• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of state of Florida
 Part I
 Part II. Crop conditions
 Part III






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00053
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00053
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        The bee disease eradication work of the state plant board
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
    Part II. Crop conditions
        Page 31
        Divisions of the state by counties
            Page 32
        Department of agriculture
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
    Part III
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Department of agriculture - Division of chemistry
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
Full Text





Vol. 29 Number 4



FLORIDAN
QUARTERLY

BULLETIN
OF THE
AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT

OCTOBER 1, 1919

W. A. McRAE

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE FLA.


Part 1-Suggestions for Fall,' Winter and Early Spring
Planting. Report on Bee Diseases. Law Relating
to Bee Diseases. Cabbage Growinn. Miscellaneous.
Part 2-Crop Conditions.
Part 3-State Drug Control-Past, nt and Future.
The Disston Sugar Planta* Fertilizers, Stock
Feed, Foods, Drugs and .cPjlines.

Entered January 31, 1903, a' *';hassee, Florida, as secoud-rlass
matter under A congresss s of June, 1900.
"Acceptance for mailir 4 special rate of postage provided for
in Section 1103, Act of .er 3, 1917, authorized Sept. 11, 1918."
THES BUULLTINS ARE ISSUED FR TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM
T. J. APPLEYARD, STATE PRINTER
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA.
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PART I

Suggestions for Fall, Winter and Early Spring Planting.
Report on Bee Diseases.
Law Relating to Bee Diseases.
Cabbage Growing.










THE BEE DISEASE ERADICATION WORK
OF THE STATE PLANT BOARD.



BY WILMON NEWELL, PLANT COMMISSIONER.

For many years Florida has been recognized by .the
beekeeping fraternity generally as being one of the best
sections of the United States for bee and honey produc-
tion. Not only do many sections of the State possess na-
tive plants, which produce nectar in abundance, but the
climatic conditions make possible the rearing of bees and
queens for at least eight months of the year.
While the beekeeping industry, has been developed to
a high state of perfection in a few counties, the State
as a whole has been very backwards in recognizing the
possibilities in this industry. Perhaps this has been due
to the abundance of other opportunities seemingly more
attractive to both newcomers and the older citizens. How-
ever, within the past two years interest in bees has been
increasing very rapidly, as is evidenced by the receipt of
many requests for information on the subject by the
State Plant Board, the University of Florida Extension
Division, and, more recently, by the organization of Boys'
and Girls' Beekeeping Clubs under the direction of vari-
ous County Agents.
Honey bees, like all other creatures, are subject to cer-
tain diseases. While most of these diseases, in the case
of the honey bee, are not so severe as to cause destruc-
tion of the colonies and can for the most part be rather
easily .cured or controlled. One disease, "American foul
brood," is exceedingly malignant. In fact, in its virulence
ii may well be compared to anthrax in cattle, glanders in
horses or cholera in hogs. The disease is caused by a bac-
terium, Bacillus larvae, which affects only the'brood or
larvae of the bees. Every larva which becomes infected
dies, hence the colony rapidly becomes weakened by rea-
son of few or no bees reaching maturity and eventually
the colony dies out entirely. Bees never recover from
the disease and the malady cannot be cured by the use of
drugs. It is, therefore, a disease where prevention and










eradication constitute the most effective measures to take
against it.
The future of the beekeeping industry in Florida is
very largely dependent on whether this disease can be
eradicated and further introductions of it prevented.
If the State can be kept free from the disease there is no
reason why Florida's honey production should not with-
in a few years reach a valuation of one million dollars
annually.
Fortunately, present information indicates that there
is a comparatively small amount of the disease in Flor-
ida; that is, in comparison to its prevalence in some of
the Northern States. It is also fortunate that the last
session of. the State Legislature passed a bee disease act
(Chapter 7938, Approved June 9, 1919), providing for
quarantine to keep diseased bees out of the State and
empowering the State Plant Board to take all necessary
steps looking to eradication of bee diseases within the
State. For the latter purpose an appropriation of $5,-
000.00 per annum for two years was made.
The Act referred to requires all colonies of bees, and
second-hand beekeeping equipment, shipped into Florida
to be accompanied by an official certificate of inspection,'
or by a special permit issued by the Plant Commissioner
upon satisfactory evidence that the bees are free from
danger of infection. The only exception is in the case of
bees shipped without combs or honey-the so-called
"pound packages." These can be shipped into the State
without certificate or inspection, as there is no danger of
such bees transmitting American foul brood. This re-
quirement of the law will be strictly enforced. It has been
given wide publicity through various journals devoted to
beekeeping, and the general managers of all transporta-
tion companies operating in Florida have been given of-
ficial notice concerning it. In addition, the various as-
sistant quarantine inspectors of the Florida State Plant
Board, located at all ports and principal junction points
in the State, will be able to readily intercept any ship-
ment of bees as to which these requirements have not
been complied with. In fact, it is next to an impossibil-
ity for bees to be slipped into the State in violation of the
law because of the thorough organization of the, Board's
quarantine service.










As the appropriation for the fiscal year did not become
available until July 1st, actual work in inspecting apia-
ries could not be commenced until after that date. At
the July meeting of the Board Mr. C. E. Bartholomew, of
Orlando, was appointed by the Board as Assistant to the
Plant Commissioner in the bee disease eradication work.
Mr. Bartholomew had charge, for several years, of the
bee disease eradication work in Iowa, was subsequently
employed as beekeeping expert by the United States De-
partment of Agriculture, and, in addition, had had charge
in the West of very large apiaries. The present Plant
Commissioner is also experienced in this line of work,
as he had charge for five years of the bee disease eradica-
tion work in Texas.
At the July meeting of the Board it was also decided,
as the appropriation was insufficient to take up apiary
inspection work over the entire State, that attention
should first be given to those areas where beekeeping in-
vestments were at their maximum or where there was
reason for believing that American foul brood occurred.
The beekeeping area along the Apalachicola river and
its tributaries, in the Counties of Franklin, Calhoun, Lib-
erty, Gadsden and Jackson, was reported as having more
or less infection by this disease. In this area the industry
is highly developed, the beekeepers using the latest and
most approved methods, the apiaries varying in size from
forty to as high as two hundred colonies and the tupelo,
bloom affording a very reliable and satisfactory honey
crop each spring. A rough estimate, based on figures
supplied by local beekeepers, indicates that in the terri-
tory between Apalachicola and the Georgia-Florida line
there are between 10,000 and 12,000 colonies and the an-
nual production of Tupelo honey is probably not far from
1.000 barrels. Naturally, a territory capable of such
honey production has long since been fully occupied by
beekeepers and there is no room for more. In fact, in
some parts of this area there are already too many apia-
ries for profitable returns, and in much of the tupelo sec-
tion the beekeepers find it necessary to move their apia-
ries further north, into Georgia and Alabama, during the
summer and autumn months in order for the bees to se-
cure sufficient honey to subsist on.
Manifestly, American foul brood could cause enormous
losses in this area, so thickly congested with bees, and it










was decided to take up the inspection and eradication
work there. The beekeepers of this area had been largely
instrumental in securing the passage of the bee disease
act and were naturally anxious that the danger confront-
ing them should be dealt with as quickly as possible.
On July 23d, Mr. Bartholomew and the writer proceed-
ed to Calhoun county. Inspections of apiarie in the vicin-
ity of Wewahitchka and aDlkeith were begun immedi-
ately. Later, Mr. C. F. Glenn, of Wewahitchka, was
Appointed by the Board as District Apiary Inspector, and
in the latter part of the month and during August assisted
in the inspections. The writer continued inspection work
in that vicinity until August 5th, and Mr. Bartholomew
until August 18th. Mr. Glenn has continued the inspec-
tion work since that time.
Up to August 30th, upwards of 2,000 colonies in Cal-
houn and adjacent counties has been inspected, with the
result that fifteen colonies had been found infected with
American foul brood. These were distributed in two
apiaries, the latter being about twenty-five miles apart.
With the owners' permission, the bees, brood, honey and
combs in all the infected colonies were destroyed by burn-
ing and the hive-bodies, covers and bottom boards disin-
fected with the burning oil spray. The lack of a suffi-
cient honey flow did not make it practical to administer
the so-called "shaking" treatment by which, under suit-
able conditions, the queen and bees can be removed from
the infected material and the colony thereby "cured." It
was also considered inadvisable to permit the diseased
colonies to remain in existence, even for a short time,
owing to the danger of the infection being carried to large
apiaries in the neighborhood. To the present writing
there have been no recurrences of the disease in either
these apiaries or those adjoining them, so there is good
reason for believing that the "clean-up" in these apiaries
was effective.
'It should be stated in this connection that during June,
just prior to the approval of the bee disease act, a rather
large apiary in Calhoun county was found by the owner
to be infected with American foul brood. The owners of
this apiary burned up all colonies in the apiary volun-
tarily and without compensation, for the protection of
their fellow beekeepers.
During the present month (September) the inspection
work has been commenced in Franklin county, partic-









ularly at Apalachicola and' alon gthe lower stretches of
the Apalachicola River, along Jackson's Old River and in
the Lake Wimico neighborhood. This work is being done
by Mr. Bartholomew and Mr. J. P. Anthony ,of Apalach-
icola, the latter recently appointed as District Apiary
Inspector in that section.
On the whole, the inspections thus far made in the Apa-
lachicola River territory indicate that, while American
foul brood has gained a foothold there, it has not become
so firmly established that it cannot be eradicated by
steady, careful work, particularly as the Plant Board is
enjoying, in this undertaking, the practically universal
co-operation of all the beekeepers.
The major portion of the current year's appropriation
of $5,000.00 will be required for the eradication work in
the area mentioned and until the disease iseradicated, or
until at least all infections have been located and gotten
under full control, it will not be possible for the Board to
take up the eradication of bee diseases in other portions
of Florida: although there are reasons for believing that
American foul brood occurs in at least three other sec-
tions. Were the Board to attempt to spread its work
over he entire State, with the appropriation available,
nothing really worth while would be accomplished in any
one section. It seems best, therefore, to clean up one area
at a time, doing the work with the utmost thoroughness.
Until such time as the Plant Board can extend this
work to other parts of the State all beekeepers should
inform themselves regarding the nature of foul brood,
learn its symptoms and be on the lookout for it, promptly
reporting to the Boar dat Gainesville any suspicious cases.
Bulletins of the United States Department of Agriculture
describing the more command bee diseases, including Amer-
ican foul brood, and copies of the Bee Disease Act of Flor-
ida and the rules of the State Plant Board, may be had
free by addressing the writer of this article at Gainesville,
Florida.
The Plant Commissioner is desirous of having the name
and address of every beekeeper in Florida, regardless of
whether he owns one colony or one thousand, and bee-
keepers will therefore confer a favor by writing him, giv-
ing at the same time the number of colonies owned.
Gainesville, Florida, September 18, 1919.










CHAPTER 7938-(No. 156).

AN ACT to Prevent the Introduction into and Dessemi-
nation Within the State of Florida of Contagious and
Infectious Diseases of Honey Bees; Providing for the
Eradication of Bee Diseases; Authorizing the State
Plant Board of Florida to Make Rules and Regula-
tions for Carrying out the Provisions of this Act; Pre-
scribing a Penalty for Violations, and Providing an
Appropriation for Carrying out the Purposes of this
Act.

Be It Elacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. All honey bees shipped or moved into the
State of Florida shall be accompanied by a certificate of
inspection signed by the State Entomologist, State
Apiary Inspector or corresponding official of the State
or Country from which such bees are shipped or moied.
Such certificate shall certify to the apparent freedom of
the bees, and their combs and hives, from contagious and
infectious diseases and must be based upon an actual in-
spection of the bees themselves within a period of sixty
days preceding date of shipment; Provided, that when
honey bees are to be shipped into this State from other
States or Countries wherein no official Apiary Inspector
or State Entomologist is available, the State Plant Board
of Florida, through its chief executive officer, may issue
permit for such shipment upon presentation of suitable
evidence showing such bees to be free from disease; and
provided, further, that the provisions of this section shall
not apply to shipments of live bees in wire cages, when
without combs or honey.
Sec. 2. The State Plant Board of Florida, created by
Chapter 6885, Laws of Florida, shall have full and
plenary power to deal with American and European foul
brood, Isle of Wight disease and all other contagious or
infectious diseases of honey bees which, in its opinion,
may be prevented, controlled or eradicated; and shall
have full power and is hereby authorized to make, pro-
mulgate and enforce such rules, ordinances and regula-
tions and do and perform such acts, through its agents
or otherwise, as in its judgment -iay be necessary to








11

control, eradicate or prevent the introduction, spread or
dissemination of any and all contagious diseases of honey
bees as far as may be possible, and all such rules, ordi-
nances and regulations of said plant Board shall have
the force and effect of law.
Sec. 3. The State Plant Board, its agents and em-
ployees, shall have authority to enter any depot, express
office, storeroom, warehouse or premises for the purpose
of inspecting any honey bees or beekeeping fixtures or
appliances therein or thought to be therein, for the pur-
pose of ascertaining whether said bees or fixtures are in-
fected with any contagious or infectious disease or which
they may have reason to believe have been or are being
transported in violation of any of the provisions of this
Act.
The said board through its agents or employees may re-
quire the removal from this State of any honey bees or
beekeeping fixtures which have been brought into the
State in violation of the provisions of this Act, or if find-
ing any honey bees or fixtures infected with any contag-
ious or infectious disease or if finding that such bees or
fixtures have been exposed to danger' of infection by such
disease, may require the destruction, treatment or disin-
fection of such infected or exposed bees, hives, fixtures or
appliances.
Sec. 4.. The shipment or movement into this State of
any used or second-hand bee' hives, honey combs, frames
or other beekeeping fixtures is hereby prohibited except
under such rules and regulations as may be prescribed
by the State Plant Board in accordance with Section 2
of this Act.
Sec.-5. Auy person, firm or corporation violating any
of the provisions of this Act or of the rules or regula-
tions of the State Board adopted in accordance with the
provisions of this Act shall be deemed guilty of a mis-
demeanor and upon conviction shall be punished by a fine
of not more than five hundred dollars, or by imprison-
ment for not more than six months in the county jail.
Sec. 6. The sum heretofore appropriated at the pres-
ent session of the Legislature by An Act known as the
Citrus Canker Appropriation Act, and placed to the
credit of the State Plant Board Fund in the State Treas-
ury for the protection of the honey bee culture, to-wit:
the sum of Ten Thousand Dollars, or so mu&h thereof as










may be necessary, shall be used and expended for the
purpose of enforcing and carrying out the provisions of
this Act, under the direction and control of the State
Plant Board.
Sec. 7. All laws and parts of laws inconsistent with
the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed.
Sec. 8. This Act shall take effect upon its becoming
a law.
Approved June 9, 1919.

FAIR ASSOCIATIONS OF FLORIDA

AND THEIR POSTOFFICE ADDRESSES.

State Fair Association.................... Jacksonville
Interstate Fair Association.................. Pensacola
West Florida Fair Association........ DeFuniak Springs
Alachua County Fair Association............ Gainesville
Brevard County Fair Association............ Eau Gallie
Broward County Fair Association..... Fort Lauderdale
Bradford County Fair Association .......... Lake Butler
Clay County Fair Association....... Green Cove Springs
Dade County Fair Association.................. Miami
Duval County Fair Association............ Jacksonville
Gadsden County Fair Association.............. Quincy
Hillsborough County Fair Association........... Tampa
Jackson County Fair Association.............. Marianna
Jefferson county Fair Association............ Monticello
Lee County Fair Association................ Fort Myers
Leon County Fair Association.............. Tallahassee
Lake County Fair Association .................. Tavares
Manatee County Fair Association.......... Bradentown
Marion County Fair Association................. Ocala
Maaison county Fair Association............... Madison
Osceola County Fair Association............ Kissimmee
Orane County Fair Association................ Orlando
Polk County Fair Association.................. Bartow
Peace County Fair Association............... Dade City
Palm Beach Fair Association .......... West Palm Beach
Pinellas County Fair Association ............ Clearwater
Seminole County Fair Association .............. Sanford
Suwannee County Fair Association............ Live Oak

As this is the last Quarterly Bulletin of the year in
which crop conditions will be discussed, and there will










not be another issue of this kind until April of 1920, we
have again decided to call attention to the possibilities of
growing profitable crops throughout the fall and winter
months.
We, therefore, suggest the following plan of crop plant-
ing and production as being well adapted to the major
portion of the State-in whole or in part as the condi-
tions warrant:

WHEAT.

By all means plant some wheat, as much as you can
consistently with the size of your farm and the needs of
the family and farm hands. We consider that the grow.
ing of wheat in Florida, owing to the condition of the
times and the demand for breadstuffs by all the world,
is practically a necessity, and that Florida, in common
with other States, should live within herself as nearly as
possible. In fact, it is a patriotic duty, which the people
of our State owes to our country and ourselves to grow
every kind of food products that is necessary not only to
maintain the people at home, but to supply our quota of
foodstuffs to others. Wheat can be grown in Florida from
the north central portion of the State, northeast and west
to the Perdido River. Most of the land in the region
named will produce one or more varieties of wheat adapt-
ed to southern conditions. Wheat is the world's choicest
bread crop and the source of one of the principal foods
of the most progressive and intelligent peoples and na-
tions of the world. The only other crop that approaches
it in food value, and that is grown to any extent is rice.
With these conditions before us we feel justified in sug-
gesting that all farmers who can, and whose lands are
adapted, in whole or in part, to wheat growing, plant at
least enough for home consumption. A few acres planted
by each farmer will give him all of the flour that he needs
throughout the year. If each farmer in Florida, of the
ordinary size farm, should plant from three to five acres
to wheat, he would find it the most profitable crop that
he could plant. In doing this, if he does no more, it would
set free many hundred thousands of bushels of wheat for
war consumption. We suggest the following varieties as
being adapted to Florida soils: Blue Stem, Red May,
Georgia Red and Leap's Prolific. Of these, the Blue Stem,










a smooth-headed wheat, is well adapted to the better
quality of sandy loam soils of Florida; likewise, the Red
May wheat. The Georgia Red and Leap's Prolific do best
on the clay loam soils. Any of the varieties mentioned
will do well on the better gradations of the soils men-
tioned above.

SOILS-Light fertile clay and medium fertile sandy
loams of good depth, and well drained, are the best lands
for wheat culture. Heavy clays are too close in texture
and liable to bake under certain conditions. But light
clay loam and good sandy loams have about the proper
consistency or degree of compactness necessary to retain
moisture, and are better adapted to wheat cultivation
than the heavier clays or lighter loams. Good drainage
is necessary to the proper development of the. wheat
plant, and a medium porous, permeable sub-soil is also
important during most of the growing period of wheat.
A great deal depends on the soil as regards the yield as
well as the quality of the grain. Deep plowing is not
necessary to the successful growing of wheat. In break-
ing land that has not been in cultivation the year pre-
vious, six to ten inches, depending upon conditions of
the soil, will be about correct. If it is stubble land that is
to be planted in wheat, it need not be broken with a turn
plow. If in the first instance the land is well broken, then
harrowed cross-wise with a disk, and later with a straight-
toothed smoothing harrow, a good seed bed will be
obtained. If it is stubble land, such a, corn land, cow-
peas or velvet beans, where the crop has been cut off for
hay, the soil will need no turning, but the planting can
be equally as well done by preparing the land with a
heavy disk; then if the wheat is to be sown broadcast
it can be sown on the disked soil and harrowed in with
a straight-toothed harrow. The best way of planting
wheat, however, is with a drill, which opens the furrows,
drops the seed, covers and rolls it with one operation.
In preparing the land, however, the surface should be
/left clean without sticks or weeds left lying on the
ground, which would interfere with the handling of the
harvest machinery. In the case of fallow lands, it should
be well broken early in the fall, or in Florida in the late
summer, from three weeks to a month, at least, before the
wheat is to be planted. One thing to remember is that










it will be a waste of both time and seed to .neglect a
proper preparation of the soil. A good seed bed is half
the battle.
The time for sowing wheat in Florida of course de-
pends upon the section of the State where it is to be
grown. In Northern and Western Florida the best time
would be from about the middle of October to the middle
of November. In Southern Florida the best time would
be about the first of November to December. There can
be no fixing of positive dates in this matter, and the
grower will have to use his discretion as to the time best
suited for planting.

FERTILIZING.-The best form of manuring for
wheat, and in general the best kind of manure adapted
to wheat growing, is farm lot or stable manure, but if
this kind of manure is applied it should be under the
crop preceding the sowing of the wheat. If commercial
fertilizers are to be relied on, then it is best to apply that
broadcast, and later, if there is barn yard manure to
spare, that can be applied as a top dressing. Manures
containing too much nitrogen should not be used. A
good formula for this purpose is, and one that is general-
ly .recommended by most growers, on the character of
soils we have in Florida, a mixture analyzing about three
and one-half per cent. nitrogen, ten to twelve per cent. of
available phosphoric acid, and about four per cent. potash,
to be followed in the spring, when the wheat indicates
a swelling of the upper portion of the plants prior to
heading, with nitrate of soda. This will be about four
weeks before the plant heads. The application of about
100 to 150 pounds of nitrate of soda per acre will add
greatly to the yield of grain. If the land has been well
cultivated and kept in a reasonably fertile condition, es-
pecially manures, like stable manure, that contain a con-
sidetable amount of humus, then the following formula
would be an excellent one in producing a good yield: Acid
phosphate, 350 pounds; sulphate of ammonia, 130 pounds;
muriate of potash, 90 pounds; mixed and used on one
acre. This also should be followed in the spring as above
suggested with about 100 pounds of nitrate of soda broad-
cast. This is rather on the intensive system of manuring,
but it will pay well. Some soils under certain conditions
will be much benefited by the application of well slacked










lime. From 25 to 40 bushels per acre on poor land, and
especially the clay land, will have a good effect. Its
benefit consists in loosening up the clay lands, making
them more friable, of easier cultivation and sets free
the potash in the clay for the use of the plants.
If the chemical manures are not available, then land
that has grown a good crop of cowpeas or velvet beans
will do well and will also produce a good crop. But grow
wheat-make your own bread.

RYE.

Don't fail to plant a good-sized. patch of rye. It is
good for bread, as well as one of the best crops for win-
ter pasture for either cattle or hogs. Every farmer should
plant rye in rotation with other crops. In this way it
yields best either for grain or pasture purposes.
Soils Beat Adapted to Rye.
Rye is one of the most important cover crops grown in
the State, although planted in a small way. Its real value
as a grazing crop, as well as a cover crop, does not seem
to have been appreciated as it deserves. Rye can be grown
on almost all of the well-drained soils of the State,
especially those in the North-Central, Northeastern and
Middle and Western sections of Florida. It is best
adapted to the lighter loam or sandy soils than to the
heavy clay lands, and it yields best and produces the best
quality of grain on well-drained sandy loam soils that
contain a fair supply of lime. It is not limited, however,
to such conditions, and it does about as well on acid soils
or neutral soils, and is possibly the best grain for plant-
ing on sandy lands, which are rough and to a considerable
extent exposed to the cold of winter. It is also better
adapted to sandy and poorer classes of lands than wheat
and will stand a much greater amount of acidity in the
soil than either wheat, oats or barley. It is also
especially good for drained marsh lands and also for cut-
over lands, which are being brought under cultivation for
the first time. Rye should be generally the first crop
grown on this character of lands, and it may be grown .
with equal success on other sandy soils where most
cereals fail to succeed, but the growing of rye should not
be attempted on lands that are subject to overflow or
where water may come or stand for any length of time.











If too rich in nitrogen or too much on the order of muck
lands, it is likely to cause the rye when grown to fatl
down, or in other words, to lodge. Neither does rye grow
so well on wet lands, but in dryer soils it is much more
resistent to cold than wheat or oats. If the land is made
too rich, however, this condition is reversed.
Rye in Rotation:
Rye, like all other farm crops, does best when planted
in rotation, although it can be grown year after year on
the sa meland with as great degree of success, if not
more so, than most small grain crops. This is because
few diseases that affect this plant are found in the soil.
In many cases rye is grown in place of wheat, and there
are many people in the world who prefer rye flour and
bread to wheat flour or wheat bread. Rye also takes less
from the soil than most of the small grain, unless it be
rice, though the difference is slight in any case. One of
the best rotations is to follow other crops with rye. For
instance, rye can be sown in the corn field after the corn
has been gathered, and in this case where the soil has
been baked it is best to plow the rye in. The better plan
is to use a disk plow and not a turn plow, and follow this
by a straight tooth harrow slanted carefully and properly.
In this way labor is saved, b yharrowing in the grain,
which is a quicker and more practical way than by plow-
ing in under the ordinary conditions. In disking, the
grain in the standing corn stalks will be leveled by the
time the grain is ready for harvest; 'if it is to be har-
vested, the cornstalks will have decayed to such an ex-
tent, at least, that they will not be in the wary of the har-
vest machinery. If it is only intended for grazing, and
in the early Spring and turning under as a green manue
crop, should some of the stalks be left standing under
these conditions, they will not be in the way.
Varieties:
For Florida, in the sections previously mentioned,
there are really only two varieties than can be depended
on. These varieties are the Ebruzzes and the South
Georgia. Under some circumstances the Ebruzzes seems
to be the best, and under other circumstances the South
Georgi appears to give best results, but like inost grains
these also are subject to fluctuations in growth, depend-
ing more favorable location in the one case or in the
other. The South Georgia rye, in soils best adapted to
its growth, grows perhaps a little taller than the
2-Eul.










Ebruzzes, but both are excellent rye'and can be depended
on. One advantage of the rye crop is that it can be, and
is often used to fill gaps between other crops. It can be
sown at most any time, earl yor late, on lands that are
either rough or well placed, and it will nearly always
take care of itself, and make a good growth, which can-
not be said of any other grain under like conditions. It
is also a good crop to grow on hillsides or on lands that
are threatened with washing, and to this extent it is one
of the best crops that can be planted. It is an excellent
preventer of soil erosion, as it prevents the washing of
the soil and the debris down into the valleys, thus hold-
ing the soil in place. After the rye has grown to prac-
tical maturity, and especially while in the milk stage, it
makes an excellent hay if cut at that time and properly
cured. It can also be made a good pasture for hogs, and
after the hogs have eaten down the grain then the crop
can be turned under for manurial purposes. For these
purposes it is one of the best winter crops that can be
grown. Hogs will harvest the crop and benefit the soil
by the dropping of manure in so doing. Rye is also con-
siered a better crop for Fall, Winter and Spring pas-
ture than either wheat or oats. It does not affect cattle
to the extent that oats and wheat does, and it makes a
better crop to turn under for green manurial purposes.
While in most cases rye does better than any of the
other cereals on poorly prepared soil, it is not a good rea-
son for neglecting the proper preparation of the soil.
As the expenses of preparing the soil is very slight and
will not be noticed to any appreciable extent, this will be
greatly repaid by a much larger yield of grain. The land
should be plowed, as a rule, from five to seven inches
deep, and it should be done from three to four weeks
before planting the seed, if possible. After the land is
plowed, it should be well harrowed and made level and
as smooth as possible, then allow it to stand for a few
days. When rye is to follow a cultivated crop it is best
to plow the land three or four inches deep and harrow it
well so as to eliminate as much of the grass and weeds
as possible. This, of course, puts the land in better con-
dition. This process can be carried out best by the use
of the disk and a straight-toothed harrow. As before
stated, cowpea land or corn-stubbled land can usually be
planted to rye by simply disking and harrowing. It then










can be covered, if so desired, by a wide shovel plow run-
ning between the rows of the cowpeas or the corn stubble
as the case may be. On land that has been'properly
broken other than corn or stubble land rye may be sown
broadcast, but the better way to plant all grain, whether
it be rye, wheat, oats or barley, is by drilling with the
machine. This machine opens the furrow, sows the seed
and covers it with one operation. If sown broadcast it
should be disked in and the land well harrowed, which
will give a smooth seed bed.
Fertilizers:
Although rye will grow well on very poor soil, com-
paratively speaking, large yields of the forage or the
grain cannot be expected on these soils, neither will rye
succeed well on very rnch soils. If grown for green pro-
duction the land should only be moderately fertilized,
nor should these fertilizers contain a too large quantity
of nitrogen. This would make the crop top-heavy and
liable to fall when the winds blow. Stable manure is
the best fertilizer for rye, but acid phosphate should gen-
erally be applied with it. It is best to mix forty to fifty
pounds of acid phosphate to each ton of stable manure,
into a form of compost. In this way each of the ingred-
idnts is better and more evenly distributed. There
should be a mixture of this kind of two to four tons
applied to the acre. If commercial fertilizer only is avail-
able, it would be well to apply acid phosphate at the rate
of about two to three hundred pounds per acre at the
time the crop is sown, and this can be harrowed in with
the seed. Cotton seed meal may also be used, but with
that there is a liability of getting too much nitrogen, but
this should be applied from two to three weeks before the
grain is sown. If the 'rye is grown for pasturage or soil
purposes, or for the straw that is in it, then a greater
quantity of nitrogen-bearing compound could be applied
in the fertilizer, but not otherwise, as it would cause the
grain to fall or lodge. To obtain the best stand it is best
to re-clean the seed before it is sown. Rye often loses its
germinating power, and when this is the case the grain
becomes light and should be separated by putting through
a wind mill.
Rye is good for your live stock; grow it.











OATS.

No farmer should fail to plant this, the most valuable
of all feed crops; he can hardly plant too largely, as oats
are among the best and safest of all feeds for farm work-
ing animals, even better than corn as a single feed ra-
tion, as they never produce sickness as corn does. Of
course, oats and corn in proper portion are d safer and
far better feed in combination than singly, and every
farmer should always strive to make enough to carry his
stock through from season to season. It saves making
large quantities of other forage not near its equal in feed-
ing value and much more expensive to produce. *
SFeed your oats mostly in the sheaf, and your stock
will eat the greatest part of the straw, but you should
arrange to feed your oats and corn in combination the
year round; but plant oats.
In this way you can make more feed to the acre of land
than you possibly can on the same acre, no matter what
crop you plant on it. You can make it at smaller cost
and less work with greater certainty of a good yield than
any other. It grows in the Winter season when nothing
else will, and it requires no cultivation. In this respect
it excels corn, and no budworm and weeds are waiting
ever ready to destroy it. Oats are easy to plant and
easy to grow. Oats and vetch go well together in Florida.
Together they will give you a splendid forage crop in the
Spring. Cowpeas and velvet beans both will do well after
oats, or you can follow with corn, or potatoes. But plant
oats, and get the recleaned. Fulgum, Apples, Burt, Ban-
croft Hundred Bushel, or some other rust-proof variety.
Oats are a crop that every progressive, up-to-date, real
farmer should grow, specially the farmer who does most
of his own work. They are equally as good for the farmer
who can grow a thousand or more acres, for they are a
crop that can be planted and harvested by hand or with
machinery.
Grow oats and live stock, for between the two they will
build up your lands, put money in your pocket and con-
tentment and happiness in your homes. Therefore do not
forget that oats is one of the two greatest food and feed
producing crops in the world, therefore one of the most
profitable.










There is no special method necessary in planting oats,
except that the better the preparation of the seed bed, the
better will be the crop. If your lands have been recently
cultivated-say in potatoes or some such crop-or where
cowpeas or velvet beans or other legumes have been
grown and there has been a thorough cleaning up of
sticks ands brush of all kinds, a disking of the land one
way will be sufficient.
The oats then can be sown on good land at the rate
of a bushel and a peck an acre; or, if the land is rather
thin, a bushel and a half to three-quarters per acre. -Then
turn under with a disk harrow across the previous way
of the harrowing and finally smooth the surface all down
*ith a slanting, straight-tooth harrow. This will make
the surface of your seed-bed smooth and you will have no
di......culty in harvesting your crop.
If the lands have not been previously cultivated then
the first thing is to plow them up well with the turn plow.
After this use the disk harrow and other methods as
prescribed above.
Should you have to fertilize the soil, a good manure
under the circumstances would be about 400 pounds of
acid phosphate-high grade-to the acre, with about 50
pounds of nitrate of soda thoroughly mixed with the acid
phosphate.
Next Spring when the oats are growing up well and
are beginning to show signs of swelling then sow broad-
cast 100 pounds of nitrate of soda per acre-this will add
at least one-third to your crop.
While you are growing grain of this kind, when you re-
move the oats, why not follow with a rice crop? This is
one of the best and most profitable grain crops that can
be grown in Florida, and is well adapted to the lands in
all sections of the State. Grow some.

OTHER VALUABLE WINTER CROPS.

There are numbers of valuable grazing crops that
should be planted by every farmer for pasture purposes
in winter time; among these are barley, rape and vetch.
They should be planted singly for the pasturing of hogs,
pigs and calves, or they can be combined into a mixture
sown all together-either way is good.
The combination is especially good, as it gives the ani-
mals that graze on it a variety of plants to choose which-









ever they most desire. The pasture mixture comprising
barley, rye, rape, vetch, wheat, or oats in equal parts
makes a most valuable mixture for pasture purposes. But
if not convenient to the farmer any one of these can be
planted in the sized patches or areas to suit the require-
ments. All are good and every farmer should utilize these
plants to a greater or less extent.
It will'help materially to grow the forage supplies
through the winter, and it will be of great benefit to the
live stock. In addition to this it is well not to forget to
plant root crops as largely as can be provided for; tur-
nips, rutabagas, beets, collards are all good for poultry,
calves and mill stock-likewise pigs.
In addition for the farm table or market we suggest
that you grow cabbage, onions, lettuce and in the proper
seasons Irish potatoes; all of these will cut down store
bills and go a long'way to supplying the family need
with nutritious and palatable and healthful food. It is
surprising to what extent grocery bills can be reduced
by giving good attention to the gardening end of the farm
in the Spring and early Summer.
Irish potatoes this Fall in the North and West have
been a poor crop and the chances are that this crop will
be in great emand before Florida can get her crop on the
market next Spring. We, therefore, believe it would pay
to plant a moderate acreage of Irish potatoes.
Do not forget to plant a good acreage of sugar cane
or sorghum or both; but be sure to plant one or the
other.
When you plant your Summer crops be" sure to mix with
or follow them with leguminous plants of some kind-sow
peas in your corn or follow your oat crop with pease or
with both peas and corn. If every crop is followed by a
leguminous crop or plant in connection with it, there
would be few farms of poor lands in the State, in a few
years, as with leguminous crops in the manner sug-
gested you can cultivate your lands and 'make them richer
all the time. It is a great mainstay of the farm, its live
stock; and the families who operate it. Thus make your
farm self-sustaining.
Any detailed information on the subjects herein re-
ferred to, the department will be glad to supply on ap-
plication.







23

CABBAGE GROWING.

By H. 8. Elliott, Chief Clerk Department of Agriculture.

This is probably more universally grown in the family
garden than any other vegetable. It, is a biennial plant,
quite 'hardy, enduring, if properly transpanlted,. a tem-
perature of five degrees Fahrenheit, if hardened by a
gradual lowering of temperature. It is found growing
wild on the coasts of England and many parts of Eu-
rope,- but has been vastly improved, under cultivation,
from the wild type, which produces no head. It was
cultivated by the Romans and probably introduced into
England by them. Bailey, in his "Cyclopedia of Ameri-
can Horticulture," says: "From the one original stock
has sprung all the forms of cabbages, cauliflower, Brus-
sels sprouts and kales." Cabbages are edible in all stages
of growth from the time they leave the seed bed until
they form 'hard heads. Many prefer the green leaves as
a boiled salad to the blanched heads. While the cab-
bage will endure a low temperature, it is intolerant of
a very high degree of heat, especially after the heads
are formed. For this reason our best crops are grown
in the South in late winter and early spring, and in the
late fall and early winter. Only the coarse types such
as our southern collards will survive our summers, and
these reach their best condition for use after they have
been subjected to severe frosts. The crop is less subject
to fungus diseases and insect pests in early spring and
late fall. The crop should be transplanted in November
and December and matured and removed from the gar-
den by the first of June and nothing of the cabbage fam-
ily should be, allowed in the garden after June 1.
During these months of summer we have better and
more delicate vegetables in abundance and the cabbage
is not needed. If allowed in the garden after June, those
that are headed are destroyed by fungus growths, pro-
ducing a nursery for the propagation of both fungus dis-
eases and insect pests.
The cabbage succeeds best upon clay loam, rendered
friable by thorough and deep preparation and a most
liberal use of animal manure. It is a gross feeder and
while it will endure much neglect and abuse, best results
are obtained only under the most favorable conditions










as to soil, available plant-food, climatic conditions, cul-
tivation, and supply of moisture. All plants grown for
their leaves or stems must be grown under favorable con-
ditions to be tender and wholesome. If grown rapidly
the cells will be large and the cell walls thin, and tender,
and when properly cooked the plants make wholesome
food. If grown slowly because of poor cultivation and
deficient food and moisture, woody fiber is increased, and
the plants become tough and form unwholesome food.
There is little danger of manuring too. heavily, provided
the soil is deeply and thoroughly prepared and soil mois-
ture retained by stirring the surface frequently amongst
the plants.
A combination of animal manures and commercial fer-
tilizers is best and most economical. When judiciously
composted and fermented to break dow nthe coarse ma-
terial, this combination destroys the seeds of grass and
weeds which are present in the manure, and-properly ad-
justs the ratio between the three principal elements of
plant-food. Since cabbages are grown for the leaves, the
fertilizer used should analyze high in potash and nitro-
gen, and low in phosphoric acid compared with that for
plants grown for seed production.
It is of the first importance to secure good seed which
has been gorwn from well-selected plants in a section
especially adapted to the cabbage. Seed saved from plants
grown in the middle south has a tendency to run to seed
or to produce only leaves, without heading. By select-
ing plants of ideal development from the fall-grown
crop, protecting them during the winter and transplant-
ing in early spring not less than three feet each way
and protecting them from plant-lice and harlequin bugs,
good seed may be saved i nour alpine region. The sub-
stances needed for the growth of the seed-stalk are stored
during the first year's growth in thestalk and leaves of
the head. It is well to slit the leaves of the head in two
directions at right angles to facilitate the escape of the
seed-stalk. It is claimed by some that the*seeds produced
on the branches of the stalk are better than those formed
at the extremity, but this has not been proved by experi-
ment. The seed may be sown for the spring crop in Oc-
tober and allowed to remain in the open ground until
time to transplant in the warmer parts of the South. By
sowing thinly on well-prepared land, stocky, hardy plants







25

are secured, which may be transplanted as early as
February 1st with safety, if the transplanting is prop-
erly done. Cabbage plants are seldom injured by the
freezing of the leaves, but if the stem freezes, the plant
is destroyed. To prevent this and produce a spreading,
stocky plant, it should be set so that the bud will be a
little below the surface of the soil. This protects the
stem from freezing in winter, causes the leaves to spread
on the surface around the plant, and prevents the freez-
ing of the soil, to the injury of the roots. The leaves
being drawn up over the bud, the cut-worm will attack
teh leaf-stalks instead of the stem of the plant.
This method of transplanting protects the plant from
the injurious effects of drought in summer by shading
the soil over the roots and retaining moisture where it
is most needed. It has been stated that the plants may
be left in the open ground during the winter in the warm-
er parts of the South. In the colder parts, they may be
grown in the open ground, and transplanted to cold
frames protected by glass, or both, if necessary as win-
ter advances, giving each plant four square inches o.
space. It is not necessary to cover them except in ex-
tremely cold spells. Slight frosts will not injure them
and exposure to the sunlight whenever the minimum tem-
perature is not below 20 degrees Fahrenheit will be bene-
ficial.
As to the best varieties, the Jersey and Charleston
Wakefield are the best of the pointed head cabbages and
seem to be the favorites with many Florida truckers. If
you prefer the flat head varieties, any of the following
will make fine shippers: The Early Flat Dutch, Early
Summer, Succession, Surehead, Large Flat Dutch and
the large Late Drumhead.
When the plants are ready to set, they should be put
out immediately, as a stunted plant is sure to make a
poor crop. The field where you are going to set the
plants should be in the best condition possible. lit should
be plowed several times, then harrowed. If you wish to
broadcast the fertilizer, it should be applied before you
harrow it; but I would advise putting the fertilizer under
the row where you set the plants. To do this, lay the
field off in furrows the width you wish the rows; some
prefer them two and a half feet apart, while others prefer
the three-foot rows. Apply the fertilizer in these fur-









rows, using about 1,000 pounds to the acre. Of course,
you could make a crop with less, but it does not pay to be
stingy with fertilizer, as cabbages are rank feeders. I
prefer to put 1,000 pounds in the furrows and then drill
an equal quantity to them after they start to grow. The
following makes a fine fertilizer for cabbages: Ammo-
nia, from 4 to 5 per cent.; available phosphoric acid, 6 to
8 per cent,; and potash, 8 to 10 per cent. .I always like
to have plenty of potash in the fertilizer for this crop.
Apply it about two weeks before you are ready to set the
plants. If you will do this and giev them all work and
water they require, the chances are you will be smiling
when you figure up the profits on the crop.
In setting the plants, it is well to get them down fairly
deep in the ground. I set them up to the first leaves. The
best tool for this purpose is a plasterer's small pointing
trowel or a round stick or dibbler. Pack the dirt well
around the roots and awter the plants immediately after
setting, pouring it at the side of the plant and not on it.
The distance to -set the plants deepnds upon the variety
of the cabbage you are planting, the early and small
varieties only requiring about eighteen inches between
the plants.
Start working the plants as soon as they take root,
and do not stop until the heads are about formed. Ship
the cabbages as soon as the heads are fully grown, as
you may lose the crop by leaving it in the field after it
matures.
If the crops do not grow fast enough to suit you or
start to turn yellow at any stage of their growth, give
them an application of nitrate of soda, about 150 or 200
pounds to the acre, drilling it in the row about six inches
from the plant, being careful not to get it on them, as it
burns.
Ship the cabbages in barrels, or, better still, barrel
cabbage cartes. You can get these from any Florida
crate manufacturer.
The only insect that will be apt to bother this vege-
table is the green cabbage worm or looper, and a solu-
tion of arsenate' of lead sprayed on the plants will fix
them, using about one 'and a half pounds of arsenate of
lead to 50 gallons of water.








-27


SUGGESTIONS FOR TRANSPORTING DAIRY COWS.

From Weekly News Letter U. S. Dept. of Agriculture.

Each fall and spring there is normally a heavy move-
ment of springer or fresh cows from the city markets
and from dairy breeding regions to the milk-produc-
ing sections of the country. Many commercial dairies do
not raise new recruits for their herds, but simply make
a practice of milking out fresh cows and then disposing
of the dry animals as beef and purchasing more cows
which have just calved. Dairy farmers, also, in order
to maintain their production of milk at a normal point
throughout the year, often have to purchase fresh cows
or near springers at a time when most of the producers
in their herds are dry. All dairymen who purchase cows
are urged by the United States Department of Agricul-
ture to exercise every effort to expedite the railroad move-
ment of the dairy matrons during their time in transit
and to provide all possible comfort for the animals en
route. Careful management will reduce mortality and
will increase production over the flow from the average
cow carelessly "railroaded."

VALUABLE ANIMAIS BY EXPRESS.

Valuable pure-bred cows usually should be handled by
express service, as their increased worth for breeding
purposes over that of grade animals, which are usually
handled b freight service, justifies the additional expen-
diture for a rapid trip from the point of loading to desti-
nation. Expressage usually costs four or five times as
much as movement by freight, but in the case of particu-
larly valuable cows the saving in animal comfort, the
shorter time in transit, and the better conveniences for
feeding and watering the animals, make the added expen-
diture advisable. In case pure-bred animals can not be
handled by express, they should be loaded according
to the special system discussed in this article. As far
as possible, dairy cows should be shipped one or two
months before they are due to freshen, as repeatedly fresh
cows have been ruined, so far as the subsequent lacta-
tion period has been concerned, as a result of being










shipped shortly before freshening or so as to calve in
transit.
Milch cows of grade breeding ordinarily are shipped
by freight, dry cows and far springers being most de-
sirable for long shipments. Heifers which are not due
to freshen until three to four weeks after arrival at
destination make good "buys," as they are. of a size and
condition which permits of loading the car to capacity.
Furthermore, immature animals are less susceptible to
injury in transit and to damage as a result of change
of environment. So far as possible, animals without
horns should be shipped, and where it is necessary to
carry any horned animals in railroad cars they should
be penned apart or tied securely at one end of the car,
so that they can not injure any of their traveling mates.
Where bylls are shipped in mixed carloads, these sires
should be confined in pens apart from the other cat-
tle.
Other conditions being equal, it is recommended by
specialists of the United States Department of Agricul-
ture and about 14 mature cows be loaded in a 38 or 40
foot car. A practical arrangement is to tie four cows
in each end of the car, facing the end walls, and then
rough partitions can be installed so that two other rows
of three cows each face a center alleyway between the
car doors, where the attendant can stay and extra feed
and water can be carried. This arrangement is most
comfortable for the cows, as they ride and absorb the
shock and jar better, while it also facilitates the oper-
ations of the caretaker in feeding the cows and cleaning
the ca.
WATCH THE WEATHER.

It is preferable to move the cows during cold weather,
as hot weather and close confinement in the car are hard
on the milk producers. Care must be exercised, however,
not to. expose the cows needlessly during very cold
weather, owing to danger of their contracting pneumonia.
Cows which have been accustomed to warm, well-venti-
lated stables suffer during the railroad trip unless the
car is properly loaded and provision made for a frequent
change of air. At best it takes an animal about a year
to become thoroughly acclimated to a warmer or colder
climate than that to which it has been accustomed, and on











this account the movement should take place at a time
of year when the temperature at the two points is as
nearly equal as possible.
Dairy animals-although they require neither petting
nor pampering-should be handled under normal con-
ditiohs before and during the railroad trip. The cows
should be fed and watered at regular intervals, and if
any of the animals are in milk they should be milked ac-
cording to regular schedule. It pays to feed grain and
hay during a long shipment where the cows are accus-
tomed to these feeds. It is difficult to feed grain in a
freight car where no special provisions are made to p e-
vent wastage, as a result of the tenedncy of the animals
to move about where they are not held securely in place.
However, on long trips grain can be carried in the car
and fed at all points where the stock is unloaded. A com-
petent attendant should always accompany the dairy
cows; he should ride in the car with the stock, as ofr:
he can avert injury to the animals by prompt action in
case one of them gets down or otherwise gets into trouble .
Several large barrels of water, as well as plenty of feed,
should be carried in the car as insurance aaginst de-
lay or accident which may detain the train to the extent
that without this feed the animals might go hungry or
thirsty far beyond the 36-hour limit. Sand is one of
the best bedding materials, and during long trips fresh
supplies of it should be placed in the car at unloading
points whenever they are needed.

WHAT IS BREEDING.

From Weekly News Letter U. 8. Dept. of Agriculture.

The following definitions have been adopted by the
United States Department of Agriculture for use in the
"Better Sires-Better Stock" campaign which it will con-
duct in co-operation with the various States, beginning
October 1:
Purebred: A pure-bred animal is one of pure breeding,
representing a definite, recognized breed and both of
whose parents were pure-bred animals of the same breed.
To be considered pure-bred, live stock must be either reg-
istered, eligible to registration, or (in the absence of pub-
lic registry for that class) have such lineage that its pure











breeding can be definitely proved. To be of good type and
quality, the animal must be healthy, vigorous, and a cred-
itable specimen of its breed.
Thoroughbred: The term "thoroughbred" applies accu-
rately only to the breed of running horses eligible to reg-
istration in the General Stud Book of England, the Amer-
ican Stud Book, or affiliated stud books for thoroughbred
horses in other countries.
Standardbred: Applied to horses, this term refers to
a distinct breed of American light horses, which includes
both trotters and pacers which are eligible to registra-
tion in the American Trotting Register. Applied to poul-
try, the term includes all birds bred to conform to the
standards of form, color, markings, weight, etc., for the
various breeds under the standard of perfection of the
American Poultry Association.
Sorub: A scrub is an animal of mixed or unknown
breeding without definite type or markings. Such terms
as native, mongrel, razorback, dunghill, piney woods,
cayuse, broncho, and mustang are somewhat synonymous
with "scrub," although many of the animals described
by these terms have a certain fixity of type even though
they present no evidence of systematic improved breed-
ing.
Crossbred: This term applies to the progeny of pure-
bred parents of different breeds, but of the same species.
Grade: A grade is the offspring resulting from mating
a purebred with a scrub, or from mating animals not
purebred, but having close pure-bred ancestors. The off-
spring of a purebred and a grade is also a grade, but
through progressive improvement becomes a high grade.



















PART II.

Crop Conditions.












DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the subdivisions of the State, and the
counties contained in each:
Western Division.
Bay, Okaloosa,
Calhoun, Santa Rosa,
Escambia, Walton,
Holmes, Washington-9.
Jackson,
Northern Division.

Franklin, Leon,
Gadsden, > Liberty,
Hamilton, Madison,
Jefferson, Taylor,
Lafayette, Wakulla-10.

Northeastern Division.

Alachua, Duval,
Baker, Nassau,
Bradford, Putnam,
Clay, St. Johns,
Columbia, Suwannee-10.
Central Division.


Brevard,
Citrus,
Plagler,
Hernando,
Hillsborough,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,


Orange,
Osceola,
Pasco,
Pinellas,
Polk,
Seminole,
Sumter,
Volusia-16.


Southern Division.


Broward,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Lee,
Manatee,


Monroe,
Okeechobee,
Palm Beach,
St. Lucie-9.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk
CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.
BY DIVISIONS.

Western Division.-Reports from our correspondents
in this division show a very great decrease in some crops
and a considerable decrease in others over the previous
year. This applies especially to cotton, which has been
almost destroyed in many sections of the two northern
districts of the State by weather conditions combined
with the boll weevil. The upland cotton crop in this dis-
trict is a fraction over 40% in prospective yield as com-
pared with the previous crop; but discussing the cotton
crop alone in this connection in all of the cotton-grow-
ing districts, we find that the combined production of
cotton as compared with the crop of 1918 will not yield
more than 33% of a crop. This means that the entire
State will not produce more than about 15,500 bales. To
be exact in figures, it will be 15,307 bales. This condition
of the cotton crop has never been equaled in all its his-
tory. TO quote one of our correspondents from one of
the long-staple growing counties: "The entire crop of
cotton produced in this county will not reach twenty
bales of long cotton; there will be about half a crop of
cane, and a very short crop of sweet potatoes. The only
good crop made is peanuts. Corn is little more than half,
if any. Half of the farmers in this county have been
compelled to leave their crops and have gone into public
work." This certainly shows a very deplorable condition,
yet it is nevertheless true, in the opinion of this Depart-
ment. The best crops in this division are the forage and
hay crops. All of the others, with the exception of pea-
nuts and corn in minor localities, will be much below
the normal yield. There will be enough, however, for food
and feed purposes, but little, if any, for export.
Northern Division.-In this division conditions vary
little from the one previously discussed. As a- condition
by divisions, the cotton crop of this division is a little
shorter in the previous one. The boll weevil has reap-
peared in localities where it missed last year, and this
condition, combined with the floods of rain and later
with the baking suns, has almost destroyed the cotton
8-B











crop. The effects of this condition on other crops have
been to their great disadvantage. We know of no crop,
and none is indicated by the reports, that will yield a
full normal crop. The seasons, however, have been favor-
able for forage crops and pasture grasses, and live stock
is in better condition at this season of the year than it
has been for some time.
Northeastern Division.-In this division there is no
improvement in the cotton crop; conditions could not be
much worse as regards cotton and many other crops; but
cotton is practically a failure. Some other crops have
produced fairly well, while others have been so damaged
by climatic conditions that they cannot possibly recover
and produce anything like normal crops. The same con-
ditions prevail in this as in the two preceding divisions,
and but for the good condition of live stock in this dis-
trict, there is little that is encouraging-as regards the
yield of crops.
Central Division.-In this division, except as to cot-
ton, crops are in better shape than in the first three men-
tioned. This is, because there were better climatic condi-
tions-less rain, and better, weather generally.. The cot-
ton crops in this division are no better than in the one
previously mentioned; in fact, they might be termed a
dead failure. The boll weevil, however, is the principal
cause of the trouble. Live Stock is in good condition,
and most of the forage plants have done fairly well. Some
of them, such as field peas and velvet beans have been
damaged by mold. Fruit trees have not suffered to any
extent, and in most instances they seem to have bene-
fited by the abundant rainfall. A fine crop of fruit is
indicated.
Southern Division.-In this division climatic condi-
tions have been more favorable than in the more north-
erly and westerly districts of the State. Rains have never
Been so heavy, frequent, and long continued. Vegetable
crops have been very good and returns profitable, as a
whole. Fruit trees and fruit are in good condition, and
a good yield is indicated. Live stock is in good condi-
tion, as pastures have been wonderfully improved by the
rains. So it seems there is some good coming out of what
might be termed a general disaster in crop production
in Florida. We trust there will never be another such
season as the last.












35

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELDS OF CROPS
FOR PERIOD ENDING SEPTEMBER 30TH, 1919, AS COMPARED
WITH SAME PERIOD OF 1918.

COUNTY Upland Cotton Sea Island Cotton

Western Division. Condition Prospectivel Condition ] Prospective
1 Yield I Yield
Bay ........... ... ... 85 85 1
Escambia ............. 32 32 .
Holmes ................ 50 60 ..
Jackson ............... 40 50 .
Santa Rosa ............ 40 50
Walton ............... 40 45
Washington ........... 50 55 ..

Div. Av. per cent....... 48 I 54 ... ..
Northern Division.
Franklin ..............
Gadsden .............. 40 30
Hamilton ......... : .... 35 37 40 20
Lafayette ... .. . .... ......
Leon .................. 45 42 .
Madison .............. 50 50 25 25
Wakulla ............... 50 45 20 20

Div. Av. per cent....... 43 41 42 32
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 0 30 20 20
Baker ................ 10 5 2 2
Bradford .............. 28 26 12 10
Columbia ............. 25 25 10 10
Duval ............. ... .. 50 50
Nassau ................ 20 22 20 22
Putnam ............... 40 25 30 20
Suwannee ............. 60 25 55 20
Div. Av. er cent....... 30 23 25 19
Central vision.
Brevard ........... ... ... ... ......
Citrus ................ . ... ......
Hernando ... ......... ..........
Hillsborough ......... ..
Levy ................ 20 25 25
M arion ................ ...
Orange ............... .. ....
Osceola ............ . ...
Pasco ............... 70 60
Pinellas .. ..... [ I.
Seminole ............... 50 50
Sumter ...... 6 ..
Volusia ...............
Div. Av. per cent....... 47 I 45 20 25
'Southers Division.
Dade ................. ..
DeSoto ................*...***
Lee ........****** ***
S Palm Beach ...... .. ... .
St. Lucie .............. *** .......

Div. Av. per cent.......I ..
State Av. per cent...... 42 41 29 25










36

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Corn Kaffr Corn

Western Division. Condition Prospective| Codtondion Prospective
Yield I Yield
Bay .................. 100 100
Escambia .............. 100 120 100 100
Holmes ............. 100 125 ... .
Jackson ................. 60 80 ...
Santa Rosa ............ 100 110
Walton ............... 100 100
Washington ............ 90 100
Div. Av. per cent .... 93 105 100 100
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 90 100 ... 1
Gadsden .............. 85 90
Hamilton .............. 85 90 ...
Jefferson .............. 90 90 ...
Lafayette ............. 75 50
Leon ................... 90 100 ...
Madison .............. 75 80 .
Wakulla .............. 90 95
PDv. Av. per cent....... 85 87 .
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... 85 80
Baker ................. 50 50
Bradford .............. 90 100
Columbia .............. 100 100 100 100
Duval ................. 60 60 85 85
Nassau ............... 40 50 35 45
Putnam ............... 70 75 ...
Suwannce .............I 65 60 ...
Div. Av. per cent........ 70 72 72 73
Central Division.
Brevard .......... ..... I *** .. ..
Citrus ....... .........I 100 100
Hernando ............ 100 90 ..
'Hillsborough .......... 50 75 ..
Levy ................. 80 75
Marion ................ 85 90 80 80
Orange ................ 100 120 ...
Osceola ............... 100 110 ..
Pasco ........ .. 100 100
Pinellas ........... 100 110
Seminole .............. 80 80
Sumter .............. 85 85 ..
Volusia .............. 70 80 ...
Div. Av. per cent....... 88 93 80 80
Southern Division.
Dade ................. 95 95
DeSoto ................ 100 100 ...
Lee ...... *............ * *. *
Palm Beach ............ .. .
St. Lucie ......... .... *...*
Div. Av. per cent....... 97 97 ... ..
State Av. per cent...... 87 91 84 84











37

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Sugar Cane Sorghum

Western Division. Condition Prospective Conditiona Prospective
SYield Yield
ay .................. 95 95 100 100
Escambia ............. 100 125 100 100
Holmes ............... 95 105 90 90
Jackson ....... ....... 50 80
Santa Rosa ........... 90 100 100 100
Walton ............... 75 85 50 50
Washington ........... 85 90 90 90
niv. Av ner cent......l 84 1 97 I 88 88


Div. De. cen ...... 1 8-7 8-8
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 100 100.
Gadsden .............. 100 100 .
Hamilton ............. 100 100 100 90
Jefferson ............. 100 110 ...
Lafayette ............. 80 80 .
Leon .................| 90 100 90 90
Madison .............. 100 100 100 100
Wakulla ............... 100 100 99 90
Div Av. per cent. .. I 96 I 88 95 92
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ................I 100 100
Baker ................. 40 60
Bradftrd ..............I 100 100
Columbia .............. 100 100
Duval ................ 65 65 85 85
Nassau .............. 90 90
Putnam ............... 90 90
Suwannee ............. 95 95 80 75
Dir. Av. per cent....... I 85 88 82 80
Central Division.
Brevard ...............| .100 100 1
Citrus .... ..... .... 75 100
Hernando .............. 100 120
Hillsborough .......... 100 100
Lew .............. .. 90 100 ..
Marion ................ 85 90
Orange ... ......... . 90 100
Osceola .......... 100 .120 100 i60
Pasco ................. 120 130
Pinellas ...............I 90 90
Seminole ....... .
Sumter ................. 90 90
Volusia ............... 90 90 100 100
Div. Av. per cent....... 94 103 100 100
Southern Division.
Dade ................. i *.* '
DeSoto ............... 100 100.....
Lee ................. 100 100 ...
Palm Beach ........... 100 110 90 100
St. Lude .............. 100 100 90 100
Div. Av. per cent....... 100 102 90 100
State Av. per cent...... 92 97 91 92












* REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Field Peas Rice

Western Division. Condition Prospeotivej Condition Prospective
Yield I Yield
Bay .................. 90 90 100 110
Escambia ............. 75 85 75 50
Holmes ................ 100 100 100 100
Jackson ............. 80 90 ...
Santa Rosa ............ 100 100
Walton ............... 50 60 60 60
Washington ........... 80 80 65 60
Div Av. per cent........ 82 86 80 76
Northern Division.
Franklin ................-- 100 100
Gadsden .............. 100 100 90 80
Hamilton ............. 100 100 90 80
Jefferson ............. 90 100
Lafayette .......
Leon ............... 90 95 90 85
Madison.............. 75 80 75 75
Wakulla ............... 90 90 75 80
III
Div. Av.. per cent....... | 92 95 84 80
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... 85 100 ..
Baker ....... ........
Bradford .............. 85 90
Columbia .............. I 90 100 100 120
Duval ................. 8 80 80 100 100
Nassau ............... 60 70 90 90
Putnam ............... 70 65 80 80
Suwannee .............. 70 65 75 60
Divv. A. per cent....... 77 81 89 90
Central Division.
Brevard ............... ... .. 90 80
Hernando ............ 100 110 100 85
Hillsborough ........... 100 100 90 80
Levy .................. 80 80 ..
Marion ................ 80 90 70 80
Orange ................ 90 100
Osceola ............... 100 100
Pasco ................. 100 90 90 100
Pinellas .............. ...." ... 100 100
Seminole .............. ... .. ... ..
Sumter ............... 75 75 ...
Volusia ............... 100 100 .....
Div. Av. per cent....... 91 93 86 88
Southern. Division.
Dade ................. | 80 85
DeSoto ............... 100 100 10 20
Lee .................. 100 100
Palm Beach ........... 100 100 100 100
St. Lucie .............. 90 100 .....
Div. Av. per cent....... 94 97 55 60

State Av. per cent...... 87 91 79 79










39

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY I Sweet Potatoes Dasheens
1. I
Western Division. Condition Prospective( Condition | Prospective
Yield I I Yield
Bay .................. 100 110 ...
Escambia .............. 100 140
Holmes ............... 100 110
Jackson ............... 70 90
Santa Rosa ............ 100 110
Walton ............... 100 | 110
Washington ........... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ........ 96 | 110
Northern Division.
Franklin ....P.......... 100 o 100
Gadsden ............... 100 100 ..
Hamilton ........... 95 100
Jefferson .............. 95 100
Lafayette ..............i 75 80
Leon ................. 95 I 100
Madison ............... 100 100
Wakulla .............. 100 100 ...
Div. Av. per cent....... 95 98 ___
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 90 I 100 ...
Baker ............. 10 5 .
Bradford ............ 100 100 .
Columbia ........ 100 110 .
Duval .............. 80 80 100 100
Nassau ...............I 90 95 60 75
Putnam ............... 90 75 .
Suwannee .............I 00 80 I
Div. Av. per cent. ...... 81 82 80 87
Central Division.
Brevard ............... 90 I 80
Citrus ................ 75 75
Hernando ............. 90 85 100 100
Hillsborough .......... 50 50
Levy .................. 80 85 .
Marion ............... 95 | 110 .
Orange ................. 100 100
Osceola ...............| 100 I 150 .
Pasco ................. 100 140
Pinellas ............... 100 125
Seminole .............. 85 I 85
Sumter ...............I 90 100
Volusia ........ ....... | 85 85
Div. Av. per cent....... 88 | 98 100 100
Southern Division.
Dade ................. 90 I 90 ... .
DeSoto ............... 100 100 1 ...
Lee .................. 100 ] 100 .
St. Lucie .............| 100 | 110
SDiv. Av. per cent....... | 98 | 103 ... .
State Av. per cent...... 92 98 90 93











40

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Cassava Peanuts

Western Division. Condition Prospectivel Condition I Prospective
Yield I Yield
Bay .................. ... 90 100
Escambia ............. ... I ... 100 100
Holmes .............. ... ... 100 120
Jackson ............. ... I ... 40 60
Santa Rosa ............ ... ... 100 110
Walton .............. ... ... 100 110
Washington ........... . I ... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent....... .. I 90 100
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. ... ... 0 00
Gadsden .............. ... | ... 80 75
Hamilton ............. .... 90 SO
Jefferson ............... ... I . 90 5
Lafayette ............ ... I ... 90 90
Leon .................I ... ... 95 100
Madison .............. ... | ... 85 90
W akulla ..............I ... I ... 95 100
Div. Av. per cent ....... ... ... 86 86
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... ... 75 90
Baker ......... ...... ... .. 80 100
Bradford ............. .. ... 90 100
Columbia .............I ...... 100 100
Duval ................ 100 100 85 85
Nassau ................ ... ... 40 50
Putnam ............ .. .... 50 50
Suwannee ............ ...... 80 75
Div. Av. per cent....... 100 100 75 | 81
Central Division.
Brevard ... ..........I .
Citrus ................ .90 100
Hernando ........... ... ... 125 135
Hillsborough ............. 90 90
Levy ............. I ... 80 90
Marion ............... I .. I 85 100
Orange ................ .... 100 100
Osceola ................ 100 100
Pasco ................. .... . 100 120
Pinellas ...............
Seminole ..... ....... 100 100
Sumter ............... ..... 80 75
Volusia ............... .. ... 90 9
Divv. v. per cent....... I 100 100 93 91
Southern Division
Dade .................. .... .
DeSoto ................ ... 90 100
Lee .................. ... .. ..
Palm Beach .......... ... .
St. Lucie .............. ... .. .. ***
Div. Av. per cent...... ... ... 90 100
State Av. per cent....... 100 100 87 92











41


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Broom Corn Milo KMeta

Western Division. Condition Prospectivel Condition I Prospective
Yield Yield
B ay ......... ......... .
Escambia ............. 100 100
Holmes ............... ...
Jackson ............... ...
Santa Rosa .......... .
W alton ............... .....
Washington ... ..

Div. Av. per cent ....... 100 100
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. . I
Gadsden ............... .
Hamilton .............. ...
Jefferson ........... ......
Lafayette ............ I
Leon ................. I I
Madison . I .. ..
W akulla ............... ... I

Div. Av. per cent....... .....'I


Alachua ..............I .... I .
Baker ................. I
Bradfo=d ..........i... 6 I
Columbia ............. 0 0 100 120
Duval ..... ....... ... I. I
Nassau ................
Putnam ............... .l
Suwannee ............. I .... I ..

Div. Av. lfer cent...... 10 30 100 110
Central Division.
Brevard .................I -. -. .
Citrus ................ I .
Hernando ............. I ..
Hillsborough ........ .... .. .
Levy ................. ....
Marion ......... ...... : 60
Orange ................ ...
Osceola :............:: ... i 00 110
Pasco ................. ..
Pinellas ............... ... ...
Seminole .............. ...
Sumter ............. ...
Volusia ............... .. .0

Div. Av. per cent.. ... j 80 85
Southern Division
Dadue ................I I I
DeSoto ................
L ee .................. * I ** *

S t L u c ie . . . . . ... * * *

Div. Av. per cent ...... ... ...

State Av. per cent...... 55 I 65 90 97


or eas r o


1










42

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY | Native Hay Grasses Rhodes Grass Hay

Western Division. Condition Prospective| Condition IProspective
Yield I I Yield
Bay ................. 90 90
Escambia ............ 100 125
Holmes ............... 100 110
Jackso ................ 60 80
Santa Rosa ............ 90 100
Walton .............. 100 100
Washington .......... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent... .... !0 91 101 .
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 90 100 ...
Gadsden ............... 100 120 ...
Hamilton .............. 100 100 .
Jefferson ..... ...... .. 90 100
Lafayette .............
Leon .................. 90 100 .
Madison .............. 100 110
W akulla ............... 90 100 i
Div. Av. per cent....... 94 I 104 ... 1
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 100 100 I ... 1
Baker .......... . *. I ...
Bradford .............. 85 90
Columbia ............. .. I
Duval ................ 100 100 I
Nassau ................ 100 100 |
Putnam ............... 80 80 ...
Suwannee ............. . '..
Div. Av. per cent....... 93 94
Central Division.
Brevard ..............| 90 90..
Citrus ............... 90 100 ..
Hernando .............I 90 1 90
Hillsborough .......... 85 I 80
Levy ................. 100 100
Marion ............... 85 95
Orange ............... 90 100 ,
Osceola ............... 100 110 100 100
Pasco ................. 100 120 ... ..
Pinellas ............... 100 100 ... ...
Seminole .............. 100 100 ... ..
Sumter ............... 90 100 .....
Volusia ............... 100 100 .....
Div. Av. per cent....... 94 99 100 100
Southern Division.
J t, 4LJ


Dade .................
DeSoto ................
Lee ...:................
Palm Beach ..........
St. Lucie ............ ..


100 100
100 100 90
100 100
100 100 90
100 100 100


Div. Av. per cent........ 100 100 93 100
State Av. per cent...... 94 100 96 100










43

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Alfalfa Natal Grass Hay

Western Division. Condition Prospeotivel Coait on [ Prospective
I Yield I Yeld
Bay .................. I
Escambia .............. ... ..00 125
Holmes .
Holmes ............... ... ... ... ..
Jackson...............
Santa Rosa ............ ... ... .
W alton .. ... . . .
Washton .. .. ........ ..

Div. Av. per cent....... ... I .. 100 125
Northern Division..
Franklin ............... ... 9 1 90 I 100
Gadsden ............... 100 100
Hamilton .............. ....I
Jefferson ..............I . .. ... I
Lafayette ............. ... ....
Leon ..................I ... .
Madison ............... .... 100110
W akulla ............... ..... .

Div. Av. per cent...... 100 100 95 I 105
Nort eastern Division.
Alacnua .............. ..... ..
Baker ................. I ...... ..
Bradford .............. ....
Columbia .............. ..... ... .
Duval ................ .
Nassau ............. . ..
Putnam .
Suwannee ............ ..

Div. Av. per cent. . ... .... ...
Central Division.
Brevard ...............I ... I . I
Citrus ................ ... I ... 100 100
Hernando ............ .. ... 100 100
Hillsborough ........... . .
Levy ................. ...... I
M arion ................
Orange ................ ... :::::::
Osceola .............. I .......
)Pasco ................. ...
Vinellas ............ .
Seminole .............. .......
Sumter ...............I .. . ..
Volusia ............... ... .. 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ... ... I ..". 100 100
Southern Division.
Dade ................. ..
DeSoto ............... ... ... 100 100
L ee ................... .... ...
Palm Beach .......... ... ... 90 100
St. Lucie ........... ... ... 90 100

Div. Av. per cent....... ... ... 93 100

State Av. per cent......I 100 100 97 j 107
I I-














REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Velvet Beans Soy Beans

Western Division. Condition Prospective[ Condition Prospective
Yield Yield
Bay .................... 100 110 I
Escambia ............. 100 125 100 1 i00
Holmes ................ 100 115
Jackson .............. 80
Santa Rosa ............ i6 115 90 100
Walton ............... 100 100
Washington ........... 100 110 90 90

Div. Av. per cent.......I 100 1 112 85 97
Northern Divisio'n. _
8 r o. 85 95


F.'ran llin ............
Gadsden ...
Hamilton........
Jefferson .........
Lafayette ..............
Leon .................
M adison ...............
Wakulla ...........

Div. Av. percent .......


50
100
100
85
90
100
100
89


50
90 ...
100
85
100 90
100
100 ...
100
90 87


90


92


Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 80 90
Baker .... .. ....... 15 10 ...
Bradford .............. 100 100
Columbia ...........1. 100 100
Duval ............... 75 75
Nassau ............... 100 75 80
Putnam ............. 0 85 ...
Suwannee ..... ....... 90 90 .

Div. Av. per cent....... 80 81 75
Central Division.
Brevard ............... 90 95
Citrus ................ 100 100
Hernando ............. 90 100 ...
Hillsborough .......... 50 50 .
Levy ................. 80 80
Marion ................ 100 100 90 90
Orange ............... 90 100 ...
Osceola ............... 100 170 .
Pasco ................. 100 110
Pinellas ...............
Seminole .............. .
Sumter ................ .6 i .. 1
Volusia ............... 90 90 ... .
I -
Div. Av. per cent....... 89 100 90 90
Southern Division.
Dade ................. . ....
DeSoto ................ 90 100..
Lee .................. 100 100
Palm Beach ............ 100 110
St. Lucie ............. 100 110 ...

Div. Av. per cent....... 97 105 ...

State Ar. per cent...... 91 97 84 90


,










45
I
REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD--Continued.

COUNTY JJapanese Cane Forage Pastures, Al Kinds

Western Division. Condition Prospectivel ConAtion Prospective
Yield I Yield
Bay ................ .. 100 100 .....
Escambia ............. 100 85 100
Holmes .............. . .
Jackson ............. . 100
Santa Rosa ........... 100 100 100
Walton .............. 100 100 100
Washington ............ 90 95 100
Div. Av. per cent....... 98 96 100
Northern Division.
Franklin ............ ... ...... 100
Gadsden .............. 100 120 100
Hamilton ............. ...... 100
Jefferson .............. 90 .90 95
Lafayette ............. .. 90
Leon ................. 95 100 95
Madison ............... 50 50 100
Wakulla ................\ ... ... 95
Div. Av. per cent....... 84 90 97
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 90 100 100
Baker............ .
Bradford .............. ...... 100
Columbia ............. 100
Duval ................. 80 80 100
Nassau ................ ... ... 100
Putnam ............... ... I 90
Suwannee ............. 95 95 90
Div. Av. per cent....... 88 I 62 97
Central Division.
Brevard ............... ..
Citrus ................ 100 100 100
Hernando ............. ...I 100
Hillsborough ........... 50 50 90 ..
Levy ................. 50 75 100
M arion ............... . ... ... ..
Orange ...............I ..100
Osceola ............... 100 100 100
Pasco ................. 90 110 110
Pinellas ............... .. ... 100
Seminole ..... .....I. I 100
Sumter ................ 90 100 100
Volusia ............... 100 100 100
Dlv. Av. per cent....... 83 92 100 7..


'outnern nzivis~on.
Dade .................
DeSoto ................
Lee ................
Palm Beach ............
St. Lucie .............


Div. Ac. per cent....... 100 100 98
State Av. per cent...... 91 88 98


1 1 .












46

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


Escambia ............

Jackson ..
Santa Rosa ..........
W alton ...............
Washington ......

Div. Av. per cent....... ..
Northern Division.
franklin ............. 75 75 .

Hamilton ....... I
Jefferson ..............
Lafayette ..............
Leon ................. .
Madison .............. ..
Wakulla .............

Div. Av. per cent....... 75 75
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... . ... ... .
Baker ................. .
Bradford ............. .
Columbia ...........
Duval ............... I .
Nassau
Nassau ............... I ... .I I
Putnam .............
Suwannee .........*

Div. A. per cent....... I ...
Central Division.
Brevard .............. . .. *
Citrus ................ ...
Hernando ............. *
Hillsborough ........... 100 100
Levy .............. ... .* *
Marion ............... *** * *
Orange .............. .. .. .I
Osceola .............. . .
Pasco................. ....
Pinellas ...............
Seminole .......... . ** *** *
Sumter ............ ..... ... ...
Volusia .............. .... -

Div. Av. per cent....... 100 100
Southern Division.
Dade ................. 95 95 50 25
DeSoto ............
Lee .................. . . ...
Palm Beach ..........
St. Lucie .. .....*..* ** *..* *.

Div. Av. per cent....... 95 95 50 25

State Av. per cent...... 90 90 50 25











47

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY I Avocato Pears I Joham Persimmons
I 1
Western Division. Condition Prospectivel Condition Prospective
Yield Yield
Bay .................. ..
Escambia ........... ...
Holmes ..................
Jackson ............... ... .
Santa Rosa ............ ... I ......
Walton ................ .....
Washington ...........

Div. Av. per cent.. .... . I
Northern Division.


Franklin .............. 90 i
Gadsden .............. ...
Hamilton .............. ...
* Jefferson .............. I
Lafayette ...... ... .. I
Leon .................. ..
M adison ............... ... I
W akulla ..............I ..
Div. Av. per cent....... I 90 1
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............
Baker ................ .:
Bradford .............. I
Columbia ............. ...
Duval ................. ... [
Nassau ............... .". I
Putnam . ..
Suwannee ............. ...

Div. Av. er cent....... ...
Central Division.


Brevard ..............
Citrus ................
Hernando ............
Hillsborough ......
Levy .................
Marion ....... .
Orange ................
Osceola ...............
Pasco ................ I
Pinellas ...............
Seminole ..............
Sumter ................
Volusia ...............

Div. Av. per cent.......


Bouthern rwvissin.


Dade .................
DeSoto ............
Lee .................
Palm Beach...........
St. Luce ..............


97


90- 90 -90

.. ..100 100
90 90

90 90


90 92 92


100 100
i66 i66


1 I


90


78


50
100
70


100



90


100
100
90


Div. Av. per cent...... 81 91
State Av. per cent...... 89 90 7B 75


I










48

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

COUNTY Guavas Orange Trees

Western Division. Condition Prospectivel Conaition I Prospective
Yield Yield
b ay ................... I ... [ i ie

Holmes ................ .. I .
Jackson ............... I . I 60 80
Santa Rosa ............ .
Walton ................ I .
Washington ........... . |


Div Av per cent . I


l Ao I 80


Northern Division.
franklin ........... . 90 0 0 90
Gadsden ........ ..... ...
Hamilton .............. ..
Jefferson .............. . .. .
Lafayette ............ I
Leon ............ .....
M adison .............. .
Wakulla ............... .... .
Div. Av. per cent....... I 90 90 90 90
No thaio~ster, D~iviasion


Alachua ............... 90 0 0 80
Baker ................. .... 1 50 60
Bradford .............. .... ....
Columbia .............. ... .... .
Duval ................. ... ... 100 100
Nassau ................ ... . ..
Putnam ............... ....
Suwannee ................ .
Div. Av. per cent....... 90 90 83 80
Central Division.
Brevard .............. 100 100 75 75
Citrus ................. ... ... 90 50
Hernando ............. 80 70 125 80
Hillsborough .......... 100 100 50 50
Levy .................. .... .
Marion ................ .. ... 60 75
Orange .............. 100 50
Osceola ................ 100 120 100 130
Pasco ................. 20 30 100 130
Pinellas ............... 100 150 100 125
Seminole .............. 100 10 0 0 100
Sumter ................ .. ... 100 90
Volusia ................ 100 70 90 85
Div. Av. per cent ....... 88 93 91 87
Southern Division.
Dadde ................. 75 75 90 90
DeSoto ................ 100 100 95 70
Lee .................. 100 100 100 100
Palm Beach ............ 100 110 100 100
St. Lucle .............. | 90 100 90 100
Div. Av. per cent ....... 93 97 95 92
State Av. per cent......I 90 I 92 84 86


Div.Av er- cent ...... I











49

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

SCOUNTY | Lemon Trees Lime Trees

Western Division. Condition Prospectivej Condition Prospectve
S Yield Yield
Bay ............... ..... .. ..
Escambia ............... .
Holmes .............
Jackson ................

W alton ...... ..........
Washington ............
----|--- -----------/
Div. Av. per cent ..... ... ...
Northern Division.
Franklin ........ ...... S 90
Gadsden ...............I I
Hamilton ............. I . .
Jefferson .......
Lafayette . . .
Leon . . ...
Madison ..............I ...
W akulla .............. ... .

Div. Av. per cent....... 90 90 ...
Northeastern Division.
A la c h u a . . . . . . . . . . . .. .
Baker .............. . . ..
Bradford ........ ....
Columbia..........
Duval .............. .. . [ ...
Nassau .............
Putnam .............. I
Suwannee ............. .. ...
I I --
Div. Av. per cent ....... | ...
Central Division.
Broward ............... 75 75 .
Citrus ................ .... .. : :
Hernando ............. ...
Hillsborough ...........
Levy ................. .....
M arion ...................
Orange ............... .
Osceola ...... ........ 100 100 100 100
Pasco ...................
Pinellas .... ........... .. ..
Seminole .............. . ....
Sumter ............... ... I .. -
Volusia ............... ...

Div. Av. per cent....... 87 j 87 100 100
Southern Division.
Dade ................. ... ... 90 I 90
DeSoto ................ ... .
Lee ................... 100 i i 6

St. Lucie .............. .. ... . I

Div. Av. per cent...... .. ... 97 97

State Av. per cent...... 88 1 88 98 98




4-B











50

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY 1 Grapefruit Trees Grapes

Western Division. Condition Prospective Condition j Prospective
S Yield r Yield
Bay .................. ... ... 80 75--
Escambia ........... ... ... 90 110
Holmes ................ ... ... ..
Jackson ............... ... . .....
Santa Rosa ........... .. .
Walton ................ ... ... 90 90
Washington ........ ... .. 85 90
Div. Av. per cent....... ... .. 86 91
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 90 /90 95 95
Gadsden ....... ..
Hamilton .............
Jefferson ......
Lafayette ........... . . 85 90
Leon ..................I 75 80 80 90
Madison ............ .. .. ... 100 100
W akulla ............... ........
Div. Av. per cent....... I 82 | 85 68 71
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... I ......
Baker ................. 10 5 40 4
Bradford .......... .....
Columbia ..............
Duval ................. ... 100 100 95 95
Nassau ............... ... ... 60 75
Putnam ............... .. ...
Suwann'ee ............. ... 70 65
lyv. Av. per cent....... 55 52 59 60
Central Division.
Brevard ............... 70 T1 ...
Citrus '................ 50 50 90 100
Hernando ............ 100 100 .
Hillsborough ........... 70 70 90 100
Levy .................. ... . 100 100
Marion ........ ..... ... . ...
Orange ................ 100 I 25
Osceola ............... 115 110
Pasco ................. 100 120 100 110
Pinellas ............... 100 100
Seminole .............. 100 100 100 100
Sumter ................ 100 90
Volusia ............... .. 90 90 100 100
Div. Av. per cent....... I 90 85 96 101
Southern Division.


Daae ................. v .
DeSoto ................ 90 90
Lee .................. 100 100 ...
alm Beach ........... 100 100 ...
St. Lucie ............... 100 95 .. .
Div. Av. per cent.......I 97 95
State Av. per cent......I 81 79 77 81











/ \





PART III.
SUB-STANDARD PHARMACEUTICALS.


Drugs below the standards fixed by the U. S. Pharmaco-
poeia and National Formulary permitted to be sold
under the U. S. Food and Drug Law.


Paper read by R. E. Rose, State Chemist of Florida, be-
fore the Association of American Dairy, Food and Drug
Officials, New York, September 10, 1919.

Resolution requesting the repeal of the proviso in the
National Law permitting the interstate shipment of
sub-standard pharmaceuticals, adopted by the Associa-
tion of American Dairy, Food and Drug Officials at
Mobile, Ala., in 1913, and again at New York City in
1919.

Fertilizers, Stock Feed, Foods, Drugs and Gasolines.


October, 1919.


R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.











STATE DRUG CONTROL-PAST, PRESENT, AND
FUTURE.
Paper by B. E. Rose, State Chemist of Florida, read be-
fore the 23d Annual Convention of the Association of
American Dairy, Food and Drug Officials, New York,
Septenter 10, 1919.
Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen:
I 'have slightly changed the title of the paper assigned
to myself, as it appears on the program, and have taken
the liberty to include the "past" as well as the present
and future in the caption, as I probably know more of
the past, than I do of either the present or future con-
trol (or lack of control) of the sale of drugs, by either
the national, State or local authorities.
My first venture in business was to apprentice myself,
soon after graduating in the New Orleans High School,
to an old-fashioned apothecary, Herman Curtis, of New
Orleans, who at that time was rated among the most
capable manufacturing apothecaries in the South; the
terms "druggist" or "pharmacist" being practically un-
known at that time. Herman Curtis was an educated
scientist, a chemist as well as an apothecary and dis-
penser; a manufacturer of practically all the various ex-
tracts, elixirs, tonics, salves, liniments, plans ers, laxa-
tives and purgatives then known to the pharmacopoeia;
purchasing bales of crude material-barks, roots, leaves,
galls, capsicum, gums, etc., dried Spanish flies (cantha-
rides) and live leaches; grinding, pounding, sifting, ex-
tracting by diffusion in water, by alcohol, ether or other
solvents; compounding various materials into fluid or
solid extracts. At that time there were few manufactur-
ers of the alkaloids; the only ones I remember were
Quinine Sulphate and Morphine, made by Powers and
Weightman. There doubtless were others; however, my
master was "old-fashioned," and had little faith in goods
not prepared by himself. Infusions, fluid extracts, ex-
tracts, "blue mass" 'and various powders were the prin-
cipal forms in which drugs were dispensed.
This was years before Pasteur's wonderful discoveries
had become generally known, which have revolutionized
the practice of medicine. Serums and vaccinations, ex-










cept for smallpox, were unknown. The preparation of
properly sterilized, pure "cow pox" was in its infancy.
Doctors and nurses carefully preserved "vaccine scabs,"
generally from healthy (?) babies, with which to inocu-
late others..
My principal duties were to weigh or measure certain
proportions of crude herbs, barks, roots, gums, etc., to be
powdered, infused or extracted, evaporated and combined
by the workmen; all work being done by hand, no ma-
chinery employed except hand mills, mortar and pestle,
with various caldrons of copper, silver and tin, filters
and strainers. Another duty was to attend the "leach
chest," feed the animals, and dispense the live leaches.
Leaching, bleeding and cupping were then practiced
largely in cases of fevers and particularly in local infla-
mations, contusions, etc.
In those days, as at present, the soda fount was a
prominent feature of the drug store. My master did not
particularly desire this business. "Business" demanding
it, he reluctantly alteredd to the demand. He, however,
discontinued this feature of the business; finding that the
labor of preparing "carbonated waters"-charging the re-
torts with marble dust and sulphuric acid, with occasion-
al bursting of apparatus-interfered with his more profit-
able business of manufacturing drugs and medicines for
other "dispensing pharmacists," a term then beginning
to be commonly used.
Gradually the "apothecary," with its rows of bottles
of various extracts, alcoholic and otherwise, has disap-
peared; while the prescription case, with a few vials of
modern pharmaceutical preparations-standard tablets
of known medicinal value, alkaloids, often synthetic-has
taken its place. Though the handsome tincture and ex-
tract bottles, which are seldom opened, or removed (ex-
cept to dust them off) are still in evidence in many drug
stores for exhibition purposes, the facts are that the po-
tent drugs are found in the prescription case. The serums
and toxins and anti-toxins are in the refrigerator, prop-
erly dated, as to age and condition, with exact directions
for use, and are dispensed in original packages.
Gradually many States enacted crude police laws,
prohibiting the sale of narcotic, habit-forming drugs, and
poisons. These laws were seldom enforced, no particular
officer was charged with their execution. Hundreds of









proprietary remedies came into existence-consumption
cures, pain killers, stimulators, invigorators, colic cure.
mothers' friends, blood purifiers, and specifics for numer-
ous ills became popular; generally having opium or
morphia as their base; while hundreds of tonics, strength-
ening cordials, or invigorating bitters, stomachics,' and
digestors, dispepsia cures, etc., with wonderful testi-
monials of miraculous cures, became common; composed
generally of poor whiskey, colored and flavored with
some ordinary herb or bark; sold at enormous profits to
the manufacturer, and the so-called druggist, or the
country storekeeper; while the trade in morphine was
common and practically uncontrolled.
While a number of States had attempted to control by
law this indiscriminate sale of potent drugs, particular-
ly habit-forming drugs, little was accomplished until the
National Food and Drugs Law of 1906 was enacted; at-
tempting to control the interstate shipment of misbrand-
ed or adulterated drugs and medicines, requiring the
label to be truthful, and to state plainly the percentage
of alcohol and various habit-forming ingredients, and to
consider as misbranded preparations with false state-
ments of their medicinal or therapeutic value. This Law
did much to retard the sale of morphine, cocaine, heroin,
etc., which, however, until the passage of the Harrison
Anti-Narcotic Act, and the' active co-operation of State
and local Food and Drug Control officers, was, and still
is, largely ineffective.
These two National Laws and amendments thereto
have been of immense educational value, calling the at-
tention 'of the public to the widespread use of these nar-
cotics, the source of probably greater evil, poverty and
distress, than the excessive use of intoxicating alcoholic
liquors. There may be some hope for an alcoholic drunk-
ard, and possibly cure or reclamation. It is generally
acknowledged there is but little hope foi the opium, mor-
phine ,cocaine, or heroin adict.
Since the enactment of the National Food and Drugs
Law in 1906, @most, if not all, the States of the Union
have adopted food and drug control laws; many of which
have been amended at divers times to conform to the re-
quirements of the National Law; while numerous decis-
ions of the U. S. Supreme Court and State Supreme










Courts have clarified various divergences of interstate and
intra-state requirements.
Prior to 1906, Florida had several statutes governing
the sale of drugs, particularly narcotics and poisons;
simply ordinary general police laws, with no officer
charged with their execution. In 1907 the first general
Food and Drug Law was passed in Florida; charging
the Commissioner of Agriculture and the State Chemist
with its execution, and appropriating funds for inspec-
tion and analysis of foods and drugs. This Act was
amended in 1911, and again in 1913 to conform with the
National Law, particularly as to standards and regu-
lations for the purpose of providing a better system of
co-operation between National and State Control of-
ficials; the inter-state and intra-state manufacture of
and shipment of foods and drugs being so intimately as-
sociated that active and hearty co-operation between Na-
tional, State, and municipal officials, is necessary to
protect the consumer from fraudulent, misbranded or
adulterated foods and drugs.
Two peculiar and important differences, however, oc-
cur between the National and Florida Laws. Among,
other constituents required to be stated upon the label of
food in Florida is "alcohol," which. is omitted in the Na-
tional Law. The Florida Law omits the "proviso" in
Section 7 of the National Iaw "in the case of drugs,"
and permits no drug to be legally sold under a name
recognized by the U. S. Pharmacopoeia or National
Formulary "if it differs from the standard of strength,
quality, or purity, as determined by the test laid down in
the U. S. Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary official
at the time of the investigation."
A resolution advocating an amendment to the Nation-
al Law striking out this "proviso,' allowing sub-stand-
ards of pharmaceuticals, was adopted by this Associa-
tion at its meeting in Mobile, Alabama, in 1913. This
resolution was presented by myself, and advocated by
Dr. Charles Caspari, Sr., a member of the National Com-
mittee on revision of the U. S. Pharmacopeia. A com-
mittee of this Association was appointed to present the
resolution of this Association to the President, the Secre-
tary of Agriculture and to Congress.
I consider this action of the Association of American
Dairy, Food and Drug Officials one of the most important










had at any time. Such an amendment would go far to-
wards clarifying the inter- and intra-state shipment of
drugs; prevent much litigation, and protect consumers
from inferior, low grade, sub-standard drugs and medi-
cines, particularly many used by mothers and nurses in
the treatment of ordinary simple cases, particularly
among children.
This resolution was as follows:
"Whereas, in the judgment of the Association of Amer-
ican Dairy, Food and Drug Officials, the clause of the
National Food and Drug Act of June 30, 1906, in para-
graph, one of Section VII, that permits the sale under
names recognized by the U. S. Pharmacopoeia and Na-
tional Formulary, of drug preparations differing in
-strength and other qualities from the respective pharma-
copoeial and formulary standards, have proven unfor-
tunate for its operation, in that it has favored the devel-
opment of variation in the strength of pharmaceutical
preparations, and especially of potent drugs, and that
the tolerances granted by this clause are both unneces-
sary and prejudicial to the public good; therefore, be it
Resolved, That the incoming President of the Associa-
tion appoint a committee of three members to represent
to the President of the United States, the Secretary of
Agriculture and the proper committees of Congress the
above expressed judgment of the Association, and its
urgent recommendation that the above provisions of the
National Food and Drug Act of June 30, 1906, be so
amended as to discontinue the tolerance herein referred
Sto."
In advocating the adoption of this resolution, Dr.
Charles Caspari, Sr., one of the most learned and promi-
nent pharmacists of the age, said:
"At the meeting in Seattle last year this matter came
up for discussion, and I took occasion then to point out
that the sub-standard clause of the National Law and
several State Laws seemed to me to be in serious defect,
especially in regard to those remedies- which Dr. Rose
has just mentioned. I am glad to state that opium prep-
arations are exempt in Maryland. It would seem to me
proper that this association take some action looking to-
ward an amendment in the National Law eliminating
this serious defect. There is no denying the fact that in
the case of drugs, and particularly where the United










States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary have
fixed standards there should be no deviation from such
standards, more especially since the statement appears
on the label that it is a pharmacopoeial preparation.
The way has been opened so that preparations are fre-
quently marketed of a strength lower than/that demand-
ed by the Pharmacopoeia. What possible excuse can
there be coming from a manufacturer or dealer as to the
deficiency of strength? This book is carefully revised, as
most of you know, every ten years, and the work (4 re-
vision sometimes covers two or three 'years, and 'then
after all this work has been carefully compiled and made
a legal standard, the law allows it to be violated, with-
out any reference at all to the standard set."
With this suggested amendment to the National Law,
eliminating sub-standard pharmaceuticals, which cause
interminable confusion, with the active co-operation of
National, State, municipal and county food and drug
officers, National, State, municipal and county boards of
health, with their various systems of inspection and con-
trol; active co-operation with the. Internal Revenue De-
partment charged with the execution of the Harrison
Anti-Narcotic Law, the illegal traffic of fraudulent drugs
and medicines, and particularly the illegal traffic in nar-
cotics should largely be prevented; as well as the fraudu-
lent sale of adulterated, misbranded drugs and patent
medicines of little or no medicinal value.
Much has been done, much is yet to be accomplished.
Judging from the progress made during the past thir-
teen years, the National, State, municipal and county
laws and ordinances enacted; the active campaign
throughout the nation, designed to eradicate, or at least-
mitigate, the various communicable and preventable dis-
ease-dyphtheria, malaria, typhus, typhoid, bubonic
plague, venereal, and other diseases-so actively and
successfully now being accomplished by the nation as
shown by the records of our National Hospital Service,
and Army hospitals; by numerous State and charitably
endowed institutes, clinics, and hospitals; believing also
that tuberculosis-the "great white plague"-but recent-
ly declared hereditary and incurable, now known to be
infectious and preventable, will be practically controlled,
And possibly stamped out, as has been typhoid and dyph-
theria; I consider the future control of drugs, or rather










of disease, bright and promising. I also believe that
medicines, as such, will be largely eliminated; that en-
vironment, proper sanitation, the elimination of cause,
the peculiar germ, bacillus, or other infection isolated
and specifics discovered; and that this great work will
be greatly hastened by the active co-operation of all
agencies for the control and mitigation of disease, by
co-operation with the Association of American Dairy,
Food and Drug Officials.
R. E. ROSE.

RESOLUTIONS UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTED BY THE ASSOCIATION
OF AMERICAN DAIRY, FOOD AND DRUG OFFICIALS,

The preamble and resolutions presented by the State
Chemist of Florida, and advocated by the late Dr. Chas.
Caspari, Sr., of Maryland (then one of the Committee to
revise the U. S. Pharmacopoeia) was unanimously adopt-
ed at the Mobile convention in 1913, and re-adopted at
the New York convention in 1919 without opposition.
The National Food and Drugs Law is as follows:
"Sec. 7. That for the purposes of this Act an article
shall be deemed to be adulterated:
"In case of drugs:
"First. If, when a drug is sold under or by a name
recognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia or Na-
tional Formulary, it differs from the standard of
strength, quality, or purity, as determined by the test
laid down in the United States Pharmacopoeia or Na-
tional Formulary official at the time of investigation:
PROVIDED, That no drug defined in the United States
Pharmacopoeia or National Formulary shall be deemed
to be adulterated under this provision if the standard of
strength, quality, or purity be plainly stated upon the
bottle, box, or other container thereof, although the
standard may differ from that determined by the test
laid down in the United States Pharmacopoeia or Na-
tional Formulary."
A standard fixed in one sentence, and absolutely de-
stroyed in the next sentence, by a proviso.
The Florida Lawv and that of a: number of other States
are as follows:
"Sec. 4. That for the purpose of this Act an article'
shall bel deemed to be adulterated:










"In the case of drugs:
"First. If when a drug is sold under or by a name
recognized in the United States Pharmacopoeia, or Na-
tional Formulary, it differs from the standard of
strength, quality or purity, as determined by the test
laid down in the United States Pharmacopoeia or Na-
tional Formulary official at the time of the investiga-
tion."
The importance of this amendment recommended by
the Association of American Dairy, Food and Drug Of-
ficials is apparent, particularly as there has recently
been introduced into the United States Senate, by Sena-
tor Calder, of New York, a bill amending the National
Food and Drugs Law of 1906 in order to permit the sale
to consumers by local dealers in all States of any food
or drug product in the original retail package, shipped
in interstate commerce, though differing as to the stand-
ards or requirements of any State*law; thus nullifying
the local police authority of the various States for the
protection of their citizens from inferior sub-standard
foods and particularly of drugs.
R. E. ROSE,
Oct. 1, 1919. State Chemist.


66th Congress, 1st Session, S. 3011.
IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES.
September 16, 1919.
Mr. Calder introduced the following bill; which was read
twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce.
A BILL.
To protect interstate commerce in foods, drugs, and medi-
cines, and to extend the provisions of the Food and
Drugs Act of June 30, 1906.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives
of the United States of America in Congress assembled.
That no law of any State, city, pr municipality relating
to the adultration or misbranding of foods, drugs, or
'medicines or regulating the branding thereof shall apply
to, or interfere with, the sale of any foods, drugs, or med-.









61

cines, in package form, which have transported in inter-
state commerce and thereby have become subject to the
provisions of the Food and Drugs Act of June 30, 1906
(Thirty-fourth Statutes at Large, page 768), and which
are not adulterated or misbranded within the meaning of
said Act as now amended or as the same may be here-
after amended, so long as articles remain in package
form and not adulterated as aforesaid and labeled as when
transported as aforesaid. The words "package form," as
use& herein, shall be held to include the individual pack-
age in which or from which the articles are sold to the
ultimate consumer.
Sec. 2. That all of the provisions of the Food and
Drug Act of June 30, 1906 (Thirty-fourth Statutes at
Large, page 768), are hereby extended so as to apply
wherever applicable to all foods, drugs, and medicines in
package form which have become subject to the provis-
ions of said Act until said products have been sold and
delivered to the ultimate consumer thereof.
I !, .,!











NEW YORK WHOLESALE MARKET PRICES.

FERTILIZER MATERIALS-Oct. 1, 1919.

AMMONIATES.

Ammonia, sulph., bulk, f. o. b. works
........ ........per 100 lbs......... 3.75 @
double bags, f. a. s. New York...... 4.70 @
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia and
14 p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. factories 6.60 & 10
wet, acidulated, 6 p. c. ammonia, 3
p. c. phosphoric acid, f. o. b. fish
factory ......................... 5.50 & 50
Ground fish scrap, 11 to 12 p. c. ammonia,
15 p. c. B. P. L., f. o. b. fish factory.. 8.00 & 10
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. f. o. b. Chi-
cago ............................... 7.00 & 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ....................,....... 7.00 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago
ground ............................. 7.00 & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15 p. c. ........................ 6.50 @ -
blood, f. o. b. Chicago ............. 7.25 @ 7.35
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago....... 4.00 & 10 & $1
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago,...... per unit 7.00 @ -
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York ......................... 7.25 @ -
Tankage, New York.................... 7.20 & 10
Nitrate of Soda............per 100 lbs. 2.871@ 2.90


PHOSPHATES.


Acid, phosphate, bulk........... per ton 18.00 @ -
Southern ports ................... 17.75 @ -
Bones, rough, hard.................... 28.00 @ 30.00
soft steamed, unground............ 26.00 @ 27.00
ground, steamed, 11/ p. c. ammonia
and 60 p. c. bone phosphate..... 32.00 @ -
do., 3 and 50'p. c. ...............: 40.00 @ -
raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and 50
p. c. bone phosphate ............. 47.00 @











Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c., f. o. b. Tampa, Fla. ............
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 75 p.
c., f. o. b. Tampa ....................
Florida high grade phosphate hard rock,
77 p. c., f. o. b. Florida ports..........
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c.......
............................ per ton.
75 p. c. guaranteed..per ton, 2,240 lbs.
78 p. c......... .. per ton, 2,240 lbs.


Nominal

Nominal

Noihinal


11.44
10.00
11.00


POTASHES.


American fertilizer potash, bulk, in paper-
lined cars................. per unit 2.25
Muriate of potash, 80@85'per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags..........per ton.110.00
Muriate of potash, min., 90@95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags............ No
Muriate of potash, min. 98 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags .................. No
Sulphate of potash, 90@95 per cent., basis
90 per cent., in bags......... per unit No
First sorts potashes..............per lb. 15


@ 2
@

minal


minal

minal
@ 20


11.50
10.50
11.50










MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
OCTOBER 1, 1919.

Under unsettled conditions, quotations are wholly
nominal."
AMMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 18% ammonia................. $ 80.00
Sulphate of Ammonia; 25% ammonia............ 130.00
Dried Blood, 16% ammonia ................... 124.00
Cyanamid, 18% ammonia................ ....... 100.00

POTASH.

Domestic Potash, 27% K20 ................ $ 94.50
High-grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% sulphate,
48% K20................................ Nominal
Low-grade Sulphate of Potash, 48% sulphate,
26% K0. ............................... Nominal
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% K20 .......... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 15% ammonia,
44% potash K20....................... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% ammonia,
42% potash K20....................... Nominal
Kainit, potash, 12% K20 .................. Nominal
Canada Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 3% K20
potash ................................. $ 30.00

'AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High-grade Tankage, 10% ammonia, 5% phospho-
ric acid ...................................... 84.00
Tankage, 8% ammonia, 10% phosphoric acid.... 70.00
Low-grade Tankage, 61/2% ammonia, 12% phos-
phoric acid ............................... 64.00
Goat Manure,, 11/2% ammonia,, 3% potash...... 35.00
Imported Fish Guano, 10% ammonia, 7% phos-
\phoric acid ............................... 107.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% ammonia,
22% phosphoric acid ....................... .54.00
Raw Bone, 4% ammonia, 22% phosphoric acid.. 57.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/2% ammonia, 2% phos-
phoric acid .................... ........... 54.00










Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 7% ammonia ........... 60.50
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2% ammonia......... 35.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High-grade Acid Phosphate, 16% available phos-
phoric acid ....... ......................$ 23.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% available phosphoric acid... 22.50
Bone Black, 17% available phosphoric acid...... 32.00

MISCELIANEOUs.

High-grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 3% ammonia,
8% potash ................. {..............$ 54.00
High-grade Baled Kentucky Tobacco Stems, 2/%%
ammonia, 7% potash ...................... 40.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% ammonia, 2% potash.... 32.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% ammonia, 4%
potash .<.................................. 54.00
Dark Tobacco Stems bale'd, 2% ammonia 4% potash 38.00
Land Plaster, in sacks ...................... 17.00
Subject to 5% discount for cash.
The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing'
and bagging any special or regular formula are $3.50 per
ton in excess of above prices./


















5-B






I '


66

STATE VALUATIONS.

Based on Commercial Values October 1, 1919.

For Available and Insoluble -Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of 1919.

Available Phosphoric Acid ............ .$ 06 a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. .01 a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). .30 a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20).............. .20 a pound

If Calculated by Units:

Available Phosphoric Acid............. 1.2 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. .20 per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen).. 6.00 per unit
Potash ............................ 4.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $3.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent. of a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for cal-
culating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take,
for example, a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.. 6.22 per cent. x $1.20-$ 7.46
Insoluble Phosphoric, Acid. .1.50 per cent. x .20- .30
Ammonia ...... ........ ..3.42 per cent. x 6.00- 20.52
Potash ............... -..3.23 per cent. x 4.00- 12.92
Mixing and bagging.......................... 3.50

Commercial value at seaports................. $44.70

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid .... 8 per cent. x $1.20-$ 9.60
Ammonia ...................2 per cent. x 6.00- 12.00(
Potash ................. ...2 per cent. x 4.00- 8.00
fixing and bagging.................... .. .....$ 3.50

Commercial value at seaports................. $33.10

The valuations and niarket prices in preceding illus.
trations are based on market prices for one-ton lots.










67

COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Total
Amnionia. Phosphoric Potash.
A__cid.
Nitrate of Soda........... 17 to 19 .......... .........
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 26........
Dried Blood .............. 12 to 17 .'........... .......
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1 to 4 ............
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap........ 6 to 11 3 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal........ 7 to 10 2 to 3 I to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13 to 17 1 to 2 1 to 2
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.
Ammoa. Available Insoluble
Ammonia. Phos. Acid. Phos. Acid.
'lorida Pebble Phosphate. ........................ 2to
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ............ ............ 30 t3 85
Florida Super Phosphate............... 14 to 45 1 to I
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 1 to 4 6to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
Pounds Per Hundred.
Actual m'oia. Phos. Lime.
Potash. Acid.
Muriate of Potash...... 50 to 62 ............... .......
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 ......... ......... .........
Carbonate of Potash.... 155 to 60 ......... ........ .........
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ................
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag. 25 to 30 ......... ........ .........
Kainit ................ 12 to 13 .........................
Bylvinit ............... 16 to 20 ....................... ..
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8 ......... I to 2........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 ......... 1 5 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 3 to 9 2 to 4 .........
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.50 0.30 0.80
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.50 0.60 0.25 0.80
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.60 1.00 0.35 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)... 0.85, 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.50 0.75 0.50 0.70










FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............. 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by............ 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into.actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by. 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by..... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply.. 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply.. 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K,0) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. nitrate of soda, and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95 per
cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen; you
want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is equiva-
lent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214, and you
get 18.90 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of -potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
.per cent. actual potash (KO).










AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.


NAME OF FEED. S m



SMaiden Cane Hay..... 28.60 1L60 42.40 2.60 4.20

Natal Grass Hay...... 36.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00

Para Grass Hay...... 31.20 8.00 45.70 1.60 6.20

Rhodes Grass Hay.... 41.10 7.70 36.80 1.30 6.60

Beggarweed Hay...... 24.30 21.60 35.10 4.10 4.00

Kudzu Vine Hay...... 32.30 15.90 33.00 1.60 6.80

Cow Pea Hay......... 20.50 13.00 45.90 4.20 7.50

Velvet Bean Hay..... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70

Velvet Beans......... 7.00 21.00 53.10 5.40 3.60

Velvet Bean Hulls.... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30

Velvet Beans and Hulls 10.70 19.40 50.60 4.50 3.50

Cow Peas ............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 8.20

Soy Bean Meal....... 4.50 48.40 27.50 6.40 4.40

Peanut Vine Meal...... 29.60 9.90 38.40 6.30 6.60

Cotton Seed~......... 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 3.50

Cotton Seed Hulls.... 44.40 4.00 36.60 2.00 2.60

Bright Cotton S'd Meal 9.40 38.62 28.60 7.80 5.80










AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continud).


NAME OF F2ZD.



bark Cotton Seed Meal 20.00 23.15 37.10 5.50 5.00

Corn Grain........... 2.10 10.50 69.60 5:40 1.50

Corn Meal............ 1.90 9.70 68,70 3.80 1.40

Hominy Feed.......... 4.00 10.50 65.30 7.80 2.90

Corn and Cob Meal.... 5.80 7.50 70.80 3.10 1.20

Ground Corn Shucks., 30.20- 2.80 54.60 0.60 1.90

Ground Corn Cobs.... 30.00 38.00 56.60 0.70 1.60
Equal parts, Corn in
Shucks & V'lv't Beans 16.03 12.56 53.71 2.32 4.83

Oats (grain) ......... 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.00 3.00

Bice (grain) ......... 0.20 7.40 79.20 0.40 0.40

Rice Bran............ 9.50 12.10 49.90 8,80 1 09

Wheat (grain) ....... 1.80 11.90 71.90 2.10 1.80

Wheat Bran .......... 9.00 15:40 53.90 4.00 5.80

Wheat Middlings..... 5.40 15.40 53,90 4.00 5.80

Wheat Mixed Feed.... 7.80 16.90 54.40 4.80 5.30

Wheat Ship Stuff....,. 5.60 14.60 59.80 5.00 3.70

Dry Jap Sugar Cane.. 26.20 2.30 62.60 1.50 2.80









AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Conttiued).



NAMB OF FEMD.



Peanut Hulls ..... 56.60 7.30 18.90 2.60 5.50
Peanut, with Hulls. 16.40 20.40 16.40 36.20 4.10
Peanut kernel .... I 2.60 26.40 17.50 44.90 2.20
'eanut Meal (with-
out ulls) ...... 5.10 47.60 23.70 8.00 4.90
Peanut Feed (in-
cluding Hulls).... 23.40 28.40 27.00 11.00 5.50










STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
"season." They may, but seldom do, vary from the
market prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight
advance or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked, "What is Smith's
Fruit and Vine worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
materials to compound a ton of goods siimlar to "Smith's
Fruit, and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed can be purchased for cas in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values," Octoer 1, 1919, are nominal.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1919, FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under .Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. D FOR WHOM SENT.

44 P


(No. 1) .............

(No. 2) ..............

(No. 1) ..........

(No. 2) .............

(No. 3) .............

(No. 4) ............

(No. 5) ............

(No. 6) ... .........


4932 9.55

4933 9.68

4934 13..07

4935 13.00

4936 13.25

4937 13.00

4938 13.13

4939 13.15


7.65

5.85

9.66

9.47

9.05

9.22

9.41

S9.10


2.00 9.65

1.95 7.80

1.66 11.32

1.79 11.26

2.55 11.60

2..55 11.77

2.26 11.67

2.34 11.44


4.95

4.08

4.51

4.63

4.52

3.94

4.54

4.61


4.69

4.39

2..95

2.96

2.98

3.02

2.93

2..85


Standard-Growers' Exchange, Arcadia. W

Standard Growers' Exchange, Arcadia.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.
Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.


Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


,








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1919-(Continued.)

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. o FOR WHOM SENT.


j I


7) .............
8) .............

9)- ............

1) ............
2) (Tankage)..


(No. .. ...........
(No. 2) .............


4940 13..23
4941112.78
494213.01

4943 8.60
4944 12.20

4945 11.42

4946 6.80
[494713.53

49481 8..78


9.09
9.38

9.70

7.58
4..50
8.43
10.40
6.03

6.90


2.75
5.80

0.89
3.02


Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

L. Wichtendahl, Gotha.
J. H. Sadler, Oakland.

R. H. Langford, Arcadia.

Mrs. I. M. Starke, Beresford.

S. J. T. Seegar, Ocoee.

S. J. T. Seegar, Ocoee.


Fertilizer

Fertilizer
Fertilizer
Fertilizer

Fertilizer
Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer









Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ..................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer (No. 10) ............

Fertilizer( No. 11) ............

(No. 498) Cotton Seed Meal...

Fertilizer ...................

Fertilizer ....... ....

Fertilizer ....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer (No. 2) .............

Sample (No. 3) ...............

Fertilizer ....................

Mixed Fertilizer ...............


9.20

13.23

12.97

11.77

13 90

11.57

..o...

9.60

8.25

10.07

7.80

9.02

12.27

19.13

6.83


7.30 1.90

4.50 8,30

6.45 2.90

4.35 3.90

9.42 1.78

9.24 1.74


7..03 3.12

5.95 1.25

5.08 3.97

9.85 7.45

4.95 3.35

6.70 0.60

5.20 3.30

4.10 5.401


-9.201 4.651 1..83 Dozier & McElroy, Orlando.


6.30

4.02

3.95

4.28

4.49

7.256

4.90

4.10

3.55

4.60

2.37

6.300

4.53

6.00


L. Wichtendahl, Orlando.

J. H. Sadler, Oakland.

W. J. Richard, Lake Hamilton.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Graham & Shriver, Ft. Myers.

Harry R. Day, Grand Island.

W. J. J. Whidden, Bartow.

Stand. Growers' Exchange, Orlando.

J. L. Dillard, Winter Garden.

Conrad Menge, Estero.

A. L. White, Ft. Myers.

Hill Crest Grove Co., St. Leo.

M. E. Card, Ft. Pierce


I


i







SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, .1919-(Continued.)


Fertilizer (No. 6) ............ 49B4

Cottonseed Meal ............... 496

Potash (Sample No. 4) ........ 4966

Ground Dried Blood ........... 4967

Ashes /...................... 4968

Mixed Fertilizer ............ 4969

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4970

Mixed Fertilizer .............4971

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1) ..... 4972

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)..... 4973


16.65

S9.72

10:17

10.98

5. 8


..... ..... .... .... 36.20
..

...... 10.80 ....

..... ...... ..... 5.531

1.15 0.10 1-.25 7.93 1.46
8.-k 0.25 8.30 4.88 0.58

7.88 0.22 8.10 2.65 2.05

8.05 0.90 8.95 4.60 4.02

6.40 0.15 6.55 3.35 2.35


S. C. Kelly, Ft. Myers.

Graham & Shriver, Ft. Myers.

A. L. WIhte, Ft. Myers.

G. F. Smith, Sanford.

0. P. Swope Land Co., Sanford.

RB F. Symes, Sanford.

0. C. Bryant, Sanford.

J. J. Bolly, Sanford.

T. F. Adams, Sanford.

T. F. Adams, Sanford.









Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1) ......

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) .......

Nitrate of Soda (No. 3) .......

Tankage ......................

Tankage (No. 1) ..............

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ......

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 3) ......

Cottonseed Meal (No. 4) ....... i

Mixed Fertilizer ...............

Mixed Fertilizer ..............

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1) ......

Blood and Bone (No. 2) ......

Blood and Bone ...............1


8.65

8.37

10.85

3.83

11.32

6.22

9.03

9.63



9.65

17.80

10.52

12.37

17.88


4.7

0.5i

1.1



3.45

6.3

2.1i

2.5


5 9.70

6.90

0 9.30



5 5.90

9.90

S9.00

r 7.80



7 7.30

5 8.35

; 9.05

S9.20

S9.10


4.33

3..65

4.53

17.08'

8.81

9.15

4.13

4.45

8.45

4.10

3.95

4.25

9.55

8.60


) G. C. Chamberlin, Sanford.

SJ. D. Hood, Sanford.

5 J. D. Hood, Sanford.

SJ. D. Hood, Sanford.

. G. Bell, Sanford. *

Joseph CLmeron, Sanford.

3 Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

) Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

.Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

I John' Bolly, Sanford.

L F. N. Esteridge, Sanford.

. L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

SL. A. Brumley, Sanford.

L. B. Mann, Sanford.


w 1 T


I


I


f








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1919-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. FOR WHOM SENT.



___________ .l-i __-__________


Blood and Bone (No. 1) ......

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ......

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1) ......

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ......

Mixed Fertilizer ..............

Pulverized Steamed Bone ......

Dried Blood ...............

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 3) .....

Mixed Fertilizer ..............


3,45

5.05

7.45

6.57

6.3.0

8.50.


5.68

8.55


Cottonseed Meal (No. 9) ...... 4997 ..... .....


6.95 10.40

2.25 7.30

1.40 8.85

3..03 9.60

1.10 7.40

16.90 25.40


3.72 9.40

0..95 9.50


9.55 .....

4.03 5.29

4.98 0.45

5.88 0..81

3.95 3.10

3.50 .....

16.50 .....

5.25 1.61

3.70 2.45

7.10 .....


Mahoney & SonSanford.

Mahoney & Son, Sanford.

0. C. Bryant, Sanford.

0. C. Bryant, Sanford.

W. J. Thigpen, Sanford.

R. J. Shimmons, Sanford.

R. J. Shimmons, Sanford.

R. J. Shimmons, Sanford.

F. M. Cameron, Sanford.

Gene Shannahan, Ft. Myers.


-A








Fertilizer ..................... 4998

Fertilizer ...................... 4999

Uncut Tobacco Stems ...........15000

fertilizer ..................... 5001

Fertilizer ..................... 5002

Blood and Bone No. 1 ......... 5003

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ........ 5004

Nitrate of Soda (No. 3) ....... 15005

Castor Pomace (No. 4) .......15006

Goat Manure (No. 5) ......... 5007

Ashes (No. 6) ................ 5008

Cottonseed Meal ............... 15009

Cottonseed Meal ............... 15010

"Flumafo" ................... 011

Fertilizer ..................... 5012

Fertilizer ...................... 5013


12,75 10.90

12.37 4.90

121.401 .....

14.68 7.25

12.08 8.30

8.40 5.60

9.62 5.95

3.44 .....

I. .. ..:... .
19.68 '0.70

10.43 .....





12.37 6.90

9.90 5.55

8.37 6..951


2.00 12..90

3.55 8.45

..... ....."

2.55 9.80

7.50 15.80

10.40 16.00

3.65 9.60

..... ....."

..... .....

0.05 0.75

..... .....





0.10 7.00

2.65 8.20

2.35 9.30


4.90

4.43

2.68

4.63

4.40

6.87

5..60

19.12

8.30

1.85



8.30

8..27

3.30

4.30

,8.35


S. S. Coachman, Largo.

Hill Crest Groves Co., St. Leo.

. M. Evans, Sanford.

It. Jenny, Ft. Myers.

Buckeye Lime Growers' Association,
Homestead.
G. W. Spencer, Sanford.

G. W. Spencer, Sanford.

G. W. Spencer, Sanford.

G. W. Spencer, Sanford.

G, W. Spencer, Sanford.

G. W. Spencer, Sanford.

Rudolf Jenny, Ft. Myers.


..... L. Santina, Ft. Myers.

..... Henry Nickel, Sanford.

2.73 Fulton & Stone, Ft. Myers.

2.80 J. W. Pixton, Ft. Myers.


I









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1919.-(Continued.)

Phosphoric Acid


NAME, OR BRAND, 3 o FOR WHOM SENT.

ll 0


Fertilizer ..................... 5014

Fertilizer (Ground Phosphate). 5015

Pigeon Manure .............. 5016

Fertilizer ..................... 5017

Angora Goat Manure......... 5018


11.27



18.61

13.13

15.75


2.17



0.04

0.90

0.05


5.60



5.45

4.60

2.4ff


1.17

1.74

0.97


H. L. Abell, Ft. Myers.

H. A. Pace, Orlando.

C. M. Berry, Sanford.

Sherwood & Baum, Ft. Myers.

Fred S. Gray, Callahan.


00
o








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING 87UFF SECTION.
SR. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1919. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspectors Under Sections I, 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1905.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND. NAME AND ADDRESS OF
.1 z | C o MANUFACTURER.

Bully Mule Feed.............. 2946 Guaranteed 23.00 10.00 45.00 3.0...... Just Mills Nashville,
SFound .... 20.38 11.09 46.1 3.74 6.97 Tenn.
"Golden Gull" Bran..........2947 Guaranteed 11..50 15.50 55.00 2.00...... Lawrenceburg Roller Mills,
Found .... 8.25 1602 52.27 1.87 6.57 Lawrenceburg, Ind.
O-U Mule Feed.:.............. 2948 Guaranteed 15.00 4.59 52.00 1.24 ..... E. Patteson & Co., Mem
Found .... 10.32 5.70 52.91 1.11 12.561 phis, Tenn.
Florida Mule Feed............ 2949 Guaranteed 15.00 4.50 51.00 1.5 ..... E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
Found .:.. 10.16 5.58 52.56 1.12 11.74 phis, Tenn.
Biles Ready Dairy Rations.... 2950 Guaranteed 10.00 24.00 50.00 5.00......The Ubiko Milling Co., Cin-
Found.... 11.67 21.94 44.27 4.05 6.95 cinnati, Ohio.
Kamillo Brand Feed............ 2951Guaranteed 30.00 30.00 22.00 6.00 ......Camilla Cotton Oil & Fert
I Found .... 23.251 32.47 22.62 6.77 4.521 Co., Camilla, Ga.








OFFICIAL FEED STUFF ANALYSIS, 1919.-Continued.


NAME,ORBRAND. J
ll p.,


Wheat Mixed Feed...........


Invegoco Meal ...............


Pillsbury's Wheat "A" Midd'ngs


Wheat Middlings with Screen'gs

Oatrashun Stock Feed.......


Dan Patch Special Horse Feed.

Alfacorn "Hevi-Oats" Horse
and Mule Feed..............

Pawnee Sweet Feed ..........


2952 Guaranteed
Found ....

2953 Guaranteed
Found ....

2954 Guaranteed
Found ....

2955 Guaranteed
Found ....

2956 Guaranteed
Found ....
2957 Guaranteed
Found ....

2958 Guaranteed
Found ....

2959 Guaranteed
Found ....


8.55 15.62
7.85 17.34

22.00 30.0q
29.15 28.52

8.00 15.00
5.20 17.72

4.00 17.00
5.50 18.21

12.00 9.00
14.71 10.38

12.50 9.00
11.92 10.69

13.50 9.00
11.47 11.14

19.001 10.00
11.471 10.10


58.17
47.94

22.00
18.93

55.00
56.24

55.00
55.72

59.00
48.98

55.00
56.23

55.00
55.77

50.00
56.50


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.



...... The Crescent Flour Mills,
7.551 Denver, Colo.

...... International Vegetable Oil
8.70 Co., Arlington, Ga.

...... Pillsbury Flour Mills Co.,
5.17 Minneapolis, Minn.

...... Geo. P. Plant Milling Co.,
4.55 St. Louis, Mo.

...... .,E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
7.35 phis, Tenn.

...... international Sugar Feed
7.36 No. 2 Co., Memphis, Tenn.

..... Alfacorn Milling Co., St.
7.14 1 Louis, Mo.

......The Corno Mills Co., St.
5.881 Louis, Mo.








Krak A Jak Horse Feed....... 2960 Guaranteed 15.00
Found .... 14.04

Granddaddy Feed ........... 2961 Guaranteed 18.00
-' Found .... 15.34

Florida Mule Feed............ 2962 Guaranteed 15.00
Found .... 10.19

Florida Mule Feed............ 2963 guaranteed 15.00
Found .... 10.19

Tennessee Horse & Mule Feed. 2964 Guaranteed 11.50
Found .... 12.28

Tip Top Molasses Feed....... 2965 Guaranteed 12.00
Found .... 15.11

Purina Pig Chow.............. 2966 Guaranteed 9.00
Found.... 8.64

Best Yet Molasses Feed....... 2967 Guaranteed 15.00
Found.. .. 9.74

Dixie Gem Molasses Feed..... 2968 Guaranteed 15.00
Found .... 14.07

Cavalry Molasses Feed ....... 2969 Guaranteed 15.00
Found .... 14.40

Creamo Brand Mixed Feed.... 2970 Guaranteed 25.00
Found.... 19.50


10.00 55.00
11.02 54.21

9.00 55.00
10.50 53.60

4.50 51.00
5.54 52.23

4.50 51. O
5.54 52.23

9.30 60.00
9.56 52.86

9.001 60.00
8.80 52.57

14.00 55.00
14.42 53.44

9.00 55.00
10.53 60.39

9.00 55.00
9.69 54.49

9.00 55.00
10.80 50.89

20.00 30.00
19.92 41.67


2.00 ...... The Superior Feed Co., Mem-
1.64 7.151 phis, Tenn,

2.0Q ...... The Quaker Oats o., Chi-
3.23 7.631 cago, 111.

1.25 ...... E. Patteson & Co, Memn
1.18 12.561 phis, Tenn.

1.25 .....G. E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
1.18 12.561 phis, Tenn.

2.50 .....Howell Grain & Feed' Co.,
1.63 8.56 Union City, Tenna

2.30...... Howell Grain & Feed Co.,
1.85 6.88 Union City, Tenan "

3.20 9.00 Purina Mills, Bt Loula,
1.71 7 34 Mo.

2.00 ...... National Milling Co., Mar
2.42 4.89 con, Ga.

2.00 .... National Milling Co., Ma-
2.30 5.95 con, Ga. --

2.00...... National Milling Co., Mar
1.54 7.13 con, Ga.

4.00 ...... Tennessee Fibre Co., Mem-
4.02 4.77 phis, Ten".


I .I I








-OFF IAL FBMDING, STU w. ANALYSIS, 1919.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


O. P. Oil Meal ..............

Vaca Dairy Feed.............

Douglas Corn Gluten Feed.....

Cotton Seed Meal.............

Rye Middlings ..............

Digest-All Horse & Mule Feed.

Peter's Bargen Horse Feed....

Valdo Horse & Mule Feed......


.0S "S ..
CD'1
toa *~
1Z.~ r-


2971 Guaranteed
Found .......

2972 Guaranteed
Found ...

2973 Guaranteed
iFound ....

2974 Guaranteed
Found ....
2975 Guaranteed
Found ....

2976 Guaranteed
Found ....
2977 Guaranteed
Found ....

2978 Guaranteed
Found ....


a~ .aiV
5Ja

lea|


9.54
12 ..1

29.0(
29.9

8.0
6.8

12.3

8.0
5.5

20.0
12.2

15.0
10.4

15.0
15.3


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.


01 32.00
2 34.88

0 14.50
2 14.39

0 23.00
7 23.92

S36.05
0 35.98

0 14.00
7 16.32

0 9.00
!9 11.45

0 10.00
71 12.15

10 10.00
22 11.06


..... 5.00 ..... J. J. Badenoch Co., Chicago,
30.11 6.6 5.5 Ill.

42.00 2.50 ..... Memphis Cotton Hull '& T1-
37.85 2.52 3.90 bre Co., Memphis, Tenn.

52.00 1.00 ...... Douglas Company, Cedar
50.89 2.62 4.15 Rapids, Iowa,

.......... ... The Southern Cotton O1'
31.56 5.82 5.22 Co., PenSacola, Fla.

60.00 3.00 ...... National Feed 'C6o., St.
53.65 6.92 4.27 Louis,.Mo.

50.00 1.50 ..... John Wade & Sons, Mem-
49.71 2.37 8.67 phis, Tenn.

59.00 2.00 ...... M. C. Peters Mill Co.,
57.17 2.40 6.71 Omaham Neb.

50.00 1.00 .. South Georgia Milling Co,
47.09 2.31 7.301 .Valdosta, Ga.


_......_. ..,








Bay Mule Molaes Feed......



Beto Stock Feed.............


Butterfat Dairy Feed........


Wheat Middling with Screen'ge


Magnolia Stock Feed..........


2979 Guaranteed
Found ....


2980 Guaranteed
Found ...

2981 Guaranteed
Found ....

2982 Guaranteed
Found ....

2983 Guaranteed
Found ....


14.00
15.94


15.00
13.03

15.00
18.50

6.50
6.07

12.00
11.40


8.;50
8.06


9.00
8.161

26.00
26.06

17.00
19.31

14.00
16.46


49.00
50,91


54,00
53.29

45.00
35.37

55.00
55.92

55.00
51.701


1.50
'2.32


2.00
.98

5.00
3.86

4.00
1.65

3.00
3.80


...... JMam-Morgan Co., New Or
8.16 leans, La.


...... Dyersburg kMilling Co.,
8.071 Dyersburg, Tenn

,..... Monarch Mills, Chatta-
5.85 nooga, Tenn.

.... Geo.. P. Plant Milling Co.,
5.95 St. Louis, Mo

..... J. T. Gibbons, New Orleans,
6.421 La.


0t
a1


-1


,









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FOOD AND DRUG SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1919. A. M. HENRY, Aast Chemist..
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 12, Act Approved June 5, 1911.'
BEVERAGES.


01
No. LABEL CONTENTS 5 8 BY WHOM SENT




1973 Lion Beverage, 11.5--fl. oz., non-intoxicating, The .......... 53. 0. ..... H. Harnell, Milton.
Windisch Mulhauser Brewing Co., Cincinnati,
Ohio.
1974 Exelso, 12 fl. oz, no alcohol, Hamm Exelso Co., St. ............ 1.36 ..... J. H Harnell, Milton.
Paul, Minn.
1975 Dry Regal Cereal Beverage, 12 fl. oz., non-intoxi-I ............ 0.13..... J. H. Harnell, Milton.
eatingg, American Beverage Co., New Orleans, La.
1976 Dry Regal Cereal Beverage, 12 fl. oz., non-intox- ............0.13 .... J. H. Harnell, Milton.
S.. eating, American Beverage Co., New Orleans, La.
1977 Schlitz Famo, 12 fl. oz., non-intoxicating, Schlitz, ............ 0.24..... H. Harnell, Milton.
Milwaukee









SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1919-(Continued.)
BEVERAGES-(Continued.)
_ r"


LABEL


Fer' Amrsa 10f.a. io-loolc eta


Fehr's Ambrosia, 10 ft. oz., non-alcoholic, Central ............
Consumers Co., Louisfille, Ky.
Bevo. ............
Lion Beverage. ............
Cider No. 1. ............
Cider No. 2. ...........
Royal Lemon Extract, 1 f. oz., alcohol 82%, Da- ........
vis & Lawrence Co.i New York.
Ieileman's New Style Lager. |............
Beverage, State vs; Brown et al. 1............


CONTENTS


BY WHOM SENT


J. H. Harnell, Milton.

J. H. Harnell, Milton.
J. H. Harnell, Milton.

J. H. Harnell, Milton.
J. H. Harnell, Milton.'
. H. Harnell, Milton.

J. H. Harnell, Milton.

W. T; Jones, 1Ft Pierce.


-


i""'l
""'I
""'~

.....

I
''.''/








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
OIL SECTION.
. E. ROBE, State Chemist. E. T. CASBER, Asst. Chemist.
Gasolines Analyzed Before Enforcement of the Law, 1919.
Samples Taken by State Inspectors Under Act Approved June 4th, 1919.
Defiolencles Below Standard Are Distinguished by Black Pace Type.


o A0 0g
NAMEOF - M 0 NAME OF MANUFACTURER
PRODUCT Q AND PLACE TAKEN
bo 8 -0 P 5A
I~I aP..aaIc


Adopted ..
1 Gasoline.....

2 Gasoline.....
3 Gasoline......

4 Gasoline.....
5 Gasoline.....
6 Gasoline.....
7 Gasoline.....


56.7
66.6
56.6
56.7


45
57
49.5
59
60
50
52
58


The. Gulf Refining. Co., Tallahassee.
Standard Oil Co., Tallahassee.
The Texas Co., Tallahassee.
The Texas Oil Co., Tampa.
Standard Oil Co., Tampa.
Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.








8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23


Gasoline.....

Gasoline.....

Gasoline .....

Gasoline....

Gasoline ....

Gasoline....

Gasoline....

Gasoline ....

Gasoline ....

Gasoline ....

Gasoline.....

Gasoline.....

Gasoline ....

Gasoline ....


Gasoline ....
Gasoline....


57.4

56.9

56.7

67.6

56.6

57.7

57.5

57.6

56.7

55.8

57.9

57.4

57.4

57.3

57.9

55.9


33

21

21

31

27

46

46s

47

20

30

32

29

22

29

29.5

27


63.5

50

51.5

61

54

72

72

73

50

57

63

89.5

50

59.5

59.5

56.5


91 97

88 97.5

88.5 97

91 97

85 97

92 96

92.5 i 96.5

92.5 96.5

88 97

86 | 96

90.5 96

90 96.5

88.5 96

90 96

90 96

87 97


The Texas Co., Tampa.

Standard Oil Co., Tampa;
I-
Standard Oil Co., Tampa.

The Texas Co., Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Tallahassee.

Gulf Refining Co., Tallahassee.

Gulf Refining Co., Tallahassee.

Standard Oil Co., Jacksonville.

Gul-Refining Co., Ocala.

The Texas Co., Fernandina.

The Texas Co., Ocala.

Standard Oil Co., Callahan.

The Texas Co., Jacksonville.

The Texas Co., Palatka

Gulf Refining Co., Gainesville.


-i


I I









Gasolines Aanlyzed Before Enforcement of the Law, 1919.-Continued,


z


(DU 0
C- d
O 00
S B 4
P45
a FI o S -
S5 p Q.S 9 Q-S r


NAME OF P,. *
PRODUCT.



Gasoline;;., 56.8 55

Gasoline..... 56.7 -56

Gasoline.;... 56;7 57

Gasoline.... 57,2 .53

Gasoline..... 57.1 53

Gasoline.... 57.0 51-

Gasoline:.... 56.8 52

Gasoline:... 56.8 54

Gasoline..... 56.8 655

Gasoline..... 56.6 653

Gasoline..... 56.6 655


*90

88.5

87

87

89,

89

87

88

89

88

88


206

207

212

213

208

208

213

210

207

212

212


NAME OF MANUFACTURER
AND PLACE TAI"EN


Mixture Standard & Gulf, St. Augustine.

Standard Oil Co., Waldo.

Standard Oil Co., Yulee.

Standard Oil Co., Ocala.

Standard Oil Co., Fernandina.

Standard Oil Co., Hastings.

Standard Oil Co., Hampton.

Standard Oil Co., Gainesville.

Standard Oil Co., Lawtey.

Mixture, Standard & Texas, Jacksonville

Standard Oil Co., Lawtey.


27.5

21

27

.21.

,21.6

22.5

22

22

-21

.25.5

21


1 ~





I








35 Gasoline.....

36 Gasoline.....

37 Gasoline.....

38 Gasoline.....

39 Gasoline....

40 Gasoline.....

41 Gasoline.....

42 Gasoline....

43 Gasoline....

44 Gasoline.....

45 Gasoline.....

46 Gasoline.....

47 Gasoline.....

48 Gasoline.....

49 Gasoline.....

50 Gasoline.....


57.7

56.6

56.6

57.0

57.9

59.9

56.8

56.7

59.5

59.5

56.6

57.8

56.3

56.3

56.8

58.2


50

52

52

52

53

49

55

48

47

48

50

47

53

49

48

S48


59

54

66

50

62

67

50

55

71

77.5

60

74

50

57.5

62.5

60


90 96.5

89.5 97

91 97

88.5 96.5

91 96

90 95

88 96

90.5 96

92 96.5

95 97

90 i 96

92 96

87.5 96

87 96.-5

90 96.5

91 96


The Texas Co., Gainesville.

Standard Oil Co., St Augustiee.

Gulf Refining Co., St. Augustine.

Standard Oil Co., Starke.

The Texas Coi, Hastings.

Gulf Refining Co., Fernandina.

Standard Oil Co., Palatka.

Stanadrd Oil Co., Starke

Gulf Refining Co., Palatka.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Gulf Refining Co., Hastings.

Gulf Refining Co., Jacksonville.

Standard Oil Co., Tampa,

Gulf Refining Co., Tampa.

Gulf Refining Co., Port Tampa.

The Texas Co., Tampal


,


T




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