• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of Florida
 Part I. Sugar article, pink boll...
 Part II. Crop report
 Part III. Rules and regulations,...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00055
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00055
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I. Sugar article, pink boll worm, federal and state quarantine action, tobacco, and good roads
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Part II. Crop report
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Part III. Rules and regulations, and analyses
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
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        Page 83
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        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
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        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
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        Page 125
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Full Text





volume 30
11I


Number Z}


FLORIDA.

QUARTERLY


BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


APRIL 1, 1920


.0
032


W. A. MNcAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTU
TALLAMASSEE FLA.


PART 1-v-Sugar Article. Pink Boll Worm. Federal and
State Quarantine Action, Etc. Tobacco. Good Roads.
PART II-Crop Reports.
PART Ill-Rules and Regulations, Analyses.

Entered Japuary 31, 1903, at Tallahassee. Florida, as second-elass
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1000.
"Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for
in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized Sept. 11, 1918."

S Tise BIlur TINS ARE ISSUED It TO TiHOS RMQUESTING THM
T. J. APPLEYARD, STATE PRINTER
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.


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.COUNTY MAP -
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FLiORIDA ,1 ARAN
SMOKING SUBDIVISIONS

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'PART I


Sugar Article.'
Pink Boll Worm.
Federal and State 'Quarantine
Tobacco.
Good Roads.


Action, Etc.










HISTORY OF SUGAR CANE IN FLORIDA


Fairbanks, in his interesting history of Florida, says;
that upon the acquisition of East Florida by the British,
in 1763, Gen. James Grant was appointed Governor, with
St. Augustine as the Capital. Governor Grant at once
set about' to improve the condition of the people of the
province, who, under Spanish rule, had been reduced to'
great straits in the neglect of agriculture and the decay
of commerce. under the proscriptive trade laws.
Governor Grant exhibited great zeal in disseminating /
the advantages possessed by the province for emigrants,
particularly its healthfulness, as shown by the longevity
,f its citizens, and in setting forth the productiveness of
Sits soil.
In 1767, Sir William, Duncanand Dr. Andrew Turnbull,
two Scotchmen, influenced by Governor Grant's represen-
tations, organized a colony of 1,500 souls, drawn from
Minorca, the Greek Islands, Italy and Smyrna, and landed
them at$the site.of New Smyrna, which was so named at
its founding.
The projectors of this scheme had expended $166,000
upon it at the time of the landing of the colonists, and
afterwards, besides more. money, "much labor was ex-
pended, in buildings, opening canals (in part through solid
rock), ditch a bnd various other improvements, the re-
mains- of which still exist."
The colonists came to East Florida under indenture, by
which they were to give a certain number of years of
labor to the projectors of tle colony for bringing them
out, a common practice in those days and not entirely in
abeyance today, though against the letter and spirit of
the emigration laws of the country.
The object of the projectors of the New Smyrna colony
was to engage principally in the cultivation of indigo and
sugar cane and the manufacture of their products .for'
shipment to the markets- of Europe, where they then com-
manded very high prices, 4nd this'marks the first instance
of manufacturing sugat from the juice of the cane on a
commercial basis' within the present bounds of the United
States.










Dr. Stubbs, in his history of sugar cane in Louisiana,
credits Etienne DeBore with first inaugurating the manu-
facture of sugar on a large scale in Louisiana, in 1794,
the centennial of which event was appropriately cele-
brated in New Orleans in 1894.
Sugar from cane had been produced in Louisiana by
Antonio Mendez, in a small way, in 1791, twenty-four
years after Dr. Turnlull had commenced its manufacture
in Florida; but Mendez's operations were on a small scale
until DeBore entered upon its manufacture to an extent
"large enough to influence the future of Louisiana."
Dr. Turnbull's colony seemed born to trouble. It had
scarcely been well settled before dissensions arose be-
tween master and servant as to the character and term of
service to be rendered, culminating, in 1769, in open revolt
of the colonists against the articles of indenture and the
harsh treatment of authority of hose over them.
The ringleaders in the revolt, as claimed, were carried
to St. Augustine, and there tried for their lives. Of five
sentenced to death ,two were pardoned by the Governor
and one was offered pardon upon his becoming the exe-
cutioner of his two remaining fellow convicts. Against
this he violently protested, while his comrades plead with
him to save his life by doing the Governor's command.
In 1776 the whole colony had disappeared from New
Smyrna, and this splendid foundation for a great indus-
'try, planted under the most flattering auspices, was lost
to the people of Florida at a time when it could have done
so much for their material and permanent prosperity.
In 1771, historian Fairbanks tells us further that "Mr.
Oswald established a plantation on the Halifax, still
designated as Mount Oswald, and Mr. Rolle, at, Rolles-
town, near Palatka. There were settlements also at Beres-
ford and at Spring Garden. The cultivation of cane was
begun on the Halifax, under the fostering care of the
British government and would in a few years have become
a very important industry in Florida." But the disas-
trous conditions prevailing at New Smyrna seemed to east
their blight over other efforts to develop into a great in-
,dustry the manufacture of sugar on the Halifax river, and
in the adjacent country, though the soil and climate were
so admirably suited to the cultivation of cane..
SAbout this period the cultivation of sugar cane in Flor-
ida drops out of written history, but there can be no doubt
that during this gap in the records sugar cane was, and











has been, extensively cultivated in almost all' parts of
.Florida, and.sugar for domestic use has been manufac-
tured from it.
Between 1850 and 1860, Major Robert Gamble, of Talla-
hassee, moved to Manatee county and embarked in the
sugar,industry. He erected a mill for the manufacture of
sugar, which was considered a great success; but the
breaking out of the civil war put an end to the industry.
Unfortunately Major Gamble's residence was destroyed
by fire a few years ago and all records of the industry,
which he had prepared for publication, were lost.
In the U. S. census for 1860, Florida is credited with
"1,669 hogsheads, or 2,002,800 pounds of sugar," and it
is generally considered that this amount included the first
year's product of sugar manufactured by the Gamble
Mills. A person by the name of "Crofield'? also estab-
lished a sugar cane factory on property quite near the
Gamble mill about this same time, and it is presumed the
cane of this factory was also consumed by the Gamble
mill.
This brings us down to the period of the St. Cloud sugar
factory at Kissimmee, built and controlled by Hamilton
Disston, and which began operations under most promis-
ing prospects, till the unexpected death of Mr. Disston
put a check upon the experiment and the mill was per-
manently closed.
Prior to this time some very interesting and important
work had been carried out relative to comparative cost
f cultivation of Aug'ar in Florida, Cuba and Louisiana.
f course, -these figures are not expected to obtain under
-present conditions, but they serve well to spow the favor-
able position that Florida occupies and her possibilities
fbr favorable sugar production.
'The following extracts from the report of Prof. D. C.
Sutton, chemist of the St. Cloud plantation, are peculiarly
interesting.
"Although labor is higher here at present than in Lou-
isiana or Cuba, a comparison with the above places will
show a decided difference in cost of cultivation in favor
of Florida.
In making these estimates, we suppose the land to be
cleared, ditched and ready; for plowing.









8

For Cuba:
Preparation of land ..........................$12.45*
Work of planting ................... ........... 9.00
Value of seed cane .............................. 3.60
Two weedings ............................ ... .. 6.60
, Three plowings ................................ 6.00
One thrashing. .............................. 1.50

Total cost of plant cane ....................$39.15

From the above we would see that the cost of one acre
of stubble would be :'

Two weedings. ............. ....................$ 6.60
Three plowings................... ............ 6.00
Oq thrashing.................................. 1.50

ICultivation of one acre of stubble............ $14.10

On good lands in Cuba, that are well cared for, crops
may be gathered from one planting, with an average yield
of 271/2 tons, under the conditions that the lands shall be
new and the cultivation done with care.
From other authofity~-we learn that cane will rattoon
there from 12 to 14 years.
The cost of cultivation per acre of plant cane in Lou-
isiana would be;/
Preparation of land ...........................$ 5.25
Value of seed cane, 4 tons per acre, $4.00 per ton... 16.00
Planting .................................... 1.50
Two weeding .................................. 4.50
Four plwings................................... 8.00
Cleaning ditches ............................... .25

Total cost of cultivation one acre plant....... $35.00

Cost of stubble per acre:
Two weedings .............. ................... $ 4.09
Four plowings .......... . ...... ....... 8.00
One stubble harrowing and digging .............. .50
Gleaning ditches................................... .25

Cost of cultivation of one acre stubble....... .$13.25











A good. yield for plant cane is 22 tons per acre and
stubble 14 tons; thus the average would be' 18 tons for
plant stubble/ ,Only two crops can be gathered from one
planting.

The cost of cultivation in Florida is as follows:

Preparation of soil.. ........ ................ 2.50
'Value of seed cane, 4 tons per acre, $4.00 per ton... 16.00
W ork of planting................... ............ 2.50
One weeding .................. ....... ......... 2.00
Three plowings............... ................. 5.00
Cleaning ditches........ ........ ................ .25

Cultivation of one acre* of plant.............. $8.25

For stubble:

One weeding.......... .... ................$ 2.00
Three plowings............... ...............5.00
Stubble digging ............ .................... .5
Cleaning ditches ............................ .25

Cost of one acre of stubble. .... .... .... $ 7.50
Exactly how many crops can be gathered from one
planting cannot be definitely stated just yet. W'e can at
present safely say, however, that cane will rattoon here
from 9 to 10 years; how much longer remains for time
to tell.
Thus, summarizing the foregoig figures, we have the
following comparative costs of cultivation in the three
countries in a closer form:
Cost of cultivation one acre plant in Cuba ........ .$39.15
Cost of cultivation one acre plant in Louisiana ..... 35.50
Cost of cultivation one acre plant in Florida ..... 28.50
Cultivation of one acre stubble in Cuba ........... $14.10
Cultivation of one acre stubble in Louisiana ....... 13.25
Cultivation,of one acre stubble in Florida ......... 7.50
But only two crops can be gathered from one planting
in Louisiana; then giving Florida and Cuba ten year
stubble, we see that the average cost of cultivation one
acre of cane in each of these respective places would be
for a period of ten years:









10

Cuba .......................................... $16.64
Louisiana ................................... 21.27
Florida .......... ........................... 9.57

The saccharine qualities of Florida cane are none the
less good for its cheap cultivation and extensive yield."

Thus we see that Florida can produce more cane at
less cost than either Louisiana or Cuba, and possibly the
Hawaian Islands and Porto Rico. Certainly it can be
manufactured into sugar as cheaply here as elsewhere,
and thus solve a great national question which has puzzled
scientific men and governments for years-especially dur-
ing the late War.
This brings us down to the period when the Disston
factory was suspended for reasons previously stated.
The State Department of Agriculture was created in
1889, and within that year a systematic record of sugar
cane production and cane products was established and
maintained, with records of all farm statistics, to the
present time. It isnot necessary to give the record of
cane production, etc., for all these thirty years; so the
following interesting statistics are submitted for the
period of 1907-08 to 1917-18, inclusive:










STATISTICAL REPORT
I i '-i


SUGAR CAN:


1907-08 ..........
1909-10 ..........
1911-12 ..........
1913-14 ..........
1915-16 ...........
1917-18 ...........


Acres


7,307
7,522
9,475
14,088
12,370
16,318


E


Sugar 0
Syrup Manufac- '
Gallons tured "m
Pounds mUo o
5 s
0 cd SC


1,678,600
2,202,025
2,374,610
3,321,465
2,837,030
3,558,205


6,910
29,335
2,933

7,595
15,810


13,428,800
17,616,200
18,996,880
26,571,720
22,696,240
28,465,640


335,720
440,405
474,722
664,293
567,406
711,641


-b

go
m
0r >ii0
djcda
?. .


$ 671,440
880,810
- 949,844
1,328,586
1,134,812
1,423,282


Cd)




$ 593,439
792,230
920,693
1,337,081
1,096,721
2,681,664


Totals.......... ....... 15,971,935 62,583 127,775,480 3,194,187 $6,388,774 $7,421,828
I I I I _ _ _ _ _ _ _









Value of sugar for the period 1907-08 to 1911-
12, inclusive, at 5c per pound ..............$ 2,502,094

Value for second period, 1913-J4 to 1917-18,
inclusive, at 82c per pound (war period).. 8,707,351

Total.............. ............... $11,209,445

Value of crop reported for full period, 1907-08
to 1917-18, inclusive..i ...................$ 7,421,828

Difference in favor of sugar had all syrup been
made into sugar and sold as made......... 3,787,617-

The molasses being a refuse product of sugar,
should be credited to the sugar, which will
add to the excess value of sugar over syrup. 1,597,093

Thus,, by making all of the syrup into s1gar,
the total value of the cane products for the
period would have exceeded the value of the
syrup by ................. ..... ......5,384,710

Thus, approximately 70% of the cane products, under
prevailing methods and conditions, are deliberately
wasted.

Finally, there are at least 15 million acres of land in
Florida unexcelled anywhere in the United States for the
cultivation of cane and the production of sugar, and if
all of these lands were placed in cultivation of cane in
addition to more than as much more acreage in farm
products, this State could furnish sugar for the whole
world and feed many millions besides.
If all of the wet lands only in Florida were reclaimed
and cultivated to sugar cane, they would produce more
than 30 million tons, worth, at 8 cents per pound, over
three billion dollars.












, PINK BOLL WORM



FOR THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN.

A Contribution By E. H.' Sellards.

On February 16th, 1918, a convention was held at Jack-
son, Mississippi, the object of which was to consider meth-
ods of control of the pink cotton boll worm, a new and
very serious cotton pest.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INSECT.'

The pink cotton boll worm in the adult or full grown
condition is a small dull brown and apparently very
harmless moth, which even when abundant is seldom seen
in the field, because it hides away during the day and
flies only in the late evening about dusk. The full grown
insect lives but a short time and does no harm other than
to deposit eggs.
The damage to the cotton is done by the young insect
when in the caterpillar, "larval" or "worm" stage. The
moth deposits the eggs on or near the cotton bolls. When
first hatched the young caterpillar is a very small white
Sworm which as soon as it comes from the egg begins to
eat its way into' the cotton boll. After going into the
Sboll the young worm burrows to the center and feeds on
the cotton seeds moving from one seed to another. Fre-
quently a single boll is infested with many worms. The
seeds are destroyed, the lint is stained, the cotton boll
often -rots and usually drops from the plant.
The worm continues feeding in the 1oll until it becomes
full grown. In its later stages it is slightly pinkish in
color from which it gets the name of pink cotton boll
worm. When full grown the worm spins a cocoon in the
cotton boll, but before doing so cuts an opening to the
outside so that the moth when it comes out of the coCoon
can escape from the boll.










14

From about four to twenty eggs are laid on a boll
by a single moth. These eggs hatch in from four to twelve
days. The worm itself requires about twenty to' thirty
days to become full grown in the boll. It then remains
in the cocoon stage from ten to twenty days. 'It is thus
seen that several generations may breed in the cotton
during a single summer and the insect thus multiples
very rapidly.

DIFFERENT FROM THE COTTON BOLL WEEVIL.

The pink cotton boll worm must not be confused with
the cotton boll weevil. It is an entirely different insect,
being a moth and not a weevil. Both are serious pests to
cotton, but of the two the pink cotton boll worm is much
the pore serious. Also the pink cotton boll worm is not
to be confused with any caterpillar that feeds on the
leaves of cotton. The pink boll worm feeds only in the
cotton boll and eats the cotton seed, and is to be found
only by cutting open the cotton boll and examining the
interior.

HISTORY OF INTRODUCTION INTO THE UNITED STATES.

The pink cotton boll worm is believed to have been
native to Egypt, but has now spread to practically all im-
portant cotton growing areas in the world except that of
the United States. It has Long been known in India and
the cotton growing countries of Africa. During 1913 and
1914 through the importation of cotton seed it was
brought from Africa to Brazil. In the same way it has
been brought to Mexico where it is probably rather wide-'
ly scattered. In the United States it is found at present,
so far as known, only in Texas, and at only two local-
ities in that State. The introduction into Texas from
Mexico is believed to have been entirely accidental, and
was due to the salvage of cotton from a wrecked .ship
carrying Mexican cotton. This cotton being not very per-
fectly ginned contained some seed, and in the seed the
pink boll worm.
This first infestation in Texas was on the Guif coast
near Galveston. Before being discovered the insect had
spread for some distance along the coast and as much as
J









seven miles inland. The second infestation in Texas is
near the town of Hlearne which is over 100 miles inland
from the Gulf Coast. This infestation is believed to have
been due to the shipment of cotton seed from the area
near the Gulf before the infestation there had been dis-
covered.

AMOUNT OF DAMAGE DONE BY THE PINK- COTTON BOLL WORM.

The damage that would result from the presence of this
insect in the cotton belt of the United States can oniy' be
estimated by the damage that it is known to have done
elsewhere. In India the loss from this insect in the cot-
ton crop is estimated at $10,000,000 per year. In Egypt
the loss is estimated at not less than ten per cent of the
crop each year and is often much more than that. In
Brazil the cotton crop where the insect was present was
reduced as much as 50 per cent within three years after
being infested. In Honolulu cotton growing has almost
ceased since the introduction of this pest. From all avail-
able evidence it seems certain that this is much the worst
cotton insect known.

METHODS OF CONTROL.

The methods of control of the pink cotton boll worm
must be based on a knowledge of the habits of the insect.
First of all it is known that the adult moth does not fly
any great distance and that naturally by its own means
it spreads very slowly. On the other hand the fact that
the young, or larvae, feed on cotton seed and live through
the winter in the cotton seeds makes the spread by ship-
ment of cotton seed very rapid unless properly controlled.
In fact the spread of the insect over large areas is ac-
complished almost entirely by man himself. Therefore
the natural method of control of the insect is, to pre-
vent its being carried from place to place in cotton seed
or in any other way.

FUMIGATION OF COTTON SEED.

It has not yet been shown to just what extent cotton
seed can be made safe for shipment from an infested area
by fumigation. It is known that the insect when spend-









ing the winter in the cotton seed encloses itself in a web
and often mats two cotton seeds around it as protection.
It is probable therefore that fumigating gases do not
readily get the insect. Carbon bisulphide and hydro-
cyanic acid gas are being used but it is doubtful if any
one can say at present just how reliable these gases are
in getting to and killing the insect in cotton seed.

CONTROL 1IETHOUS IN TEXAS.

The methods of control that are being used in the in-
fested aeas in Texas are intended not only to prevent
spread but also to entirely exterminate the insect. The
plan of control there used is as follows: When infesta-
tion is discovered the infested area is quarantined so that
the shipment both of the cotton and cotton seed can be
controlled. The second step is to discontinue, through
proclamation from the Governor, the growing of cotton
in the infested area. for a period of three years., Finally
there is also declared around this area a cotton free zone
ten miles in width in which cotton shall not be grown.
The worm is not certainly known to feed on any plant
other than cotton, hence the discontinuance of growing of
cotton in an area for a period of three years is believed
to'be sufficient length of time to insure the eradication
of the insect. The ten-mile wide surrounding zone is be-
lieved to be wide enough so that no adult moths will
spread by flight or being carried by the wind or otherwise.

l! HOW TO RECOGNIZE THE INSECT.

It is not believed and it is not probable that the pink
cotton,boll worm has found its way into Florida. How-
ever, since insects may' be carried in many accidental
ways. as the introduction into Texas shows, farmers in
Florida should always be on the lookout for any new or
unknown insect in their cotton fields. It is especially im-
portant in case of infestation to discover the insect when
first introduced and before it has spread so that it can be
the more easily controlled and exterminated.
It is not always easy for the farmer to distinguish this
insect from others that are more or less like it and in
case of doubt the only safe plan is to send the unknown










inseSt to the entomological department .f the State Ex'-
perimen', gtdtion for: identification n. When, looking, for
this ifisect in the' otton field, search should benmade for
a small dusky, brown moth scarcely one-half inch, long
which,appears very shy, and will quickly ; hide from sight
by getting unpler leaves, 'gass or loo.e 'dirt.. The moths
fly mostly about dusk-and'wilseldom he seen at midday?
If infestattoh is suspFected-.he cottonn bois should be
?searched for the worms feeding on the o.tton seeds. These
worms .are, small, hardly one-half, inch long whey. full
grown. When young they are white worms with brown
heads, and when nearly full grown 'the body becdombi
ontiewhat pinkish in color. The cocoon: is also found in
the boll near the outer edge and always with a. hole cut
to the exterior so that the moth when it emerges can get
out. As'already stated .the catergillarsffeed almost en-
birely in the bolls and- never on t'f leaves, so' that' ordi-
rary caterpillars feeding. on cotton leavewneelc nushe no
[iueasiness so far as t'hisa insect is concerned. -
From what is-known 'of the habits of the pink cottoil
,oll wormi we may, reasonably be encouraged, to believe
:tat by the application oLproper scientific methods and
the strict control of the shipment of cotton and cotton
seeds this ,ery %eriotis cotton pest, can'be entirely eradi-
cated and permanently excluded from the United States.
Careful -watch. for pany possible infestation and" prompt
and rigid action to exterminate.the pest should It gain a'
foothold are the measures absolutely necessary to the
freedomin of the cot on belt 6ofthe United States, from this
additional serious cotton insect. ,.

RELATIVE TO A NEW OUTBREAK OF THIS PEST
IN LOUISIANA, THE U. S. DEPARTMENT
OF AGRldULTURE' SASS:
"Unless radical steps: are promptly taken the worst
. ki'own pest of cotton will getout of hand.
The pinJk boll worm of cotton, previously supposed f to
.exiteim this country only in Texas, has been discovered
at a number of dtplaces in Cameron Parish,. Louisiana,
where i iis believed tO have been- for 'at least two years.
It has been found also inv Calcasieu. Parish, but so, r
cently that definite information- as to distribution is not
2-Bu~uetin.









available., The old infested area around Trinity Bayias
'also been somewhat extended. Lots of cotton. eed rang-
ing 'from' 1;,to. 0 cars have been shipped from Cameron
Parish to Alexandria/, 'roussard, Shreveport, Bunkie,
and Moriroe, La. Sin' A nton io. Fort Worth, lHoston,
,San M'arcos,, and New Braunfels, Tex. Several.,of these
pointss have. o, oiil Mills and the seed' was probably based
for planting.., Thps, there is the-possibility that the pink
boll worm has been scattered to.all of these sections and
possibly to others not/yet determined.-, .
idThis bringa' about a serious situatidoi fdi the cotton in-
dustry of the U Tnld .States, shys the United States D)e-.
partmeni of Agrieglture. Unless the radical but nles`'L
sary steps are promptly taken by the States concerned
in cooperation with ,he Federal Department of Agricul-
ture,/ Site pink boll `worm will certainly get. out of hand
.apd 'the .roriof' extermination already carried-out in
'Teas will be Ipst. Congress has been asked to provide
additional funds and' to make them immediately available.
CONFERENCE TO PLAN iOikK.

A conference was_,held in New Orleans on March 5,
which as, attended ~jy ieprecentatives of all the cotton'
*:'States .and of the' Department of Agriqulture. .The con-
Sference was called by Gov. Pleasant, ,of Louisiana, in
cooperation'1 with Governor:elect Parker, who is presi-
dent of the Americau Cottoni Association. The purpose
was to conrider.the whole situation at if it has now de-
veloped and to secure the taking of necessary steps by
Texas and Louisiana aad any otlief States concerned to
meet the .emergency. .
The newly 'discovered. infestations in Cameron and,
Calcasieu Parishes, Lou!siana, and Orange County, Texas,
are along the lower-course, of the Sabine River, near the
Gulf of Mexico. In addition, thqre is some reinfestatiob
oft the old Trinity Bay, area in' Texas, but the work of
recleaning that area has almost been completed. ^he
work, _hpwevef, has' consumed practically; all the money
that the United States Department, fAgriculture 'ad
available for pink boll wonm, eradication: Reinifestatidn










around' Trinity Bayi was due,l to. a- modifil~tioan of the
pol ei originally agreed upon by. the department rpd
Stateaauthorities of allowing no cotton to I be' grown in
infested areas for a period of-two 'or three years.

A revisiIo of .the State pink boll. worm. Act permitted
cotton to be grown, under'restriftidn's in the yAinity ay.
area during 1k19, Th, reinfestatign: which hs. resulted
froni suei growth of cotton is scattered pretty welover
the old district, 'but the actual points of infesatjon art
very few as compared with' 1917, and the amount'of in-
fe'station in the felds where the' insect has been found is
insignificant as to tumpers. Thk results clearly in'icite,
say the specialists of the department, the possibility of
extermination' y 'the method of establishing noncotton
ones and the cleaning up of all volunteer cotton if con-
tinied for. a sufficient 'period. It. was deviation from
this method that brought thbe reinfetation in Texas, and
the department will insist that .it be strictly followed in
the tremendously greater t il ':that now cMnfronts the
country. "This is the.only means,.of control," says the
department, "that gives us hop of ultimately 'eradicating
this most destructive pest of cotton, and the success: of
the work must necessarily depend on: tho absolute co-
operation of the States concerned.
LOUISIANA TAKES ACTION.

Louisiasna, .immediately upon the discovery oftie': in-
festation'i- Cameron Parish, declared a drastic quaran-
,tine prohibiting the growth of cotton and providing for
the destruction of existing cotton and cotton seed within
a radius of 15 miles of any infested point in that State.
No provision hag been made, however, for- compensating
planters for cotton destroyed. It is:' absolutely neces-
sary, .the department says, that some provision, be made
. to reimburse the planters for losses, which they must
accept in the interest of'the cotton-4industry as a whole.
The payment of these losses, it is. pointed out,, will be
very small as compared with the xisk to the cottoni-rop
should the pink boll worm get.beyond control.










The possibilities of further spread, due to the ship-
met of presumablly infested cotton and cotton seed from
CamerOn, Parish maless it necessary that all-such ship-
:meunsabe traced t6 destination and that steps be taken.
to safeguard jany lo&al infestatiohls. that may, have re-
sulted." ."


THE PINK BOLI WORM1 OF COTTON

By W'ilIton Neivell, Plant Commissioner.,

State Plant" Board of Florida.

The most serious insect pdst of icottp kirwn is the
Pink, Boll Worm.-' this Ansect has occasioef tremend-
ous losses in the countries wherd it has keen permanently
established., It is known to' be present in India, Egypt,.
Brazil, Mexico, and the.,-awiian Islands. In certain of
these, countries, nder -favorable conditions, the cotton
crop has been damaged is much as 60 per cent. The in-
sect was introduced into th'e United States some' years
ago 'n :shipments- of cotton seed' frpm MejAco.. These
shipments were made into Texas and infe-tatiOn was'
found in the Trinity Bay section of Texas in 1917. tVhen
the presence of the insect *as discovered its eradication
was undertaken by the United States Governme tt and
the State authorities of Texas. This .eradication work
has/.been prosecuted vigorously and has given progmse
of ultimately being successful- Recent developments,
that is within the past six weeks, indicate, however, that
'the American cotton industry is now confronted -y prob,
ably :the most serious situation that it has ever had to
face.' These developments are the discovery of pink boll
worm in three bf-the ,southwestern Parishes of Ifouis,
iana and in parts'of Texas outside of the previously known
to be infested area. All, indications make it appear that
the infestation insouthwestern 'Louisiana, which is se-
vere, is of some -years standing,-certainly two 'years and
perhaps three years. ITvestigations have not yet been
completed to determine the exact areas of infestation
but there is every reason to believe that the pink boll
.worm will be" fouid- to be present ipn other parts of










Louisiana 'and'Texas than those already known to be
infested.' This'cQnlus!ion seems to be justified by rea-
son'of the fict liht during the past two or three years
large quantities of cotton eed'have been shipped, from
the now known to be -infested area ii4" southwestern
Louisiana t numerous pointsin ithe States of Louisiana
and Texas. Shipments of seed have also been made -to
other points in the cotton belt. It will not be until after
these- shipments of seed have beeh: traced and careful
investigations have beefi mad6 in all parts of the Cotton
belt that the authorities, will know whether or not in-
festation exists throughout the cotton producing section
of the country. ,
SThe States of Louisiana and' Texas and thq United
States Government propose to handle this situation
vigorously.' A large appropriation had already been
made by Congress for continuance of the eradication
work arid it is understood' hat 'even larger sums will
now be appropriated in view bf the recent developments.
Florida and other of the cotton States"have already, im-
posed quarantines against the movement into these res-
pective States of cotton and certain cotton products, .and
,of cotton seed and its products. These quarantine meas-
ures are regarded as highly essential to the protection
of the- industry in preventing the further possible spread
of infestation from hidden or undiscovered infested areas.
The huthorities.expect that all pltsons interested in the
production. of cotton will render every assistance in the
application of quarantine rules. Planters, commercial
users of cotton .and transportation companies must real-
ize-that it is for their protection and the future good of
-the country as, a whole that these restrictive- measures
have-bgen placed in effect. It is realized by the author-
ities that considerable inconvenience will be attached to
the application of the quarantine rules but it appears
that the seriousness of the situation amply justifies and
warrants the use of'drastic measures.
The quarantine regulations of the State of Florida are
embodied in Rules 45-A and 45-B, adopted by the' State
Plant Board at its meeti'nglin Jacksonville on March 8th.
These Rules were adopted in accordaene with .Ghapter
6885 Laws of Florida. Under these Riles the shipment










into the State of Florida fionl the States of Louisiana
and Texas of cotton,, seed" cotton, cotton. linters,' Ptton
waste, cotton bagging, etc., and of cotton. seed, .`otton
seed hulls, machinery and implements .used in the cul-
tivation, harvesting, or manufacture, of cotton is abso-
letely prQhibited. Also under these Rules shipment of
seed c6tt on, cotton (lint', Ifters, Waste, etc.), cotton seed
ani cotton :seed hulls front\ States other than Louibiana
and Texas is prohibited except under permits froinm hk
Plant Commissioner, Gainesville, Florida. These permits
are issued by the Plant Commisioner upon the request of-
shippers when such request is accompanied by affidavits
or other information indicating to the Plant Commisioner:
that the shipment may be made with relative safety.
Such affidavits must', SHOOW clearly the POINT OF
ORIGIN of the material-for which permit for shipment
is desired. It should also be indicated that the shipper
(or producer) has not received, directly oi indirectly,
from Lohisiana or Texas since January 1, 1918, any cot-
ton or cotton see' or.: any other dangerous' material.
A specimen form of affidavit is attached to. serve as a
guidp.
In order that there may be some slight appreciation
of the possible damage which may be done .tothe Ameri-
can cotton industry should the pink, boll warm find per-'
manent and wide-spread lodgement in the cotton belt it
may .he stated that in the opinion of competent author-
ities we may expect a loss of 30 per cent. It must be
understood that this Ioss.is.in addition to the loss already
occasioned by the Mexican' boll weevil. From tbe fore-
going statements it. would appear that with a wide-spread.
and permanent iiifeftation by pink boll worm the pro-
duction .of cotton would become practically impossible.
upon a commercial basis.









23 ,


STATE PLANT BOARD

QUARiANTINVE (DEPARTMENT.

Rules and Regulations of the 1'tate Plhnt Board Re-
lating to the S1$pmeint into Florida' of Cotton, Cotton
Waste, Damiaged Cotton, etc.
-.

SHiPkENT INTO FLORIDA OF, CiTTro, Co~MPN SiED, CER-
TAIN COTTON PRODUCTS, COTTON MACHINERY, COTTON
BAGGING, ETC., FROM LOUISIANA AND TEXAS
PROHIBITED.

At its meeting, held in Jacksonville,- Florida, March
8, 1926, Rules Nos. 45-A and 45-B of the State'Plant
Board were adopted.
'"Rule 45A. In border to prevent the introduction of
the pink boo wprim (Peatinophora Gossypiella Saunders)
the imprrtatfon into the State of Florida from' all foreign:
countries, from the States of Louisiana and Texas and
from all States in which the pink boll worm imay here-
after-be found to exist, of cotton lint, winters,' waste,
sweepings and samples; and. of seed cotton, 'cotton seed,
cotton seed bulls, cotton ginning and milling machinery,
cOtton' baggipg and all .things or materials which haye
been used in connection, with ,growing, harvesting, baling
or manufacturing cotton lint or cotton 'seed is. hereby
prohibited. .

SHIPMENT OF COTTON, COTTON SEED, CuEAII COTTON'
PRODUCTS, ETC., INTO FLORIDA FROM STATES OTHER
THAN LOUISIANA AND TEXAs, PROHIBITED
]iXCEPT UNDER PERMITS.

"Rule 45-B. The importation into the State of Floridaf
of cotton lint, cotton seed, seed cotton, cotton seed hulls,
cotton linters, cotton waste, cotton. sweepings, cotton
,samples, cotton mill waste, damaged and 'redried cotton
is prohibited from all States of-the United States -other
than Texas and Louisiana; provided, 'that shipments of
seed cotton, cotton seed, cotton seed bulls, cotton lint,
cotton linters, cotton waste, cotton sweepings, cotton
samples, cotton mill waste, damaged and redried cotton











from ,States other ':than Texas and ,Louisiana, may be
madq 'into Florida tuion special peTrmits issued by the
Plant Commissioner (Gaineville, F6lorida) after he has
been furnished, ith l n tisfactory affidavt or other evi-
deuce as to the point of origin .of the material included
in, such shipments and with such ,other information as
may be necessary to-establish th -safety, of such ship
mentor .the freedom of same from possible infestation
by the 1pink boll worm of cottonn (Pectiiophora Goosypi-
la Saunders) /
The above quoted- rules and. regulations, having been
adopted in accordance with" the prov\-i oni of the Florida
Plant Act of- 1915 Chapter 6885 of the' Laws of Florida,
have the full force and effect of law. The& compliance
therewith on the part of all shippers and common carri-
ers is requested in, order, that the cotton industry of
Florida may be protected against danger F-om the pink
boll *worm. r
WILMON NEWELL,

Plant Commissioner, State,of. Fldrida.

Gainesville, Florida, March 10, 1920.,











Since the Above Article was Put in Type the U. S.
Government has Issued the Following Relating to th(
-Same Shbject.

FEDERAL AND STATE QUARANTINE
WITH RESPECT JO THE PINK
BOLL WORI,

As a result of the hearing conducted' April i6 and 7 by
the Federal Horticultural Board of the United States
Department of Agriculture on account 'of the pink boll
worm, an after consultation with the Governor and other
authorities and representatives of the State of Texas,
and with official and other representatives of the State
of Louisiana, .the Federal Horticultural Board will re-
commend to tihe Secretary of Agriculture the following
quarantine and restrictive action to -e enforced by tlher'e
States iii. co-operation with thti department with the
object of preventing the further spread and effecting the
extermination of the pest. The prompt carrying out of
these plans has been definitely promised by the official
representatives of these States.

QUARANTINE AND RESTRICTIVE ACTION AS TOITEXAS.

1. The .State of Texas will establish and enforce a
noncotton ,area covering the regulated zone now in effect
in southeastern Texas with certain additions to ipclide
new ,points of infestation which have been determined
outside of the old quarantine line. This zone involves all,
or portions of the Counties of Jefferson, Ch'ambers, Gal-
vestion, Brazoria, Harris, Liberty, Fort Bend, Jasper,
and Newton..
2. In addition to and' surrounding' this noncotton
area, aV a further factor of safety, the State of Texas
will establish and enforce a regulated zone of 25 miles
-in wtjith. The growth of cotton in such regulated zone
will be permitted ;under the restriction that the rop shall
be under Ahefull control of the State authorities in co-
operation with the United States Department of Agricul-
ture for the purpose of enforcing any safeguards that
shall be determined to h- nosarv.











3. The State of Texas will establish similar regulated
zones of a ten-mile radius surrounding all oil mills in
Texas which are nkown to have received seed during the
last three years from the Parishes in southwestern Louisi-
,ana now known to be invaded by this pest.- Such points
in Texas are now known to include Houston. San An-
fdnio, San Marcos and Sffyder,
4. In addition it is understood and agreed that the
State of Texas will maintain and continue the noncotton
z6ne established for the last two years at Hearne, Texas,
and the nonotton zone established /fr6 1918, including
the Counties of Presidio and Brewster, in the Great Bend
of the, Rio Grande; and will continue the quarantine
with respect to Valverde,. Kinney and Maverick Counties
on the basis of a noncotton zone, extending inward five
niles-from the Mexican Border ol these Counties and the
inclusion in a regulated zone of the portion of these
counties outside of such border zone in which all cotton
produced will be under the control of the State author-
ities in co-bperation with the, United States Department
of Agriculture as in the case of other regulated zones.
The Governor of Texas hac agreed for the State. to pro-
mulgate immediately, the noncotton zones indicated and
to take steps for the prompt establishment of the restric-
ed zones referred fo. He has further stated that he will
convene the State Legislature id extraordinary session
during May for 'the purpose of making such amendments
as may be necessary to the Pink Boll Worm Act of the
State to carry out the action indicated and to make pro-
visibo by specific appropriation of State moneys for the
reimbursement of planters in the noncotton zones for the
losses which they may sustain as a result of the prohi-
bition of the growth of cottonand for the reimbursement
of such plantersfor cotton actually produced in 1919 and
which has already been destroyed in control operations
with respect to the pink boll worm.

QUARANTINE AND RESTRICTIVE ACTION AS TO t OIS.IANA.

1. The State of Louisiana will' establish aid enforce
as a noncotton area all of the Parishes of Cameron, Cal-
casieu and Jefferson Davis. Inasmuch as these parishes
include a considerable area beyond known infestation, .









the requirement of a regulated" .zine surrounding these
parishes is deemed unnecessary.
2. The State of Louisiana will establish a regulated
zonWe'of a.ten---mile radius surrounding all oil mills iir
Louisiana 'which are known- to have received 'seed during
the I ht three years from the ,parishes of southwestern
Louisiana lwn known to be invaded by this Oest. Such'
points iii Louisiana* are now known. to include Shreveport,
Mirobe{ Bunkie, Alexandria, Broussard,- Eunicc and
Gretna. -. .
SThe Governor and other authorities of Loiiiisana have
already taken steps to provide/and enforce sheh poncotton
zone' and also for the 'reimbursement of the losses of
planters in such zone as a result of this action.

PROPOSED QUARANTINE ACTION. BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT
OF AGRICULTURE.

The execuhdon of this agreemfient and plan of action
arrived at by the.,Federal Horticultural Board of thip
Department and the Official Representatives of the States
of.yLouisiana and Texas will niake it possible, the Secre--
tary. of' Agriculture' states, ta limit the Federal quaran-i
tind" to the noncotton and the regulated zones described
as' to these two States. This action will be 'supplement-
al to the. State quarantines and for the purpose of giving
Federal authority: and aid iintheir enforcement.
'It will place no0'estrictions on themovement interstate
;of cotton' and cotton, products outitf the sections of Texas
anl: Louisiana not included in thd quarantined digtricts;-
Sin other words, the districts actually known to be invaded
by the pink boll worm and the districts whichhave been
placed under regulation on account of' contiguity to such
districts or suspicion of possible -.infestation through
movement of cotton seed.' It is believed that it will, be
possible to discontinue many if not all of the regulated
zones about oil mills in Texas and Louisiana which are
under suspicion on account of having received seed from
the invaded districts in Louisiana should the thorough
inspection of the season of 1920 show absence of inva.
sion by the insect at these points.









COTTON FRODt'CTi INCLUDED.

t is proposed that these quarantines and iestrictiont
coveringg movement f products out o fnoncotton and re-
gulated zones of the States of, Texas and Louisiana ,jiall
apply'to, all cotton products other thqn oil, including
seed cotton and cotton lint-baled br' uu bl ed--cottfon
seed, cottonseed 'hulls, cottonseed 'cake.And meal, sagging
and other countaniners that have been fSed .with res ie:t to
cotton, andi shall include also provision ,fbr such 'inspect-
ion and cleaning of 'common ciarIer.r vehicles, etc., as
may be necessary to prevent 'the accidental transportat-
ion of sptton 'seed.
The 'Ydpartment believes, arid haS been tentatively so
Advised, that this action on the part of Texas and Louisi-
ana as co-operated in by the Federal Department of Agri-
culture Will make it possible for the other cotton States
of the South -hich have already issued quarantines or
are contemplating issuing such quarantines against Texas
and Louisiana on account' of the pink boll wvrm to accept
the Federal quarantine as fully meeting the ndeds of at
least to limit such quarantine action ttjthe areas, and pro-
ducts covered by the Federal quarantine and by' the quar-
antines promulgated by the States of Texas and. Louisi-
ana.











-TOBACCO CULTURE IN FLORIDA


The tobaccoo plb t may be grown successfully in all
latitudes from southern Canada to the Tropics. and on a
great variety of soils, but the commercial value of the
product is influenced to a greater degree by the particular
soil and climatic' conditions under which the plaiit is
grown than is: alon6st any other important drap. These,
facts'.re so well tecognized.that'the,bobacco industry has
become highly specialized, and the trade regularly 1doks
to certain well-defined areas of production for its supply
of the:various classes and types qf leaf required. In these
tobcc6o producing districts the' necessary facilities for
marketing are usually available, and prevailing prices of
the cured leaf are g9yerned largely by the relative supply
and demand and b4the quality of the- leaf pfoduced.-
Each important district produces a tobacco of certain
well-knowvn characteristics which make it desirable for
special purposes of manufacture or export. Moreover, in
practically all of these districts the production can be
readily increased to meet any increased demand at profit-
able prices. For these reasons, efforts to introduce the
commercial growing of tobacco in sections outside of the
established producing centers are likely to result in fail-
ure, either because the leaf produced is not quite right in
type or satisfactory marketing facilities are not available.
Furthermore, any development of the industry in a newv
section on a large scale, which would be essential for
economical' marketing, would most likely lead to over-
production, and as a consequence, unprofitable prices.
As a matter of fact, over-production is a constant menace
in all of the established centers of tobacco growing,
The methods of growing and handling the crop must
be varied according,to the type of leaf which it is desired
to produicejfor the kind, of tobacco obtained is influenced
very greatly by the methods o growing and handling
which are employed. The methods for the production of
the various types briefly outlined in the present bulletin,
though possibly susceptible of improvement iin some of
the details, are the best than can be recommended in,view
of the present knowledge and experience of investigators
and the more successful growers.










TYPES.

While cultural methods in their Application to the' dif-
ferent cigar-tobacco types and districts may be modified
to advantage iA some of the details, thi essential;feaitures
'are more or less similar, so that it will suffice to 'outline
the most approved methods, and only tlhe more important
differences in cultural methods to be.followed in theo rp-
maininig districts need to be mentioned.

CIGA-iEaiLP ToBAcCo VAlRETIESi.

The Cuban group is :composed of strains or selections
,obtained from imported;seed. Seed imported from Cuba
is usually found to be composed of several distinct sub-
varieties. The Cuban is the only Variety of -much imi-
portance,in the southern cigar-tobacco districts, where it'
is grown b`th for wrappers-and for.fillers, although the
Sumatra: variety formerly was grown extensively for
wrapper leaf. In' Florida a considerable acreage 'of
Cuban tobacco for the production of .wrapper leaf is
grown under an artificial shade of cloth or wooden slats
'on frames,

CIGAR WIIAPPIR AND BiNDER TYPE.

The area, centering around Gadsden, Leon, Madison,
Jefferson aid PAsco counties, Florida, and Decatur county,
8eorgia, are the ;principal wrapper leaf .sections. The
.typical wrapper 'leaf soils of Florida are fine 'sands and
sandy loams containing only a very small percentage of
clay and having a very limited capacity for holding water.
THE, SED BED.

A well-drained friable soil having a southern or eastern
Exposure isto be preferred for- the seed bed,' and when
practicable a suitable spot i the .woods' is chosen. Select-
ing a time, after removing the forest growth, when the
soil is not too wet,. it is burned to destroy weed seeds and
insects. A good method is to Jay small poles or skids
over the area to be burned, at.intervals of three feet, and.
to pile brush and wo6d oi one end of the skids. After
setting fire to the brush, ,the burning material is pulldd







31

forward on the skids as rapidly as the, soil becomes suffi-
ciently, heated and sterilized-to a depth of two or three
'inches. After removing all debris, the soil is thoroughly
spaded or-plowed to'a depth of a few inches. jBefore
seeding, a fertilizer consisting of abolt five pounds of
cottonseed meal or two or three pounds of nitrate of soda
and one pound of acid phosphate for each one hundred
square feet of bed is to be worked into the soil.. In sowing,
'the seed-should be mixed with a large volume of fertilizer,
corn meal, or sifted ashes (about two quarts for each tea-
spoonful of seed), in order to secure an eveA distribution
of the seed. A heaping teaspoonful- of seed is sufficient
to sow 25 square yards of seed bed and should furnish
enough plants to set an acre in the field. The seed beds
may be'sown in January, February or March. The seed
must be covered only very lightly, arid it is better simply
. to press the soil down firmly by trampling or with a board
or roller. The bed should be surrounded with logs or
boards set on edge to a height of si -,to ten inches to form
-a cold frame, over which are stretched wires to support
'the cheese cloth which is to be placed over the frame
before the, plants come up. 'The precautions regarding
watering and hardening the .plants prior to transplanting,
as described for the cigar types, are to be carefully,fol-
lowed.
TRANSPLANTING AND CULTIVATING.

Prior to transplanting, the'land should? be thoroughly
fitted by plowing and harrowing, after which the rows are
laid off, the preferred distance between rows being 31/2
feet. The plants are ready to set when 4 to 6 inches high.
The' accurate spacing of the plants may be readily at-
tained by using a simple marking device, which is drawn
across the field so as to indicate, the points at which the
plants are to be set. Throwing up slight ridges for the
rows will remove the danger of the young plants being'
drowned in case of heavy rains. Transplanting is, done
mostly by hand. Fertilizers should be applied in the
process of preparing the land for transplanting. Ten'
to twenty tons of 'barnyard manure will not be too much
per acre. Commercial fertilizers are generally used in
addition, the usual application being 600 to 1,200 pounds
per acre of a mixture containing about 3 per cent nitro-
gen, 8. per cent phosphoric acid, and 3 per cent potash.









Much larger quantities of fertilizer will give better results
in most cases.
A cowpea or velvet bean soil plowed under\in the fall'
gives good results.with this type of tobet6..
Cultivation shouldbegin as soon as the plants start to
grow and should continue as long as the size of the plants
will' permit. The first cultivation is deep, after which
frequent shallow'cultivations are most desirable. i Where
the plants are set in checks they may be cultivated bote
ways, so as to reduce the amount' of hand hoeing required
to keep down weeds. The sweep and cultivator are the
best plows to use.

ARV'sTING.
Either of two methods of harvesting Havana Seed
tobacco may be used. The one.,nost commonly practiced
is to cut the whole, plant when 'the middle leaves are
"ripe," i. e., when the leaves have assumed a lighter
shade of green and have thickened so that upon folding
a section of the leaf it creases or cracks on the line of
folding. In harvesting the plants ,the 'stalk is cut near
the ground with a light hatchet, ~knife, saw,- r a special
form of long-handled shears, and the plant is carefully
'laid upon the ground, where it is allowed to remain kntil
the leaves have wvilted sufficiently to avoid much breaking
in handling. It is then hung upon .a lath' four feet long
by piercing the stalk- near its base with a removable metal
"spearhead" placed on the end of the lath and sliding
the stalk on the lath. As a iule, six plants should be hung
on a lathand distributed evenly. Instead of spearing the
stalk, it may be hung upon the lath by means of a hook
or a nail driven through the lath at a sufficient angle to
hold the plant securely. SixAiooks or nails are put at
'equal distances on the lath, the three on one side alter-
nating with those on the opposite side.
The laiths carrying the plants should be placed upon a
rack and hauled to the curing barn, where they are hung
in tiers with a space of six to twelve inches between the
laths.
In the second method of harvesting'Havana Seed, the
leaves are'picked from the plant as they ripen. The de-
gree of ripeness is not so advanced as that described for










stalk-cut tobacco. The proper degree of ripeness is very
important, for upon this largely depends the development
of the desirable qualities of texture, body, color, elasticity,
etc., during the process of curing. A safe guide is to take
the first picking at the time the seed head forms, and
subsequent pickings at intervals of six days. Five pick-
ings should be made, the first one comprising the lower
four leaves of commerciall size, and, proceeding upward
on the plant, the second and third pickings each including
three leaves, and the fourth and fifth pickings three or
four leaves each. As the leaves are taken from the plant
they should be laid in the row and then carried by an
attendant in baskets to the cuiing barn. Here, by means
of a large needle, a string is passed through the stem of
the leaf, one end of the string being attached to the end
of the four-foot lath, and when the string is 'full the free
end is attached to the other end of the lath. Each lath
should carry from 36 to 40 leaves and the leaves should
be put on in pairs, so that they are back to back and face
to face. The laths should be spaced five inches apart in
the curing barn. Never cut tobacco while the dew or
raindrops remain on the leaves, as black spots will result.
It is preferred to cut in the afternoon, as the sun is getting
weaker; in the forenoon, unless cloudy, there is danger
of sunburn, which will result in ten minutes just before
noon. Before and after the. plant is cut, be careful to
remove every worm, as they will destroy the tobacco if
taken into the barn, i. e., cigar leaf to be air-cured. If
the ground has not been cultivated for two or three weeks
before cutting there will be a nice carpet of grass on
which to lay the tobacco when cut. Don't lay it down
in the sand or dirt-select a shaded grassy place, and
after it has wilted so as not to break, lay it very carefully
on.the straw on the floor of the wagon, and when a me-
dium load is on, cover with a sheet or some weeds, so as
to protect it from the sun while en route to the barn,
where it must be placed on straw or a rug, very carefully,
till the attendant, who must remain there, has speared it
on the laths and put it closely up on the bottom tier poles,
where it may remain till next noonday, when it should be
carried up and adjusted on the upper tier poles. It should
be put about six inches apart on the laths, and they about
seven or eight inches apart on the poles.
1--Bu1lletin.










CIGAR TOBACCO BARNS.

All barns should be convenient to the tobacco field.
For cigar leaf, never build one less than thirty feet wide
and sixteen feet high at the sjdes, and as long as you
please. You cannot let tobacco remain on the bottom
tier poles in this climate, as it would be liable to mould
in wet weather. A barn 32 by 50, with 16-foot posts and
siding, is sufficient for five acres ordinarily. The first
cutting may often be stripped and boxed to make room
for the last cutting, as it will do to strip in 35 to 40.days
if not very large. The tier polka should be 10 to 12 feet
long.
Pine poled four or five inches in diameter, removing
the bark with drawknife, make the best poles, and even
good rafters. The posts should be 4 to 6, if sawed, and
put on sills, which is the best on the outside. The two
rows on inside (for there should be four rows of posts to
have three spaces-a driveway in the middle) may be cut
from the pine and cypress forests and placed on the
ground. The middle posts should'be 20 feet long to give
pitch or slope to the roof. The eaves should project 12
to 18 inches, also the gable roof. The roof must be ven-
tilated at the top, so as to allow the hot air to escape,
otherwise the tobacco will char or "pole burn" near the
roof. The laths should be four feet and two inches long-
poles four feet apart and 32 feet, one above the other-
the first one 51/2 feet from the ground floor. Windows
should be made between each post ,which should be eight
-feet apart. They should be as long as possible and the
width of three boards, say 30 or 35 inches wide, and 8
or 10 feet long, hung with strap hinges on top to push
out at bottom everynight and close every dry day while
tobacco is hanging.

STRIPPING AND BOXING.

Cigar tobacco is ready to strip from the stalk even be-
fore all the green has disappeared from the stalk, but not
until the stem of the leaf is cured. By opening windows
every night in July and August in Florida the tobacco
will be soft or "in case" every morning, when enough
should be taken down and covered to last the strippers
for one day. Beginners should make only three or four










GRADES OF CIGAR LEAF.

First, wrappers (perfect leaves); second, binders (par-
tially perfect leaves),; third, filler (ragged and all im-
perfect leaves). The fourth grade should be the trashy
leaves, which, if sold at all, should not be included with
the crop. Always give the lower grade the benefit df the
doubtful leaf. The best plan iB to take off all the imper-
fect leaves first, leaving those with apparent wrapper
qualities for more critical examination. Bind in "hands"
(or bundles) of twenty to thirty leaves of even length
and quality, and keep under cover till noon or evening,
when it must be put into the boxes straight and compact,
lapping tips about six inches, and let the butts be about
one inch from the ends of the box, so as to allow the heat
from the sweating process, which begins at once, to es-
cape, Keep tobacco in boxes covered with cheap oilcloth
while stripping, as a case or box may not be filled for
several days. When full, fit boards and press down by
standing on boards, or a small lever may be used. When
the box is full it is ready for the local buyer, who expects
to rehandle it in his own warehouse (until the average
Florida tobacco grower has learned to grade more accu-
rately) and sweat and otherwise prepare it for the manu-
facturer or the greater markets of this and foreign coun-
tries. It pays the farmer to sell quickly and take a few
cents less and let tje local dealer rehandle and gride
more perfectly and sweat it or "betune it," thereby re-
lieving the planter of a task he cannot well perform, if
indeed they will pay him a fair price, otherwise he had
better have it sweated or "betuned" and prepared for
the manufacturer. Sometimes one hundred to five hun-
dred per cent may be saved in this way.
Never undertake to soften or bring tobacco in case to
strip or handle by "sprinkling or pouring," much less by
"immersion." Nevertheless, if the weather- should be dry
and windy, and should so continue, your crop will be in
great danger (in FloridarTof injury from evaporation and
deterioration, becoming dry and harsh or "bony and
crusty." It should be put into the cases (boxes), which
should be 2 or 21/2 feet wide by 3 or 3 feet long (but
not made of pitch pine, as it will impart the turpentine,
odor), by or before the end of October or November (un-
less it is a fall crop, which is/possible). It is important,










to obtain the best results, to put Florida cigar tobacco
in the boxes before its "life blood" has been evaporated
by hanging too long on the poles. In other words, its
inherent moisture (sap) should be conserved by early
stripping and boxing, for therein consists the secret of
preserving the life, aroma, brilliancy and elasticity of the
article, which keeps it soft, rich and mellow, besides pre-
venting its corruption and consumption by moth and rust;
for if this rule is not observed, and the tobacco,is put up
in a declining condition, so it will continue until for a
.year or two, when the little white worm, sometimes seen
in old cigars made of poor, lifeless tobacco, will attack
and consume it.





















A SYSTEM OF GOOD ROADS IN EVERY

COUNTY IN FLORIDA, A PUBLIC

NECESSITY




The following is an extract from an address
Delivered by me at the Palm Beach County Fair,
West Palm Beach, March5, 1920:


.I


,. . \ *> :,.'/,










A SYSTEM. OF GOOD ROADS IN EVERY
COUNTY IN FLORIDA, A PUBLIC
NECESSITY


The citizens of Florida have never consented to vote
for a State bond issue for good roads.--.A number of
States have voted large bond issues for road building,
,these bonds to be liquidated by a direct State tax on real-
estate and personal property.
We have come to the time, however, when good roads
are a public necessity in all of- the counties of Florida,
and we should have them. The agricultural development,
and, in fact, all rural development is dependent on good
roads.
The following is a plan I wfsh to suggest for raising
a sufficient amount of money to give the whole State of
Florida a system of'good roads without placing a penny
of tax on real estate and. personal property.
The Oil Inspection Division of the Department of Agri-
ulture, with one-eighth of a cent per gallon on gasoline,
kerosene,- etc., will put into the State Treasury this year
approximately $50,000. .Change this tax to 1 cent per
gallon and the sum would be $400,000. The automobile
license tax will approximate this year $400,000. If prop-
erly regulated, this tax would reach $600,000, thus mak-
ing a total of $1,000,000 per annum from these two
sources.
The average of eight hundred State convicts on the
public roads, at a value of $500 each per annum, is equal
to $400,000 in labor. Bond the State for $20,0,00,000.
The United States Government would supplement for
an equal sum, thus giving $20,000,000 more to meet the
State's bond issue.
Counting the $20,000,000 that would be derived from
a State bond issue, $20,000,000 Government funds and
the labor value of the State convicts, for a period of ten
years will give a grand total of $44,000,000 for a system
of State highways.
By abolishing the lease system of County convicts, we
would have an average of 1,600 laborers, worth $400 each
per annum. This would add 6,400,000 worth of labor
for the period of ten years.










If all of this $40,000,000 in money and the $10,400,000
in labor was available for use under the State Road De-
partment, we would have at the end of ten years a system
of public roads in Florida not equaled by any State in
the Union.
The $1,000,000 tax on motor vehicles and gasoline will
pay an annual interest of 5% on the $20,000,000 of State
bonds.The increase in- population and a better road
system will increase this tax sufficiently to retire this
$20,000,000 in 25 years. This plan would do away with
the two-mill State road tax we now have and there would
be'no State tax required on our real estate and personal
property to pay the interest on the bond issue, and liqui-
date the same in the period of 25 years.
There are 70,000 farms in Florida. From these farms
we market, in perishables, staples and live stock, 70,000
carloads of products, or approximately 1,400,0i0 tons.
Counting excess labor, expense and delay, it would cost
at least $1.00 per ton more to get these products to mar-
ket over poor roads than-over good roads. This means
a direct cost to the producer of $1,400,000 per annum.
This cost must be added to the consumer's price, so it
affects. everybody., The wvar and tear of vehicles, extra
feed and gasoline, will amount to another $500,000. Good
roads, then, means a direct gain to the producers of the
State of not less than $2,000,00 per annum in marketing
farm and grove products alone. This $2,000,000 loss is
enough to pay every farm mortgage in the State in three
years, to say nothing of the moving to market of many
millions of dollars worth of poultry, live stock and other
products that would be hauled annually over a system
.of good State roads.
Education is the transforming influence of the world
and the basis of all progress. Agriculture is also basic.
Upon it rests the commerce of the world and even civili-
zation.
Good roads are the veins through which flow the very
life's blood of education, agriculture and commerce. Good
roads are one of the great sources of life to any country,
and with better education, better agriculture and good
roads Florida will come into her own in a decade. Hav-
ing been born and reared on a Florida farm, and hav-
ing had considerable experience in farm work. and
having had experience in the work of education, in Flor-











ida, and knowing the State of Florida as but few men
know it, I have for some time been convinced that Flor-
ida's future depends largely on three things, viz: "Better
Schools, Better Agriculture and better Roads."
In sending out my good roads address to the Press
and Boards of Trade of the State I used the following
letter of transmittal:
Dear Sir:
I hand you herewith an extract from the address that
I made at Palm Beach County Fair on the 5th inst., with
reference to building a system of good roads for Florida.
Please give my proposition your very best thought, and
if you think the suggestion worthy of consideration, make
such comment as you think it merits.
We must have a system of good roads for the entire
State. It will cost many millions of dollars to build.this
system. Real estate and personal property are already
too heavily tax-ridden. Some other source must be found
from which to raise this money. Motor vehicles and
gasoline can and should pay the tax.
Fill the State with good roads and our farms will mul-
tiply ten--fold, and all rural development will increase
proportionately. Young men and young women will stay
on the farm and the "back to the land movement" will.
become a reality in this State.
No better slogan can be had'for a real development in
Florida than "BETTER SCHOOLS, BETTER AGRICUL-
TURE, AND GOOD ROADS FOR EVERY COUNTY
IN FLORIDA."

With best wishes, I am
Yours for, development,

W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture

If the World War taught us anything it was to think,
in bigger terms and plan for bigger things. Education,
Agriculture'and Good Roads being three of the big things
that Florida must look well to if she progresses as she
should, and all being inter-dependent, I discussed in my
West Palm Beach address, the subject of a State System
of Good Roads and how to get them without taxing the
real estate and personal property.











A large number of newspapers, Boards of Trade and
individuals have heartily endorsed the plan. I do not
believe that anyone in the State will oppose this plan',
or some very similar plan, if he thoroughly understands
it. This plan will not only build a system of qtate Roads
and pay the bonds in a reasonable time but it will also
enable the State to remove the two mill tax now assessed
for good roads.
That the State might be bonded for good roads, under
some Oafe plan, the Legislature, at the 1919 Session,
passed the following Resolution:
"HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 279.
A JOINT RESOLUTION proposing an Amend-
ment to Section 6 of Article IX of the Consti-
tution of the State of Florida Relating to Tax-
ation and Finance.
Be It Resolved by the Legislatureof the State
of Florida:
That the following amendment to Section 6 of
Article 9 of the Constitution of the State of
Ilorida relating to taxation and finance is here-
by agreed to and shall be submitted to the
electors of the State for adoption or rejection at
the next general election held hereafter, that is
to say that Section 6 of Article 9 of the Consti-
tution of the State of Florida be amended so as
to read as follows:
Section 6. The Legislature shall have power
to provide for issuing State bonds only for the
purpose of repelling invasion or suppressing'in-
surrection, or for ,the purpose f redeeming or
refunding bonds already issued at a lower rate
of interest, or for the purpose of acquiring, build-
ing and maintaining a system of good roads and
bridges throughout this State under such regu-
lations as may be prescribed by An Act of the
Legislature; provided, that any bond issues au-
thorized in pursuance hereof for a system of
good roads and bridges shall not exceed in
amount five (5) per cent of the total tax assess-
ment of the State at the time of issue
Approved June 7, 1919."











We can have a system of State Roads the equal of any
State in the Nation and at the same time reduce the mill-
age on real estate and personal property two mills.
Will we do it?.
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla.,
April 1, 1920.















i














/


















PAR-T II.
Crop Report.









44

DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES

Following are the subdivisions of the State, and the
counties contained.in each:


Western Division.

Bay,
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-9.


Northeastern Division.

Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns,
Suwannee-10.


Browarf,
Dade,
DeSoto,


Northern Division.

Franklin,
SGadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Lafayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Taylor,
Wakulla-10

S Central Division.

Brevard,
Citrus,
Flagler,
S Hernando,
Hillsborough,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Osceola,
Pasco,
Pinellas,
Polk,
Seminole,
Sumter,
Volusia-16.


SouthBrn Division.

Manatee,
Monroe,
Okeechobee,
Palm Beach,
St. Lucie-9.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner H. S. ELL.IOT, Chief Clerk



CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.
BY DIVISIONS.

Western Division.-The spring is this, and all other
sections of the State has been very unfavorable to all
vegetation. Cold rains have prevailed, and frosts, though
light, have been frequent. At this writing the weather
is still unfavorable, retarding the growth of all crops
just coming up. In many localities, damage is severe
enough to necessitate the plowing up of considerable
areas of cotton, and replanting.

The shortage of labor and cotton seed, created to a
considerable extent by too close selling also prevented
farmers in large numbers of cases, from planting the.
usual crop. A good deal .of cotton was plowed up be-
cause of cold and' later planted to other crops,-prin-
cipally corn. This condition naturally brings about a
shortness in the acreage of the cotton crop not originally
intended, ,bue nevertheless, it cannot be helped. These
conditions reduce the acreage in cotton to practically
the same as that of last year and probably less. Otherwise,
crop conditions in ,this district are good, though late;
corn;, and small crops not having been seriously affected
by cold, are in good condition, and the acreage planted
to these crops is the largest in the farming history of
this district.

All the standard crops in this district are increased
in acreage, except oats, which is about the same, and
their condition at this time has never been better. This
does not apply to vegetables and truck, but it does to
livestock-the latter being in much better condition than'
is usual at this season bf the year.

Northern Division.-The same climate conditions exist
throughout this district as in the first named, and the
same effects of these conditions have been felt throughout


J .. . .










the season .in this division. Crops of all kinds would
have been slightly increased in acreage,' and are in fair
condition, but for unfavorable atmospheric conditions.
About the same amount of injury has been done the cot-
ton crop in this district as in the Western Division, and
the reduction in acreage will probably be. greater, pro-
portionately, than "n the former district. Probably, less
cotton had to be plowed up than in the former-but a
similar proportion of replanting has been done-plant-
ing to corn, taking the place of cotton. The same con-
ditions 6f livestock exist in this, as in the other district,
and as a matter of fact, livestock on the range has not
peenquite so good for years, as at this season of the year.
All crops are in usual condition, with the exceptions
noted. Tobacco is exceptionally good.

Northeastern Division.-In this division of the State,
acreage planted to cotton is considerably decreased from
Last year,-the variety of cotton being Sea Island, has
been very badly damaged by the boll weevil. The indi-
Scationds are for a smaller crop proportionately even, than
in the Northern and Western portions of the State.
Where the cotton is planted early, growers will meet
with success as it seems that nothing but early planting
will save the crop from this insect. 'The acreage of other
crops in this division is about the same as that of last
year, and indications are that corn and other crops (es-
pecially the forage crops) will be largely increased over
those of last year. If unfavorable indications continue,
this means that corn and other field crops will show a
much smaller yield than the crop of 1919. It is notice-
able also that in this and the first two districts discuss-
ed wheat has been planted to a considerable extent again
this season.

Probably for the first time in many years rice and rye
both show good increases. Acreages are in good condi-
tion throughout the counties for growing these grains./
/This is worthy of note for the reason that it will go a
long way toward conserving and preventing the use of
imported foodstuffs--such as wheat and rye flours. It
is better to grow these crops than to buy them from out-
side. In this, as in the other districts the vegetables
products and livestock are in fairly good condition.










Central Division.-In this division, both the vegetable
and standard crops, were largely increased in acreage,
and were in good condition; but, unfavorable climatic
conditions seriously damaged many crops, which will
necessitate replanting, and which will also delay ma-
'turity.

In this district acreages planted to field' crops are of
course, not so large in proportion to those planted to
other -crops, and in this district also, the bulk of the
soil products consists of a larger proportion of fruit and
vegetable crops.

It is also noticeable in this and other districts of the
State that there are new and special crops that have not
been planted to any great degree heretofore, that are
now commanding attention. Dasheens are grown in
twenty-three counties and are in demand as a commercial
crop; they show prominently in this connection. There
is notable improvement in the condition of citrus fruit
groves in this division, as i 'nthe former ones. Livestock
is reported in good condition from all parts and the bu-
siness of growing livestock is growing, rapidly. Good
rains have covered this entiresection of the State.

Southern Division.-In this division, given up chiefly
to fruit and vegetable production, the increase in acre-
age has been large and in about the same proportion to
crops in other sections of the State. Climatic conditions
have been unfavorable and crops have suffered very much.

The same proportionate acreages in all crops grown
in this division are in keeping with similar conditions in
other sections of the State. If nothing further happens
to prevent, this district as well as the others will produce
good crops.

Even though, the above conditions look poor, the re-
cuperative power of Florida sunshine will bring good
results, though delayed. The consolation is that no sec-
tion of the country can get ahead of us in the final ma-
turity of crops, as the same unusual conditions have
been experienced by the whole country.










48

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.
| I Sea
COUNTY Upland Island Corn Millet
Cotton Cotton
Western Division- Acreage Acreage Acreage [ Acreage
Bay .................. 100 ... 120
Calhoun ................ 90 ... 120 100
Escambia .............. 50 ... 105 100
Holmes ............... 110 110 100
Jackson ............... 90 ... 110 100
Santa losa ............ 60 ... 105 100
W alton ............... 90 ... 115
Washington .......... 85 ... 110
Div. Av., per cent... 84 ... 112 100
Northern Division- (
Gadsden ............... 120 ... 100
Hamilton .............. . 100 60 100
Jefferson .............. 80 ... 90
Lafayette ............. ... 65 100 75
Leon ................. 90 125 80
Liberty .............. 65 100
Madison .............. 75 25 125 50
Taylor .............. 65 110
Wakulla .. ........ .. 90 . 104 100
Div. Av., per cent.... 93 52 106 76
Northeastern Division-
Alachua .............. 60 10 100
Bradfordi .............. ... ... 110 .
Clay .... .. .......... ... ... 100 100
Columbia .............. 110 40 130 100
Duval ................. ... ... 100 .
Nassau ................ 20 30 100
Suwannee ............. 50 0 105 100
Div. Av, per cent.... 60 33 106 I 100
Central Division--
Brevard ........
Flagle ............ .80 5
Hernando ............. .. . 100
Hillsborough ....... .... 120
Marion ................. .. ... 125
Orange ............... 95
Osceola ................ 100
Pasco ................. 110
Polk ................. I. 100...
Seminole .............. 100
Summer ............. .. .00
V olu-ia ............... 10 .
iv. Av.. per cent.. I I 103 5
Southern Division-
Broward .............. 100
Dade .... ............. . 100
DeSoto ........ ........ ... ... 100
Le ......................I ..
Okeechobee ....... 12
Palm Beach ............ ... 125
Div. Av., ptr cent.... ... 100
itntte Av.. per cent... 79 43 1 107 I 70










49

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION'OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

I Milo I Sugar Japanese
COUNTY Oats Maize Cane Cane

Western Division-- A Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage
Bay .................. 100 ... 120 120
Calhoun ............... 100 .. 125 115
Escambia .............. 105 ... 110 100
Holmes ................ 100 ... 120 ...
Jackson ............... 100 ... 125 100
Santa Rosa ............ 105 ... 120 100
Walton .......... ....... 100 ... 110 100
Washington ............ 110 ... 115 95
Div. Av., per cent.... 103 ... 118 104
Northern Division-
Gadsden ............... 100 ] ... 125
Hamilton .............. 100 . 100 100
Jefferson ............ 75 ... 110
Lafayette .......... . 7 . 90 95
Leon .................. 115 ... 125 100
Liberty ................ 100 ... 110
Madison ............... 100 ... 125 100
Taylor ................ 100 ... 110
Wakulla ............... 100 ... 120 108
I----I-----
Div. Av.. per cent .... 906 ... 112 101
Northeastern Division- .
Alachua ...........:... 75 ... 150 100
Bradford ............. 100 ... 150 .
Clay ................. 100 .. 125 100
Columbia .............. 140 ... 150 200
Duval ........... . 100 ... 110 85
Nassau ...... .......... 125 ... 100 90
Suwannee ........ .... 105 I .. 110 100
II- I
Div. Av., per cent.... 106 ..I 128 113
Central Division--
Brevard ...............
Flagler ............. .. 1 8 5
Hernando .............. 75 ... 130 115
Hillsborough ........... 80 ... 115 110
Marion ................ 75 ... 100 75
Orange ........................
Osceola ................ 100 ... 120
Pa rco ................. ..... .. 200 300
Polk .................. ... 125
Seminole .............. ... ... 75
Sumter ............... 110 100
Volusia ............... .110 110
Div. Av., per cent.... 66 .. 109 116
Southern Division--
roward ................ ... 10090
Dade ...... ...... ... ... 100
DeSoto .............. ... ... 100 90
Lee .......... ......... ... ... 100 50
Okeechobee ............ ... ... 125 100
Palm Beach ............ ... ... 130 110
Div. Av., per cent .... ... 100 109 88
State Av.. per cent.... I 93 j 100 115 104

4-Bulletin.














REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920,, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)
Broom I Kaffir Tobacco
COUNTY Corn Sorghum Corn Open
I Field
Western Division- I Acreage I Acreage Acreage Acreage
Bay. ..................
Calhoun ............... . 100 1 0 1
Escambia .............. ... 100 ...
Holmes ................ I ... 110 I
Jackson ................ ... 110 100 I
Santa Rosa ............ ... 110 ..
W alton ................ 110 ...-
Washington ............. ... 95 .
Div. Av., per cent.... ... 105 100
Northern Division-
Gadsden ............... I .. 100 ... 90
Hamilton .............. I ... 100
Jefferson .............. ... \ 100
Lafayette .............. ...
-Leon ......... I ........ ... 100 90 90
Liberty ...... .. .100 .
M adison ............... ... -., 50
Taylor ................ 90
Wakulla ............... .. 90 120
Div. Av. ner cent .... 91 90 100
Northeastern DIvision-
Alachua ............... .
Bradford .............. ...
Clay ............... 100
Columbia .............. 100 100
Duval ................. 100
Nassau ...... I 50
Suwannee ............. 100 125
Div. Av., per cent.... I 90 100 ... 88
Central Division-
Brevard ............... .... I
Flagler ............... 2 .
Hernando ........... .. .. I
Hillsborough . ........ 100
M arion ................I .. 80
Orange ................ I
Osceola ............... I 100
Pascy .......... . 100 .. I 120
P olk ................. ... I ... I ... .
Reminole ............ .
Summer ................I ... 100 .
Volusia ............... .. 100 ...
Div. Av.. per cent .... ... I 83 ... 120
SMothern Diviston-
Broward .............. I .. .
Dade .................. .. I .. .
DeSoto ................I ... ... ...
Lee ...... .......... ..... '1
Okpechobee '. ......... ... .
Palm Beach .......... 60 I ... ... .

Div. Av., per cent .... 60 ... ...
State Av.. per cent .... 75 I 95 I 95 103












51

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

I Tobacco 1 Sweet
COUNTY | Under Rye Rice Potatoes
| Shade _
Western. Division- I A'reage | Acreage Acreage I Arreage
Bay ................... ... 100 110
Calhoun ............... ... 100 ... 110
Escambia .... ..... ... 100 125
Holmes ................ 100 115
Jackson ............. ... 100. ... 125
Santa Rosa ........... ... ... 100 120
W alton ............... ... 100 ... 110
Washington ............ ... ... ... 115
Div. Av., per cent .... .. 100 100 116
Northern Division-
Gadsden ................ 100 100 ... 120
Hamilton ............. ... 100 100 100
Jefferson .............. ... 100 150 110
Lafayette ............. .. 95 100 100
Leon .................... 100 100 100 125
Liberty ............. .. 100 100 110
Madison ............... 125 i 100 50 100
Taylor ................ . .. 90 90 110
Wakulla ..............: ... ... 108- 102
Div, Av., per cent.... 108 98 100 109
Norheastern Division- -
Alachua ........... 75 .. 100
Bradford ............. ... 100 110 130
Clay .................. . ... I . 100
Columbia .............. .. 110 100 110 '
Duval ................. ... 100 100 100
Nassau ............. ... 125 125
Suwannee ............. 105 100 105
I-~
Div. Av.. per cent.... ... 98 107 110
Central Division-
Brevard .............. ...
Flagler ................ ... 1 10 20
Hernando .............. ... 150 ... 100
Hlllsborough .......... . . I ... 110
Marion ................ ... 50 ... 125'
Orange ........ i66
Osceola ................. 0 1 0
Pasco ................ 150 200 100 200
Polk .............. 110
Seminole .......... .. .. 100
Summer .......... ...... ... 90 90 110
Volusia ................ ... 110
Div. Av.. per rent.:... 150 98 75 112
Southern Division--
Broward ... 100
Dade ................. 100
DeSoto .... ....... ...80 90
Lee ................... .. 85 80
SOkeechobee ... / 95
Palm Beach ........... ... -90
Div. Av., per cent.... ... ... 83 93
State Av., per cent.... 129 I 99 93 108











52

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR .199.-(Continued.)


I Field I 1 Velvet
COUNTY Peas Peanuts Cassava Beans

Western Division- Acreage Acreage Acreage Acreage
Bay ................... 100 110 ... 110
Calhoun ............ 120 150 150
Escambia .............. 100U 70 100
Holmes ................ 100 110 .. 115
Jackson ........... 110 110 .. 120 i
Santa Rosa ........... 105 115 110
Walton ................ 110 110 115
Washington ............ 105 115 .10
Div Av npr ont I 106 i 111 116


Northern Division--
Gadsden ........ ... 90. 90 | ... 100
Hamilton .............. 100 100 .. 100
Jefferson ...... 105 100 . 125
Lafayette ........... .. 100 110 . 110
Leon ................. 115 125 . 125
Liberty ................ 100 105 . 100
Madison............... 100 100 50 100
Taylor ............... 100 100 . 100
Wakulla ............... 100 99 . 112
Div. Av., per cent. ... 101 j 103 L 50 108
Northeastern Division-
Alachua ............... ... 125 ,*, . 100
Bradford .............. ... 150 . 100
Clay .............. 100 110 ... 100
Columbia ........ .. . .. 90 110 . 120
Duval ................. 100. 100 ... 100
Nassau ............... 100 150 ... 125
Suwannee ............. 100 100 .. 100
Div. Av., per cent.... 98 .121 ... 106
Central Division-.
Brevard ............
Flagler ................ 60 3 . 20
Hernando .............. ... 110 ... 120
Hillsborough .......... ... 100 .. 120
Marion ................ 100 100 .. 150
Orange ............... ... .i.
Osceola ........... 100.. 10 120
Pasco ................. 150 200 ... 150
Polk ................... 100 100 .. 100
Seminole... .......... 100 ... ... 100
Sumter .!......... .... 100 100 ... 115
Volusia .............. 100 100 .. 100
v. Av..per cent.... 101 102 100 109
Southern Division-
Broward .............. . 100 100 .. 100
Dade ................... 100 100 ... 100
DeSoto ................ 100 90 ... 100
Lee ................... 100 80 75 100
Okeechobee .......... 90 90 .
Palm Beach ............ 100 ,90 ... 10
Div. Av., per cent....! 1 97 92 75 100
State Av., per cent ....l 101 106 75 108













REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BHING PLANTED* AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 81, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Cabbage Irish Potatoes

Western Division- Acreage | Conditign Acreage | Condition
Bay .................... 100 90 100 85
Calhoun ................ 100 85 100 80
Escambia .............. 60 50 75 100
Holmes ................I 100 70 105 75
Jackson ..... .......... 100 75 100 75
Santa Rosa ............ 100 70 100 70
Walton ............... 100 70 100 70
Washington ............ 90 75 90 75
Div. Av., per cent.. ... 94 73 96 79
Northern Division--
Gadsden ................ 120 85 100 75
Hamilton .............. ... .. 100 80
Jefferson .............. 110 90 100 80
Lafayette ............... 50 75 50 75
Leon ................... 100 95 100 85
Liberty ................ 90 90 80 90
Madison ............... 50 90 100 85
Taylor ...... ......... ... .. 100 80
W akulla ............... ..

Div. Av., per cent ... __ 87 1 88_ 91_., 81
Northeastern Division--
Alachua ............... 75 75 50 75
Bradford .............. I ....
Clay ................... ... 100 90
Columbia ............. ... 100 90
Duval ................. 100 100 100 75
Nassau ................ 100 50 100 75
Suwannee ............. 105 85 100 80
Div. Av., per cent.... | 95 I 78 92 I 81


Central Division-
Brevard ......... ...... 3 25 5 25
Flagler ................ 50 40 90 85
Hernando .............. 100 100 100 80
Hillsborough ........... 70 60 80 75
Marion ................ 60 50 50 60
Orange ............... . s
Osceola ............... 100 100 8 80
Pasco ................. 100 90 200 20
Polk .................. 150 90 90 80
Seminole .............. 100 100 100 100
Sumter ................. 100 100 100 00
Volusia ................ 100 95 100 80
Div. Av. per cent ... I 87 77 90 70
Southern Dvision-


Broward ....... .... .... 100 90 1 u H0
Dade ......... ......... -105 95 110 90
DeSoto ................. 90 I 90 50 80
Lee .................... 120 90 25 80
Okeechobee ............ 95 90 95 90
Palm' Beach .......... 95 95 100 80

Div. Av., per cent....I 98 92 78 85
State Av. er cent. 92 82 8979
State Av.. ner cent. 92 1 82


f I













REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WIT4. SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Dasheens Tomatoes

Western Division- acreage Condition Acreage Condition
Bay ................... I . ... 100 80
Calhoun ................. ... ... 100 75
Escambia ............ ... 100 60
H olm es ......... ... ... ... . .
Jackson ............. .. ... .. 100 60
Santa Rosa ............ ... ... 100 60
W alton ................ .. ... 100 65
Washington ........... ... .. 90
"Div. Av., per cent.... .. 99 64
Northern Division--
Gadsden .............. ... ... 100 75
Hamilton .............. ... ... 100 70
Jefferson .............. ... ... 100 75
Lafayette .............. ... ... 00 75
Leon .................. ... 100 00
Liberty ................ .
M adison ................
Taylor ............90 90
W akulla ...............

Div. Av, per cent.... .. .. 97 79
Northeastern Divisidn- __
Alachua ............... ... ... 1 00 80
Bradford .............. .. .. ...
Clay .................. ... 100 90
Columbia .............. . . 10 90
Duval ................. 100 00 100 100
Nassau ............... 125 100 100 75
Suwannee .............. .

Div. Av., per cent.... 113 ] I 100 100 87
Central Divis'on- _
Brevard ............ . 1 20 1 25
Flagler ................ 1 25 2 30
Hernando ............ .. . 300 100
Hillsborough ........... .110 90
Marion ................ 75 50
Orange ................ ... 100 80
Osceola ............. ... ... 100 50
P asco ................. . . .
Polk ....... ........... ... 80 75
Seminole .............. . 50 100 100 100
Sumter ................ .... .. 100 85
Volusia ............... I .. . ... 110 50

Div. Av.," nr cent.... 17 11 48 98 67
Southern Division-


Broward .............. .
D ade ................. .
DeSoto ................ ...
*L ee ................... .
Okeechobee ............ .
Palm Beach ........... 125

Div. Av., per cent.... 125
te Av. er cent... 85
State Av.. per cent. I 85


100
100
100 lO


1VU 50
100 60
100 70
100 75
105 90
110 85
k 103 72
99 74










55 -


REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND 'CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING-'MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPAREp WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Cucumbers English PeAs

WKestern Division- [ Acreage Condition Acreage Condition
Bay .................. "" ..
Calhoun ............... 100 80 90 90
Escambia ............ .. 90 60 100 100
H olm es ................ . ...
Jackson ............... 100 65 100 100
Santa Rosa ............ 100 60 100 100
Walton ............... 100 65 100 95
Washington ........... I 90 65 90 I 90

Div. A'., per cent ... 97 66 97 I '6
ANortherna Division--
Gadsden ............... 5 90 70
Hamilton .............. 90 70
Jefferson .............. 100 75 .
Lafayette .............. 90 75
Leon ................. 100 85
Liberty ................ 100 80
Madison ...... ........ 75 85
Taylor ................ SO 90 .
W akulla ................ ..- ..

Div. Av., per cent.... 93 78 75 85
Northeastern Division-
Alachua ............... 100 80
Bradford .............. .
Clay .................. 100 90 100 90
Columbia .............. ... ... 100 90
Duval ................. 100 100 100 100
Nassau ................ 100 10 100 75
Suwannee ........... . .....
Div. Av., per cent.... 100 70 100 89
Central Division--__
Brevard ............ .... ... I
Flagler ............... 2 30 2 40
H ernando .............. ...... .
Hillsborough ........... ... .
Marion ................ 50 40
Orange ................ 100 80
Osceola ........... 70 70 ..
Pasco .................
Polk .................. 90 80
Seminole ............. 100 100 100 100
Sumter ................ 100 90 100 100
Volusia ................ 100 80 100 100
i I I -----[----- ------------
Dlv. Av!, per cent.... 77 71 1 76 85
SSouthern Division--
Broward .............. ... ... ...
D ade ................. ... 6 ......
DeSoto ................ 40 .....50
Lee ................... 40 60
Okeechobee ............ 90 90 90 90
Palm Beach ........... 90 90 0 90

Div. Av., per 'cent.... 65 73 90 90

State Av.. per cent... 86 72 88 80













REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Beans (String) I Beans (Lima)

Western Divsion- Acreage | Condition Acreage Condition
Bay .................. 110 80 100 80
Calhoun ............... 110 75
Escambia ............... 100 90 100 50
Holmes ............... ... ..
Jackson ............... 105 75
Santa Rosa ............ 100 70
Walton ................ 100 70
Washington ............ 90 70

Div. Av., per cent.... 1 102 76 100 65
Northern Divsion--
Gadsden ........ .... 100 70 ...
Hamilton ............,. 100 75 ...
Jefferson .............. 100 80 ...
Lafayette ............. 75 80
Leon ................. 100 85 ...
Liberty ..... .......... 100 80
Madison ......... ..... 100 85 ..
Taylor ......... ....... 100 85
W akulla ............... I ....

Div. Av., per cent....I 94 80 ... .
Northeastern Division-
Alachua ................ 100 80 ...
Bradford ............... .. ..
Clay .................. 100 90
Columbia ..............
Duval ................ 100 100 100 100
Nassau ................ 100 10 100 10
Suwannee ............. 100 40

Div. Av., per cent.... 100 64 190 55
Central Division-
Brevard ............
Flagler .................. 2 40
Hernando .............. 100 70
Hillsborough ........... 100 1 85
Marion ................. 100 60
Orange ................ .
Osceola ............... 100 100
Pasc6 ................. 120 40
'Polk .................. 150 90
Seminole ..............1 100 75 100 75
Sumter .... ........... 110 40
Volusia ............... 100 100 100 100

Div. Av., per cent. ... 108 70 100 88
Southern Division--
Broward .............. 90 40
Dade ................. 90 40 ... .
DeSoto ............... 50 40
Lee ................... 84 40
Okeechobee ............ 95 95 100 90
Palm Beach ........... 100 95 10 95
Div. Av., per cent.... i 85 58 105 93
State Av., per cent .... 98 70 101 I 75













REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY | Lettuce Romain

Western Division--- Acreage | Condition Acreage | Condition
Bay .........................
Calhoun ............... 100 100 .
Escambia .............. 75 50
Holmes ............... .... .
Jackson ............... .. ..
Santa Rosa ............
W alton ...............
Washington ............ ....
Div. Av., per cent.... 88 75
Northern Division-
Gadsden .............. .. 100 90
Hamilton ............
Jefferson .............. 100 95
Lafayette ........ ..... ...... ...
Leon ................. 100 100
Liberty ...............
Madison ........ ...... 100 0 ..
T aylor ................ ........
W akulla ............... . .. I ...
Div. Av., per cent.... 100 94 I
Northeastern Division-
Alachua ............... ... ... .
Bradford .............. ... ... .
Clay .................... .. ..
Columbia .............. .
Duval ................. 100 100 100 100
Nassau ................ 75 10 I
Suwannee ............. .
Div. Av., per cent...., 88 55 I 100 I 100
Central Division--_
Brevard ............... 1 40 ... ...
Flagler ................. I 40 .
Hernando .............. . I
Hillsborough .. ... .. .
M arion ................ .
Orange ................ 100 90
Osceola ............. 120 100 .... .
Pasco ................. I
Polk ... ........ : "60 85 0 i10 i66
Seminole .............. 100 85 100 100
Sumter ..... ........... 85 90
Volusia ................ 105 95
Div. Av., per cent.... 72 78 100 I 100
Southern Division-
Broward ............... I ..
Dade .................I .....
DeSoto ................I ....
Lee ................... ... ...
Okeechobee ........ 100 95
Palm Beach ........... 110 100 ..
Div. Av., per cent,...1 105 98 ...
State Av., per cent.... 91 80 I 100 I 100










58

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Eggplants Peppers

Western Division- I Acreage I Condition I Acreage Condition
B ay ..................
Calhoun ............... 10 75 100 75
Escambia .............. 10 65 100 70
Holmes ............... .
Jackson ............... ....
Santa Rosa r.. . .. . . . 100 60
W alton ............... 9 60
Washington ........... 8 60 80 50,
Div. Av., per cent.... 9 65 95 64
Northern Di.vision--
Gadsden ............... .
Hamilton ............. . 100 70 100 75
Jefferson ............... 10t 70 100 80
Lafayette .............. .. 75' 80
Leon .................. 10 100 100 90
Liberty .................
Madison ............... 5 80 75 80
Taylor .............. . 85 80
Wakulla ............... ..

Div. Av., per cent.... 8 80 89 | 81
A northeastern Divisio-
Alachua ............... .
Bradford .............. .
Clay ................
Columbia ......... .. ..
Duval ................. 10 100i6 10 0
Nassau ................I 50 25
Suwannee .......... ... ...

Div. Av., per cent.... 75 63 I 100 100
Central Division--
Brevard .... ........... . .. 1 10
Flagler ................ 2 20 2 20
Hernando .............. ..., ... 100 70
Hillsborough ........... .
M arion ................ ...
Orange ............... .
P sco ..... .......... ... .
Polk .................
Polk e . . . . . . . 1 100 100 100
Seminole .............. 16 6106 10i6 i66
Sumter ................
Volusia .............. 100 50 100 60
Div. Av., per cent.... QL 67 57 67 57
Southern Division-
Broward ............... 90 70O 95 70
Dade .................. 90 75 100 75
DeSoto ................. 100 70 100 65
Lee ................... 200 75 100 70
Okeechobee ............ 90 90 105 95
Palm Beach ............ 90 90 110 95
I .
Div. Av., per cent....I 110 78 102 78
State Av., per cent .... 87 69 91 I 76












REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION'OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
SCENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.--(Continued.)

COUNTY Celery Beets

Western Division- I Acreage | Condition Acreage Condition
B ay .................. .
Calhoun ............... ... 100 100
Escambia ............. ... ... 100 75
H olm es .............. ... .
Jackson ..... ......... ... ...
Santa Rosa ........ ...1111 100 ..
Walton ...... .. ... 100 70
Washington .. ....... . .90 80

Div. Av., per cent.... ... .. 98 81
Northern Division-
Gadsden ............... ... .... 100 90
Hamilton .. ........... .. ... ..
Jefferson .............. 100 100
Lafayette ............. . 100 90
Leon .................. 100 100 100 100
Liberty ................ ... ... 100 90
Madison ............... 75 0
T aylor ................ .........
W akulla ............... ......

Div. Av., per cent..... 100 100 96 93
Northeastern Division-
Alachua ..............
Bradford .............. .. .. .
Clay ...... ........... .
Columbia ............ ...
Duval ................. ... .. 100 100
Nassau ................ .50 100
Suwannee .............I 100 50

Div. Av.. per cent.... ... .. 83 83
central Division-
Brevard ............... -I ...
Flagler ............... . .
Hernando .............. ... .
Hillsbo(ough ........... ..
M arion ................. ... ..
Orange ...............
Osceola ..........::: ..... 10:: io6 8o 1
Pasco ................ ..
Polk .................. 100 100
Seminole .............. 75 100 100 100
Sumter ........ ...........
Volusa ................. 100 100

Div. Av., per cent ... 94 100 93 100
southernn Division-
Broward .............. ... .......
Dade ..................
DeSoto ................ ... .. ** *.
L ee ................... ......
Okeechobee ............. .. .
Palm Beach ....... 100 100 110 100

Div. Av., per cent.... 100 100 110 100

State Av., per cent.... 98 100 92 91











60

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Onions Watermelons

Western Division-- I Acreage | Condition Acreage | Condition
Bay .................. 100 90 110 70
Calhoun ............... 100 100 105 70
Escambia .............. 100 100 100 70
Holmes ............... ... ... 105 75
Jackson ............... 100 100 110 80
Santa Rosa ............. 100 100 1W0 70
Walton ............... 90 90 105 65
Washington ............ 90 90 110 60
Div. Av., per cent.... [ 97 96 107 70
Northern Division-
Gadsden ................ 100 100 110 80
Hamilton ............. 100 95 100 85
Jefferson ............. / 100 100 110 f 85
Lafayette .............. 100 100 75 80
Leon ................. 100 100 115 80 ,
Liberty ................ 100 100 110 80
Madison ............... 100 100 100 85
Taylor ..... ....... 100 90 110 85
Wakulla .............. .... 105 90
I- I [--I----
Div. Av., per cent.... 100 98 104 1 83
Northeastern Division-
Alachua ............... I 100 100 150 90
Bradford ............ 1
Clay .................. 100 100 100 90
Columbia .............. 100 95 300 90
Duval ................. 100 100 100 100
Nassau ................ 100 75 125 90
Suwannee ............. 100 80 100 95
I I 00 0
Div. Av., per cent .. 100 92 146 93
Central Division--___
Brevard .............. I .5 25
Flagler .............. 2 30 5 40
Hernando ............. 100 100 300 90
Hillsborough ...... ....
Marin .............. .. 100
Orange ........... 100 90
Osceola ............80 50 80
Pasco .. ... ..... ... 120 60
Polk .......... 80 70
Seminole .............. 100 ) 100 100 75
Sumter ................ ... 110 60
Volusia .............. 100 100 30 50
TDv. Av.. per cent.... 76 76 94 60
Southern Division- -
*Broward ............... I ...
Dade .................. .. .. ...
DeSoto ................ ... .
Lee ...................I ... I I
Okeechebee ............ 100 90 110 90
Palm. Beach ............ 100 90 120 95
Div. Av., per cent.... 100 90 115 93
Rtatp Av.. er cent .... .I 9 I B90 11.3 80










61

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Cantaloupes Strawberries

Western Division- AcreAge | Condition I Acreage | Condition
Bay ................... 100 70 ...
Calhoun ............... 100 T
Escambia ............. 100 70 90 50
H olm es ................ ... ..
Jackson ............... 100 80 ..
Santa Rosa ............ 100 70 ...
W alton ................ 100 65
Washington ............ 100 60
Div. Av., per cent.... 100 69 90 50
Northern Division-
Gadsden ................. 100 80 ...
Hamilton .............. 100 75 .....
Jefferson .............. 110 80 ...
Lafayette .............. 50 80 ... .
Leon .................. 115 80 ...
Liberty ............... I ..
Madison ............... 90 81 50 100
Taylor ................. 90 85
Wakulla ............... 101 90 100 90
Div. Av., per cent.... 95 82 75 95
Northeastern Division-
Alachua ............... 50, 80 .
Bradford .............. 0... ... 100
Clay ................... .. ... 100 100
Columbia .............. .. .
Duval ................. 100 100 100 100
Nassau ......... .... 100 90 50\ 90
Suwannee ...... ...... ... ...
Div. Av., per cent I 89 90 88 98


Brevard ............... ...
Flagler ............... 5 30 2 40
Hernando .
HilIsborough ........... .
Marion ............. ..
Orange.. A
Osceola ........ 80 50 100 75
Pasco ............:.... 50 50 150 100
Polk .................. ... 150 100
Seminole .............. 100 100 100 100
Sumter ................ 50 60
Volusia ................ 20 40 100 90
Div. Av., per cent.... 51 55 100 84
Southern Division---
Broward ............... 0- ... 0to 90
Dade ................. . ...100 95
DeSoto ................ ....
Lee ................... .. .
Okeechobee ............ ..
Paln Beach........... 130 110
Div. Av., per, cent.... ... ... 110 98
qtnot Av.. per cent.,i.I 87 74 93 93


Gestral Divisi n-












62 .

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)
Orange Lemon Lime Grapefruit
COUNTY Tees Tees Trees Trees

Western Division- I Condition I Condition | Condition Condition
Bay ................... 100 100 100 100
Calhoun ............. 110 ... ... 110
Escambia .............. 80
Holmes .............. .. .. ..
Jackson ............... ... ...... .
Santa Rosa ..... ........... ...
W alton .............. .. ...... ..
Washington ........... ... ...
Div. Av per cent.... 97 100 100 105
Northern Division-
Gadsden .............. ... ... ...
Hamilton ......... .
Jefferson .............. ... ... ...
Lafayette ....90 .... .....
Leon .............. ... 100 100
Liberty ............... ........
Madison ..............
Taylor .............. 90 .. .. 90
W akulla .............. 90 ... ... 90
Div. Av., per cent .... 93 1 .. 93
Northeastern Division-
Alachua .......... .. 75 ... ... 75
Bradford ..............
Clay .................. 1 100 ... .
Columbia .................
Duval ................. .100 ... 100
Nassau ............... ..... .
Suwannee ............. .. . .
Div. Av., per cent... 92 100 92
Central Division- -- -
;revard ....... ........
Flagler ................. 100 90 ... 100
Hernando .............. 150 ... ... 150
Hillsborough ............ 95 . ... 95
Marion ............... 5 .. .. 75
Orange ................ 100 ... 100
Osceola ............... 100 100 00 80
Pasco ................. 120 ... ... 120
Polk .................. 100 ... 100
Seminole .............. 100 100 100 100
Sumter ............... 100 ...... 100
Volusia ............... 85 ...... 80
Div. Av.. per cent.... 102 97 .100 100
Southern Division-
Broward ............... 90 70 75 95
Dade .................. 90 75 80 95
DeSoto ............... 95 90 90 90
Lee ........ .......... 95 90 90 95
Okeechobee ............ 100 ... 90 100
Palm Beach ............ 100 ... 95 100
Div. Av. per cent.... 95 81 87 96
State Av..per cent... 96 95 96 97














REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION 0, CROPS, PLANTED AND
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920,' AS'
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

COUNTY Bananas Pineapples Mangoes Grapes
_l I
Western Division- I Condition | Condition ] Condition I Condition
Bay .... ... ... . ... .. I ... ... 100 (
Calhoun ............... ... .
Escambia ............. ... ... .. 75
Holmes ................ ....
Jackson .............. .. .. ... 90
Santa Rosa ............ ..
W alton ................ 90
Washington .......... ... ... 85

Div. Av., per cent . ... ... 88
Northern Division---
Gadsden .............. ... ... . 90
Hamilton ...... ........ ... .. ... 100
Jefferson .............. ... . ... 100
Lafayette .............. ... 100 *
Leon .................. . 100
Liberty ........ .......' ... ... ... 100
Madison ............... ...
Taylor ................ .. .
W akulla ................ .. .. .

Div. Av.. per cent.... [ ... ... ... /

Alachua ............... .. 100
Bradford .............. ... ... .. .
Clay .................. ........
Columbia .............. ... .... .90
Duval ................. .... ... .. ... 100
Nassau ............... ...
Suwannee .............
Div. Av.. pe' cent... 97
Central Division- --_
Brevard ............
Flagler ............... 100
Hernando ........ ..... 100 ..
Hillsborough .... .... '. .. ,x N
M arion ................
Orange ................ ..
Osceola ................ 100 30 70 25
Pasco ................. ... ... ... 100
P o .................. . .
Seminole ............. ... 75
Sumter .......... ..... .
Volusia ............... 1 40 .. ... 100
Div. Av., per cent.... 1 80 30 70 82
Southern Division- __
T nA


Broward ............
Dade ............ ...
DeSoto ................
Lee ..................
Okeechobee ............
Palm Beach ..........
I-


Div. Av., per cent.... 83 60 75

State Av.e per cent.... 82 45 73 91


- I-------I-----










64

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS, PLANTED AN'
BEING PLANTED AND CONDITION OF FRUIT TREES BY PER-
CENTAGE;FOR-THE QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31, 1920, AS
COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1919.-(Continued.)

I Avocado --
COUNTY Guavas Pears Peaches Pears

Western Division- I Condition I Condition I Condition I Condition
.Bay ............. : 100
Calhoun ........../. .. I. 100 :0
.Escambia ......... .. ... 75
Holm es ................ | . 80
Jacksno . . . 80 70
Santa Rosa ............
W alton ................ .. 85
W ashington ............ ... ...0 I .
nlv a .. A iV r t ....I .. I ... i 7


Northern Division- |
Gadsden ...... ........ . 90
Hamilton ........ ...... .. I I . 100 |
Jefferson .............. |.. 100 .
L tfayette '....... ... .. [ ... 100 90
Leon ..................I 100 75
Liberty ......... .. 90 I
Madison ...... ... ..5
Taylor .....0 I
Wakulla ..... . . . . /* o0 I 0
Div. AV., per cent.... .. 95 I 85
Northeastern Division--
.0 I 100


Alacdfua ............... ... ..i .
Bradfo rd j 100 . .100
Clay ................... .. ... ioo i60
Columbia............. ... 90
Duval ............ ... . ... 75 100
Nassau ............... ... 50 90
Suwannee .............. ... I -
S100 8 98


iv. v., p r ~cn . i ... .l
Central Division- --
.revard ......... -. ... ... ...
Flagler................ 100 60 90
yHernando .............. ... 75 75
Hillsborough .... .... . ...
Marion ............... ... 25 20
Orange ................ ... 90 100
Osceola ............... 100 125 125 100
Pasco ................. 100 100
Polk .................. ... .
Seminole 85 ...............100 100
Sumter ....... . .90.
Volusia ............... ...90 40 40
niv. Av., per cent..... 95 125 78 75
-Southern Dwision- 50I '
reward .......... ..... 0 50
Dade .................. 60 60
DeSoto ................ 90 80 ...
Lee ................... 100 90 ...
Okeechobee ............ 75 80
Palm Beach ............ 70 85 ..
Div. Av., per cent.... 74 74 ..
State Av., per cent.... 85 1 100 85 85





I- "














PART II.
/
Rules and Regulations.
Analyses.


5-Bulletin












DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OF THE STATE
9F FLORIDA


REGULATIONS FOR DRAWING, PACKING AND
TRANSMITTING SAMPLES OF FERTILIZER
AND FEED STUFF FOR ANALYSIS BY
THE STATE LABORATORY.

All Other Rules and Regulations Relating to the Matter
Herein Referred to or Disoussed Are
Hereby Rescinded.


ANALYSES MADE BY STATE LABORATORY.
Only such materials are analyzed by the State Lab-
oratory as are directed by the Pure Food, the Fertilizer,
and Stock Feed Laws.
There are no fees' or charges of any kind made by the
State Laboratory.
The State Laboratory is not permitted to compete with
commercial laboratories.
No commercial work of any kind is accepted.
The State Laboratory does not analyze the materials
used by, nor the products of Fertilizer, Feed Stuffs, or
other factories, by which to guarantee their goods. Such
analyses are commercial problems.
ANALYSES IN CRIMINAL CASES

The State Laboratory does not make post mortem ex-
aminations, nor furnish evidence in criminal cases .(e3-
cept as provided by the Pure Food, Fertilizer and Stock
Feed Laws). Such analyses and examinations are made
by specialists employed by the grand jury and prosecut-
ing attorney, the cost being taxed as other criminal costs,
by the court.






S- 68

STATE OF FLORIDA.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

February O0, 1920. ....
REGULATIONS GOVERNING' THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF SAMPLES OF COMMERCIAL
FERTILIZER AND COMMERCIAL FEEDING
'STUFF TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICUL-
TURE FOR -NALYSIS BY THE STATE CHEMIST.

The following .regulations fo:'diawirig, preparing and
sending samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial
stock feed, under the authority given in Section 15 of
Chapter 4983, Acts 6f 1901 (Chhpter XXI., General
Statutes), as amended by Chnplter'' 660, Acts of 1907,
and Section 15, Chapter 5452, Acts/of 1905, as amended
by Chapter 5661, Acts of 1i'0, and Chapter 7939, Acts of
1919, are this day adopted.

OFFICIAL SAMPLES, drawn by State Chemist, As-
sistant State Chemists or Inspectors.
An approximately equal quantity (a pint or a pound
approximately) shall be taken from ten or more original
packages of the same brand in the possession of any
manufacturer, dealer or person, when the lot being sam-
,pled contains tenor more packages of the same brand.
In case the lot contains less than .ten packages of the
same brand, each package shall be sampled as directed.
Preparation of Sampl--The several samples, drawn as
above, from each package, shall be carefully and thor-
oughly mixed. From tiis well mixed lot drawn\from
each package as above, a fair sample of not less than one
pound, in the 'case' of fertilizers, and of not less than
one-half pound in the case of stdck feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can-approximately a quart can or bot-
tle.


4 !












The sample shall be delivered to the. State Chemit;, who
shall prepare the same for-analysis (by properly grin d-
ing, mixing and sifting the same.) The State:-hemist
shall retain one-haIlf of thisprepared sample foranalysis;
the remainder shall be. placed in a glass bottle, sealed,
and identified by the laboratory number and date, and
placed in the-custody of the Commissioner of Agriculture.
These duplicate samples shall be retailed for a' period of
three months frbm the date of the certificate of analysis.
[u case of appeal from analysis of the State Chemist
(within three months from the date of the certificate),
the sample shall be retained indefinitely, until, the final
disposition of the case.

Special Samples.-Samples drawn and transmitted by
the 'purchaser under Sections 9 of both the Commercial
Fertilizer and the Commercial Stock Feed Laws.

SAMPLING TEN OR LESS PACKAGES. .

The purchaser, or owner of the material to be sampled,
when the lot or -shipment contains ten or less original
packages, each bearing the guarantee tag and stamp re-
quired by law, of the same brand, shall take, in the pres-
ence of two disinterested' persons, within sixty days
after delivery, an approximately equal quantity (a pint
or a pound) from each of the ten or less packages of the
same brand.

NOTE: It is suggested that when practicable all sam-
ples should be taken\ with an approved "sampler" (a
sdgar, flour or cheese tryer, alprod augur, a semi-circular
instrument of tin or sheet iron, capable of drawing a
sample through the center of the package, approximately
twenty inches long); the sample to be taken through tbe
center of the package.

SAMPLING MORE THAN TEN PACKAGES.

In case the lot or shipment contains more than. ten
packages of,the same brand, each bearing the guarantee
tag and stamp required by law, a sample.shall be drawn
in the presence of two disinterested persons from ten or
S more packages.
N\










After carefully and thoroughly mixing these samples,
* a fair sample of the mixture, not less than a pound in the
case of commercial fertilizer, and not less than one-half
pound in the case of co mercial stock feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can and sealed in the presence of the
witnesses.

On the sample thus drawn shall be written the name
and address of the purchaser, and the name of a disinter-
ested party, who shall transmit the package to the Com-
missioner of Agriculture by mail or prepaid express,
properly packed to prevent damage in transportation.
The purchaser, or sender, of the sample shall also ad-
dress a letter to the commissionerr of Agriculture pdvis-
ing him of the sending of the sample, stating the number
of original packages purchased, each bearing the guaran-
teed analysis and inspection stamp required by law, rep-
resented by the sample, the date of purchase, and the
date of delivery of the goods.

NOTE: THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE ENCLOSED IN THE
PACKAGE.

Blank form of the letter of transmittal will be fur-
nished by the Commissioher of Agriculture and is pub-
Slished herein. It Inst be literally complied with, other-
wise the sample will ot be accepted for anaylsis.

SAMPLES IN "PAPER OR WOODEN PACKAGES WILL NOT BE
AcCEPTeD.

These regulations Ere adopted to secure fair samples
o' sufficient size to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for three, months from the date of
certificate of analysis.

The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser.

The drawing and ending of special samples is in rare
cases in compliance: with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper boxes, badly packed, and frequently in very








71'

small quantity .(less than an ounce) and often there
are nor marks; numbers or other means of identification;
the postmark in many instances being absent...

NOTE:. ,STRICT COMPLIANCE WITH THE ABOVE REGULA-
" TIONs WILL BE 'REQUIRED. THE SAMPLE, iO BE A PROPER
SAMPLE, MUST NOT BE LESS, THAN ONE POUND OF FERTILIZER
OR ONE-HALF POUND OF STOCK FEED, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE,
SEALED AND' ADDRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER LOF AGRICUL-
TURE. THE PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS, AND THE
NAME OF THE SENDER, MUST OLSO BE ON THIS PACKAGE,
THIS RULE APPLYING TO SPECIAL SAMPLES -OF FERTILIZERS OR
COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFF, DRAWN AS DIRECTED.

IF MORE THAN, ONE SAMPLE IS'SENT REPRESENTING DIF-
,FERENT BRAIDS THE SAMPLES MUST BE NUMBERED SO AS TO
IDENTIFY THEM; .ALL THIS SHOULD BE DONE IN THE PRES-
ENCE OF THE WITNESSES, AND' THE PACKAGE SEALED AND
MAILED OR EXPRESSED BY A DISINTERESTED PERSON.

NOTE: The' tags off the sacks with the guaranteed
anaylses and stamps, and names of manufacturers should
be retained by the purchaser, to compare with the cer-
tificate of analysis when received and NOT SENT TO THIS
OFFICE.'

Rai Phosphates.-Ground raw phosphate rock-hard
Sor soft-contains phosphoric acid, more or less available,
hence is classed a fertilizer, when sold to consumers for
fertilizing purposes, under Section 11 of the law; and is
required to be guaranteed -and, stamped as required by
Section 3; listed and guaranteed under oath, as required'
by Section 6, and the inspection fee paid previous'to sale;
as provided by Section 6.

Lime is not classed as a fertilizer. It is not required to
be sold under guarantee, iior the inspection fee paid; .
hence is not subject to free analysis by the.State Lab-
oratory.

The following form letter for transmitting special sam-
ples of fertilizers ,or feeding stufs- is adopted and must
be explicitly complied with in order to.obtain a legal cer-
Stificate of analysis.





1 ;; / '' ^











V_ 7 T Z !1 '


FORM] FOR TRANSM
MERCI L FER'

diAL FU


72

[TTING SAMPLES OF
PILIZER OR COMMER-
EDIN STUFF.


COM-


.,,.,.... ... .~ ., .. Fla., ........192....
IEon. W. A, McRae,, ,

Commissioner of Agriculture.
.. 1 ,, ,,-/ ,


/, iTahlaassee, Forol
Iear Sir:-

I send youi today by
.............. ....
(Indicate Fertilizer, C
for analysis by the tate

This sample is taken
Bearing -the guarantee t

purchased from a register

. . .. 1 2. .,and,

day of.............. .

This ample was draw

presence of two witnesses

The guarantee tags anm
ages sampled are retained

This* simple is sent bh

Mr. ........ ...... ....

Yol


rida.


mail (or express) a samp-le of
!-

tton Seed Meal or Feed Stuff.)
ChemiSt.

'rom a lot of.... packages, each
g and stamp required, by law,
red dealer, on, the......day of

delivered on or about the.......
1, 92'...

n from ........ packages in the
this day.

stamps off the ......... pack-
by the purchaser.',

me, one of the-witneqses, for

........, the purchaser.
rs truly,,


~. L


9


i.-
i
i


**
t f











73

OBJECT OF THE LAWS.

-, The object of the Fertilipr" and Stock Feed Laws is:'
First, to protect the- consider from fraud, false repre-
senttions by illegitimate dealers who have not complied
with the law, _nr iled their guaranteed analysis under
oath, j:4d who ha-ve qi, A pd their i's.pection tg, fixed
by law:
,.e~iad, ~t~ p 9,tcF .thelawfi ldel.er,.who ha,, h fully
compliqd with. theta law by filing hisguarantee under oath,
anid:,haspaid his inspection fee, and ho.has placed upori
each bag or other.,package, a.guarantee tag ,hbowing the
/minimum percentage of valuable ingredients in the fer-
tilizer, or feed stuffs, as provided by the law.
NOTE ; These rpgujAtions gre adopted to coform, with
the decision,of the Supreme Cpurt O Floridai ofifay 12,
1917, as follows;, .. ,
"The terms of the statute in giving the special right of
Action to 'any person purchasing' fertilizer clearly con-
templates that the test shall be made. with at least some
degree of promptness after the delivery of the fertilizer,
and that more than one sample shall be taken/when the
quantity of fertilizer purchased- makes it expedient to
have plural samples to secure a fair test."

( .' SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is .the only. state, in. the Union that provides
for the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or pur-
chaser, UNDER PROPER. RULES AND REGULATIONS FIXED BY
LAW,-to be sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture for
analysis free of cost. Any person who has pur-
chased fertilizers or feeds 'FOR' IrS OWN USE' MAY *DRAW
A SAMPLE OF THE SA M, ACCORDING TO LAW 'AND REGULA-
TIONS, and have the same analyzed by the State Chemist
free of cost, ,.In,case of,.pdulteration, or deficiency the
purchaser can, n ..estAblishing the6 fact, receive double
the cost dema ed, fir th.e goos.
The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples.
Rules and regulations are published in every Quarterly
Bulletin for drawing and .transmitting "special samples."





\ : ,


74

This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of, adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.

WATER ANALYSIS.

The .State Laboratory..'will analyze samples of water
from public-owned water supplies, municipal plants, etc.,
owned and operated-by the city or town, when accom-
panied by the certificate of the mayor, or other city offi-
cer, that the water is furnished the public by the city or
town.
It will not analyze water for individuals or corpora-
tions selling water, tq the public, water companies, ice
companies, mineral springs, health resorts, etc., main-.
tained for profit. Such samples should be sent to a com-
mercial laboratory.
The State Laboratory does not make bacteriological
examinations for disease germs. Such examinations are
made by the State Board of Health at Jacksonville, Fla.,
-which has entire charge of the public health.
We do not make a sanitary analysis. We determine
the total dissolved solids in the sample quantitatively,
and report them as parts per 1,000,000, naming the prin-
cipal ingredients in the order of their predominance
qualitatively. We find Calcium Carbonate (lime), Sodium
Chloride (salt), Magnesium Sulphate (epsom salts),
Silica (sand), and Iron, is the general order of their
predominance, though on the coast, where the total dis-
solved solids amounts to 5,000 or more parts per 1,000,000,
Sodium Chloride (salt) is the predominant substance.
Fromn a knowledge of the chemical analysis of a water,
unaccompanied by any further information, no conclu-
sion as to the potability and healthfulness of the water
can be deduced.
Therefore, we require the following information to be
given in regard to'the source of the water:
(1). 'The source of the water: spring, lake, river,
driven well, dug well, bored well, artesian well or flow-
ing well; and also the depth.of the water surface below
the top of the soil, and in cased wells, the depth of the
easing.


/ I.


. 1 1;







75

(2). 'he locality of the source of the water; town,
city or village; or the section, township and range.
No samples of water will be analyzed unless the name
and address of. the sender is on the package for identi-
fication.
SWE REQUIRE TWO GALLONS OF EACH SAMPLE OF WATER IN
A NBW JUTQ, STOPPED WITH A NBW CORK, AND SENT BY 'PRE-
PAID EXPRESS. We will not accept any sample of water
for analysis not in a new jug. Vessels 'previously used for
other purposes are never properly cleaned for sending
samples' of water for analysis. Corks, onc mused for other
substances (molasses, vinegar, wvhiskey, kerosene, etc.) are
never properly cleaned.
NOTE: We find ehe waters of the State -springs,
wells, driven wells and artesian wells generally very
pure and wholesome, with but little mineral impurity,
and that such as is not harmful. Except in cases of
gross carelessness, in allowing surface water to contam-
irate' the well or spring, the waters of the State are pure
and wholesome. The deep wells of the State are noted
for their purity and healthfulness.

SOIL ANALYSIS.

Frequently samples of soil are sent in for analysis with
a request to advise as to the best diethods'of fertilizing.
There is but little information to be 'deriyed from a soil
analysis that would be of benefit to farmers. So much
depends on tilth, drainage, culture and other physical
conditions, that an analysis made under 'laboratory con-
ditions is of little value.
A chemical anaylsis of soil may indicate a very fertile
soil, rich in plant food, while the facts are the soil' is
not productive. This is instance by the rich sawgrass
muck lands and river bottoms of the State, that are
fertile chemically, but not productive until properly
drained; also by the arid lands of th West, rich in the
elements of plant food, but not productive until irri-
gated. .Other soils, with less plant food, but on account
of proper physical conditions, culture and tilth, are ex-
ceedingly productive.
The average of thousands of analyses of Florida soils





I-:











made byr' i F~t FIida Agricultural. Experim~ient Station
and the State Laboratory is as follows:
Nitrogen (per cent)'....;.......... 0,0413
Potash'(per bbeit) .. .; . .: :*0.009L
SPhosp~dikid Aeid '(pr cent) .,.:. .. ,013M
This is a fair average of all of the Norfolk and Ports-
mouth soil peris, of the State, which comprise.,' ~dr the
-greter portion o'f the State.
In this connection we quote from',the report of the
Indigna Agsicultpral Experiment Station,- Purdue Uni-
versity, Lafayette, Indiana, 1908, As follows:
S"Soil A alysis ,of Iittle Value in, Showing Fertilier
Requzlrmewntd-'1lhe Chemical Department is'calied upon
to answer liundreds' of letters of inquiry -in -relation to
,agricultural 'chemical problems from people all over the
State. ."I this' connectiohi it might be well to say that
there is a widespread idea that the chemist can analyze
i sample of. soil and, without further knowledge of the
conditions, write out 'a (prescription of a fertilizer which
will fil the needs of'that particular soil.
"The. Experiment stationn does not analyze samples of
pnoi to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is,no
bhelpical method known that will show reliably thea yal-
ability,,of the. plant food elements present in the soil, as
this is a variable factbr, influenced by the kind of cfop,
the type' of' soil, the. climate and biological conditions;
hence, we do not recommend this method of testing soil.
. "The method reqom4 epded, by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot,system, in which:long, nar-
row strips, of the field to be tested are measured off side
by,side. The cropip. planted: uniformly over each,, : Dif-
ferent fertilizers Are applied-to the different plots, every
- third orfourth, one being left unfertilized.: 1T41e produce
irom these ,plots, is harvested separately and weighed.
In thip manner the farmer can tell what fertilizer is best
suited, for his heeds. As climatic conditions may' iiflu-
qnce the yield with different fertilizers, it is best to carry
on such tests for more than one year before drawing defi-
nite conclusions. There is positively no easier or shorter
method of testing the soil that we feel safe in recommend-
ing.








"Soil can be greatly improved by an-intelligent rotation
of crops, the conservation of stable inanures, and the use
of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need
haye'-o .f'ear'tht .the proper' lplic'ation of commercial-
fertilizer will dihjie,.the iatidi .. : *

ANALYSIS 0C1'FODS AND ]pUGS.
Samples of foods and drugs are drawn under special
regulatiolsL'as provided by law.
Application should be made to the Commissioner of
Agriculture or State, Chemist for the necessary blanks,
instructions, etc., foi drawing and transmitting samples
of foods and drugs,, including drinks of al'kiid~.'i '
FOOD AND DRUG SAMPLES NOT DRAWN 'AND -TRANSMITTED
ACCORDING TO LAW WILL NOT BB ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS.

COPIES OF LAWS, RUL-tS AND IdlGtILATIONS,
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the
respectve laws, including rules and regulations and
standards, by applying tobthe Commissioner of Agricul-
ture. Application for the Quarterly Bulletin, of the State
Departnmet of Agriculture should also .be'maae to the
OomAnissioner of Agriculture, or State dCiemist. The
Bulletin of the Florida Agriculture Experiment, Station
can be had by application to the Direotor at Gainesville.

These regulations supersede and revoke all previous
regulations governing the drawing and transmitting of
samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial stock
feed. i

Commissioner of Agriculture
February 10th, 1920.
Tallahassee, Fla.









18 .

NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT APRIL
1, 1920, FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMMONIATES .
Ammonia, sulph., bulk, f. o. b. iorks, per
100 lbs. ............... .... .... Noinlnal
double bags, f. a, s. New York ......... 7.30 @ 7.35
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. Chicago,
ground ...:,.......... ........... 8.50 & 10
Tankage, 10.and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ..... ...................... 8.50 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground .. :... ................. 8.50 & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15 p. e....................... @ 6.25
blood, f. o. b. Chicago ............... 8.70 @-
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago.....:. 4 & 10 & $1
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago, per unit......- @ 7.00
Dried Blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York .......................... 8.75 @-
Tankage, New York ................. 8.00 @-
Nitrate of Soda, per 100 lbs............. 3.85 @ 3.90
PHOSPHATES.
Acid, phosphate, basis 16%, bulk, per ton. 19.00 @-
Southern ports' ...................... 23.00 @
Bones, rough, hard ............ ........ 30.00 @32.00
soft, steamed, unground .............. 26.00 @27.00
ground, steamed, 11/4 p. c. ammonia and
60 p. c. bone phosphate............. 32.00 @ -
do, 3 and 50 p. c.................... 47.00 @-
raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and 50 p. c.
bone phosphate .................... 52.00 @-
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c., f. o. b. Tampa, Fla............ 6.85 @-
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 75
p. c., f. o. b. Tampa................ 10.50 @--
Florida high grade phosphate hard rock,
77 p. c., f. o. b. Florida ports........ 12.50 @-
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c., per
ton ...... ..................... . 11.00 @ 11.50
75 p. e. guarlpteed, per ton, 2,240 lbs.. 9.75 @10.25
78 p. c., per ton, 2,240 lbs.............. 11.00 @11,50







79

POTASHES.

AiAerican fertilizer, potash, in paper-lined
cars, f. e. b'. works, per unit. .......
Muriate of potash, 80@85 per cent, K. 0.
L., bags, per unit .. .... ..L.. . .. .
Sulphate of potash, 90@95 per cent, basis
i 90,per cent, in bags, per unit........
First sorts potasies, per lb...............


2.25 @--

2.70 @ 2.75.

4.00 @--
15 @ 201





80

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND K'iirnLI-
ING MATERIALS ATiFLORIDA SEAPORTS,
APRIL 1, 1920.

COMPOSITION

MATERIAL 2-o -' 0


-'4
^l2 |-24 I


I
Dissolved bone black.
High grade acid, phos-
phate ............
Low grade acid phos-
phate ............
Hardwood ashes.....
Hardwood ashes.....
Cotton seed meal.....
Sheep manure. .....
Goat manure.........
Ground tobacco stems
Steamed bone meal..
Raw bone meal......
Low grade tankage..
Medium grade tank-
age ..............
High grade tankage..
DIried blood.........
Dried blood..........
Nitrate of soda...'...
Sulphate of ammonia.
Baled tobacco stems..


16 ......

14 ......
...... ..... .

2.5 ......
2 ......


8
5
4

3
1.5


14
17
8

7
3.5


3
2
1.5
3.5
3
7.5



. .


7
2.25
1.5
2.5
3
4.5
6.5/

8
10'
14
16
18
25


$3 .00

25.00

23.50
30.00
27.00
83.00
41.00
35.00
55.00
65.00
70.00
68.00

82.00
99.00
146.00
16700
92.00
135.00
40.00


Terms: 30 days net, or 5% discount for cash in 10 days.
The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing
and bagging any special or regular formula are $3.50 per
ton iq excess of above prices.









STATE VALUATIONS

(Based on onomwerirl value April 1, 19.20, at Florida
-factries in ton lots for cash, f. o. k.)

AvjaiJb Phosphoric Acid ........... 7c a pound
Inoa4ble Pkosphoric Acid, ..,....... Ic a pound
Ammwoia ,(or its equivalent in nitrogen). 35e a pound
Potaah ,(as actual potash, K20) ........ 20c a pound

If calculated by waits:

Available Phosphoric Aid ............... $1.50 per unit
Tasoluble Phasphoric Acid.............. ..20 per bait
Amamoia (or its equivalent in nitrogen).. 7,.00 per unit
Potash ................................ 4.00 per unit

With a uniform allowance of $3.50 per ton for mixing and
bagging.

A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
fnd this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid.. 6.22 per cent x $1.50 = $ 9.33
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.. 1.50 per cent x .20 -- .30
Ammonia ................. 3.42 per cent x 7.00 = 28.94
Potash ................. 3.23 per cent x 4.00 = 12.92
Mixing and bagging............. ............. 3.50

Commercial value at seaports............... $49.99
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:

AVailable Phosphoric Acid...8 per cent x $1.50 = $12.00
Ammonia ..................2 per cent x 7.00 = 14.00
Potash .....................2 per centx 4.00- 8.00
Mixing and bagging............................ 3.50

Commercial value at seaports................ $37.50
1 /
The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.

6-Bulletin









STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at the
date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the "season."
They may, but seldom do, vary from the market prices,
and are made liberal to meet any slight advance or de-
cline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked, "What is Smith's
Fruit and Vine worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined
aqd the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
materials to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State' value" is,simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values," April 1, 1920, are nominal.










FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by. 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by..... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply.. 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply.. 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (KO2) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. nitrate of soda, and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiva-
lent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214, and you
get 18.90 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K2O), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (KO).











COMPOSITION -OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

S Powds .Per Hw3dlrd.
T. > Total
Aiselnia. ,P osphorie Potash.
___~________^____Acid._____
'itirate of Soda.......... 17 to 19 .......... ...........
Sulphate of Ammonia.. 21 to 2 ....................
Dried Blood ........ 2 t 17 ........... ............
Coc entrnwed Ta n.age... 1 to 1 'to ...........
Bioe Tankage ......... 6 to 9 10o .........
Pried Fish Scrap........ 6 to 11, 3 to 8 ............
cotton Seed Meal........ 7 to 10 2 to 8 1 to 2
Hoof Meal .............. i to 17 to 2 1 to 2
N PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.
Available Inspluble
Ammonia. Phos. Aeid. Phos. Aeid.
'lorida Pebble Phosphate. ............... 26 to 82
Florida Rock Phosphate., ............ ...... ..... 30 to 85
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 8
Ground Bone ........... 3 to 6 5 to 8 1 to 17
Steamed Bone ......... 1 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 41 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Actual m'oa. Phos. Lime.
'Potash. Am Acid.
Muriate of Potash.... 50 to 62 ......... ................
Sulphate of Potash...... 48 to 52 ........... ..... ......
Carbonate 'of Potash.;... 55 to 60 ........ ......... .........
Nitrate of Potash.......140 to 44 12 to 16 ......... .........
Dil. Sul. of Pot.L nd-Mag. 25 to 30 .................. .........
Kainit ........... .12 to 13 ....... ....... .....
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20 ......... ......... .........
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30 .......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes. unleached. 2 to 8 ........'. 1 to 2 .........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 6 to 2 ......... 1 to 14135 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 3 to 9 2 to 4 ......... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.50 0.30 0.30
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.50 0.60 0.25 0.30
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.C6 1.00, 0.85 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30[ 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.851 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.501 0.75 0.50 0.70








85

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLOIWDA, FEEDING
STUFFS&



NAME OF FEED.
\4


Maiden Cane Hay..... 28.60 11.60 42.40 2.60 4.20

Natal Grass Hay...... 36.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00

Para Grass Hay_..... 31.20 8.00 45.70 1.60 6.20

Rhodes; Grass Hay.... 41.10 7.70 36.80 1.30 6.60

Beggarweed Hay....... 24.30 21.60 35.10 4.10 4,00

Kudzu Vine Bay ....... 32.36 15.90 33.00 1.60 6.80

Co* Pea Hay......... 26.50 13.00 45.90 4.20 7.50

Velvet Bean. Hay.... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70

Velvet Beans .-....... 7.00 21.00 53.10 5A0 3.60

Velvet Bean H uls.... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30

Velvet Beans and Hulls 10,70 19.40 50.60 4.50[ 3.50

Cow Peas ............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.20

Soy Bea Melat....... 4.50 48.40 27.50 6,40 440

Peanut Vine Meab...... 200 0.90 38A04 0.30 6.80

Cotton Seed........... 23.20' 18.40 2430 19,90 3.5

Cotton Seed Bul. i... 44,40, 4.00 36.60 2,00 2.8

Bright Cotton S'di Meali 940: 38.62. 28.60 7.80 5.8


I I/










AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continued).







bark Cotton Seed Meal 20.00 23.15 37.10 5.50 5.00

Corn Grain........... .2.10 10.50 69.60 5.40 1.50

Corn Meal ........... .1.90 9.70 68.70 3.80 1.40

Hominy Feed...... .... 4.00 10.50 65.30 7.80 2.60
Corn and Cob Meal 5.80 7.50 70.80 3.10 1.2







Ground Corn Shucks. 30.20 2.80 54.60 0.60 1.90


Equal parts, Corn in
i Si













Shucks & V'lv't Beans 16.03 12.56 53.71 2.32 4.33
bark Cotton Seed Meal 20.00 23.51 37.10 5.50 5.00







Rice (rain)........... 0.20 10.50 79.0 0.40 0.40

Rice Bran Meal............ 1.90 12.10 68.70 .80 10.00








Wheat (grain) ....... .1.80 11.90 71.90 2.10 1.80
Wheat Branominy Feed.......... .00 15.40 53.90 7.80 5.80
Wheor and Cob Meaiddngs.... 5.0 7.50 70.80 .10 3.20

Wheat Groun d Corn Shucks.. 7.80 16.90 54.40 4.80 5.30
Ground Corn Cobs.... 30.00 3.00 56.60 0.70 1.60
Equal parts, Corn in
Shucks & V'lv't Beans 16.03 12.56 53.71 2.32 4.33







heats (grain)p Stuff....... 95.60 14.60 59.80 5.00 3.00

Dryice Jap Sugar Cane.. 26.20 2.30 762.0 01.50 2.80
Rice Bran..... I ...... 9X0 12.10 49:90 8.80 10.00

Wheat, (grain) ... .... 1.80 11.90 71.90 2.10 1.80

Wheat Bran.......... 9.00 15.40 53.90 4C00 5.80

Wheat Middlings......[' 5.401 15.401 59.40 4.10 3.20
Wheat Mixed Feed...-. 7.80 16.90 54.40 4.80 5.30

Wheat Ship Stuff..,... 5.60 14.60 59.80 .5.00 3.70

Dry, Jap Sugar Cane.. 26.20 2.30 62.60 1.50 .2.80








87

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continued).

0 ^
NAME OF TEED. ,



Peanut Hulls ..... 56.60 7.30 18.90 2.60 5.50
Peanut, with Hulls. 16.40 20.40 16.40- 36.20 4.10
Peanut Kernel .... 2.60 26.40 17.50 44.90 2.20

Peanut Meal (with-
out Hulls) ...... 5.10 47.60 23.70 8.00 4.90
Peanut Feed (in-
cluding Hulls) .... 23.40 28.40 27.00 11.00 5.50
,, I I










COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED
STUFF FOR 1920.

For the season 1920 the\following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation April 1st.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:
$3.25 per sack of 100 lbs., $1.82 per bu., 56 lbs.
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.
Protein, 6.8c per pound........ ........ .. $1.36 per upit
Starch and sugar, 3.1e per pound......... .62 per unit
Fat, 6.8c per pound.....................1.36 per unit

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

Corn and Oats, Equal Parts:
Protein .... ................... ..11.15 x 1.36, $15.16
Starch and Sugar...............64.65 x .62, 40.08
SFat ........................... 5.20 x 1.36, 7.07

State value, per ton................. ...... $62.31

EXAMPLE NO. 2.
Corn:
Protein .........................10.50 x 1.36, $14.28
Starch and Sugar................69.60 x .62, 43.15
Fat ............................. 5.40 x 1.36, 7.34

State value, per ton .................... $64.77









89

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.,
Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the
respective laws, including rules and regulations and
standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissioner of Agriculture, or State
Chemist. 'The bulletins of the Florida Agricultural Ex-
periment Station can be- had by application to. the Director
at Gainesville.
The form letter for transmitting special samples of fer-
tilizers or feeding stuffs as shown in the rules and regu-
lations is adopted and must be explicitly complied with
in order to obtain a legal certificate of analysis.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1920. GORDON HART, Assistant Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section.9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


O
Phosphoric Acid. .-


NAME, OR BRAND. S Acd I FOR WHOM SENT.



i I 1 T


Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.......... 5064 12.86

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.......... 5065 10.44

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 506611.38

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5067 12.68

Goat Manure No. 3............. 5068 15.31

Goat Manure ................. 5069 17.60

Blood and Bone No. 1........... 5070110.71

Raw Ground Bone No. 2........ 5071 7.43


8.25

2.25

7.92

5.80

1.45

0.80

4.25

8.48


3.32 11.57

2.42110.67

0.35 8.27

0.271 6.07

0.25 1.70

0.07 0..7

1.80 6.05

16.12 24.60


S6.35 2.24

5.76 3.80

3.84 5.52

5.54 3.91


Ed Cameron, Sanford.

J. R. Murphy, Sanford.

A. S. Hawkins, Sanford.

G. S. Cain, Sanford.

Joe Fernandez, Sanford.

C. Bell, Sanford.

B. E. Squires, Sanford.

C. Bell, Sanford.









Tankage No. 2................ ..5072 9.10 7.77

Tankage No. 3............. ... 5073 13.74 7.49

Tankage No. 1.................5074 5.98 3.57

Tankage No. 1................. 5075 6.46 4.87

Fertilizer ..................... 5076 12.75 3.95

Fertilizer No. 1.........' ..... 5078 10.34 10.65

Fertilizer No. 2................ 5079 9.86 10.73

Fertilizer No. 3................ 5080 10.26 10.28

Fertilizer ...............:...... 5081 9.84 6.58

Fertilizer .................... 5082 8.27 5.73

Complete Orange Fertilizer..... 5083 4.08 6.60

Fertilizer .................... 5084 7.07 6.43

Fertilizer ...................... 5085 9.53 8.65

Fertilizer .................. .. 5086 8.01 8.28

Mixed Fertilizer............... 508711.77 5.74

Mixed Fertilizer.............. 5088 9.28 4.75


5.001

2.20

1.45

1.47

1.82;

1.67

2.42

13.20

1.82

1.05

0.62

4.13

0.77


12.3710.62 .....-

12.51 9.83.

6.07 11.70 .....

9.87 9.60 ...

-6.15 8.89 4.92

12.10 4.15 4.66

12.20 4.20 4.42

12.10 4.00 5.78

8.25 4.80 5.58

8.15 3,73 3.34

[19.80 4.04 4.64

8.25 4.85 2.36

9.70 3.52 5.38

8.90 3.06 2.72

9.87 5.74 6.08

5.52 5.631 3.80


Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

Ed Cameron, Sanford.

J. F. McClelland, Sanford.

J. R. Murphy, Sanford.

Borax 0.14%. T. P. Drake, Sanford.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Gordon & Colbert, Ft. Myers.

W. iR. Haygood, Oxford.

H. O. Juve, Oslo.

pene Shannahan, Ft. Myers.

H. H. Tussy, Ft. Myers.

Hubbell Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Mike Stoinoff, Sanford.

John Bolly, Sanford.


L









SPECIAL FERTIUIMR ANALYSES, 1920-(Continued.)

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND, Y FOR WHOM SENT.

__j J a *


Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1...:......

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Mixed Fertilizer (Special) No. 1.

Goat Manure No. 4.....;.......

Raw Ground Bone No. 3........

Raw Bone Meal................


10.28

9.32

10.83

6.99t

5.00

8.38;

11.21

14.33;

6.80

6.0q


6.421

4.40,

5.53

7.23

5.7Q

6.35

8.30

0.72

11.53

12.35


0.851 7.27

0.821 5.22

1.97 7.50

1.97 9.20

2.27 7.97

1.67 8.02

0.751 9.05

0.05 0.77
14.3725.90

15.45.27.80


3.85 5.821W. H. Allen, Sanford.

5.85 5.42 Henry Witte, Sanfcrd.

4.51 3.54 Fish & Fish, Sanford.

4.53 3.36 S. H. Buchanan, Sanford.

A.50 5.56 S. H. Buchanan, Sanford.

4.63 9.18 J. M. Oglesby, Sanford.

5.60 5.40 J. M. Oglesby, Sanford.

2.25 2.88 Fish & Fish, Sanford.

5.71..... Fish & Fish, Sanford.

5.92 .... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.


/









Tankage No. 2...............

Blood and Bone Tankage No. 3..

K ainit .........................

Castor Pomace No. 2..........

"Orange Fertilizer".... ........

Fertilizer No. 1..................

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Fertilizer ...................\ .

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ..................... .

Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer ......................

Bone Meal .....................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer .......................

Fertilizer ...................


8.536

6.48

0.47

7.74

12.70

3.95,

3.30

4.84

5.98

9.56

10.04

7.57

9.56

14.27

8.27

3.50


12.05 8.85 ..... Fish & Fish, Satford.

9.70 10 ..... J. R. Murphy, Sanford.

..... ..... 14.62 H. H: Chappell, Sanfor

9.. 61..... Henry Witte, Sanford.

9.90 2.52. 5.24 Ed M. Earnest, Palatki

14.35 8.90 3.60 Standard Growers Exch

18.80 4.54 3.54 Standard Growers Exch

11.30 4.89 5.12 C. J. Stubbs, Ft. MYers,

12.00 5.38 6.46 Hill Crest Grove Co., S

7.30 3.75 4.42:W. H. Towles, Ft. Myei

7.20 3.38 5.10 W. H. Towles, Ft. Myei

8.55 3.30 3.68 Ben Faulkner, Ft. Mye

16.35 9.04 ..... DeSoto Frlit Co., NMt

12.20 3.95 5.14 Geo. Kingston, Ft..Mye

9.65 3.64 4.64 J. R. Springer, Orlando,

7.75 4.05 4.63 C. J. StubbY, Ft. Myers.


d;



a,

range, Ft. Myers.

ange, Ft. Myers.



t. Leo.

rs.



res.

Ltee.

rs.


- - - - ~ -I


, ,, i


.











SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1920-(Continued.)

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. FOR WHOM SENT.


___ -a


Mixed Fertilizer ............... 5116

Celery Fertilizer No. 1.......... 5117

Lettuce Fertilizer No. 2........ 5118

Mixed Fertilizer (Lettuce) No. 1. 5119

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.......... 5120

Mixed Fertilizer (Vegetable) No. 3 5121

Special Mixed Fertilizer No. 4.. 5122

Special Lettuce Fertilizer No. 5.. 5123

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 5124

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1......... 5125


6.20 0.45 6.65 5.63

5.80 1.87 7.67 4.76

5.95 1.20 7.15 5.76

8.67 0.85 9.52 4.74

5.35 2.85 8.20 5.701

7.53 1.47 9.00 4.12

5.83 2.82 8.65 6.68

6.20 4.3210.52 6.13

4.65 3.551 8.20 7.03

6.00 0.80 6.80 5.67


J. E. Esteridge, Sanford.

J. E. Pace, Sanford.

J. E. Pace, Sanford.

Smith & Dutton, Sanford.

Smith & Dutton, Sanford.

Smith & Dutton, Sanford.

Smith & Dutton, Sanford.

Smith & Dutton, Sanford.

C. C. Sperring, Sanford.

|G. C. McDougal, Sanford.









Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer ................

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.........

Mixed Fertilizer ..............

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Blood and Bone No. 3...........

Tankage No. 2.................

Tankage No. 1..................

Kainit No. 2...................

Kainit No. 3...................

Mixed Fertilizer ................

Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer ...............


514014.93 6.43

51411 4.21 5.30


1.801 8.18

2.401 11.40

2.30 8.95

4.42 11.20

3.501 9.37

9.12114.55

5.6511.94

9.25113.35




1.20 8.13

4.15 10.40

2.451 8.38

3.15110.65

3.62110.05

2.751 8.05


4.851

4.70

4.81

4.77

4.75

8.40

9.23

9.15




4.75

4.82

5.57

4.85


4.44 3.08

5.34 5.40


M. Fleischer, Sanford.

W. H. Peters, Sanford.

W. W. Miller, Sanford.

L. S. Robb, Sanford.

Carl Carlson, Sanford.

J. E. Pace, Sanford.

G. C. McDougal, Sanford.

W. W. Miller, Sanford.

Carl Carlson, Sanford.

W. W. Miller, Sanford.

C. L. Byrd, Sanford.

H. A. Loppin, Sanford.

R. L. Greer, Sanford.

R. L. Greer, Sanford.

L. B. Mann and C. E. Henry, Sanford.

B. E. Lake, Sanford.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1920-(Continued.)

Phosphoric Acid


N O FOR WHOM EINT.
NAME, OR BRAND. .1 M


-d 0 A


Mixed Fertilizer ................ 5142

"Nitrapo" (Kailiit).............. 5143

Sheep Manure ................. 5144

Tankage No. 1................ 5145

Blood and Bone Fertilizer No. 1.. 5146

Tankage No. 2................. 5147

Sheep Manure No. 3............. 5148

Goat Manure No. 2............ 5149

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2......... .5150

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2.......... 5151


13.53

1.17

27.90

8.35

7.26

8.58

7.80

11.51

8.74

8.50


6.561 3.6719.23


. ... .. ...

0.171 8.90

8.00[12.75

5.621 8.68 1

8.32112.63

0.70 1.53

0.27 1.03

1,60 8.75

3.201 8.85


4.50

.... .i

2.16

L0.02 ,

1.02

9.53

3.64

3.92

4.47

4.46


J. F. Mann and C. E. Heniy, Sanford.

Borax 0.68%. L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

J. R. Murphy, Sanford.

0. J. Pope, Sanford.

Joseph Comeron, Sanford.

C. B. Bell, Sanford.

C. B. Bell, Sanford.

E. M. Galloway, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

0. J. Pope, Sanford.









Mixed Fertilizer ................

-, Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer ................

SMixed Fertilizer No. 1........ .

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1.........

Mixed Fertilizer No. 1..........

Mixed Fertilizer Nd. 1..........

Fertilizer ............. .........

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer No. 1.................

Fertilizer No. 2.............. ..

Nitrate of Soda.................

Cotton Seed Meal No. 1.........

Cotton Seed Meal No. 2.........

Goulding's Gem Guano.........


15152

5153

5154

5155

5156

5157

5158

5159

5160

5161

5162 1

5163

5164

5165 .

5166.

5167


7.30

5.74

9.53

6.56

8.53

L3.50

10.85

8.01

9.54

6.47

10.93

9.80

0.84


0.701 8.53 4.62

0.47 6.231 5.91

2.771 7.70 6.10

4.201 8.05 7.22

1.851 8.60 6.55

2.001 8.55 4.44

2.901 7.95 5.90

2.251 8.33 4.97

5.95112.35 3.06

2.90j10.55 3.581

3.85110.50 5.35

3.60 10.60 5.04

.... .... 19.58 .

.7.75 .

. .. .. 8.15 .

2.7010.60 3.03


2.98 R. T. Wynne, Sanford.

2.96 H. B. Lewis, Sanford.

4,34 W. A. Raynor, Sanford.

3.94 Smith, Connelly & Lake, Sanford.

3.64 Smith, Connelly & Lake, Sanford.

3.46 E. M. Galloway, Sanford.

3.9C. B. Bell, Sanford.

2.56 Borax 0.1517. J. M.-Brown, Sanford.

5.07 M. W. Jenkins, Sanford.

3.66 J. H. Sadler, Oakland.

5.32 E. P. Fripp, Miami.

5,40 E. P. Fripp, Miami.

.... L. B. Skinner, Dunedin.

.... A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy.

.... A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy.

2.28 A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy.


6.56 7.90










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1920-(Continued.)


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ...................... 15168

iNitrapo" ................. .. 5169

"Nitrapo" ...................... 5170

"Nitrapo" .................... 5171

"Nitrato" ...................... 5172

Fertilizer No. 1................. 5173

Fertilizer No. 2................. 5174

Fertilizer No. 3................ 5175

Fertilizer No. 4................. 5176

Fertilizer No. 5...... .......... 5177


6.83 1.67 8.50
6 8 31. . . .


..... .....



11.40 1.05

4.20 8.05

6.17 3.50

1.08 .....

6.63 4.35


0.56 E. M. Willis, Williston.

14.12 Borax 0.41%. Rex Packard, Sanford.

18.05 Borax 0.55%. Rossetter & Son, Sanford.

18.95 Borax 0.72%: L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

12.90 Borax 0.46%. Ben Fish and Joe Cam-
eron, Sanford.
L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

.... L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

1.00 L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

1.06 L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.








Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 1-A ..............

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Fertilizer No. 1.-...............

Feitilizer No. 2 ................

Fertilizer No. 3.................

Fertilizer No. 4.................

Fertilizer No. 5................

Fertilizer ....-: ..................

Fertilizer A ..................

Fertilizer B ............... ....

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Mixed Fertilizer ................


li.84

8.65

8.90

0.95

9.93

5.80

5.97

10.09

5.16

7.06

9.17

6.47

2.11

4.56

8.61

10.82


8.28

2-28

11.28



0.90

8.65



6.70

3.65

8.38

9.00

7.78



6.41

8.35

6.10


3.10 11.38 4.58 4.56 Sol Wittenstein, Orlando.

7.60 9.88 4.47 4.72 Standard Growers Exchange, Orlando.

0.82112.10 4.50. 2.14 Sol Wittenstein, Orlando.

19. 50 ..... L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

..... 0.90 8.00 0.70 L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

3.70J12.35 6.57 1.18 L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

.. .... ..... 43.34 L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

1.40| 8.10 7.45 3.26 L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

4.00 7.65 9.68 0.52 J. H. Sadler, Orlando.

1.6710.05 4.69 2.50 J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

1.10110.10 5.43 2.64J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

6.70 14.48 6-05 2.32 A. W. Hurley, Orlando.

..... ..... ..... 24.98 G. L. Huxtable, Winter Garden.

7.87 14.28 9.71 ..... L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

0.35 8.70 6.97 4.04 L. W. Tilden, Tildenville.

1,351 7.45 7.08 3.24 Henry Nickel, Sanford.


~ I I I I


co
eo










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 192--(Continued).


hosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND 4 d FOR WHOM SENT.
d
0 Ai
,E-4
'U


Mixed Fertilizer ..............

Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer No. 2..........

Tankage No. 3 ...................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ................. ...

Tankage No. 1..................

Mixed' Fertilizer ...............


5194 8.33

5195 13.92

5196 9.39

5197 1. 60

5198 7.45

5199 14.61

5200 7-.38

5201 12.25

5202 7.75

5203 -6.30


2.25 7.43

4.80 10.00

2.80 9.58

3.62 9.83

6.75110.75

3.80110.40

6.17J15.10

0.25j 9.75

11.90117.30

1.00 8.831


5.94 3.92 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

5.62 5.58 Seminole Farms, Inc.wanford.

4.87 2.44 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

5.59 5.54 Henry Nickel, Sanford.

LO.20 ..... G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

3.54 1.38 Gordon & Colbert, Ft. Myers.

6.37 2.24 Nelson Henchen, Ft. Myers.

2.40 2.98 G. W. Rhodes, Woodville.

7.73 ..... R. O. Meriwether, Sanford.

4.92 3.141C. B. Miller, Sanford.




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