the finest beef in the
country. She should be pushing hard for the position
and rank of the first dairy State in the Union. She can
do neither so long as so large a proportion of her cattle
are tick-bitten runts, so long as so much of the blood of
her dairy cattle goes to feed ticks when it should be pro-
ducing milk.


OPPORTUNITY IFOR LIVE STOCK MEN.

The announcement made by Armour & Co. that the
stock yards in Jacksondille, operated as the Interstate
Stock Yards for four years, in conjunction with the pack-
ing plant of the company, would be abandoned in the
near future in compliance with the edict of the Attorney
General of the United States, ordering the big packing
companies to confine their activities strictly to the pack-
ing business and refrain from handling groceries, canned
fruits or carrying on other business, recalls the sugges-
tion made some time ago that this furnishes an excellent
opportunity for the live stock men of the State to organ-
ize a co-operative marketing agency and lease the stock
yards as a headquarters for handling the cattle, hogs,
sheep and other animals raised in the State and in South
Georgia.
After discussing this matter with a number of the
best live stock men in the State, it would seem as if this
plan was entirely feasible and would work out in a sat-
isfactory manner to all concerned. It has been suggest-
ed that a thoroughly competent manager be secured,
who would ha ve full charge of the stock yards and the
marketing of the stock shipped here by the members and
others w'ho wished to avail themselves of the benefits of
this arrangement. If the membership in this co-opera-
tive organization was sufficiently large the stock yards
could be made self supporting in the small fees charged
for handling, feeding and caring for the stock and the
best prices would be secured because the manager would









21

have only the interests of the members and live stock
owners to consider and it would be to his. interest to see.
that the best prices were secured.
Another benefit would result from this co-operative
arrangement. Many times there are farmers and. live
stock men who want feeders to utilize surplus crops
or pastures and others have an insufficient amount of
the latter and are anxious to dispose of their surplus
stock. The central organization and yards could be util-
ized to affect this exchange and thus benefit its members.
Those in need of extra feeders could notify the manager
and as soon as some stock came in that would answer
the description of what was wanted he could notify the
farmers and take their orders for shipment.
This plan would also attract more buyers and the
competition would result in better prices for the live
stock. It is believed that the Cuban trade will want
a great deal of our stock and now that we have regular
steamship lines to Cuba there will be a number of buy-
ers in this market and with a yard maintained by a co-
operative organization of live stock raisers competition
would result in bringing the prices up to the best mar-
ket prices in the country. This would encourage the
increase of production, especially of the better grades
of cattle and bogs and in time the big packing plant
would be able to enlarge and other packing plants would
come and a live stock market of considerable magnitude
would be established in Jacksonville.
There is every reason to believe that Florida will de-
velop into one of the leading live stock States in this
country, and this will mean that the marketing facili-
ties will have to be improved and enlarged and the op-
portunity to secure the well-equipped stock yards of
Armour & Co. should not be neglected by the live stock
men of the State.



DESTROY THE RATS.

The worst tax we have to pay is the tax of waste.
The rat is an animal of waste, and so far as we know
has no value to society, and there is no other animal that
does so much damage as the rat.


*


r










The rat is a carrier of disease. He is costing the State
of Florida and the Nation maiy thousands of dollars at
this time. Destroy the rat. Save to our people the mil-
lions in money value he is now destroying annually, and
thus protect our citizens from the dreaded disease, Bu-
bonic Plague, which will not be a menace if the rat is
destroyed.
The press of the State is backing up this movement,
and I quote below three short articles from the following
papers: "Lake Wales Highlander," "The Florida Metrop-
olis" and "The Pensacola Journal."
"Lake Wales Highlanders" says:

WAR ON THE RAT.

England has declared war on the rat, and proposes to
exterminate them, regardless of cost. And not a soul has
come forward to defend the act, or to ask for a postpone-
ment of its destruction. Forit is the one creature in the
world without a friend or defender. The cats have their
defenders; there are people who tell us that snakes are
not harmful; books are written to prove that hawks and
owls and other birds of pray play a valuable part in this
world-but nobody defends the rat, and you never heard
a Lake Wales man or woman wishing they had more of
them about the house.
We cannot speak for-England, but our own govern-
Inent estimates the damage annually done by rats in this
country at two hundred million dollars. That is equiva-
lent to the work of two hundred thousand men, working
six days in the week for an entire year. So if we were
to employ two hundred thousand able-bodied men in this
country to exterminate the rats it would be a cheap prop-
osition. For the rats could be destroyed in one year, and
the men could spend the balance of their lives in produc-
tion. And yet, we will probably never be able to do this.
We will 'have to go ahead suffering the loss of two hun-
dred millions of dollars' worth of property every year.
However, this can be reduced considerably-and that is
by every man and woman declaring their own individual
war on the rat-and then seeing how many of them they
can slay each year.










"The Florida Metropolis" says:
Did you know that the rats in the United States are
accomplishing damage to the extent of $180,000,000 an-
nually ?
The interest on more than $4,000,000,000 of war bonds
could be paid yearly by this vast sum.
Considering it from another angle, school houses for
the accommodation of two million children might be
built.
The campaign against rats which is now being waged
in various Southern coast cities, Jacksonville included,
should be extended without delay to all important com-
munities in the nation. The Metropolis recently suggest-
ed the inauguration of a nation-wide rat extermination
campaign, and a week should be set aside for that pur-
pose.
Aside from their great destructive powers, the, rats
are one of the greatest carriers of disease. They have no
place whatever, apparently, in the scheme of life except
to form a pest. They can be easily done away with. Why
not do it?
Are you doing all you can to make the extermination
campaign in Jacksonville the success that it should be?


ERADICATE THE RATS.

"The Pensacola Journal" says:
Rats are destructive and expensive. They are also de-
cidedly dangerous as, through them, the death-dealing
Bubonic Plague is introduced, and recently in other
cities several lives have been lost through this terrible
disease.
An effort is now being made to exterminate the rats
at all ports of entry, and this excellent work on the part
of the health department of the State should have the
hearty co-operation of the citizens and business men in
all of the cities endangered and at the same time a gen-
eral effort should be made to entirely eradicate the rats
from every section of Florida, where they have flourished
too long.
It has been stated recently that the cost of maintain-
ing the rats of the country runs into hundreds of mil.
lions of dollars a year, in the consumption of food prod-
ucts, which are growing scarcer every day and which











must be conserved in every manner possible. Why should ,
we feed millions of rodents that are taking the bread
from our mouths? It sounds shiftless and careless, to
say the least.
An organized, concerted effort should be made to clear
out the rats in Florida so that we could advertise the
fact that we have no rats and that we are making every
effort to conserve food as well as to produce more of it.
It is a well-known fact that hundreds of rats are tol-
erated in big wholesale and retail groceries and ware-
houses and even in retail stores we have seen indica-
tions of scores of rodents, which were eating up the
profits and contaminating the food that the people were
purchasing every day. This is a condition that can be
eliminated with a certain amount of effort and this ef-
fort should be put forth at once.
State Health Officer Greene is in earnest about the
eradication of the rats and he will have the earnest sup-
port,of every health officer in the State, but the people.
must co-operate and take an interest in this work of
eradication, and if they do splendid results can be ob-
tained. In every warehouse, store and shop extra ef-
forts should be made immediately to exterminate the
rats "and there should be no let up until every rodent is
wiped out. Publicity will be of great assistance in this
campaign, just as it' has been in the -eradication of the
citrus canker, the 'hog cholera, the cattle tick and every
other pest, and the newspapers of the State can render
helpful assistance by calling upon their readers to join
in this crusade against an enemy that is destructive, ex-
pensive and dangerous.


INSECT PESTS'.

Since July is the month to destroy insect pests, I give
below an article from the U. S. Department of Agricul-
ture, Washington, D. C., on this subject:
Washington, July 9.-July is the month to kill enemy
insects, says a statement from the American Forestry
Association. Charles Lathrop Pack, president of the
association, estimates the annual feast of enemy insects
costs this country $500,000,000. To check this annual
feed the association makes these suggestions for July:
/











Spray fruit trees with bordeaux-lead., Spray elms
for elm leaf beetles with arsenate of lead, one pound to
ten gallons of water. Spray for forest tent caterpillars
with arsenate-of lead (same proportion). Spray tussock
moth and other lead eating insects with arsenate of lead
(same proportion).
"If woolly aphis is found on under side of beech tree
leaves spray with whale oil soap, one pound to-ten gal-
lons of water. Use the same combination on the red
spider that may be found on prostrate junipers, yew and
box. The sycamore blight may be found in the shape of
a white woolly mass on the under side of leaves causing
them to curl and wilt. Get the bordeaux mixture in pro-
portions of one pound to eight gallons of water.
"A good way to destroy caterpillars is to drive carpet
tacks part way into a long stick end. Catch your web at
highest point and start turning in until you have the
web, then plunge into any liquid that will kill them."



FEDERAL FORECAST OF WHEAT AND CORN
PRODUCTION SHOWS INCREASE.

Washington, July 10.-An increase of 28,000,000
bushels .in the country's wheat crop as compared with
last month, with a total forecast of 809,000,000 bushels;
a prospective corn crop larger than last year's and large
crops of oats, barley, white potatoes, tobacco, flax and
rice than were grown a year ago, were the features of
the government's July crop report issued by the Depart-
ment of Agriculture.

OTHER FORECASTS PRODUCTION.

Winter wheat 518,000,000 bushels.
Spring wheat 291,000,000.
Oats 1,322,000,000.
Barley 193,000,000.
Rye 82,000,000.
White potatoes 388,000,000.
Sweet potatoes 98,500,000.
Tobacco 1,501;000,000 pounds.
Flax, 14,400,000 bushels.
Rice 52,100,000 bushels.
I










Hay 84,800,000 tons.
Apples (total) 200,000,000 bushels.
Apples (commercial) 30,200,000 barrels.
Peaches 45,200,000 bushels.

WHEAT REMAINING.

Wheat remaining on farms July 1 is estimated at 5.1
per .cent of last year's crop, or about 47,756,000 bushels,
compared with 19,261,000 last year and 31,923,000, the
five-year average.
Acreage of crops not previously announced is:
White potatoes 3,849,000; sweet potatoes 1,022,000;
tobacco 1,859,700; flax 1,706,000; rice 1,345,700.
Corn acreage and forecast of production in thousands
(i. e. 000 omitted) by the principal producing Southern
States follow:
Virginia 1,520 acres and 40,797 bushels.
North Carolina 2,784 and 56,988.
Georgia 4,627 and 60,035.
Tennessee 3,022 and 73,994.
Alabama 4,117 and 62,620.
Mississippi 3,701 and 59,438.
Louisiana 1,900 and 38,882.
Texas 6,625 and 146,081.
Oklahoma 3,255 and 55,660.
Arkansas 2,599 and 5,941.
Forecast of production of winter wheat in the prin-
cipal producing Southern States (in thousands of
bushels, i. e. 000 omitted) :
Virginia 11,286; North Carolina 7,774; Tennessee
4,134; Texas 14,249.


















PART II.
CROP REPORT











DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.
Following are tle subdivisions of the State, and the
counties contained in each:
Western Division.
Bay, Okaloosa,
Calhoun, Santa Rosa,
Escambia, Walton,
Holmes, Washington-9.
Jackson,
Northern Division.
Franklin, Leon,
Gadsden, Liberty,
Hamilton, Madison,
Jefferson, Taylor.
Lafayette, Wakulla-10.
Northeastern Division.
Alachua, Duval,
Baker, Nassau,
Bradford, Putnam,
Clay, St. Johns,
Columbia, Suwannee-10.
Central Division.
Brevard, Orange,
Citrus, Osceola,
Flagler, Pasco,
Hernando, Pinellas,
Hillsborough, Polk,
Lake, Seminole,
Levy, Sumter,
Marion, Volusia-16.
Southern Division.
Broward, Monroe,
Dade, Okeechobee,
DeSoto, Palm Beach,
Lee, St. Lucie-9.
Manatee,











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

W. A. McRAE, Commissioner. R. T. MICKLER, Clerk

CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS BY
DIVISIONS.

Western Division: General crop conditions in this sec-
tion run about the average with few exceptions. The un-
favorable atmospheric conditions have damaged the corn
crop somewhat, but during the past few days this crop is
improving rapidly. On account of labor shortage and the
boll weevil, the cotton crop will be short.
The live stock condition is above the average, largely
due to the fact that the pastures are in excellent condition
at this season.
Northern Division: Conditions in this division do not
differ essentially from those of the Western division. The
same climatic conditions that exist in the Western divi-
sion can be applied to this division.
Northeastern Division: The condition .of crops in this
division seems to be the average. The cotton crop will be
short, as the acreage planted is considerably smaller' than
last year. The forage crops, according to all indications,
will be larger than last year. The condition of live stock
is decidedly good.
CentraZ Division: In this section crops look encourag-
ing. In some sections of this division the corn crop was
damaged by rain. The citrus fruit crop indicates a large
yield. The farmers are still handicapped by the shortage
of labor, but this is being met by the use of improved ma-
chinery. Live stock is in good condition. The growing of
live stock is increasing rapidly.
Southern Division: This division is largely given to
fruit and vegetable growing. The increase in acreage has
increased considerably. In some sections of this division
the corn crop will be good.








32

Great interest is being shown in the development of the
sugar industry in this section of the State and much
money is being invested in lands, seed cane for planting,
and improved methods of clearing the land, and in culti-
vating the growing crop.
In a few years to come this should be the "sugar sec-
tion" of the Uiited States.
The climatic conditions have not been too favorable,
but these conditions have been general throughout .the
entire country. No section of the country can get ahead
of Florida in the final maturity of crops.













33

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS,
FRUIT AND FRUIT TREES FOR QUARTER ENDING JUNE 30tn,
1920. ALSO CONDITION OF LIVE STOCK AS COMPARED WITH
SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.

Upland Sea island
COUNTY Cotton Cotton Corn Sorghum

Western Division Condition Coondition Condition Condition
Holmes ................ 80 .. 65 50
Jackson ................ 60 .. 70 50
Santa Rosa ............ 40 60 20
W alton ................ 50 75
Div. Av. per cent ..... 57 75 65 40
Northern Division.
Gadsden ..... ......... 60 80
Hamilton .............. 100 80 65
LaFayette .............. 60 50 75 80
Leon .................. 90 .. 60 100
Madison ............... 100 50 90 100
Wakulla ............... 110 .. 115 70

Div. Av. per cent...... 87 60 81 87
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ 50 25 75 90
Baker .................. 100 .. 110
Clay ...... .............. 75 60 100
Columbia ................. 45 30 80 60
Duval .................. .. 100 100
Suwannee .............. 65 60 55 70
Div. Av. per cent...... 65 48 80 84
Central Division.
Brevard ................
Hernando .............. 85 3 100
Hillsborough .......... .. 90
Levy ................... .. 60 80
Marion .......'. ........... 50 80
Orange ................. .. .. 100
Osceola ................ .. .140 100
Pasco .................. ... 80 90
Pinellas ................ .. 100
Polk ................... ... 75
Seminole .............. ... 100
Volusia ................ .. .90 105

Div. Av. per cent...... 85 30 90 91
SBothern Division.
Dade .................. .... 100 10
Lee ................. .. .. .. 80 80
Palm each .......... .. ..
St. Lucle .............. .. .. 90 90

Div. Av. per cent ...... .. .. 90 90

State Av. per cent..... 74 54 81 78


3-Bul.


.^











34


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIEBD-Continued.

Kafftr ugar Japanese
COUNTY Corn Cane Cane Rice

Western Division Condition Codondition ition I Condition
Holmes .... ....... 90 55
Jackson ............... .. 40 60 40
Santa Rosa ............. .. 70 40 20
Walton ................. 75 75
Div. Av. per cent...... .. 69 58 38
Northern Disron.
Gadsden ............... .. 150 100 100
Hamilton ............... .. 100 75
LaFayette ..... ...... 80 75 90 90
Leon ......... .... ... 85 85 100
Madison ................ .. 120 100 0
Wakulla .............. .. 150 111 91
Div. Av. per cent...... 80 118 97 84
Northeastern Division.
Alahua .............. .. 90 100
Baker .................. .. 120 16)
Clay ............ ....... .. 100 100
Columbia ............. .. 90 ,. 90 90
Duval .................. 100 110 100 100
Suwannee ............... 85 80 70
Div. Av. per cent...... 100 99 94 90
Central Division.
Brevard ................ .75 .0.
Hernando ............... 100 100
Hillsborough ........... 100 100 80
arion ................. .. 80 90 75
Orange....... r ........ 100 100
sceola .................. 00 120 120
Pasco .................. .. 110 120 100
Pinells................. 100
Polk ................... .. 80so
VoSt. Luca................... 100
Div. AT. per cent...... 100 95 197 82
Soutate A. per cents. 95 95 on.
Dade ................... 100 125 125
Lee .................... .. 90 85
Palm Beach ............ .. 85
St. Lucie ............... ... .. 100
Div. Av. per cent...... 100 100 104
State Av. per cent...... 95 95 90 74












35

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

weet Field Egg
COUNTY Potatoes Dasheens Peas Plants

Western Division Condition Conditon Condition I Condition
Holmes ................ 90 .. 75.
Jackson ................. 30 .. 40
Santa Rosa ............. 80 .. 60
Walton ................ 100 .. 50
Div. Av. per cent...... 52 56
Northern Division.
Gadsden ................ 125 .. 80
Hamilton ............... 100 .. ..
LaFayette .............. 85 90 ..
Leon .................. 100 ..
Madison ................I 100 .. i 0 100
Wakulla .......... ..... 103 .. 90
v. Av. per cent...... 102 90 87 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ 100 .. 100 75
Baker .................. 100
Clay ................... 100 100 100
Columbia ............... 80 .. 90
Duval ................. 95 1 100 100 100
Suwannee .............. 85 ....
Div. Av. per cent...... 93 100 97 87
Central Division.
Brevard ............... .
Hernando....... 100 50
Hillsborough ........... 75 80 75
Levy ................... 85 80 70
Marion ................. .. 60 75 50
Orange ................ 110 .. 100 100
Osceola ................. . .
Pasco .................. 120 110 90
Pinellas ................ 100
Polk ................... 80 .. 75
Seminole ............... 100 100 100
Volusla ................. 100 105 90
Div. Av per cent...... 95 55 91 82
RoSthern Division.
Dade ................. 110 100 12
Lee ..... .............. 90 .. 9060
Palm Beach ............ 90 I
St. Lucie .............. 100 90 95
Div. Av. per cent...... 97 95 104 60
State Av. per cent...... 88 85 87 82


\















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Onions Cassava Tobacco Peanuts

Western Division Condition Condition Condition Condition
Escambia ............... .
Holmes ................ .. .. 85
Jackson ................ .... 60
Santa Rosa ............. 30 ... 70
Walton ............... 75 .... 100
Div. Av. per cent..... 52 .. .. 56
Northern Divieon.
Gadsden ................ .. 100 100
Hamilton ............... .. 100. 100
LaFayette ............... ... .. 100
Leon ................... .. 100 90
Madison ................ 90 .. 120 80
Wakulla ............... 119 92
Div. Av. per cent....... 0 .. 106 92

Alachua ................ 100 .. 80
Baker ................ .. .. .. 125
Clay ..................
Columbia ............... 90
Suwannee .......... 90 95
Div. Av. per cent...... 100 100 90 98
Central Division.
Brevard .................
Hernando .............I .. 100
Hillsborough ............ 80 80
Levy ................ 80 80 65
Marion ........... .... 25 60
Orange ..... ......... 100 100
Osceola ................ 100 80 100
Pasco ........... 130 110
Pinellas ................. .
Polk .. 85i 80
Seminole ..... 10. 100
Volusia ................ 100 .. .100
Div. Av. per cent ...... 84 85 130 89
Southern Division.
Dade ................... 100 .. .. 125
Lee .................... .. 80
Palm Beach .............
St. Lucie ............... .. 85
Div. Av. per cet...... 100 .. .. 97
State Av. per cent ...... 85 92 109 86










37

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIEID--Continued.

Coo I Hay Velvet
COUNTY P eas Pastures Grasses Beans

Western Division I Condition Condition I Condition Condition
Holmes .... ... 90
Jackson ............... 40
Santa Rosa ...... ... 100 45 40
Walton ................ 100 10
Div. Av. per cent...... .. 100 45 45
Northern Division.
Gadsden ................ 80 120
Hamilton ...............
LaFayette ..............
Leon ................. 100 110 10
Madison ............... 100 125 80
Wakulla ................ 83 109
Div. Av. per cent...... 91 118 .. T100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ 100 100 100 100
Baker............ .. 110
Clay ...............:::::. 100 100
Columbia ............... 0 100 90
Duval. .......... 100 100 16600
Suwannee .............. 85 80 90
Div. Av. per cent...... 96 98 100 96
Central Division.
Brevard ................ 85
Hernando ..........: 100: 100 100 100
illsborough ............ 90 91 90 90
Levy ...................... 80 85 .. 50
Marion ................ 75 95 90
Orange ................. 105 95 100 100
Osceola ................. 120 100 100 13f
Pasco .................. 120 100 110 120
Pinellas ................ 100 100 100
Polk ................... 80 90 85 80
Seminole ............... 100 100 100 100
Volusia ................ 105 100 105 100
Div. Av. per cent...... 98 96 99 95
Southern Division.
Dade .................. 125 100 100 100
Lee .................... 80 90 80 85
Palm Beach ............. 80
St. Lude .... .......... 90 100 .. i
Div. Av. per cent...... 95 97 9 95


State Av. per cent..........95 102 84 87


j 102 j 84 1 87


State Av. per cent ..... 1 9 ,-,











38

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


soy lMlo
COUNTY Bean* Alfalfa Maize

Western Division Condition Condition Condition
Holmes ... ...................... .. ...
Jackson .......................... .... .
Santa Rosa ....................... ..
Santa Rosa ....................... ..
Walton ......... ............... ...

Dlv. Av. per cent ...............
Northern Division.
Gadsden .......................... .. ..
Hamilton' ........................
LaFayette ........................
Leon .................. ..........
Madison ........................ ......
Wakulla .......................... ..

Div. Av. per cent ...............
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ......................... .
Baker ........................... .. .
Clay ..............................
Columbia ....................... l .
Dnval .......................... 100
Suwannee ........................

Div. Av. per cent................ 100
Central division.
Brevard .......................... .. ..
Hernando ........................ ..
Hillsborough .........................
Levy ......................... ....
Marion ...................... ........
Orange ..... ...................
Osceola ..........................
Pasco ............. ............... 100
Pinellas ......................... ....
Polk......................... .....
Seminole .........................
Volusia .......................... .. 100

Div. Av. per cent ................ 100 .. 100
southern Division.
Dade ............................ 100 ..
Lee ............................. ... .
Palm Beach ..................... .. ..
St. Lucie ........................ .. .

Div. Av. per cent ................ 100 ..

State Av. per cent............... 100 .. 100













REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY I Oavas Avocado Pears


Condition Prospective Condition Pro'p'ot've
Western Division Yield Yield
Holmes ................ ....
Jackson ................
Santa Rosa .............
W alton ................
Div. Av. per cent......
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............... .. .
Hamilton ..............
LaFayette ..............
Leon
Leon ................. ...... .
Madison ............... .
W akulla ............... ....
Div. Av. per cent......
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................
Baker ................. ...
Clay ................... .
Columbia ...............
Duval .................
Suwannee ..............
Div. Av. per cent...... _
Central Diviion.
Brevard ............... 90 100 ..
Hernando .............. .
Hillsborough ........... 75 95
Levy .....................
Marion ...............
Orange... .........
Oscecola ............... 120 120 150 10
Pasco ............... 110 110
Pinellas ................. 100 150
Polk ................... 75 75
Seminole ............ 100 100
Volusia ................ 100 90
Dv. Av. per cent .... 96 105 150 10
Southern Division.
Dade .................. 100 100 80 90
Lee ................ 75 100 45 60
Palm Beach ............ 90 75 90 70
St. Lucie ...............1 100 120
Div. Av. per cent...... 91 99 72 73
O+....~ .. .. I GA I m 111 I 4


a ev. per cen ...... -


tS t A t


o4 I I 'rrl 1 42










40

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Bananas Mangoes

Cn condition Prospective Condition Pro'p'ct've
Western Division Yield Yield
Holmes ................ .. .
Jackson ...............
Santa Rosa ............. .. ..
W alton ............... .. .
Div. Av. per cent...... .
Northern Division. p
Gadsden ................. ... .
Hamilton.............. .. .. .. ..
LaFayette ............ .. .. ..
Leon .................. .I
Madison .............. . ..
Wakulla ............... .. I .
Div. Av. per cent...... I .. ..
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ ..
Baker ................ I . I .. I
Clay ............ ..... . I .. 1 .. I
Columbia ............... .. I ..
Duval ................ . .
Suwannee .............. .. i .. [ ..
Div. Av. per cent ..... . .
Central Division. __
Breverd ................ .. I .. I
Hernando .............. 100 I 100
Hillsborough ........... .. I .
Levy .................. .. I
M aron .. .............. .. I
Orange ........ .........I .
Osceola ..................I 70 I 100
Pasco .................. .
Pinuellas ............... .. ..
ePolk ............... . .
Seminole .............. .. . I
Volusia ................ .. I .
Div. Av. per cent.. .. 90 75 70 00
Southern Division._ _
Dade.. ............... 9-0 1o 1 I 80 I 90
Lee ..................... 30 0 40 I .
Palm Beach ............ I 80 85 85 1 5 60
St. Lucie .............. .. I .. I 75 60
Div. Av. per cent...... 67 75 1 8s0 70


State Av. per cent...... 79 75 7 75 85










41


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD--Continued.

COUNTY Orange Trees Lemon Trees

Condition Prospective Condition Pro'p'ct've
Western Division Yield I Yield
Holmes ....... ........ .
Jackson ................
Santa Rosa ............ 30 20
W alton ................. 50 90
Div. Av. per cent...... 40 55
Northern Division.
Gadsden ............ ... ..
Hamilton ...............
LaFayette .............. 50 75
Leon ...................
M adison ................ .
W ak'ulla ............... .
I -----J---I--
Div. Av. ncr cent...... 50 75 .
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ .. I
Bnker ................. .. 1 I
Clay ................... 100 I 50
Columbia ............. I .
Duval ................... I 90 .
Suwannee .............. .. I .. I
Div. Av. ner cent...... 95 I 70


7en trl. Division.
Brovard ................. 75 90 75 I 90
Hernando .............. 100 150 I
HillRborough .......... [. 75 I 90 75 90
Levy ................... 50 25 .. I
Marion .................I 90 75 ..
Orange ................. 100 160
Oseceola ............. ... 130 100 130 I 90
Pasco .................. 110 150 ..
Pinellas ................. 100 80
Polk ......... .......... s. 8 80 ..
Reminole ............... 100 100 I ..
Volusia ... ............ 90 I 95 '
Div. Av. per cent .... I 92 100 93 90
Rnouther Division.
Dade..................no n run I C


LeD e .................. 90 10 98
Palm Beach............ 90 95
St. Lucie ............... 95 90
Div. Av.-per cent...... 91 93 100 95
State Av. per cent...... 74 79 96 92











42

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Lime Trees Grlpefruit Trees
II
Condition Prospeotive Condition Pro'p'ot've
Western Division Yield Yield
Holmes ................ ..
Jackson .........................
Santa Rosa ............ .. ...
Walton ........ ....... .. .. .
Div. Av. per cent ........
Northern Divison.
Gadsden ................
Hamilton ...............
LaFayette .............. 50 75 30 50
Leon ................... .
Madison ................ ..
W akulla ...............

Div. Av. per cent .... 50 75 30 5O
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ .... / ..
Baker ................. .. .. .
Clay ................ .. ......
Columbia ... ..........
Dural ............... .... 9. 0 00
Suwannee ..............
Div. Av. per cent ....... 90 90
Central Diision.
Brevard ................ .. 85 100
Hernando .............. .. .. 100 75
Hillsborough ........... .. .. 75 90
Levy .................. ..
Marion .................
Orange ................. .. 100 100
Osceola ............... 130 90 140 100
Pasco .................. .. .. 1,0. 110
Pinellas ................ .. .. t10 80
Polk .. ......... ... .. ,. 75 50
Seminole............... ... .. 10 100
Volusia ................ .. .. 90 60
Div. Av. per cent...... 130 90 96 86
Southern Division.
Dade .................. ..95 100 80 90
Lee .................... 80 90 80 90
Palm Beach ............ 90 90 90 85
St. Lucle ..............I .. 95 60

Div. Ay. per cent...... 88 94 77 88

State Av. per cent...... 89 86 73 79














REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Japanese Persimmons Plums

Condition n Prospqtive Condition Pro'p'ot've
Western Divitson Yied Yield
Holmes ................
Jackson ................ . ... ..
Santa Rosa ............... ..
Walton .... ............. ........

Div. Av. per cent...... ........
Northern Division.
Gadsden ................
Hamilton ............... .. .. 80 100
LaFayette .............. 75 100 15 25
Leon .................. ........
Madison ............. ....
Wakulla ................ .. .. 20 40
Div. Av. per cent...... 75 100 38 55
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ .. .. 90 90
Baker .................. 75 100 75 100
Clay ................... 100 100 ..
Columbia ............... .
Duval ................. 100 100 100 100
Suwannee .............. ......

Div. Av. per cent...... 92 100 58 97
Central Division.
Brevard ................ 75 90 .. .
Hernando .............. 100 100
Hillsborough ............. 60 75 60 75
Levy .................. .. .. .. ..
Marion .................
Orange ................. 100 100
Osceola ................ 100 100 100 100
Pasco .................. .... 80 50
Pinellas ................ .. ....
Polk ................... ... .. I
Seminole ....... ....... .. ..
Volusia ................ 100 60 .

Div. Av. per cent...... 89 88 63 75
Southern Division.
Dade .................. .. ....
Lee .................... .....
Palm Beach ........... .
St. Lucle .............. 90 100 ..
Div. Av. per cent...... 90 100
State Av. per cent...... 86 97 53 76













REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


Jackson :::.............
Santa Rosa ............
W alton ................


Northern Division.
Gadsden .......
Hamilton ............. 85 100
LaFayette .............. 80 100 50 50
Leon ................... 10 10
Madison .............
Wakulla ................ 65 89 35 60
Div. Av. per cent. ...... 52 66 57 70
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ 90 50 90 75
Baker .................. 75 100
Clay ................. 100 100
Columbia ..............
Duval .......... ...... 100 100 90 0
Suwannee ..............
Div. Av. per cent........ 58 C3 93 88
Central Dvision.
Brevard ................. 75 90
'Hernando .............. 50 50 100 100
Hillsborough ............ 45 60 40 60
Levy .................. 75 50 85 75
Marion ............. 50 50
Orange ................. 100 60 100 50
Osceola ................ 40 30 90 80
Pasco .................. 15 20 35 50
Pinellas ...............
Polk ................... 75 75
Seminole ...........
Volusia ................ 30, 10 100 60
Div. Av. per cent...... 54 46 75 67
Southern Division.
Dade ...............
Lee ..................
Palm Beach ............
St. Lucie ............... *
Div. Av. per cent ...... ..
State Av. per cent...... 47 54 67 73















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Watermelons Cantaloupes

Condition Prospective Condition Pro'p'ct've
Western Division Yield Yield
Holmes ................ 50 80
Okaloosa ........
Santa Rosa ............. 75 100 30 75
Walton ................ 50 80 50 80
Div. Av. per cent...... 54 77 40 77
Northern Division.
Gadsden ..... ............
Hamilton ............... 100
LaFayette ............... ..
Leon .................. 50 45
Madison ................ 60 80 50 75
Wakulla ............... 85 100 65 80
Div. Av. per cent...... 93 81 57 77
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ 75 60 50 40
Baker .................. 80 100
Clay ................... 100- 100
Columbia ..............
Duval .................. 90 90 90 90
Suwannee .............. 75 100
Div. Av. per cent...... 84 90 70 65
Central Division.
Brevard ................ 560 85 75 90
Hernando ................ 100 300
Hillsborough .......... 40 70 40' 75
Levy ....... ...... 60 50 60 50
Marion ................. 50 50 25 15
Orange ....... .......... 100 100
Osceola ............ 90 100 90 100
Pasco ................. 90 100 75 90
Pinellas ................[ 100 150
Polk ..................I 60 65
Seminole ................1 100 125 100 80
Volusia ................ 90 90
Div. Av. per cent...... 78 107 66 71


southern Division.
Dade .............
Lee ................ ...
Palm Beach ............
St. Lucie ............ ...

Div. Av. per cent......

State Av. per cent......I












46

REPORT O0 CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Pineapples Grapes
Condition |Prospective Condition IPro'p'ct've
Western Division .. .. Yield Yield
Holmes ............... .. .. 80 100
Jackson ............... ...
Santa Rosa ............. .. .. 90 80
W alton ................. ......
Div. Av. per cent...... .. .. 85 90
Northern Division.
Gadsden .......... .......
Hamilton ............ ...:
LaFayette .............. .. .. 80 100
Leon ................... ..
Madison ........... ..... .. .. 70 90
Wakulla ......... ..... .... 85 120
Div. A. per cent...... .. .. 98 103
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................ .. ..100 100
Baker ....... ........ .. .. 85 100
Clay .................... .. 80 100
Columbia ..............
Duval ................ .. .. 100 100
Suwannee ........... .... ...

Div. Av. per cent... ... 91 100
Central Division.
Brevard ........... ..... 75' 90
Hernando ............. .. ...
Hillsborough ........... ..
Levy .................. .. .. 60 50
M arion ................. ....
Orange ................. 100 150
Osceola ................ 80 50
Pasco .................. ... 85 11
Pinellas ..................... .
Polk ................... .
Seminole ....... ... ..1.. 160 160
Volusia ................ .. .. 100 100
Div. Av. per cent...... 80 50 87 100
Southern Division.
Dade ................... 60 75
Lee .................. ..
Palm Beach ............ 90 75
St. Lucie .............. 70 125 95 100
Div. Av. per cent...... 73 92 95 100
State. Av. per cent...... 76 71 87 99












47

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

Horses and
COUNTY Mules Cattle Hogs Sheep

Wester Divison Condition Condition I Condition I condition
Holmes ................ 105 110 115 100
Jackson ............... 60 70 30
Santa Rosa ............ 80 75 60 90
Walton ................ 100 100 75 50
v. Av. per cent...... 86 89 83 67
Northern Division.
Gadsden .............. 100 100 85 100
Hamilton .............. 100 100 100 100
LaFayette .............. 100 100 100
Leon ................... 100 110 110
Madison ............... 100 125 100 75
Wakulla ............... 100 100 100 95
Div. Av. per cent. .... 100 106 99 92
Northeaotern Division.
Alachua .............. 100 100 100 100
Baker ................ 100 100 80 110
Clay ................... 100 100 100 100
Columbia ............... 100 100 100 90
Duval ............... 100 100 100 100
Suwannee .............. 75 70 70
Div. Av. per cent...... 96 95 92 100
Central Division.
Brevard ................ 85 75
Hernando ............ 100 100 100 100
Hillsborough ............ 100 100 100 90
Levy ................. 50 75 60
Marion ................ 90 85 95 80
Orange ................ 100 125 100
Osceola ................ 100 90 90 100
Pasco ................. 110 120 100 100
Pinellas ................ 100 100 100
Polk .................. 75 70 80
Seminole ............... 100 100 100 100
Volusia ................ 90 85 100 90
Div. Av. pe- cent ...... 92 95 92 94
Southern Division.
Broward ...............
Dade .................. 10 100 12 100 100
DeSoto ................
Lee .................... 90 95 80 0
Manatee ............. ... .
Monroe .................
Okeechobee .............
Palm Beach ......... ... 10 98
St. Lucie ............... 90 85 85
Div. Av. per cent...... 95 101 90 95
State Av. per cent...... 94 97 91 90


.A. ..-













48

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Tobacco 'Honey Wool

'Western Division Pounds Pounds I ounds
Holmes ........................... 00,000 $0,000
Jackson .......... ............. .
Santa Rosa .......... .............. 3,000 45,000
Walton ............ ...... .... 5,000 500,000

Div. Av. per cent .............. 9 333 I 203,666
Northern Division.
Gadsden ........................ 1 00 0 [
H am ilton .......................... I
LaFayette .............. I I
Leon .............. -.. .... .. ......
Madison ................ ......... *:* '
Wakulla .................. ... ... 1,100 10,800 1,100
Div. Av. per cent................ 50,500 10,800 I 1,100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ...........................
Baker ............................ 50,000 10,000 10,000
Clay ...... ....... ............. . .
Columbia .............. ............ . "
Duval.................. .... 500 1,500
Suwannee .................. 80,000 30,000

Dlv. Av. per cent................. 65,000 10,106 5,750
Central DJ vision.
Brevard .......................... ... 20,000
Hernando ........................
Hillsborough .....................
Levy .......................... . . 500
M arion ..........................
Orange .................... ... . 15,000
Osceola .......... ....... ....... .. 4,000 8,000
Pasco ............ ................ 1,100
Pinellas .... .................... .. 20,000
Polk ........... ................. I .
Seminole ......................... .. 10,000
Volusia ......................... .. 140,000 5,000

Div. Av. per cent................. 1,100 29.929 6,500
Southern Division.
Dade ........................ .... ... ..
Lee ..............................
Palm Beach ........... ......... .. 25,000
St. Lucie ..................... ... .. ..
Div. Av. per cent ................. .. 25,000
State Av. per cent............... 38,666 17,046 | 53,754
























PART III.

Rules and Regulations.
Analyses.


4--Bul.




p


DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
OF FLORIDA


OF THE STATE


REGULATIONS FOR DRAWING, PACKING AND
TRANSMITTING SAMPLES OF FERTILIZER
AND FEED STUFF FOR ANALYSIS BY
THE STATE LABORATORY.

All Other Rvues and Regulations Relating to the Matter
Herein Referred to or Disoussed Are
Hereby Resoinded.



ANALYSES MADE BY STATE LABORATORY.
Only such materials are analyzed by the State Lab-
oratory as are directed by the Pure Food, the Fertilizer,
and Stock Feed Laws.
There are no fees or charges of any kind made by the
State Laboratory.
The State Laboratory is not permitted to compete with
commercial laboratories.
No commercial work of any kind is accepted.
The State Laboratory does not analyze the materials
used by, nor the products of Fertilizer, Feed Stuffs, or
other factories, by which to guarantee their goods. Such
analyses are commercial problems.

ANALYSES IN CRIMINAL CASES

The State Laboratory does not make post mortem ex-
aminations, nor furnish evidence in criminal cases (ex-
cept as provided by the Pure Food, Fertilizer and Stock
Feed Laws). Such analyses and examinations are made
by specialists employed by the grand jury and prosecut-
ing attorney, the cost being taxed as other criminal costs,
by the court.


.1.


,











STATE OF FLORIDA.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

February 10, 1920.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF SAMPLES OF COMMERCIAL
FERTILIZER AND COMMERCIAL FEEDING
STUFF TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICUL-
TURE FOR ANALYSIS BY THE STATE CHEMIST.

The following regulations for drawing, preparing and
sending samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial
stock feed, under the authority given in Section 15 of
Chapter 4983, Acts of 1901 (Chapter XXII., General
Statutes), as amended by Chapter 5660, Acts of 1907,,
and Section 15, Chapter 5452, Acts of 1905, as amended
by Chapter 5661, Aets of 1907, and Chapter 7939, Acts of
1919, are this day adopted.

OFFICIAL SAMPLES, drawn by State Chemist, As-
sistant State Chemists or Inspectors.
An approximately equal quantity (a pint or a pound
approximately) shall be taken from ten or more original
packages\ of the- same brand in the possession of any
manufacturer, dealer or person, when the lot being sam-
pled contains ten or more packages of the same brand.
In case the lot contains less than ten packages of the
same brand, each package shall be sampled as directed.
Preparation of Sample.-The several samples, drawn as
above from each package, shall be carefully and thor-
oughly mixed. From this well mixed lot drawn from
each package as above, a fair sample of not less than one
pound, in the case of fertilizers, and of not less than
one-half pound in the case of stock feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can-approximately a quart can or bot-
tle








53

The sample shall be delivered to the State Chemist, who
shall prepare the same for analysis (by properly grind-
ing, mixing and sifting the same.) The State Chemist
shall retain one-half of this prepared sample for analysis; 0
the remainder shall be placed in a glass bottle, sealed,
and identified by the laboratory number and date, and
'placed in the custody of the Commissioner of Agriculture.
These duplicate samples shall be retained for a' period of
three months from the date of the certificate of analysis.
In case of appeal from analysis of the State Chemist
(within three months from the date of the certificate),
the sample shall be retained indefinitely, until the final
disposition of the case.

Special Samples.-Samples drawn and transmitted by
the purchaser under Sections 9 of both the Commercial
Fertilizer and the Commercial Stock Feed Laws.

SAMPLING TIN OR LESS PACKAGES.

The purchaser or owner of the material to be sampled,
when the lot or shipment contains ten or less original
packages, each bearing the guarantee tag and stamp re-
quired by law, of the same brand, shall take, in the pres-
ence of two disinterested persons, within sixty days
after delivery, an approximately equal quantity (a pint
or a pound) from each of the ten or less packages of the
same brand.
NOTE: It is suggested that when practicable all sam-
ples should be taken with an approved "sampler" (a
sugar, flour or cheese tryer, a prod augur, a semi-circular
instrument of tin or sheet iron, capable of drawing a
sample through the center of the package, approximately
twentA inches long); the sample to be taken through the
center of the package.

SAMPLING MORE THAN TEN PACKAGES.

In case the lot or shipment contains more than ten
packages of the same brand, each bearing the guarantee
tag and stamp required by law, a sample shall be drawn
in the presence of two disinterested persons from ten or
more packages.










After carefully and thoroughly mixing these samples,
a fair sample of the'mixture, not less than a pound in the
case of commercial fertilizer, and not less than one-half
pound in the case of commercial stock feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can, and sealed in the presence of the
witnesses.

On the sample thus drawn shall be written the name
and address of the purchaser, and the name of a disinter-
ested party, who shall transmit the package to the Com-
missioner of Agriculture by mail or prepaid express,
prQperly packed to prevent damage in transportation.
The purchaser, or sender, of the sample shall also ad-
dress a letter to the Commissioner of Agriculture advis-
ing him of the sending of the sample, stating the number
of original packages purchased, each bearing the. guaran-
teed analysis and inspection stamp required by law, rep-
resented by the sample, the date of purchase, and the
late of delivery of the goods.

NOTE: THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE ENCLOSED IN THE
PACKAGE.

Blank form of the letter of transinittal 'will be fur-
nished by the Commissioner of Agriculture and is pub-
lished herein. It must be literally complied with, other-
wise the sample will not be accepted for anaylsis.

SAMPLES IN PAPER OR WOODEN PACKAGES WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.

These regulations are adopted to secure fair samples
of sufficient size to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicee sam-
ple will be preserved for three months from the late of
certificate of analysis.

The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser.

The drawing and sending of special samples is in rare
cases in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in -" boxes, badly packed, and frequently in very








.55

small quantity (less than an ounce) and often there
are no marks, numbers or other means of identification;
the postmark in many instances being absent.

NOTE: STRICT COMPLIANCE WITH THE ABOVE REGULA-
TIONS WILL BE REQUIRED. THE SAMPLE, TO BE A PROPER
SAMPLE, MUST NOT BE LESS THAN ONA POUND OF FERTILIZER
OR ONE-HALF POUND OF STOCK FEED, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE,
SEALED AND ADDRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICUL-
TURE. THE PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS, AND THE
NAME OF THE SENDER, MUST ALSO BE ON THIS PACKAGE,
THIS RULE APPLYING TO SPECIAL SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS OR'
COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFF, DRAWN AS DIRECTED.

IF MORE THAN ONE SAMPLE IS SENT REPRESENTING DIF-
FERENT BRANDS THE SAMPLES MUST BE NUMBERED SO AS TO
IDENTIFY THEM. ALL THIS SHOULD BE DONE IN THE PRES-
ENCE OF THE .WITNESSES, AND THE PACKAGE SEALED AND
MAILED OR EXPRESSED BY A DISINTERESTED PERSON.

NOTE" .The tags off the sacks with the guaranteed
anaylses and stamps, and names of manufacturers should
be retained by the purchaser, to compare with the cer-
tificate of analysis when received and NOT SENT TO THIS
OFFICE.

Raw Phosphates.-Ground raw phosphate rock-hard
or soft-contains phosphoric acid, more or less available,
hence is classed a fertilizer, when sold to consumers for
fertilizing purposes, under Section 11 of the law; and is
required to be guaranteed and stamped as required by
Section 3; listed and guaranteed under oath, as required
by Section 5, and the inspection fee paid previous to sale
as provided by Section 6.

Lime is not classed as a fertilizer. It is not, required to
be sold under guarantee, nor the inspection fee paid;
hence is not subject to free analysis by the State Lab-
oratory.

The following form letter for transmitting special sam-
ples of fertilizers or feeding stuffs is adopted and must
be explicitly complied with in order to obtain a legal cer-
tificate of analysis.











FORM FOR TRANSMITTING SAMPLES OF COM-
MERCIAL FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF.


....................... Fla., ....... 192....
Hon. W. A. McRae,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:-
I send you today by mail (or express) a ,sample of
..............................................
(Indicate Fertilizer, Cotton Seed Meal or Feed Stuff.)
for analysis by the State Chemist.

This sample is taken from a lot of.... packages, each
bearing the guarantee tag and stamp required by law,
purchased from a registered dealer, on the.......day of
......... 192..., and delivered on or about the......
day of....................., 192....
This sample was drawn from........ packages in the
presence of two witnesses, this day.

The guarantee tags and stamps off the ........ pack-
ages sampled are retained by the purchaser.
This sample is sent by me, one of the witnesses, for
Mr. ........................., the purchaser.
Yours truly,




I"


57

OBJECT OF THE LAWS.

The object of the Fertilizer and Stock Feed Laws is:
First, to protect the consumer from fraud, false repre-
sentations by illegitimate dealers who have not complied
with the law, nor filed their guaranteed analysis under
oath, and who have not paid their inspection tax fixed
by law.
Second, to protect the lawful dealer who has fully
complied with the law by filing his guarantee under oath,
and has paid his inspection fee, and who has placed upon
each bag or other package a guarantee tag showing the
minimum percentage of valuable ingredients in the fer-
tilizer or feed stuffs, as provided by the law.
NOTE: These regulations are adopted to conform with
the decision of the Supreme Court of Florida of May 12,
1917,. as follows:
"The terms of the statute in giving the special right of
action to 'any person purchasing' fertilizer clearly con-
templates that the test shall be made with at least some
degree of promptness after the delivery of the fertilizer,
and that more than one sample shall be taken when the
quantity of fertilizer purchased makes it expedient to
have plural samples to secure a fair test."

SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only state in the Union that provides
for the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or pur-
chaser, UNDER PROPER RULES AND REGULATIONS FIXED BY
LAW,-to be sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture 'for
analysis free of cost. Any person who has pur-
chased fertilizers or feeds FOR HIS OWN USE MAY DRAW
A SAMPLE OF THE SAME, ACCORDING TO LAW AND REGULA-
TIONS, and have the same analyzed by the State Chemist
free of cost. In case of adulteration or deficiency the
purchaser can, on establishing the fact, receive double
the cost demanded for the goods.
The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples.
Rules and regulations are published in every Quarterly
Bulletin for drawing and transmitting "special samples."


........................................ .










This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded, goods.

WATER ANALYSIS.
The State Laboratory will analyze samples of water
from public-owned water supplies, municipal plants, etc.,
owned and operated by the city or town, when accom-
panied by the certificate of the mayor, or other city offi-
cer, that the water is furnished the public by the city or
town.
It will not analyze water for individuals or corpora-
tions selling water to the public, water companies, ice
companies, mineral springs, health resorts, etc., main-
tained for profit. Such samples should be sent to a com-
mercial laboratory.
The State Laboratory does not make bacteriological
examinations for disease germs. Such examinations are
made by the State Board of Health at Jacksonville, Fla.,
which has entire charge of the public health.
We do not make a sanitary analysis.. We determine
the total dissolved solids in the sample quantitatively,
and report them as parts per 1,000,000, naming the prin-
cipal ingredients in the order of their predominance
qualitatively. We find Calcium Carbonate (lime), Sodium
Chloride (salt), Magnesium Sulphate (epsom salts),
Silica (sand), and Iron, is the general order of their
predominance, though on the coast, where the total dis-
solved solids amounts to 5,000 or more parts per 1,000,000,
Sodium Chloride (salt) is the predominant substance.
From a knowledge of the chemical analysis of a water,
unaccompanied by any further information, no conclu-
sion as to the potability and healthfulness of the water
can be deduced.
Therefore, ,we require the following information to bb
given in regard to the source of the water:
(1)' The source of the water: spring, lake, river,
driven well, dug well, bored well, artesian well or flow-
ing well; and also the depth of the water surface below
the top of the soil, and in cased wells, the depth of the
easing.










(2). The locality of the source of the water; town,
city or village; or the section, township and range.
No samples of water will be analyzed unless the name
and address of the sender is on the package for identi-
fication.
WE REQUIRE TWO GALLONS OF EACH SAMPLE OF WATER IN
A NEW JUG, STOPPED WITH A NEW CORK, AND SENT BY PRE-
PAID EXPRESS. We will not accept any sample of water
for analysis not in a new jug. Vessels previously used for
other purposes are never properly cleaned for sending
samples of water for analysis. Corks, once used for other
substances (molasses, vinegar, whiskey, kerosene, etc.) are
never properly cleaned.
NOTE: We find the waters of the State springs,
wells, driven wells and artesian wells generally very
pure and wholesome, with but little mineral impurity,
and that such as is not harmful. Except in cases of
gross carelessness, in allowing surface water to contam-
ir.ate the weJ1 or spring, the waters of the State are pure
and Wholesome. The deep wells of the State are noted
for their purity and healthfulness.

SOIL ANALYSIS.

Frequently samples of soil are sent in for analysis with
a request to advise as to the best methods of fertilizing.
There is but little information to be derived from a soil
analysis that would be of benefit to farmers. So much
depends on tilth, drainage, culture and other physical
conditions, that an analysis made under laboratory con-
ditions is of little value.
A chemical anaylsis of soil may indicate a very fertile
soil, rich in plant food, while the facts are the soil is
not productive. This is instanced by the rich sawgrass
muck lands and river bottoms of the State, that are
fertile chemically, but not productive until properly
drained; also by the arid lands of the West, rich in the
elements of plant food, but not productive until irri-
gated. Other soils, with less plant food, but on account
of proper physical conditions, culture and tilth, are ex-
ceedingly productive.
The average of thousands of analyses of Florida soils



.-










made by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
and the State Laboratory is as follows:
Nitrogen (per cent)............... 0.0413
Potash (per cent) .................. 0.0091
Phosphoric Acid (per cent)......... 0.1635
This is a fair average of all of the Norfolk and Ports-
mouth soil series of the State, which comprise by far the
greater portion of the State.
In this connection we quote from the report of the
Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station, Purdue Uni-
versity, Lafayette, Indiana, 1908, as follows:
"Soil Analysis of Little Value in Showing Fertilizer
Requirements.-The Chemical Department is called upon
to answer hundreds of letters of inquiry in relation to
agricultural chemical problems from people all over the
State. In this connection it might be well to say that
there is a widespread idea that the chemist can analyze
a sample of soil and, without further knowledge of the
conditions, write out a prescription of a fertilizer'which
will fill the needs of that particular soil.
"The Experiment Station does not analyze samples of
soil to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is no
chemical method known that will show reliably the avail-
ability of the plant food elements present in the soil, as
this is a variable factor, influenced by the kind of crop,
the type of soil, the climate and biological conditions;
hence, we do not recommend this method of testing soil.
"The method recommended by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot system, in which long, nar-
row strips of the field to be tested are measured off side
by side. The crop is planted uniformly over each. Dif-
ferent fertilizers are applied to the different plots, every
third or fourth one being left unfertilized. The produce
from these plots is harvested separately and weighed.
In this manner the farmer can tell what fertilizer is best
suited for his needs. As climatic conditions may influ-
ence the yield with different fertilizers, it is best to carry
on such tests for more than one year before drawing defi-
nite conclusions. There is positively no easier or shorter
method of testing the soil that we feel safe in recommend-
ing.









61

"Soil can be greatly improved by an intelligent rotqtiQn
of crops, the conservation of stable manures, and the use
of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need
have no fear that the proper application of commercial
fertilizer will injure the land."

ANALYSIS OF FOODS AND DRUGS,

Samples of foods and drugs are drawn under special
regulations as provided by law.
Application should be made to the Commissioner of
Agriculture or State Chemist for .the necessary blanks,
instructions, etc., for drawing and transmitting samples
of foods and drugs, including, drinks of all kinds.
FOOD AND DRUG SAMPLES NOT DRAWN AND TRANSMITTED
ACCORDING TO LAW. WILL NOT BB ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS.

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the
respective laws, including rules and regulations and
standards, by applying to the Conmmissioner of Aricul-
ture. Application for the Quarterly Bulletin of the State
Department of Agriculture, should also be mad6 to the
Commissioner of Agriculture, or State Chemist. The
Bulletins of the Florida Agriculture Experiment Station
can b6 had by application to the Director at Gainesville.

These regulations supersede and revoke all previous
regulations governing the drawing and transmitting of
samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial stock
feed.
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture
February 1'Oth, 1920.
Tallahassee, Fla.











NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT JULY
1, 1920, FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMMONIATBS.

Ammonia, sulph., bulk, f. o. b. works....
.................... per 100 lbs. 5.50 @ -
double bags, f. a. s. New York........ 7.00 @ 7.05
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia and
14 p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. fac-
tories ......................... 7.50 & 10
wet, acidulated, 6 p. c. ammonia, 3 p. c.
phosphoric acid, f. o. b. fish factory,
if made .................... .... 6.50 & 50
Ground fish scrap, 11 to 12 p. c. ammonia,
15 p. c. B. P. f. o. b. fish factory, ton 100.00 @ -
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. Chicago,
ground ......................... 7.50 & 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ........................ 7.50 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ........................ 750 & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago, 14
to 15 p. c ........................ 7.00 @ ,7.25
blood, f. o. b. Chicago................ 8.00 @ 8.25
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago. per ton 16.00 @ -
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago........ % unit 6.75 @ 7.25
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York ...................... 8.00 @ -
Tankage, New York ................... 7.75 & 10
Nitrate of soda............ per 100 lbs. 3.85 @ -
futures ......................... 4.10 @ 4.25

PHOSPHATES.

Acid, phosphate, basis 16%, bulk. .per ton 21.00 @ -
Southern ports .................. 21.00 @ 22.00
Bones, rough, hard ................... 30.00 @ 32.00











soft steamed, unground ........... 26.00 @ 27.00
ground, steamed, 11/4 p. c. ammonia
and 50 p. c. bone phosphate...... 38.00 @ 45.00
do., 3 and 50 p. c ................ 45.00 @ 50.00
raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and 50
p. c. bone phosphate............. 60.00 @ 62.50
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c., f. o. b. mines ................ 11.00 @ 11.50
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 75 p.
c., f. o. b. mines................. 12.00 @ 13.00
Florida, land pebble phosphate rock, 77
p. c., f. o. b. mines................ 14.00 @ 15.00
Florida high-grade phosphate hard rock,
77 p. e., f. o. b. mines............ 16.50 @ 17.50
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. e...
.........................per ton 15,00 @ 15.50
75 p. c............per ton, 2,240 lbs. 11.00 @ 12.00
70 p. c. ground .................. 10.50 @ 11.00
unground .................... 9.00 @ 10.00


POTASHE'.


American fertilizer, potash, in paper-lined
cars, f. o. b. works..........per unit
Muriate of potash, 80@85 per cent. K. C.
L., bags ..................per unit
Muriate of potash, min., 90@95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags,...........
Muriate of potash, min. 98 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags ..............
Sulphate of potash, 90@95 per cent., basis
90 per cent., in bags ..........per unit
First sorts potashes ........... per lb.


2.25 @

2.40 @

2.50 @


2.30


Nominal

3.50 @
15'@












MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JULY 1, 1920.

COMPOSITION

MATERIAL a
0. I A 1 0,
WVj P W < ar P <| P


Dissolved bone black. 1 16 .......
High grade acid phos-i
phate ............ 16 ...... .
Low grade acid phos-
phate ............. 14 ...... .
Hardwood ashes..... ...... ......
Hardwood ashes..... ...... ......
Domestic potash.......... ......
Nebraska potash..... ..... ......
Sulphate of potash.... ...... ......
Manure salt......... ...... ......
Kainit .............. .... ......
Nitrate of potash..... .. ......
Shrimp scrap........ 7......
Cotton seed meal..... 2.5...
Sheep manure....... 2 ....
Goat manure......... .
Ground tobacco stems. ...... ......
Steamed bone meal... 8 14
Raw bone meal...... 5 17
Low grade tankage... 4 8
Medium grade tankage 3 7
High grade tankage.. 1.5 3.5


..... . . .I


3
2
. 25
28
50
20
12
15
1
1.5|1
3.5
3
8


Dried blood ......... ...... ...... ......
Dried blood.......... ..... ......
Nitrate of soda....... ........... ...
Sulphate of ammonia. ..... ..... .....
Castor meal......... .......... .......


18
4
7
2.2
1.5
3
3
4.5
6.5
8


$34.UU

28J00

23.50
31.00
28.00
90.00
98.00
180.00
70.00
45.00
130.00
75.00
78.00
40.00
35.00
66.00
65.00
70.00
78.00
92.00


10 110.00
14 157.00
16 164.00
18 95.00
25 137.00
6.5| 70.00


Terms: 30 days net, or 5% discount for cash in 10 days.
The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing
and bagging any special or regular formula are $3.50 per
ton in excess of above prices.


' I~' ~~









65

STATE VALUATIONS

('Based on commercial value July 1, 1920, at Florida
factories in ton lots for cash, f. o. b.)

Available Phosphoric Acid............. 9c a pound
SInsoluble Phosphoric Acid.............. 2c a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). 38e a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ........ 18c a pound

If calculated by units:

Available Phosphoric Acid.............. $1.80 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.......... ..... 0.40 per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen).. 7.60 per unit
Potash ............................... 3.60 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $3.50 per ton for mixing and
bagging.

A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid..6.22 per cent x $1.80 = $11.20
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. .1.50 per cent x 0.40 = 0.60
Ammonia ................3.42 per cent x 7.60 = 25.99
Potash ............... .3.23 per cent x 3.60 = 11.63
Mixing and bagging........................... 350

Commercial value at seaports .............. $52.92
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid...8 per cent x $1.80 = $14.40
Ammonia ..................2 per cent x 7.60 = 15.20
Potash .....................2 per cent x 3.60 7.20
Mixing and bagging........................... 3.50

Commercial value at seaports................ $40.30

The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.

5-Bul.


*> .- : *.












STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or de-
cline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked, "What is Smith's
Fruit and Vine worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined
and the inquirer informed what the,cost of the necessary
materials to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The,"State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for-cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values," April 1, 1920, are nominal.

FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by. 1.85










67

Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by..... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply.. 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply.. 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (KO) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. nitrate of soda, and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent.-by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiva-
lent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214, and you
get 18.90 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K2O), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
Super cent. actual potash (K20).













COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Total
Ammonia. Phosphoric Potash.
Acid.
Nitrate of Soda.......... 17 to 19 ............ ...........
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 26 ......................
Dried Blood ............ 12 to 17 ........... ............
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1 to 4............
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap........ 6 to 11 3 to 8...........
Cotton Seed Meal........ 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13 to 1 1 to 2 1 to 2
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.
Available Insoluble
Ammonia Phos. Acid. Phos. Acid.

Florida Pebble Phosphate. ............ ............ 26 to 8
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ..................... 30 to 85
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 2
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 1 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Actual Amona. Phos. Lime.
Potash. Am'on Acid. Lme
Muriate of Potash...... 50 to 62 .......................
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 .......................
Carbonate 'of Potash.... 5 to 60 ......... ......... .........
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ..................
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag. 5 to 30 .................. .......
Kainit ................ 12 to 13 .........................
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20 ......................
Cbtton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8 ....... to 2 ........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 ......... to 1j35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 3 to 9 2 t 4 .........
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.50 0.30 0.30
Horse Manure (fresh).. .50 0.60 0.25 0.80
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.60 1.00 0.3 0.85
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.50 0.75 0.50 0.70








69

AVERAGE COMPOSITION .OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.



NAME OF FEED. /
cB a"


Maiden Cane Hay..... 28.60 11.60 42.40 2.60 4.20

Natal Graas Hay...... 36.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00

Para Grass Hay...... 31.20 8.00 45.70 1.60 6.20

Rhodes Grass Hay.... 41.10 7.70 36.80 1.30 6.60

Beggarweed Hay...... 24.30 21.60 35.10 4.10 4.00

Kudzu Vine Hay...... 32.30 15.90 33.00 1.60 6.80

Cow Pea Hay......... 20.50 13.00 45.90 4.20 7.50

Velvet Bean Hay..... 29.70 14.70 41.0b 1.70 5.70

Velvet Beans ......... 7.00 21.00 53.10 5.40 3.60

Velvet Bean Hulls.... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30

Velvet Beans and'Hulls 10.71 19.40 50.60 4.50 3.50

Cow Peas............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1:40 3.20

Soy Bean Meal....... 4.50 48.40 27.50 6.40 4.40

Peanut Vine Meal..... 29.60 9.90 38.40 6.30 6.60

Cotton Seed.......... 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 3.50

Cotton Seed Hulls.... 44.40 4.00 36.60 2.00 2.60

Bright Cotton S'd Meal 9.40 38.62 28.60 7.80 6.80








70

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continued).


I ) i
w^'a
*,T~ ~ ~ i xm/^m-Ji.ik :


Dark Cotton Seed Meal

Corn Grain...........

Corn Meal............

Hominy Feed.........

Corn and Cob Meal....

Ground Corn Shucks..

Ground Corn Cobs....
Equal parts, Corn in
Shucks & V'lv't Beans

Oats (grain) .........

Rice (grain).........

Rice Bran............

Wheat (grain) .......

Wheat Bran.........

Wheat Middlings .....

Wheat Mixed Feed....

Wheat Ship Stuff.....

Dry Jap Sugar Cane..


Z
co .0
gl


na~amr wm pru~ru.


-V 04


20.00 23.15

2.10 10.50

1.90 9.70

4.00 10,50

5.80 7.50

30.20 2.80

30.00 3.00

16.03 12.56

9.50 11.80

0.20 7.40

9.50 12.10

1.80 11.90

9.00 15.40

5.40 15.40

7.80 16.90

5.60 14.60

26.20 2.30


5.00


37.10

69.60

68.70

65.30

70.80

54.60

56.60

53.71

59.70

79.20

49.90

71.90

53.90

59.4(

54.40

59.80

62.60


5.40

3.80

7.80

3.10

0.60

0.70

2.32

5.00

0.40

8.80

2.10

4.00

4.10

4.80

5.00

1.50


1.50

1.40

2.60

1.20

1.90

1.60

4.33

3.00

0.40

10.00

1.80

5.80

3.20

5.30

3.70

2.80








71

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS-(Continued).



NAMB OF FEED. C



Peanut Hulls ..... 56.60 7.30 18.90 2.60 5.50

Peanut, with Hulls. 16.40 20.40 16.40 36.20 4.10

Peanut Kernel .... 2.60 26.40 17.50 44.90 2.20

Peanut Meal (with-
out Hulls) ...... 5.10 47.60 23.70 8.00 4.90

Peanut Feed (in-
cluding Hulls).... 23.40 28.40 27.00 11.00 5.50










COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED
STUFF FOR 1920.

For the season 1920 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation April 1st.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard ig fixing the com-
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:
$3.25 per sack of 100 lbs., $1.82 per bu., 56 lbs.
To.find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.
Protein, 6.8e per pound ................ $1.36 per unit
Starch and sugar, 3.1c per pound......... .62 per unit
Fat, 6.8c per pound................... 1.36 per unit

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

Corn and Oats, Equal Parts:
Protein ........................11.15 x 1.36, $15.16
Starch and Sugar.... ........... 64.65 x .62, 40.08
Fat ............................ 5.20 x 1.36, 7.07

State value, tper ton....................... $62.31

EXAMPLE NO. 2.
Corn:
Protein ........................10.50 x 1.36, $14.28
Starch and Sugar ................ 69.60 x .62, 43.15
Fat ............................ 5.40 x 1.36, 7.34

State value, per ton...................... $64.77








73

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free 'of charge, the
respective laws, including rules and regulations and
standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissioner of Agriculture, or.State
Chemist. The bulletins of the Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station can be had by application to the Director
at Gainesville.
The form letter for transmitting special samples of fer-
tilizers or feeding stuffs as shown in the rules and regu-
lations is adopted and must be explicitly complied with
in order to obtain a legal certificate of analysis.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1920. GORDON HART, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. D FOR WHOM SENT.


o 'a
...... 1 ....I . I _
--L. I.~~~~ ~ Cd ,..l_ 1 I---------


Fertilizer ...................... 5319 9.651 6.85
Fertilizer ......................5320 7.521 8.25

"Nitrapo" ............. ..... 5321 0.87 .....

Fertilizer ......................5322 12.17 6.80

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5323 7.02 7.12

Fertilizer ...................... 5324 9.77 9.80

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 5325114.22 5.02

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5326 8.801 4.93


8.25

0.35


1.75

0.48

0.60

5.55

0.82


4.55

4.00

18.35

4.53

6.14

5.78

4.87

4.88


4.32

3.26

16.08

4.06

5.40

0.69

2.55

2.84


J. L. Dillard, Orlando.

J. H. Finch, Marianna.

J. F. Smith,, Sanford.

Joe Fernandez, Sanford.

H. H. Chappell, Sanford.

Harley Ward, Winter Park.

M. E. Card, Fort Pierce.

Borax-None, A. R. Meriwether, Sanf'd.


V








Mixed Fertilizer ...............5327 9.87 5.12 1.70

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5328 13.35 8.80 0.75

Cotton Seed Meal .............. 5329 8.72 ..... .....

Fertilizer ................. 5330 0.22 ..... .....

Fertilizer (B 4-26-20) .......... 5331 8.15 11.12 0.50

Fertilizer (A 4-26-20) .......... 5332 9.75 8.65 2.00

Fertilizer. .................... 5333 14.6211.55 1.15

Fertilizer ....................... 5334 20.00 10.30 0.63

Fertilizer ...................... 5335 9.02 9.77 1.00

Mixed Fertilizer ................ 5336 9.72 6.85 3.00

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5337 7.45 4.55 2.35

Mixed Fertilizer ...............5338 9.82 5.20 4.40

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5339 8.37 4.50 2.32

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 534017.52 5.08 2.72

Fertilizer .................... 5341 8.32 6.03 6.92

Fertilizer ......................53421 9.25 8.18 6.07


6.82 4.91 5.98 Borax-None, L. G. Hunter, Sanford.

9.55 3.73 4.14 Borax-None, L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

..... 9.10 .... Palmer Slyvester, Hinson.

... ..... 48.75 A. J. Dozier, Arcadia.

11.62 4.45 2.46 S. Wittenstein, Orlando.

10.75 3.36 7.10 S. Wittenstein, Orlando.

12.70 2.09 2.80 G. E. Kemp, Havana.

10.93 0.00 3.97 G. E. Kemp, Havana.

10.77 5.05 3.92 L. B. Skinner, Dunedin.

9.85 4.91 5.30 Tropical Vegetable Co., Sanford.

6.90 5.27 5.22 W. J. Thigpen, Sanford.

9.60 4.24 3.30 Joe Fernandez, Sanford.

6.82 5.09 4.64 L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

7.80 3.99 2.34 D. S. Graham, Chiefland.

12.95 4.61 2.12 Dr. S. McAlroy, Orlando.

14.25 4.35 1.90 J. R. Springer, Orlando.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSIS, 1920.-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. '- FOR WHOM SENT.
.El '. 0 . . 0
0g ;3 -8 'a I
C3 0 14 0 0
S I E- N


I I I I


Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5343 11.07

Goat Manure ................. 5344 18.80

Mixed Fertilizer ...............5345 7.57

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5346 7.47

Fertilizer...................... 5347 9.22

Fertilizer ..................... 534810.70

Fertilizer ...................... 5349 8.82

Fertilizer ...................... 5350 5.47

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5351 5.57

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ...... 5352 8.171


5.13

2.07

6.95

5.17

8.35

9.63

9.50

8.97

5.40

4.85


7


.021 9.15 4.36 3.341Borax 0.50, A. P. Connelly, Sanford.

.081 2.15 2.29 2.74 Borax-None. Royal Fern Co., Sanford.

.37113.32 3.93 2.08 Borax, 0.0065. Royal Fern Co., Sanford. c

.55 5.72 4.82 3.18 Meriwether & Flowers, Sanford.

.25 10.60 3.47 4.76 E. S. Lawrence, Orlando.

.8712.50 4.04 5.54 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

.50113.00 5.14 3.48 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

.45 10.42 3.6.4 0.70 Geo. W. Hopkins, Deer Park.

.00 8.40 4.95 2.10 J. M. Evans, Sanford.

.1011.95 4.79 3.86 J M. Evans, Sanford.







Mixed Fertilizer .............. 5353 10.50 5.67 4.50 10.17 4.73
Fertilizer ...................... 5354 9.42 8.93 0.821 9.75 3.77
Fertilizer ...................... 5355 7.75 8.25 1.25 9.50 3.18
Raw Ground Bone .............. 5356 6.87 8.88114.62 23.50 5.091.
Fertilizer ...................... 5357 9.65 11.23 2.07 13.30 4.55
Fertilizer ...................... 535 1 9.57 9.82 0.80 10.62 5.001
I I I I


Thrasher Bros., Sanford.
H. S. Miller, Homestead.
The Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto.
H. E. Heitman, Ft. Myers.
Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.
H. Levine, Orlando.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1920. GORDON HART, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by Inspectors Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1401.
Deficiencies greater than 0.20% are distinguished by Black Face Type.


Phosphoric Acid.
S--BY WHOM AND
NAME, OR BRAND. WHERE
o 0 MANUFACTURED.

I I 3 | I ..
cdr V. 1 10 0 0 ______
---------------------^---------------- --J --T --- ..


Nitrate of Soda ................. 2562 Guaranteed .....
Found ..... 1.79

H. G. Dried Blood .......... 2563 Guaranteed .....
Found..... 9.81

L. G. Blood and Bone .......... 2564 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 5.08

Castor Meal ................... 2565 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 7.92

N. A. C. Sulphate Potash ...... 566 guaranteed ....
Found..... 4.36


......... I. ... 8.00 ....... Amer. Agricultural Chem-
..... ..... ..... 19.07 ..... ical Co., Jacksonville.
I I I
..... ..... .... 16.00 ..... Amer. Agricultural Chem.-
..... ..... ... 18.05 ..... ical Co., Jacksonville.
..... ..... .... 6.00 ..... Amer. Agricultural Chem-
7.62 9.70 7.32 8.37 ..... ical Co., Jacksonville.
..... ..... ..... 5.00 0.50 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
..... .......... 6.27 0.46 Co., Jacksonville.
..... /.......... ..... 50.00 Nitrate Agencies Co.,
..... ..... ..... 43.36 Jacksonville.








N. A. C. Special Mixture ........ 2567 Guaranteed
iFound.....
Fertilizer ...................... 2568 Guaranteed
Found.....
Extra Fruit and Vine .......... 2569 Guaranteed
Found.....
Exchange Perfection Citrus G'wr. 2570 Guaranteed
Found.....

Cane and Corn Special ........ 2571 Guaranteed
I Found.....

Exchange Summer Citrus Fertz.. 2572 Guaranteed
Sound.....

Gulf Special Grower........... 2573 Guaranteed
Found.....

Exchange Citrus Fertz. No. 7.... 2574 Guaranteed
SI Found.....

Bowker's Nassau Guano........12575 Guaranteed
Found.....
German Kainit ............... 2576 Guaranteed
Found.....


9.00
7.24

10.00
11.32

10.00
9.05

10.00
7.50

12.00
11.02

10.00
8.65

8.00
7.80

10.00
9.22

10.00
10.60

12.00
2.82


..... .... 5.00 3.00
0.20 9.13 6.73 3.54

1.50 ..... 5.00 5.00
2.60 9.45 5.14 5.44

1.00 9.00 3.00 3.00
7.00115.30 4.44 3.46

..... 10.00 4.00 3.00
2.00 9.60 4.85 3.52

..... 10.00 3.00 1.00
5.00114.00 3.51 2.20

1.00 ..... 2.50 5.00
2.87 10.80 3.18 4.86

1.00 7.00 4.00 1.00
9.50 15.65 5.15 1.3(

1.00 ..... 4.00 4.00
3.1210.50 4.59 4.40

2.00 .... 2.00 2.00
3.50 10.90 2.71 2.22

.. .. ... 12.C00
..... . ... 2.90


INitrate Agencies Co.,
Jacksonville.

Amer. Agricultural Chem-
ical Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa,
Fla.

Exchange Supply Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

West Coast Fertilizer Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

Exchange Supply Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa,
Fla.

[Exchange Supply Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

IThe Coe-Mortimer Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.

irginia-Carolina Chemical
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


I








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER AN. ALYSIS, 1920.-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.
0. BY WHOM AND
NAME, OB BRAND. 88 &JB M WHERE
S g e MANUFACTURED.
AI i l ;Z


H. G. Sea Island Fertz. ........ 2577Guaranteed 10.00 9.00 1.00 ..... 2.00 3.00 Virginia-Carolina Chemical
Found..... 9.95 9.22 0.75 9.97 1.91 3.46 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Special Tree Mixture .......... 2578 Guaranteed 12.00 5.00 ..... 8.00 4.00 1.00 West Coast Fertilizer Co.,
Found..... 10.40 6.40 8.57 14.97 4.00 1.52 Tampa, Fla.

Acid Phosphate ............... 2579 Guaranteed 10.00 16.00 1.00 ..... ..... .....[ Armo ur Fertilizer Co.,
S Found..... 9.70 15.77 1.10 16.871 ..... ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

Sweet Potato Special .......... 2580IGuaranteedl 10.001 6.00 ..... 6.00 3.00 2.00 West Coast Fertilizer Co.,
SFound..... 12.67 5.95 8.30 14.25 3.18 2.18 Tampa, Fla.

Bakers Fruit and Vine Manure .. 2581 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 3.00 11.00 3.00 5.00 Amer. Agricultural Chem-
] Fiound ..... 6.47 7.55 7.00[ 14.35 3.87 4.80 ical Co., Jacksonville
S I I 1
General Crop Fertz. (No. 3) .... 2582 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 3.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
Found.... 13.82 8.25 0.60 8.85 4.09 4.66 Jacksonville, Fla.

Special Vegetable Mixture ...... 2583 Guaranteed 12.00| 6.00 ..... 8.001 4.00 1.00 West Coast Fertz. Co.,
S [Found..... 14.221 6.581 7.5714.151 3.811 1.481' Tampa, Fla.


I *







Special Fruit and Vine ........ 2584|Guaranteed 10.00] 8.00 1.001 9.001 3.001 5.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
I Found..... 10.421 7.75 5.87113.621 3.691 6.781 Tampa, Fla.
5 80] 04.001 ..... .001 3.00iExchange
SExcahnge Perfected Citrus G'wr.12585|Guaranteed)10.00 6.00 4.00.00 3.00|Exchange S u p 1 y Co.,
S Found..... 110.00 5.80 6.30 12.10j 4.091 3.021 Tampa, Fla.
I I
Extra Fruit and Vine .......... 2586 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 1.00 9.00 3.00 3.001The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
IFound..... 8.90 7.45 8.0515.50 3.23 3.321 Tampa, Fla.
2587 Guaranteed1000 8.00 1.00.... 4.00 2.00 Suspended for further in-
I Found..... 11.72 7.65 0.85 8.50 2.94 2.581 vestigation.
Special Fruit and Vine ........ 2588Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 1.00 9.00 3.001 5.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
Found..... 8.20 7.65 5.55 13.20 3.181 5.701 Tampa, Fla.
I I I I I I
Wauchula Cuke Special ........ 2589 Guaranteed 12.00 6.00 .... 8.001 5.001 2.00 West Coast Fertiliz3r Co., co
Found..... 10.35 7.30 5.70 13.00| 6.20 1.52 Tampa, Fla.
Special Vegetable (No. 1) ...... 25901Guaranteed 8.00 5.00 ..... 10.00 4.001 2.00 West Coast Fertilizer Co.,
Found..... 14.74 6.90 5.10 12.00 4.00 1.44 Tampa, Fla.
I I I I
Special Formula for Peanuts .... 2591 Guaranteed 10.00 10.001 2.00 ..... 1.00| 1.00 Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
Found..... 9.05 10.65 0.8011.45 0 1.271 0.901 Montgomery, Ala.
Pure Gold Mixture ............. 2592Guaranteed 11.00 11.001 2.00 ..... 3.00..... Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
Found.... 8.50 10.901 0.75111.651 3.101..... Montgomery, Ala.
Early Bird Florida Vege. ManureL2593 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 0.50.... 4.00 3.00 Osceola Fertilizer Co.,
ound..... 7.85 5.43 1.801 7.23 3.96 3.14 Jacksonville, Fla.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTU: E-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
T,':. -'r -fT'NC i,-FTlV SEC'TION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1920. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemili anti tLaae Impctura nu1 ec cluns 1, 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1906.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND. NAME AND ADDRESS OF
E MANUFACTURER.
-L I U.. -_- I C !

Mim Sweet Feed ............ 3049Guaranteed 15.00 9.00' 50.00 2.00|...... The Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
Found..... 13.70i 9.08 51.93i 3.201 5.94 Memphis, Tenn.
Peerless Horse and Mule Feed.. 3050!Guaranteod 12.00 10.00' 55.00 2.00 ..... Omaha Alfalfa Milling Co.,
[Found.. 14.31' 1.19 54.35E 2.76 4.481 Omaha, Neb.
Little Jo Dairy Feed ........ 3051Guaranteed 12.00i 0.00 55.001 2.00 ......Just Mills, Nashville, Tena.
SFound..... 9.66 11.10 54.421 3.52 8.59,
Ky. Choice Mixed Feed ........ 3052 Guaranteedi 8.50 15.00j 57.50' 4.00 ...... The Acme Mills, Hopkins--
Found..... 7.20 25.45 46.751 4.001 7.001 ville, Ky.
Southern Scratch Feed ........ 3053 Guaranteed 10.00 9.00[ 60.00 2.50 ......'J. T. Gibbons, New Orleans,
I|Found..... 2.32 11.18 68.98 2.75 1.721 La.
Dried Beet Pulp .............. 3054 Gualanteed| 20.00 8.001 58.00 0.50 2.50|The Larrowe Milling Co.,
S ]Found.....I 15.57i 10.18 ,7.951 0.23[ 3.65| Detroit, Mich.









Good Cotton Seed Me1l ...... 3055 Guaranteed 1 1.00
j Found..... 13.23

Buco Cotton Seed Feed ...... 305C Gurant : 27.0
Found.. .... 21.72'

Purity Wheat Feed ............ 307 CGurant ed 8.00(
Found.. 6.75

Wheat Bran with Screenings .. 3058 Guaranteed 11 .00
Sound ..... 9 .2

Schumacher Feed ............ 3059 Guarants d; 11.00
iFcund ..... 7.:71

Second-class Cotton Seed Meal. 30C, Guaranited .. ..
Found .... ......

Second-class Cotton Seed Meal.. 3061 Gui. ant te3 ......
S Found ..... ......

Chieftain Horse Feed ........ 3062 Guarantcedi 12.00
Fcund..... 12.1C

Butter Fat Dairy Feed ........ 3063iGuaranteedi 16.501
|Found..... 13.07

Tip-Top Molasses Feed ....... :064 Guaranted el 15.0
1 i r fns ..... 1 15. 0l i


26.00' 27.001 5.50 ...... Central Oil Co., Macon, Ga.
33.221 33.551 5.501 5.851

20.00 38.00| 3.50 . ...The Buckeye Cotton O'1 Co.,
17.55 11.82 4.02 4.071 Cincinnati, O.

15.00 55.00 3.50 .. .. .John Wade & Sons, Mem-
16.021 56.53 3.351 5.35, phis, Tenn.

15.00 55.00 3.001.. .. Geo. P. Plant Milling Co.,
15.18 52.871 3.O0 6.551 St. Louis, Mo.

10.001 62.001 3.25 ... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
13.25, 56.31 4.501 7.47; cago, Ill.

3. ...... ...... ...... Central Oil Co., Macon, Ga.
35.02 ...... .. . ......

36.05. ...... .... ....... Central Oil Co., Macon, Ga.
29.35 ....... ...... ......

0.00: 59.00 2.00 ....G. E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
9.4S 53.101 2.34 6.60 phis, Tenn.

18,001 55.001 4.00 ..... .Golden Grain Milling Co.,
19.83 43.051 4.151 .381 East St. Louis, Ill.

.09' 55.00 2.001...... .National Milling Co:, Macon,
0.r1' 49.521 2.021 7.54 Ga.








OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSIS, 1920-Continued.



NAME, OR BRAND. & NAME AND ADDRESS OF
c ?>, MANUFACTURER
5 G39 0 *S^" .
z S g
i-) 0d j PH Z- e <


Opco No. 2 Medium Grain Mix- 3065 Guaranteed[ 15.00[ 9.00
ture ........................ Found..... 10.19' 9.78

Golden Sweet Mule Feed ...... 3066 Guaranteed 18.00 9.00
Found..... 16.36 9.76[

Big Mule Molasses Feed Mix- 3067 Guaranteed 15.00i 10.00
ture ........................ Found..... 14.641 8.88[

Peanut Feed ................. 3068 Guaranteed 27.00 ..... .
Found..... 38.11 24.001

Peanut Feed ................. 3069Guaranteed 27.00. ...
IFound..... 34.241 24.04
Peanut Feed .................. 3070 Guaranteed 27.00'......
Found..... 33.75' 24.921

Peanut Feed ................. 3071 Guaranteed 27.00 ......
Found ..... 32.32 24.32


48.00 2.00 ...... Owensboro Produce Co.,
54.711 2.68 7.061 Owensboro, Ky.

55.00 2.00 ...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
52.621 2.071 6.73 cago, Ill.

50.00 2.50 ...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
55.181 2.50 6.21 cago, Ill.

22.00 ...... ...... Camilla Cotton Oil and Fer-
19.46 5.51 3.87! tilizer Co., Camilla, Ga.

22.001...... ...... Camilla Cotton Oil and Fer-
21.721 5.55 5.641 tilizer Co., Camilla, Ga.

22.00 ...... ...... Camilla Cotton Oil and Fer-
20.53 6.05 5.76 tilizer Co., Camilla, Ga.

22.00] ............ Camilla Cotton Oil and Fer-
22.601 6.271 6.10 tilizer Co., Camilla, Ga.









Second-class Cotton Seed Meal. 3072 Guaranteed ......
Found..... ......

Look-Out Horse and Mule Feed. 3073 Guaranteed 15.00'
Found..... 13.141

Over-the-Top Horse and Mule 3074 Guaranteed 15.00
Feed ....................... Found.... 11.83

Stra-Lad Horse Feed .......... 3075 Guaranteed 11.00
Found..... 9.121

Vaca Dairy Feed ............ 307 Guaranteed 29.00
Found..... 27.70

Wneat Middlings with Screen- 3077 Guaranteed 6.50
ings ........................ Found..... 6.351

Purity Wheat Feed .........3078 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 7.60

Purina O-Molene Feed ...... 13079 Guaranteedl 8.001
Found..... 6.271

Molasses Feed ............... 3080Guaranteed 15.00
Found..... 13.67

Buckra Horse and Mule Feed.. 3081 Guaranteedl 15.001
| Found..... 12.11;


36.05 ............ ......!Florida Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
37.85 ..... ....... ...... sonville, Fla.

9.00 45.001 2.00 ...... Monarch Mills, Chattanooga,
10.06 48.90! 2.76 6.91 Tenn.

10.00 50.00 2.50 ...... South Georgia Milling Co.,
10.87' 47.43 2.63 7.511 Valdosta, Ga.

9.50 55.00 2.50 ...... Straton-Landish Milling Co.,
11.501 61.661 3.701 3.201 Milwaukee Wis.

14.50 38.00j 2.50 ...... Memphis Cotton Hull and Fi-
15.14 39.62 2.52 3.97 bre Co., Memphis, Tenn.

17.00 55.00 4.00...... Geo. P. Plant Milling Co.,
17.37 56.46 4.35 4.42 St. Louis, Mo.

15.00 55.00 3.50 ...... IJohn Wade & Sons, Mem-
15.80 55.561 4.321 5.501 phis, Tenn.

9.70 61.00 3.20 .....Purina Mills, St. Louis, Mo.
10.23 65.70 3.00 3.211

9.00 55.00 2.00 ...... J. T. Gibbons, New Orleans,
10.21 52.19 2.12 7.43 La.

9.00 54.001 2.001 ...... Dyersburg Milling Co., Dy-
9.31 50.001 1.80 8.56 ersburg, Tenn.
1 I 1








OFFICIAL FEEDING S



NAME, OR BRAND.
o

T-
Mim Sweet Feed ............ 13082 Guaranteed
Found.....
Vaca Dairy Feed .............. 3083 Guaranteed
S Found.....
Scoco Cotton Seed Feed ...... 3081 Guaranteed
S Found.....

Kamilla Brand feed .......... 3085 Guwranteed
S Found.....

Best Yet Molasses Feed ...... .3086,Guaranteed
Found.....

Purina O-Mcline Fezd ........ 3087 Guarantaedl
S Found.....

Peerless Horse and Mule Feed |3088 Guaranteed
I |Found.. . I


TUFF ANALYSIS, 1920-Continued.



NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.


15.001 9.00 50.001 2.00 ...... The Buckeye Cctton Oil Co.,
16.38 10.321 48.76'i 2.92 7.95 Memphis, Tenn.

29.00 14.50 38.001 2.50 ...... Memphis Cotton Hull and
30.40j 18.16 34 15 2.52 3.62 Fibre Co., Memphis, Tenn.

27.001 20.00 38.001 3.50 ...... The Southern Cotton Oil Co.,
19.60 24.57 35.89i 3.57 5.10 Pensacola, Fla.

25.00 30.00 22.001 6.00 ...... Camilla 0:1 and Fertilizer
32.941 27.03 20.611 6.701 3.92 Co., Camilla, Ga.

15.00i 9.001 55.00; 2.00...... National Milling Co., Macon,
20.321 12.34 43.091 2.741 9.221

8.00| 9.70 61.001 3.20 ......|Purina Mills, St Louis, Mo.
9.531 10.02 62.88' 2.50 4.47

12.001 10.00 55.001 2.00 ...... Omaha Alfalfa M'lling Co,
13.37 10.38 54.031 1.911 5.11 Omaha, Neb.







Oatrashun Stock Feed ........ 3089 Guaranteed 12.00 9.001 59.001 2.00|...... G. E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
S IFound..... 14.19 10.81j 53.30| 1.97 6.63 ph.s, Tenn.
I I I
Alfo-Sweet H. & M. Feed ...... 3090|Guaranteed 13.50 9.00 55.00 2.00 ...... Alfccoln Milling Co., East St.
S Found..... 12.75 10.25 54.08 2.39 7.59 Louis, 111.
M lasses Feed ............. ......3091Guaranteed 15.00 9.00 55.00 2.001...... J. T. Gibbons, New Orleans,
I Found..... 14.731 11.251 48.45 2.831 6.991 La.
Vaca Dairy Feed .............. |3092Guaranteed 29.00 14.50 38.00 2.50|...... Memphis Cctton Hull and Fi-
S Found..... 26.72 14.92 40.69 2.50| 3.85 bre Co., Memphis, Tenn.
I I I










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY
FOOD AND DRUG SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.- SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSIS, 1920. A. M. HENRY, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 12, Act Approved June 5, 1911.
BEVERAGES.


LABEL.


CONTENTS


Beverage No. 4. .................... ............

Beverage No. ..................... ............

[Beverage No. 6 .................... ............

N. A. B. in bottles, Nick Peters ..................

N. A. B. on draft, A. D. Lindsay. ...... ............

Apple Cider, C. H. Knight. ......... ...........

Virginia Dare Wine, Nick Peters .... ............


BY WHOM SENT.


9.56 ...... RL. Millinor, Madison.

8.47 ...... R. L. Millinor, Madison.

7.56 ...... R. L. Millinor, Madison.

0.24 ...... J. H. Harvell, Milton.

0.47 ...... J. H. Harvell, Milton.

0.24 ...... J. H. Harvell, Milton.

0.30 ...... J. H. Harvell, Milton.








2008 Buck .............................. ............. 6.481 ......W. F. Banks, Tallahassee.
2012 Canadian Club Whiskey ........................ 41.651 ......Prosecuting Attorney, Palm Beach County.
2013 Old Irish Whiskey. .............................. 42.101...... Prosecuting Attorney, Palm Beach Ccunty.
2014 Beverage No. 7. ................... ............ .7.09. ...... R. L. Millinor, Madison.
2019 Wine, Ida Miller. .............................. 13.61 W. H. Lyle, Live Oak.
I |









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OIL SECTION. E. T. CASLER, Asst. Chemist.
OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920.
Samples Taken by State Inspectors Under Act Approved June 4th, 1919.
Deficiencies Below Standard Are Distinguished by Black Face Type.

Q" 0 0" '
S ... 0 o o a NAME OF MANUFACTURER
0 0 SENT IN BY AND PLACE TAKEN
S 4 i P INSPECTOR


Florida Not Not
Standard ...... .Above 20 50 90 95 Above
Adopted 60 225
436 Gasoline 58.2 48 27 70 92 97 220 W, H. Mapoles.. Gulf Refining Co., Woodville.
437 Gasoline 59.1 43 30 65 93 97 217 W. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Wakulla.

438 |Casolinc 59.1 48 35 69 93 97 216 iW. H. Mapolcs.. rhe Texas Co., St. Marks.
439 [Gasoline 58.1 48 29 65 92.5 96 211 W, H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Crawfordville.

440 JGasoline 59.1 45 28 62 92 96 215 j W H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Wakulla.

441 Gasoline| 58.1 50 25 62 93 97 218 IG. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Boca Grande.

442 jGasoline 59.5 50 39 76 95 1 97 202 1G. B. Hills... .. Gulf Refining Co., Boca Grande.







443 |Gasoline 58.11 47 42 76 95 97 205 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Arcadia.
444 IGasolinel 57.71 55 31 67 93 97 218 G. B. Hills...... The Texas Co., Arcadia.

445 Gasoline 58.3 49 28 63 93 97 215 G. B. Hills ..... Standard Oil Co., Arcadia.

446 IGasoline 58.0 46 43 75 95 97 206 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Arcadia.

447 ]Gasoline 58.7 47 27 62 93 97 218 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Baldwin.

448 Gasoline 58.7 48 27 62 93 97 217 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Baldwin.

449 Gasoline 59.0 46 27 62 93 97 218 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Macclenny.
450 IGasoline 59.0 45 36 69 93 97 215 7. M. Johns..... The Texas Co., Macclenny.

451 IGasoline 59.0 45 28 62 93 97 21,8 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co, Macclenny.

452 Gasoline 59.0 44 27 62 93 97 217 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co, Macclenny.

453 Gasoline 58.1 47 43 75 95 97 208 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Plant City.

454 Gasoline 58.3 48 25 60 93 97 218 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Plant City.

455 Gasoline 58.1 48 43 75 95 97 208 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Plant City.

456 Gasoline 58.3 48 25 60 92 97 219 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Plant City.

457 Gasoline 58.1 46 43 75 95 97 209 G. B. Hills..... Gulf Refining Co., Plant City.

458 Gasoline 58.11 47 43 75 95 97 208 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Plant City.









OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920-Continued.


o o,- O NAME OF MANUFACTURER
a) F SENT IN BY
3 I INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
4 A4 I INSPECTOR

z ^ d El z 4 _P. QO
Florida
Standard Not Not
Addpted Above 20 50 90 95 Above
S60 _ 225

459 Gasoline 59.0 43 28 63 93 97 218 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Titusville.

460 Gasoline 59.1 47 35 68 93 97 216 E. M. Johns..... Gulf Refining Co., Titusville.

461 Gasoline 59.1 43 29 63 93 97 218 IE. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Cocoa.

462 Gasoline 58.8 48 34 73 93 97 218 E. M. Johns..... Gulf Refining Co., Cocoa.

463 Gasoline 59.0 43 28 63 93 97 218 E. M. Johns..... IStan.ird Oil Co., Cocoa.

464 Gasoline 59.1 45 27 66 93 97 221 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Cocoa.

465 Gasoline 60.3 43 35 69 93 97 215 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

466 Gasoline 59.6 45 32 66 92 97 218 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

467 Gasoline 59.5 45 31 66 92 97 217 G. B. Hills..... Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.







468 Gasoline 58.5 48 27 62 93 97 216 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

469 Gasoline 59.0 45 27 64 93 97 219 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

470 Gasoline 58.5 48 27 62 93 97 216 IG. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Port Tampa.

471 Gasoline 59.0 47 28 65 93 97.5 218 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., New Smyrna.

472 Gasoline 59.0 47 27 61 92 97 221 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., New Smyrna.

473 Gasoline 59.0 54 35 74 94 97.5 217 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., New Smyrna.

474 Gasoline 58.8 49 27 63 93 97 220 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., DeLand.

475 Gasoline 59.0 48 34 69 93 97 216 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., DeLand.

476 Gasoline 58.8 53 34 69 93 97 220 E. M. Johns..... Gulf Refining Co., DeLand.

477 Gasoline 61.6 42 47 79 95 97 218 E. M. Johns.... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

478 Gasoline 58.9 46 28 63 93 97 216 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

479 Gasoline 58.6 49 34 70 93 97 217 E. M. Johns..... Th Texas Co., Jacksonville.

480 Gasoline 58.6 51 34 70 93 97 215 E. M. Johns..... The Texas Co., Jacksonville.

481 Gasoline 58.9 46 28 62 92 97 218 E. M. Johns.....I The Texas Co., Jacksonville.

482 IGasoline 60.7 46 45 78 93.5 97 229 E. M. Johns..... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

483 Gasoline 58.4 52 47 77 95 97 209G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Bartow.











OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920-Continued.


6 -i
o ,p: a


Florida ,
Slind ard I.\n
Adopted v c

484 |Gasoline[ 58.9[ 48

485 IGasolinel 57.71 56

486 Gasolinel 57.71 54

487 jGasolinel 58.61 49

488 IGasolinel 58.31 46

489 |Gasoline[ 58.81 50

490 |Gasoline] 59.01 49

491 Gasoline 58.81 50

492 Gasolinel 59.01 47


U)
2-
C)

dc


*0
U)

Ct 0

0.2


no 0o


93

93.5

93

93

95

92

92

93

92.5


a
0 E
o




Not
0, Alhnve
225


97.5

97.5

97.5

97

97

97

97
97

96


216 G.

218 |G.

218 ;G.

222 |G.

i215 iG.

225 VV.

220 -V.

213 W.

219 VW.


SENT IN BY
INSPECTOR


NAME OF MANUFACTURER
AND PLACE TAKEN


B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Bartow.

B. Hills...... The Texas Co., Bartow.

B. Hills...... The Texas Co., Bowling Green.

B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Bowling Green.

1. Hills ...... Culf Refining Co., Bowling Green.

H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Lake City.

-I. Mapoles.. Gulf Refining Co., Lake City.

H. Mapoles.. The Texas Co., Lake City.

H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Jasper.








493 Gasoline 59.01 47 28 63 93 97 218 1V. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Jasper.

494 Gasoline 59.0 47 28 63 93 97 218 Wh H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Jasper.

495 Gasoline 5.8 849 28 61 92 97 223 G. D. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Wauchulla.

496 Gasoline 57.8 48 41 74 93 97 211 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Wauchulla.

497 jGasoline 57.7 55 31 67 93 97 218 JG. B. Hills...... The Texas Co., Wauchulla.

498 iGasoline 58.7 51 28 62 92 I 97 219 G. B. Hills ...... Standard Oil Co., Wauchulla.
I i 9
4909 Gasoline 58.7 51 28 62 92 97 221 G. B. Hills..... Standard Oil Co., Zolfo.

500 [Gasoline 58.5 48 42 74 95 97 208 IG. B. Hills...... Culf Refining Co., Zolfo.

501 iGasoline 58.9 52 27 63 92 97 221 W. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Perry. '

502 Gasoline 58.9 53 35 70 93 97 217 W. H1. Mapoles.. Gulf Refining Co., Perry.
I
503 IGasoline 58.5 49 26 62 91.5; 97 229 W\. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Perry.

504 Gasoline 58.7 55 35 70 93 97 216 W. H. Mapoles.. Gulf Refining Co., Perry.

505 Gasoline 58.9 52 28 62 92 97 218 I V. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Perry.

506 Gasoline1 62.5 47 49 82 96 97 198 E. M. Johns..... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

507 Gasoline/ 58.6 48 28 61 92 97 218 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Alachua.

508 Gasolinei 58.8 51 33 67 93.5' 97 215 |E. M. Johns..... The Texas Co., Newberry.










OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920-Continued.


r, Q a -so o
0 CU O

02 I .f l


Florida . Not
Standard Above 20 50 90
Adopted 60 __

509 Gasoline 58.8 49 28 62 92

510 Gasoline 62.2 46 49 82 95

511 Gasoline 62.1 46 49 81 95
^ ^^ ^.


Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline

Gasoline


S5i.0O

58.0

58.7

58.7

58.7
59.1


U

o





Not
Above
225


NAME OF MANUFACTURER
SENT IN BY AND PLACE TAKEN
INSPECTOR


E. M. Johns ....

E. M. Johns.....

E. M. Johns.....

W. H. Mapoles..

W. H. Mapoles..

VW. H. Mapoles..

W. H. Mapoles..

|W. H. Mapoles..

W. H. Mapoles..


Standard Oil Co., Newberry.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Co., Mayo.

Standard Oil Co., Mayo.

Standard Oil Co., Mayo.

Standard Oil Co., Live Oak.

The Texas Co., Live Oak.

Gulf Refining Co., Live Oak.


lb







518 1Gasoline 58.3 52 34 65 92 97.5 228 E. M. Johns..... Nortex Refining Co., Palatka.

519 Gasoline 58.3 52 34 65.5 92 97.5 228 E. M. Johns..... Nortex Refining Co., Palatka.

520 Gasoline 57.9 46 26.5 54 88.5 97 227 E. M. Johns..... Peninsula State Oil Co., Palatka.

521 IGasoline 57.9 47 26 54 88.5 97 227 E. M. Johns..... Peninsula State Oil Co., Palatka.

522 Gasoline 58.7 52 34 68.5 93 97 217 E. M. Johns..... The Texas Co., Palatka.

523 Gasoline 58.1 51 25 61 92 97 220 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Palmetto.

524 IGasoline 58.8 47 27 62 92 97 220 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Palmetto.

525 Gasoline 58.1 51 43 76 95 97 206 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Bradentown.

526 Gasoline 58.0 50 43 75 94 97 211 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Bradentown.

527 Gasoline 58.1 53 25 60 92 97 220 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Bradentown.

528 Gasoline 58.0 52 41 75 94 97 209 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Bradentown.

529 Gasoline 56.8 40 15 33 84 94 224 E. M. Johns..... Twin City Oil Co., Daytona.

530 Gasoline 60.2 42 38 65 88.5 96 244 E. M. Johns..... Nortex Refining Co., Daytona.

531 Gasoline 58.2 51 33 65 91 97 229 E. M. Johns..... Nortex Refining Co., Daytona.

532 Gasoline 58.3 52 33 65 91 97.5 228 E. IM. Johns..... Nortex Refining Co., Palatka.

533 Gasoline 58.4 49 25 59 92 97 222 E.- M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Starke.












OFF'ICI



oo .




I 'l'oida Not
Standard I Above 20
SAdopted _) I

534 Gasolinel 58.7 46 28 62

535 Gasoline 57.9 48 44 76

536 Gasoline 58.2! 48 44 75

537 Gasoline 508.1 40 2G 61

538 Gasoline 58.7 49 zd6 62

539 Gasoline 58.2 50 25 ,60

540 jGasoline] 57.9 50 43 75

541 Gasoline 58.1 47 25 38

542 Gasoline] 58.11 46 28 60


AL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920-Continued.


S? SILENT IN BY NAME
) *" INSPECTOR A
.S g V


Not
Do 115 Above


OF MANUFACTURER
ND PLACE TAKEN


222 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Starke.

210 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Ft. Myers.

208 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Ft. Myers.

218 G. B. Hills ..... Standard Oil Co., Ft. Myers.

220 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Ft. Myers.

221 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Ft. Myers.

210 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Ft. Myers.

220E M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Green Cove Springs.

218 E. M. Johns..... Standard Oil Co., Green Cove Springs.








513 1Gasoline 5S.61 48 27 59 91 97 222 IE. M. Johns.... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.
544 Gasoline 62.2 45 49 81 96 97 200 E. M. Johns..... Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.
513 Gasoline, 58.8 45 28 60 91 97 222 E. M. Johns ..... Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.
5- I I I G II T
5 ( gasoline 58.91 50 33 67 93 97 217 E. M. Johns..... The Texas Co., Jacksonville.
547 Gasoline! 58.7 46 28 59 91 97 225 W. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Milton.
518 Gasoline 58.5 47 28 60 91 97 225 W. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Milton.
549 Gasoline 58.7 46 28 60 91 97 225 W. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Milton.
550 Gasoline 58.5 46 23 60 90 97 225 H. Mapoles..Standard Oil Co., Milton.
551 Gasoline 58.5 46 2S. 60 91 97 225 W1 H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Bagdad.
52 Gasoline| 58.5 48 28 59 90 97 225 W. H. Mapoles.. Standard Oil Co., Bagdad.
553 Gasoline 58.8 50 36 TO 93.5 97 215 IG. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Ft. Meade.
554 Gasoline! 57.9 52 24 60 92 97 224 1G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Ft. Meade.
I I
555 Gasoline 57.4 58 28 66 93 97.5 222 1G. B. Hills...... The Texas Co., Ft. Meade.
556 Gasoline 57.8 54 24 60 92 97.5 223 G. B. Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Ft. Meade.
557 Gasoline 58.7 50 35 69 93 97 218 G. B. Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Ft. Meade.
558 Gasoline, 59.11 48 36 70 93 97 218 G. B. Hills..... Gulf Refining Go., Ft. Meade.









OFFICIAL GASOLINE ANALYSES, 1920-Continued.


O0
r- E
4

Florida
Standard **
Adopted

|Gasolinel 59.0

Gasoline 58.9

Gasoline 58.3

Gasoline 58.1

Gasoline 54.1

Gasoline 57.7

Gasoline 58.4

IGasoline 57.6

JGasoline 58.9


0
-o
0


O


u a
00 w
SENT IN BY NAME OF MANUFACTURER
SENT IN BY
INSPECTOR AND PLACE TAKEN
IN S PC
,1S~ W


90 95


92 97

93 97

92.5 97

91 97

74 97

93 97

92 97

93 97.5

92 97


Not
Above
2253 i

221 G. B.

217 |G. B.

222 G. B.

219 G. B.
Above
270 G. B.

218 IG. B.

224 G. B.

222 G. B.

221 G. B.


Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Hills...... IGulf Refining Co., Tampa.
I
Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Hills .... Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Hills..... The Texas Co., Tampa.

Hills...... Standard Oil Co., Scffner.

Hills...... The Texas Co., Seffner

Hills...... Gulf Refining Co., Dover.




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