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 Cover
 State chemist's report, 1917
 Department of agriculture - Divisions...
 Department of agriculture - Divisions...
 Expenditures chemical division,...
 Index






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00047
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00047
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    State chemist's report, 1917
        Page 3
        Page 4
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    Department of agriculture - Divisions of chemistry
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    Department of agriculture - Divisions of chemistry
        Page 201
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    Expenditures chemical division, 1917
        Page 213
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    Index
        Page 225
        Page 226
Full Text




VOLUME 28 NUMBER 1

FLORIDA QUARTERLY

BULLETIN


January 1, 1918

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE


REPORT OF THE CHEMICAL DIVISION


R. E. ROSE
STATE CHEMIST


Analyses of Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs, Foods and Drugs.
Rules and Regulations.


Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.


These Bulletins Are Issued Free to Those Requesting Them.

T. J. Appleyard, Printer, Tallahassee, Fla.
41W~














STATE CHEMIST'S REPORT

1917



Tallahassee, Fla-, January 1, 1918.
To His Excellency,
Sidney J. Catts, Governor.
Tallahassee, Florida.
Sir:-I have the honor to submit the following report
of the Chemical Division of the Agricultural Department
of the State of Florida for the year ending December 31,
1917:
The report of the State Treasurer shows the sale of in-
spection stamps covering 214,087.92 tons of commercial
fertilizers and cotton seed meal-
Amounting to ........... ........... ..... $53,521.92
And 132,789.12 tons of Commercial Feeding
Stuffs-
Amounting to ............................. $33,197.28

A total revenue of ........ ............... $86,719.20
paid into the State Treasury to the credit of the General
Revenue Fund. From which is to be deducted the total
expenses of the Chemical Division, incident to the execu-
tion of the Fertilizer, Feed Stuff and Pure Food and
Drug Laws, including the expenses of the Immature
Citrus Fruit Law ($1,859.05), total expense of the chem-
ical division being $21,075.12, showing a balance of $65,-
644.08 paid into the General Revenue Fund of the State.
A summary of these expenditures will be found on the
succeeding page. A detailed financial report will be
found on the last pages of this report.


\ ^ !












FINANCIAL REPORT


Summary.

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF CHEMICAL
DIVISION, 1917.

Salary of the State Chemist ............... 3,000.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Fertilizers .... 1,800.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Food and Drugs 1,800.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Stock Feed ... 1,800.00
Salary three Food and Drug Inspectors ..... 4,500.00
Salary Clerk Chemical Division ............ 1,080.00
Salary Janitor ............................. 300.00
Traveling Expenses three Food and Drug In-
spectors ................... ..... ........ 2,569.81
Samples and incidentals, Pure Food Depart-
m ent .................................. 673.27
Chemicals, apparatus and incidentals, State
Laboratory ............................ 727.91
Traveling expenses State Chemist and Assist-
ants .................................. 833.86
Postage State Chemist ....................... 131.22
Salaries of Citrus Fruit Inspectors .......... 1,083.32
Traveling expenses Citrus Fruit Inspectors.... 775.73

Total expenses Chemical Division ....... .21,075.12
To credit General Revenue .................. 65,644,08

Gross Revenue ....................... .86,719.20

Appropriation, 1917, ...................... $23,630.00
Expenses Chemical Division ................ 21,075.12

Unexpended appropriation ............. .. 2,554.88











SUMMARY OF ANALYTICAL REPORT, 1917.

The following analyses were made during the year:
Official samples, fertilizers ...................... 28
Special samples fertilizer (sent in by citizens) .... 355
Official samples feed stuff ....................... 266
Special samples feed stuff (sent in by citizens) .. 31
Official food and drug samples ................... 148
Special food and drug samples (sent in by citizens) 64
Official samples citrus fruit ..................... 173
Special samples citrus fruit ..................... 159
W ater samples ................................ 17
Miscellaneous samples (sent in by citizens) ....... 110

Total number analyses .................... 1357

SPECIAL SAMPLES DRAWN BY PURCHASERS.

The Florida law is peculiar in this respect, permitting
citizens, purchasers of lawful feeds and fertilizers that
are duly registered, under oath with the Commissioner
of Agriculture as evidenced by the guarantee tag and
stamp upon each package, to draw samples of the same,
according to law, rules and regulations, to prevent the
submission of spurious samples, and obtain, without cost,
a certificate of analysis by the State Chemist. In case
of deficiency in the goods so purchased, the sample being
properly drawn, packed and transmitted, according to
law and regulations, the purchaser can, upon proof of
the fact, obtain a judgment for double the amount of the
price of the goods, while the dealer will be subject to the
penalties of the law. This provision of the law, how-
ever, does not apply to illegitimate goods sold by un-
registered, unlawful dealers or their agents; consumers
who purchase such unlawful goods having no recourse
under the law, for damages.











FERTILIZERS SUMMARY.

FRANK T. WILSON, B. s., ANALYST.

Official samples fertilizers ...... ................ 28
Special samples fertilizers ....................... 355

Total analyses Fertilizer Department ......... 383

The nine samples of complete fertilizer drawn by the
State Chemist and Inspectors had the following average
composition and guarantee:
Available
Ammonia. Phos. Acid. Potash
Official analysis ........3.52% 5.93% 2.10%
Guarantee .............3.19% 5.89% 2.28%
Excess above guarantee .0.33% 0.04% .....
Deficiency below guarantee ..... ..... 0.18%

Average State value found, per ton ............. $47.05
Average State value guaranteed, per ton ........ 45.95

EXCESS 0.20% ABOVE GUARANTEE.

We find complete fertilizers exceeding the guarantee
0.20% (twenty points), as follows:
In ammonia .....................6 samples, or 66.7%
In available phosphoric acid ........4 samples, or 44.5%
In potash (K20) ................... 3 samples, or 33.4%

DEFICIENCY 0.20% BELOW GUARANTEE.

We find complete fertilizers below guarantee 0.20%
(twenty points), as follows:
In ammonia ..................... 0 samples, or ... .%
In available phosphoric acid ...........4 samples, or 44.5%
In potash (KO) .................. 5 samples, or 55.6%












SUMMARY COMMERCIAL STOCK FEED.
E. PECK GREENE, B. S., ANALYST.

The following analyses have been made during the
year:
Official samples feed stuff ...................... 266
Special samples feed stuff ....................... 31

Total analyses Feed Department ............. 297

The average composition of the official samples was as
follows:
Starch and
Protein. Sugar. Fats.
Official analysis ........... 14.66 52.67 3.08
Guaranteed analysis ....... 13.00 55.20 2.97

Average excess ........ 1.66 0.17 0.11

We find the official samples of feed stuffs exceeded the
guarantee 0.20% (twenty points), as follows:
In protein ....................... 146 samples, or 54.88%
In starch and sugar ............ 86 samples, or 32.33%
In fats ......................... 71 samples, or 26.69%
There was a deficiency of 0.20% (twenty points), as
follows:
In protein ..................... 20 samples, or 7.49%
In starch and sugar ............. 92 samples, or 34.57%
In fats ....................... 60 samples, or 22.55%










8

FOOD AND DRUGS SUMMARY.
A. M. HENRY, B. s., ANALYST.

Official food and drug samples ............. 148
Special food and drug samples ............. 64
Water samples ........................... 17

Total food and drug samples ............. 229
Official citrus fruit samples ............... 173
Special citrus fruit samples ................ 159

Total citrus fruit samples ............... 332

Grand total -food and drug samples ........ 561

CITRUS FRUIT SUMMARY.

Analyst- Mature. Immature. Total
Heck, George .................. 91 45 136
Lewis, J. T. ................... 17 58 75
Robson, Reid ................... 9 5 14
Spear, G. T. ................... 70 37 107

Total ...................... 187 145 332
Per cent ... ................56.33 43.67 100










9

SUMMARY OF ILLEGAL, ADULTERATED, MISBRANDED,
LIGHTWEIGHT FERTILIZERS, COTTON SEED MEALS,
FEEDING STUFFS, FOODS, CITRUS FRUIT
AND DRUGS REPORTED.


ARTICLE 1



Fertilizers .................. ....... 14 404 80,800

Cotton Seed Meals ................. 14 1,052 105,200

Feeding Stuffs ..................... 43 3,247 324,700

Foods ............................... 50 3,625 70,578

Flours ............................. 11 1,978 21,762

Citrus Fruits ....................... 7 1,685 100,000

Drugs .............................. 3 202 160


Total ........................... 142 12,193 703,200







LIST OF CASES CERTIFIED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE FOR VIOLATION OF THE
FLORIDA AND NATIONAL FOOD AND DRUGS ACTS.

No. Reported. Name and Address of Material Violation.
Manufacturer

21451 Dec. 19, 1917 Sulzberger & Sons Co., Chicago,] Canned roast Adulterated. Consists in whole or in part
Illinois. beef I of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
mal or vegetable substances.

2095 July 18, 1917 IBridalveil Canning Co., RondalCanned apples Adulterated. Consists in whole or in part
& North Wilkesboro, N. C. of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
mal or vegetable substances.

2088 June 21, 1917. Galo Beaumont, Calahorra. Canned peas Adulterated. Consists in whole or in part
SSpain. of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
mal or vegetable substances.

2089 June 28, 1917. Schall Packing Co., Baltimore Canned Adulterated. Consists in whole or in part
Maryland. pineapple. of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
mal or vegetable substances,

2093 July 1S, 1917. Schall Packing Co., Baltimore, ICanned jAdulterated. Consists in whole or in part
Maryland. pineapple. of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
mal or vegetable substances,
2094 July 1S, 1917. Schall Packing Co.,
Baltimore, Md. Canned Adulterated. Consists in whole or in part
pineapple. of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
mal or vegetable substances.








20961 July .S, 1917. jServ-us Pure Food Co., New | Canned Adulterated. Consists in whole or in part
York and Chicago. pineapple. of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
[ j mal or vegetable substances.
I
2103 Sept. 1, 1917. Jones Bros. & Co., Atlanta, Ga. Raspberry lAdulterated. Consists in whole or in part
preserves. of filthy, putrid and decomposed ani-
mal or vegetable substances.
I I
2068 April 21. 1917. George Dalidet & Co., Bordeaux Canned peas. Adulterated. Added poisonous, deleter-
France. ious substance.
I
20691 April S3, 1917. Wespelear, Belgium. I Canned peas. Adulterated. Added poisonous, deleter-
ious substance.

2083 May 19, 1917. Wespelear, Belgium. I Canned peas. Adulterated. Added poisonous, deleter-
SIl ious substance.

2084 May 19, 1917. Wespelear, Belgium. I Canned peas. |Adulterated. Added poisonous, deleter-
ious substance.

20881 June 21, 1917. Galo Beaumont, Calahorra, I Canned peas. Adulterated. Added poisonous, deleter-
Spain. ious substance.

21061 Sept. 3, 1917. Fort Stanwix Canning Co., I Canned beets. Misbranded. No statement of net con-
Rome, N. Y. tents.

21471 Dec. 18, 1917. Miller Bros. & Co., Baltimore, J Canned IMisbranded. No statement of net con-
II Maryland. I blackberries.! tents.








LIST OF CASES CERTIFIED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE FOR VIOLATION OF THE
FLORIDA AND NATIONAL FOOD AND DRUGS ACTS.-(Continued.)


Reported.


April 21, 1917.


Feb. 21, 1917.


No.


20681


20391



20881


21071


21031


2041f


20421
1


1917.


1917.


1917.


1917.


1917.


" I


Violation.


SI
Name and Address of Material
S Manufacturer i

George Dalidet & Co., Bordeaux, Canned peas.
France.

Glasner & Barzen Distilling &I Whiskey.
IImporting Co., Kansas City,1
Mo.

Gal Beaumont, Calahorra, Canned peas.
Spain.

Jones Bros. & Co., Atlanta, Ga. Blackberry
I jam.

Jones Bros. & Co., Atlanta, Ga.I Raspberry
preserves.

Uddo Bros. & Co., New Orleans, Edible oil.
La.

IBologno & Toormina, New Or-[ Edible oil.
I leans, La. I


No statement of net con-


No statement of net con-


Misbranded.
tents.

Misbranded.
tents.


Misbranded.
tents.

Misbranded.
tents.

Misbranded.
tents.

Misbranded.
tents.

Misbranded.
tents.


net con-


net con-


net con-


net con-


net con-


June 21,


Sept. 2,


Sept. 1,


Feb. 28,


Feb. 28,


--


statement


statement


statement


statement


statement








20531 Mar. 30, 1917.

|1
20371 Feb. 13, 1917.

20381 Feb. 13, 1917.

20551 Mar. 30, 1917.

I
20561 April 3, 1917.


20571 April 5, 1917.


20721 April 9, 1917.


2087 June 14, 1917.


20741 May 14, 1917.


2098. Aug. 8, 1917.

21441 Dec. 1, 1917.


A. J. Lewis, Walnut Point, Va.j Canned
tomatoes.
t'David Stott, Detroit, Mich. Flour.

David Stott, Detroit, Mich. Flour.

Queen City Milling Co., Lexing-] Flour.
ton, Ky.

IQueen City Milling Co., Lexing-I Flour.
ton, Ky.

Platte Valley Milling Co., Goth-I Flour.
enburg, Neb.

Portland Flouring Mills Co., Flour.
Oregon-Washington.

Portland Flouring Mills Co., Flour.
Oregon-Washington.

Shawnee Milling Co., Shawnee,j Flour.
Oklahoma.

]Liberty Mills, Nashville, Tenn. I Flour.

Liberty Mills, Nashville, Tenn. I Flour.
I . I


Misbranded.


Misbranded.

SMisbranded.
[Misbranded.


Misbranded.


SMisbranded.
I









Misbranded.

Misbranded.


Misbranded.


Misbranded.

Misbranded.
-Misbranded.


Short weight.


Short weight.

Short weight.

Short weight.


Short weight.


Short weight.


Short weight.


Short weight.


Short weight.


Short weight.

Short weight.


^








LIST OF CASES CERTIFIED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE FOR VIOLATION OF THE
FLORIDA AND NATIONAL FOOD AND DRUGS ACTS.-(Continued.)

No. Reported Name and Address of Material Violation.
Manufacturer

20711 April 27, 1917. Griffin & Skelly Co., San Fran-1 Dried I Misbranded. Short weight.
cisco, Cal. apricots.

2073j May 11, 1917. IP. J. Guarino. New Orleans, La.I Spaghetti. Misbranded. Short weight.









15

MISBRANDED LIGHTWEIGHT FLOUR.

There were reported 11 attachments of misbranded,
lightweight flour, totaling 1,978 packages-6-, 12- and 24-
pound-amounting to 21,762 pounds. The result of the
examination of these cases was reported to the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture, the evidence only being furnished
by the State Chemist; all prosecutions under the Food
and Drug, Fertilizer and Feed Stuff laws, being made
under the authority and direction of the Commissioner
of Agriculture, the Attorney General, the State's attor-
neys and county solicitors.
It is unnecessary to say that this practice of selling
misbranded, lightweight foods is not only illegal, being
contrary to both the National and State laws, but is
particularly reprehensible when considered in connection
with the high price of all foods, and bears heavily on
those who, from necessity, purchase in small packages.
[t will be noted that small packages of flour-6-, 12- and
24-pound-are those generally found shortweight.











MISBRANDED LIGHTWEIGHT FEED.

An unusual number of such infractions of the law are
reported, largely consisting of the failure to properly
register the goods, or to place the proper guarantee and
inspection stamp upon each package as required by law.
Dealers and consumers should decline to purchase goods
not properly registered, and duly guaranteed under oath;
such goods are not only illegal, but their sale subjects
the dealer to the penalties of the law, while the pur-
chaser, having no guarantee, cannot recover, in any ac-
tion for damages, for deficiency either in the quality or
quantity of the goods.
We find that in many cases these lightweight and de-
ficient feeds are sold direct to the consumer by agents of
unregistered dealers from other states, and not through
Florida merchants or dealers, hence it is difficult, if not
impossible, to collect for deficiencies in quantity or
quality. Both the State and National laws require a truth
ful statement of the net weight of all foods (for men
or animals) printed on the package. The failure to state
"conspicuously, legibly and correctly the net contents of
the package in terms of weight, measure or numerical
count" under the laws, both State and National, consti-
tutes a misdemeanor, and subjects the guilty party to
the penalties of the laws.












IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT.

The usual annual Comedy, or Farce, was enacted dur-
ing the inspection season of 1917; the "green fruiter" as
"Harlequin" the National and State Inspectors and
Chemists as "Pantaloon," the prosecuting attorneys,
grand juries and courts as "Clown," with ninety-five per
cent. or more of the citrus growers and the general pub-
lic, the consumers, as "audience," or victims, of the
nimble "green fruiter" or "Harlequin."
Forty-three per cent. of the official samples of citrus
fruit analyzed were found immature. Seven shipments
were attached; 1685 boxes, which were promptly replev-
ined, and immediately shipped; the fruit being notor-
iously immature, as shown not only by the chemical test,
the standard fixed by the National and State authori-
ties, but also by physical appearance, green and imma-
ture, not fully grown.

U. S. Food Inspection Decision No. 133, of. April 6,
1911, says:
Evidence is adduced showing that such oranges do
not change in sugar or acid content after removal
from the tree. Evidence further shows that the same
oranges remaining on the tree increase markedly in
sugar content and decrease in acid content. FuR-
THER, THERE IS EVIDENCE TO SHOW THAT THE CONSUMP-
TION OF SUCH IMMATURE ORANGES, ESPECIALLY BY
CHILDREN, IS APT TO BE ATTENDED BY SERIOUS DISTURB-
ANCES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
Chapter 6236, Laws of Florida, Acts of 1911, is as fol-
lows:


2-Chem.











IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT LAW.
(CHAPTER 6236-No. 117). '

AN ACT to Prohibit Certain Dispositions of Citrus Fruits
Which Are Immature or Otherwise Unfit For Con-
sumption, and the Misbranding of Citrus Fruits.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the.State of Florida:

Section 1. That it shall be unlawful for anyone to sell,
offer for sale, ship or deliver for shipment, any citrus
fruits which are immature or otherwise unfit for con-
sumption, and for any one to receive any such fruits
under a contract of sale, or for the purpose of sale, or of
offering for sale, o- for shipment, or delivery for ship-
ment. This section shall not apply to sales or contracts
for sale of citrus fruit on the trees under this section;
nor shall it apply to common carriers or their agents
who are not interested in such fruits and who are merely
receiving the same for transportation,
Sec. 2. It shall be unlawful for any one to misbrand
any package or any wrapper containing citrus fruits;
and all citrus fruits shall be deemed misbranded if the
package or the wrapper shall bear any statement, design
or device regarding the fruit therein contained which is
false or misleading either as to the name, size, quality
or brand of such fruit or as to the locality in which it
was grown.
Sec. 3. Whoever shall violate any of the provisions of
this Act shall be punished by a fine not exceeding One
Thousand Dollars or by imprisonment for not more than
six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment, and
the fruit, whether immature or otherwise unfit for con-
sumption, or misbranded, shall be subject to seizure and
disposition as in the case of adulterated or misbranded
foods and drugs.
This law has been held constitutional by both the
Florida Supreme Court and the United States Supreme
Court in the case of Sligh vs. Kirkwood, Sheriff of Or-
ange County, Florida.
It has never been invoked, though numerous cases of
its violation have occurred.












Section 7 of the Florida Food and Drugs Law, Chap-
ter 6541, 1913, is as follows:
Sec. 7. If upon trial of any person convicted under
this Act, it shall appear that any article of food, drug
or liquor sold, kept or offered for sale, by the person
convicted is adulterated or misbranded, OR IS OF A POIS-
ONOUS OR DELETERIOUS CHARACTER WITHIN THE MEANING
OF THIS ACT, THF SAME SHALL BE SEIZED AND DESTROYED,
OR IF NOT OF A POISONOUS OR DELETERIOUS CHARACTER MAY
BE SOLD, OR OTHERWISE DISPOSED OF, BY ORDER OF THE COURT
IN SUCH MANNER AS THE COURT MAY IN ORDER DIRECT,
WHICH ORDER SHALL GUARD AGAINST ANY FURTHER VIOLA-
TIONS OF THIS ACT BY SUCH SALE OR OTHER DISPOSITION.
The proceeds from any sale so ordered, less expenses,
shall be converted into the General Fund of the State
Treasury.
This Section of the law has never been invoked, as
there has never been, to the knowledge of the writer, a
case under the Florida Food and Drugs Law adjudicated
by the courts, though the annual reports of this office
show a large number of infractions thereof.
Conceding that U. S. F. I. D. No. 133 be correct, and
that "THE CONSUMPTION OF SUCH IMMATURE ORANGES, ES-
PECIALLY BY CHILDREN, IS APT TO BE ATTENDED BY SERIOUS
DISTURBANCES OF THE DIGESTIVE SYSTEM," the sale or ship-
ment for sale of such fruit is not only illegal, but wilfully
criminal, hence the replevin and shipment of such dele-
terious foods should be resisted by the proper officers.
This opinion is sustained by the Attorney General of
Florida, as reported to yourself and predecessors, as fol-
lows:












REPLEVIN OF ADULTERATED, MISBRANDED
FOODS.
(REPORTS OF 1913-14-15 AND 16.)

The unresisted replevin of illegal, adulterated, mis-
branded, lightweight or deleterious food stuffs, attached
by inspectors and placed in the custody of the sheriff of
the county, has made the attempt to enforce the law
farcial.
I would respectfully again call your attention to this
evident miscarriage of justice and the necessity *of hav-
ing the proper officer resist the replevin of such goods
found to be illegal.
In this connection, I am pleased to say, the position
of this division -of the Agricultural Department is sus-
tained by the Attorney General, who, in an opinion dated
November 18, 1913, says:
"In view of this rule and the great public import-
ance of the question, I would suggest that the pro-
per course for your 'department (the Agricultural
Department) to pursue would be to assume the stat-
ute valid until declared invalid by the highest court
of the State."
In view of the fact that goods attached by Inspectors,
under Setcion 8 of Chapter 6541- the Pure Food and
Drugs Law and after analysis by the State Chemist,
showing them to be illegal, have been replevined, with-
out resistance, and sold or shipped for consumption, I
again respectfully call your attention to this very im-
portant matter, on which depends the proper enforce-
ment of the Pure Food Law of the State and the pro-
tection of our citizens from adulterated, misbrand'ed,
immature, unwholesome or deleterious foods and drugs.








CITRUS FRUIT ATTACHMENTS.

No Attachd Name and Address inspector No. of
o. Attached Reported of Shipper or Packer Inspector B'oxes

2110 Sept. 28, 1917 Oct. 2, 1917 Dr. P. Philips, Orlando J. T. Lewis 140

2111 Oct. 3, 1917 Oct. 6, 1917 Dr. P. Philips, Orlando J. T. Lewis 300

2114 Oct. 12, 1917 Oct. 26, 1917 Grover Hupple, Ocoee J. T. Lewis 350

2116 Oct. 17, 1917 Oct. 26, 1917 Dr. P. Philips, Orlando J. T. Lewis 70

2117 Oct. 18, 1917 Oct. 26, 1917 Pilgrim Packing Co., Maitland J. T. Lewis 350

2120 Oct. 28, 1917 Oct. 31, 1917 Dr. P. Philips, Orlando J. T. Lewis 250

2128 Nov. 2, 1917 Nov. 5, 1917 H. C. Schrader & Co., Orlando J. T. Lewis 225


Total.......... 1,685












COOPERATION WITH NATIONAL FOOD AND
DRUG AUTHORITIES.

Section Two of the Florida Food and Drugs Law pro
vides that in cases of violation of interstate laws the
"Commissioner of Agriculture shall certify the case to
the United States District Attorney in whose district
the violation of the law may have been committed."

Section Fifteen provides "that the Commissioner of
Agriculture, with the advise of the State Chemist, shall
establish such rules and regulations as shall not be in-
consistent with the provisions of this Act in conformity
with the rules and regulations formulated by the United
States Department of Agriculture, by authority of the
National Food and Drugs Act of June thirtieth, nineteen
and six, and amendments thereto."

The United States Department of Agriculture has es-
tablished the "Office of State Cooperative Food and Drug
Control" for the purpose of cooperating with the states
in cases of violation of interstate laws, and will take
charge of all cases of violation of interstate laws on re-
ceipt of the evidence transmitted by the State authori-
ties, and will refer the same to the "U. S. District At-
torney in whose district the violation of the law may
have occurred" for prosecution. It is evident that the
Florida law (Section Two) contemplates such reference,
and cooperation, as cases of violation of interstate laws
originate at the point of manufacture or shipment from
other states, and are not within the jurisdiction of the
U. S. District Attorneys of Florida. The officers, "Chem-
ist in Charge," of the "Office of State Cooperative Food
and Drug Control," and "United States Local Inspec-
tors," have shown an active interest in this essential co-
operation, and have visited this State on numerous oc-
casions for consultation with the "State authorities."

As a very large proportion, 75% or more, of the man-
ufactured foods and drugs sold in Florida are of inter-
state origin, an active cooperation with the National
authorities is essential in order to more effectively pro-
tect the citizens of Florida from iisbranded, lightweight.
or adulterated foods, drugs and feeds.












"INVOICES, WITHIN BILL OF LADING ATTACHED."

Instances have occurred wherein Florida citizens have
paid "drafts with bill of lading attached," and on exam-
ination have found the shipment not only short weight,
but also not of quality as guaranteed, being deficient in
quality, as well as quantity. Such goods, under the law,
have been attached in the possession of the purchaser,
sold by the sheriff and the proceeds paid into the State
Treasury. The purchaser, having in good faith paid the
shipper's draft, has been further penalized by having the
goods (for which he has paid) attached and sold as light-
weight, misbranded or adulterated, and has been forced
to seek redress by suit instituted in the State where the
shipment originated, at his own cost.

A more cordial and efficient cooperation with the Na-
tional authorities as provided by law, by reference to the
"U. S. District Attorney in whose district the violation
of the law may have been committed," through the "office
of State Cooperative Food and Drug Control," of the
U. S. Department of AgricUlture, would result in the
protection of the citizens of the State, (who are paying
a large sum-more than $75,000 per annum for such pro-
tection), from this imposition.

The efficiency of the National authorities in convicting
criminal violators of the law being proverbial.

LEGISLATION SUGGESTED.

I would respectfully call your attention to the neces-
sity of a State law for the protection of our citizens,
similar to that of other states, providing that the pro-
ceeds of a "draft with bill of lading attached" should be
held by the bank or other collector for a reasonable time
in order that the consignee have an opportunity to ex-
amine the shipment to discover if the same be as repre-
sented either in quantity or quality.












FALSE ADVERTISING.

A law to prevent extravagant and false advertising,
similar to that provided by other states, would go far
towards preventing the sale of many so-called specifics
for hog cholera and diseases of animals and men; "won-
derful" substitutes for fertilizer, extravagant and un-
truthful statements as to seeds and fruits, generally of
little or no value, sold at enormous profits generally to
the farmer.
Florida has an excellent "Blue Sky Law" to protect
her citizens from "wild cat" speculation in stocks and
bonds, and should have a similar law to protect her far-
mers and others from worthless fertilizers, seeds, plants
and so-called specifics for most diseases to which man or
animal is subject.
While the "label" may be truthful or evasive, and cun-
ningly devised to avoid the Food and Drugs Law, the
advertisements are extravagantly untruthful. This abuse
has been corrected in many states. These swindlers find
Florida a fruitful field for their swindles.

COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS-FERTILIZER
MATERIALS.

Much has been said and published recently in reference
to the high price of fertilizers. This is true as applied
to mixed fertilizers, but excepting German Potash Salts,
there has been much exaggeration as to the advance in
cost of fertilizers materials.












NITROGEN-AMMONIA.

Thanks to the decision of the National Food Adminis-
trator to import Chilean nitrates to be sold to farmers at
cost, the price of Nitrate of Soda, which is universally
conceded by all experiment stations and scientific agri-
culturalists as the basic-unit, or prime factor, in calcu-
lating or determining the agricultural, or the commer-
cial, value of all nitrates ammoniatess, organic or salts),
will be materially reduced. The present excessive prices
of organic ammoniates, tankage, blood, fish scrap, castor
pomace, etc., will necessarily be lowered to meet the
value, or cost, to the farmer when the supply of Chilean
nitrates, at cost, becomes available.
Ammoniates, salts and organic, are quoted at an av-
erage of $7.00 per unit of 20 lbs. (salts $6.50, organic
$7.50), or an average of 35c per pound for the actual
nitrogen, calculated as ammonia. The quotations for
1916 were $4.50 per unit, or 233/4c a pound of nitrogen as
ammonia (NH,), an increase of $2.75 per unit, or 60%.

SUPERPHOSPHATES-ACID PHOSPHATE.

The present quotation for 16% available acid phos-
phate in ton lots for cash f. o. b. Florida factories, is
$20.40 per ton. The same material sold in 1916 for
$15.33 per ton, an increase of practically 33 1-3%.












POTASH.

Quotations for potash are simply "nominal," there be-
ing no regular source of supply; prices are not stable.
German Salts are not to be had, while American potashes
have increased in value (there were practically no Amer-
ican potashes before the war), their composition is var-
iable and by no means uniform. There is every reason
to believe that economical sources of American potash
will be developed from saline lakes, Pacific kelp and
from the flue dust of cement kilns-a considerable
tonnage of such has been secured during 1917; so far,
its quality has by no means been uniform, hence numer-
ous complaints of deficiencies of potash in mixed ferti-
lizers have occurred.
Many manufacturers, assuming the percentage of
potash represented to be in these salts to be correct, (and
also in organic potash goods, tobacco dust or stems, goat
manure, etc.), have found their mixed goods deficient,
though their charges for potash in mixed goods approx-
imate $10.00 per unit, or 50 cents per pound for actual
water soluble potash (K20).
WOOD ASHES.

Enormous quantities of so-called Hardwood Ashes have
been purchased from dealers and others not dealers, at an
average of $22.00 per ton, guaranteed! to contain 3%
Potash, or $7.33 per unit, 361/2C per pound, of Potash
(K20).
Probably no greater obsession pervails among farmers,
and particularly cotton and orange growers, than the
necessity of a greater supply of potash than normally
contained in soil. Enormous sums have been paid for so-
called unleached hardwood ashes, often to agents of
"wild cat" concerns from other states unregistered, ille-
gitimate goods, without legal guarantee, sold for cash on
arrival "invoice, bill of lading attached."
I quote from a recent Press Bulletin from this office
as follows:











HARDWOOD AND PALMETTO ASHES.
The present scarcity, and high price, of German potash
salts and the universal demand for potash by the farmer,
particularly in the cotton belt, and in Florida, has led
to universal activity in the search for a supply of potash
to meet this demand.
The United States Geological Survey, and numerous
individuals, have spent much time and labor in the
search, with some hopes of success.
Potassium is one of the most universally distributed
elements, found in all soils in greater or lesser amounts,
particularly in rocks of Feldspathic origin, in granites
and numerous other minerals, and in clays, resulting
from their decomposition. Sandy soils are notably de-
ficient in potash, while clays are generally well supplied
with potash-mostly, however, insoluble and unavailable.
By proper culture, the growth of legumes and applica-
tion of lime, this insoluble potash is rendered available
to plants.
HARDWOOD ASHES.
All hardwood ashes, burned under laboratory condi-
tions, show a large potash content. Such analyses, how-
ever, are by no means a proper criterion by which to
estimate the potash content of commercial ashes.
Many analyses of Canada and other hardwood ashes
have been made by the State laboratory, samples of com-
mercial ashes from the furnaces of wood burning plants,
and from the waste ash heaps of immense quantities of
ashes formerly burned to make "pearl ash", in the Can-
adian forests. A material now seldom used, as "Caustic
Soda," so-called "caustic potash" or "concentrated lye"
or "Ball potash," which contains no potash whatever, on
account of the low cost of its manufacture from salt
(sodium chloride), caustic soda has replaced "pearl ash"
(Potash) in the manufacture of soaps, formerly made
exclusively from potash, derived from wood ashes. It
is hardly necessary to say that the Canadian ash heaps
alluded to have been leached and their potash removed,
and that by far the greater part of the "Canada hard-
wood ashes" have little potash in them. Their potash
content is from 0.50% to 4.0%, averaging about 1.50%.
Numerous analyses of Wood ashes show as follows-
commercial samples:












WOOD ASHES.


Kind.


Potash


3437 Canadian H. W. Ashes.. 2.72
3474 Ashes ................ .1.47
3489 Cypress Ashes .......... 0.61
3494 Hardwood Ashes ......... 2.92
3496 Ashes ................. 0.43
3528 Cypress Ashes ............. 0.36
3567 Ashes ................... 0.90
3568 Ashes .................. 0.48
3592 Hardwood Ashes ....... 3.22
3612 Hardwood Ashes ....... 1.61
3613 Hardwood Ashes ....... 1.27
3690 Ashes No. 1 ............ 3.37
3691 Ashes .................. 3.29
3695 Hardwood Ashes ....... 0.86
3712 Ashes ................... 4.37
3720 Ashes .................. 3.42
3724 Ashes .................. 0.26
3737 Ashes .................. 1.81
3730 Ashes No. 2 ............ 0.96
3736 Ashes ................ *0.28

Average ............... 1.73
*Minimum per cent.
tMaximum per cent.


. Sand.
32.73
27.99
19.27
*3.75
78.15
18.20
28.26
f83.98
71.55
23.00
22.20
8.02
9.00
46.16
39.77
20.66
5.11
22.11
74.15
23.20

32.86


Carbonate
of Lime.
63.64
70.50
78.22
93.32
21.42
80.84
70.84
*15.54
25.23
75.39
76.53
88.61
87.71
34.78
55.86
76.00
194.63
76.08
25.00
76.52

64.33


PALMETTO ROOT ASHES.
Recently, on account evidently of the numerous articles
in the press on the subject, quoting the analysis of pal-
metto roots perfectly cleaned and free of sand, burned
under laboratory conditions, from small samples of excel-
lent roots, numerous letters of inquiry and samples of
palmetto ashes, have been received by the State Labo-
ratory, together with samples of various wood ashes,
evidently burned under ordinary conditions in heaps in
the field, in ordinary furnaces, stoves, etc., frequently
showing by the condition they had not been protected
from the weather.
Potash is one of the most soluble salts, more so than
common salt; any exposure to dampness, fog or rain, will
rapidly leach out all the potash, not only from the ashes,
but also from the roots.











PALMETTO ASHES.
Carbonate
No. Kind. Potash. Sand. of Lime.
3525 Saw Palmetto Ashes .... 0.49 96.39 3.12
3593 Palmetto Root Ashes ... 0.24 94.20 5.56
3616 Palmetto Ashes .......... 1.07
3705 Palmetto Ashes ......... 0.25 96.30 2.90
3721 Palmetto Ashes ......... 1.44 .....
3728 Palmetto Root Ashes ... 4.04 81.00 15.00
3729 Palmetto Ashes ......... 2.33 77.20 20.47
1111 Palmetto Ashes ......... 0.57 ....
1258 Palmetto Ashes ......... 5.73 ... .
2016 Palmetto Ashes ......... 2.35 ..... .....
2065 Palmetto Ashes ......... 3.35 ... .
2197 Palmetto Ashes ......... 0.51 ... .

Average .............. 1.86 89.20 9.41

You will note the average of 12 samples of Palmetto
Ashes show 1.86% potash (K20), 5 samples show 89.20%
sand. The highest potash was 5.73% No. 1258, the low-
est 0.24% No. 3593.

We have discussed this fully to correct the false
impression so generally prevalent that palmetto roots,
burned under ordinary conditions, were particularly val-
uable as a source of potash, which is by no means a fact.
We find that, as a rule, all ashes are greatly over-rated
as to their potash content. The average analysis of hun-
d'reds of commercial samples of ashes made by this and
other laboratories, show as follows: 1 to 5% of potash.
Twenty samples of wood ashes analyzed in recent years
average 1.73% potash, 32.86% sand and 64.33% carbon-
ate of lime.
Hardwood ashes have been largely used in Florida
with good results. In the opinion of the writer, their
greatest value was in the lime content. However, ashes
sell at from $15.00 to $20.00 per ton, while lime carbon-
ate can be purchased in car lots at $1.75 per ton and
sand can be had for the hauling.











LIVE STOCK-MANURE.
PRODUCTIVE SOIL--FERTILE FARMS.

It is well known to practical farmers, as well as sci-
entific agriculturalists, that where the dairy cow, the beef
animal, the hog and the sheep are much in evidence, that
the soils are fertile and the farms productive. It is not
generally known, however, that it was not the original
fertility of the soil that produced the cattle, hogs and
sheep, but that the growth of live stock produced the fer-
tile soil; that the manure pile and compost heap, aided
by phosphates and potash, were the basis of the fertility
of the soil, the productiveness of the farm, and the wealth
of the community. This is particularly true of France,
Belgium, Denmark and Sweden, where the soil, which
has supported for centuries a dense population, produces
far larger crops per acre than do the virgin soils of
America. There the compost heap, reinforced with Am-
erican phosphates, with cotton seed meal, and other Am-
erican concentrates fed the cattle, is recognized as the
basis of credit to the farmer; the producer of all wealth,
the foundation, base or "mud sill" on which the pros-
perity of nations is builded.

With the dairy cow, the beef animal, the hog and the
"golden hoofed" sheep, a naturally fertile and productive
soil, mild climate, abundant rainfall, well distributed
and continuous sunshine, aided by the spread of agri-
cultural knowledge through our schools and colleges,
together with the cooperative farm demonstration and
home economics, a system of practical agricultural ed-
ucation and manual training fostered by the Nation and
State through the Smith-Lever Bill, the Hatch and Mor-
rell Bills, together with the recent Farm Loan Act, in
which the farmer is recognized as the principal factor in
the Nation's prosperity and welfare, and the soil and its
products as the basis of all credit, the prospects for the
development of Florida's wonderful natural resources-
her mines, forests, groves, fields and pastures; her waters
with their immense undeveloped wealth, and particularly
her boys and girls, the future men and women of the
State-are indeed bright.











THE COMPOST HEAP.

With the rapid increase of live stock, cattle and hogs,
the fertilizer bill of Florida farmers should be very ma-
terially reduced, while their fields, pastures and mea-
dows should rapidly increase in fertility and productive-
ness by the intelligent use of the compost heap.

With her vast deposits of phosphates and of muck, or
peat, aided by the manure from live stock (to add nitri-
fying bacteria to the muck) vast amounts of valuable
composts (the Bank, or Basis of Credit of Belgian,
French and Dutch farmers) should be produced in Flor-
ida. Her mucks, found in such vast quantities through-
out the State containing 3% of nitrogen, which can be
readily made available by composting with acid phos-
phate and stable manure, should increase her produc-
tiveness enormously.

A cord of compost made of three parts of muck of good
quality, one part of good stable manure-practically a
ton-to which is added 200 lbs. of 16% acid phosphate,
will furnish sufficient fertility for an acre of ordinary
soil; the manure will add the necessary bacteria (yeast
or starter) while the acid phosphate will form a medium
for the growth of more bacteria, and the conversion of
the inert nitrogen to an available form.

The neglect of the compost or manure heap in Florida
has been an economic crime, andi has cost the growers of
the State millions of dollars for commercial fertilizers,
most of which could have been produced on the farm at
a comparatively small cost in labor and care.

Belgian, French, Dutch and German farmers have
made their fields fertile and productive by the economic
use of American concentrated cattle feeds, reinforced by
American phosphates, properly composted, thus main-
taining the fertility and productiveness of their farms.
"Worn out" soils are unknown in these countries, their
fields constantly increase in productiveness, owing to
the careful conservation of all manure and composting
it with available acid phosphate.











FISH SCRAP.

No state has a more extended sea coast with more
abundant possibilities for a profitable fishing industry
than Florida. Immense quantities of edible and inedible
fish are found on the Florida sea coasts, her inlets and
bays. As is well known, fish scrap is one of the most val-
uable sources of nitrogen and available phosphoric acid,
ranking second to none in the fertilizer market.

SPECIAL SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS
AND FEEDS.

Florida is the only State that permits the purchaser
of fertilizers and feeds to draw a fair sample of the goods
purchased under proper rules and regulations in the
presence of witnesses (to guard against the submission
of spurious samples) and to transmit the sample to the
Commissioner of Agriculture for analysis free of cost
by the State Chemist; and in case of deficiency, either
in quality or quantity of the material, to obtain damages
from the manufacturer or dealer selling the goods.
It will be noted that this feature of the Law is being
to much larger extent invoked by the consumer, who
has, during the past two years, sent in a very much
greater number of such samples, particularly of fer-
tilizer-according to Law, Rules and Regulations, prop-
erly drawn, packed, witnessed and transmitted as the
Law directs. This affords the consumer greater protec-
tion than has the official sample drawn by the Inspec-
tors, hence the great increase in the "special sample" as
shown by the attached reports, and the comparatively
small percentage of official samples of fertilizers.
That this feature of the Law is having a beneficial ef-
fect upon the quality of fertilizer sold, and is to a large
extent protecting the consumer, is shown by the follow-
ing extract from a recent letter from one of the County
Demonstration Agents from a county using a very large
quantity of commercial fertilizer:
"I have drawn probably 250 samples, fully 60%
which have shown up short under the Law, so far.
In the neighborhood of $18,000.00 was paid back
under different adjustments during the past year
by the fertilizer companies to the Farmers."












CANE CULTURE AND SUGAR MAKING.

A number of analyses of sugar cane will be found un
der the proper head. These analyses show (as has been
frequently shown in former reports) that Florida sugar
cane is equal in quality to that produced anywhere; and
that with proper culture as large tonnage per acre can
be produced as in Louisiana, Texas or Cuba. Your at
tention is called to the special report on the advisability
of establishing a modern sugar factory, to produce only
standard granulated sugar, on the State Farm, as made
to the Board of State Institutions, November 25, 1916.
Such a factory would not only be exceeding profitable,
but would be an object lesson, a practical demonstra-
tion, that the soil and climate of Florida are peculiarly
adapted to the culture of sugar cane and the manufac-
ture of sugar. By employing only modern apparatus,
using all the economical devices now employed by the
beet sugar factories of the West and the modern cane
sugar factories of Louisiana and Cuba, the yield of pure,
standard granulated sugar (direct from the cane without
the intermediate refining of raw sugar), can be doubled
in quantity and in value. The cost of manufacture can
be reduced one-third as compared to the present crude,
inefficient and wasteful methods employed in the man-
ufacture of crude syrup and raw sugar-methods that
are still generally employed in Mexico and the Philip-
pines-in which one-half of the sugar content of the
plant is wasted in the crude, inefficient mills, while a
large percentage is further lost or destroyed by the waste-
ful evaporating apparatus, while the resulting syrup or
raw sugar, not to exceed 50% of the available sugar in
the cane, is necessarily sold at one-half to two-thirds
the price of standard granulated sugar. The cost to man-
ufacture this raw material, per pound, is far greater than
the cost to manufacture standard granulated sugar in a
modern sugar factory. Cane that will produce one hun-
dred pounds of crude syrup or raw sugar, using the pres-
ent inferior apparatus, will yield two hundred pounds of
standard granulated sugar, using modern apparatus, at
less cost per pound to manufacture.


3-Chem.












Sugar cane is successfully and economically produced
in all parts of Florida; by far the largest acreage in the
northern counties, as shown by the report of the Com-
missioner of Agriculture. The crude apparatus used,
compared to a modern sugar factory, is comparable to
the spinning wheel and hand loom of our grandmothers'
to the modern cotton spinning and cloth factory; the ox
cart to the railroad train.
With sugar cane of the quality grown, and the tonnage
obtained in Florida, a modern factory, with all the eco-
nomical devices, triple mills (nine rolls and crusher),
bagasse burners, multiple evaporating apparatus, filters
and centrifugals, pure standard granulated sugar can be
produecd in Florida for not to exceed three cents per
pound. The present price is 8.25 cents a pound, with the
probability of not selling for less than 6 cents per pound
for years to come; the demand is far greater than the
supply, the market universal. The material is stable, not
subject to decay or deterioration, and can be, if neces-
sary, held for months. Pure sugar is as staple as cotton,
corn or wheat. Raw sugar and syrup are not staple; they
must be sold quickly to a refiner or a "smear house" at
the price fixed by the refiner.
A modern factory on the State Farm would not only
be a most profitable investment for the State, but a prac-
tical demonstration of the extreme profitableness of cane
culture and sugar manufacture in Florida.
It is unnecessary to say that the reclaimed lands of
the State, not only the Everglades, but the numerous
drainage districts organized under the General Drainage
Act, some fifteen or more, of from 30,000 to 350,000 acres,
respectively, are eminently fitted for sugar culture, hav-
ing wonderfully fertile and productive soil, abundant
rainfall and long-continued sunshine, the three principal
factors necessary for successful production of sugar.
No state in the Union, not excepting Louisiana or
Texas, nor the Western beet sugar states, has superior
conditions for the profitable production of sugar than
has Florida, while the peninsular portion of the State,
with its wonderfully fertile soils, particularly the well-
drained swamp lands, is the equal of Cuba for sugar pro-
duction, both as to soil and climate.












A modern factory should handle not less than 500 tons
of cane in 24 hours; a 1,000 or 2,000-ton factory would
be more economical.
A fair average yield of sugar cane per acre for the
State is twenty tons, often a yield of thirty tons is se-
cured. An average of thirty-five tons per acre on a field
of 360 acres of well drained muck land has been secured,
with a maximum of sixty-five tons on the best drained
portions of the field.
A safe estimate of yield per acre on properly culti-
vated, and intelligently fertilized land is twenty tons per
acre; while on well drained muck or swamp land an
average of thirty tons may be expected.
A sugar factory should operate 100 days in Florida.
A 500-ton factory will consume 20 acres of can per day,
averaging 25 tons per acre; and should therefore provide
2,000 acres of cane to the factory, of which one-third
should be produced by the owners of the factory, and
two-thirds by growers, under contract. Beet growers
in the West, and cane growers in Cuba contract to pro-
duce cane for the value of one-half the sugar content of
the beets or cane, delivered at the factory or railroad
loading station.
Molasses, formerly a waste product, is now a valuable
by-product, and will largely, if not entirely, pay the cost
of manufacturing the sugar.
The bagasse (or cane pulp) produced in a properly
equipped modern sugar factory will provide 50 to 75
per cent of the necessary fuel to run the factory.
Standard granulated sugar can be, and is, made direct
from the cane, at less cost to. manufacture, with a larger
output of refined goods than can be secured by the crude
process of making raw sugar or syrup-increasing the
value and quantity of the material 50 per cent, hence
increasing the profits of both producers and manufac-
turers, proportionately.
A 500-ton factory will cost new, approximately, $250,-
000 to $300,000 erected; larger factories will cost less
proportionately.
Rebuilt 200 to 500-ton factories, now being discarded
(scrapped) for larger and more economical factories in
Cuba and Louisiana can be obtained at considerably less
cost.









ANALYSES OF CANE JUICE SOUTH GEORGIA AND FLORIDA.


Mixed. average for season 357 acres (Sutton)..


16.61113.79


1.67182.721........ St. Cloud, 1890


N. Florida and S. Georgia, 37 samples (Stnbbs) ..... 115.041 1.78 81.681 Florida & Georgia, 1899
Red Ribbon and Bourbon, 13 samples (Stubbs) .... 117.121 1.08188.021Florida & Georgia, 1899
D 74 (Rose) ............................... 114.00 11.71 ..... ..... ...... Tallahassee, 1908
Ribbon Cane (Rose) ........................ 113.80 10.20 ..... ........... Tallahassee, 1908
D 74 (Rose) ............................ ... ..... 11.72 0.92 ..... ..... Tallahassee, 1908
Bourbon Cane (Rose) ......................... 114.40 13.00 0.40 90.15 ........Fellsmere, 1913
Ribbon Cane (Rose) .......................... 15.44 12.01 2.32 77.78 ........Fellsmere, 1913
Yellow Ribbon Cane (Rose) ................... 114.91114.06 0.15 94.30 ............Ritta, 1913
Green Cane (Rose) ........................... 115.09112.681 1.55 83.90 ........... Ritta, 1913
D 74 (Rose) ............................... 16.60 13.02 1.27 84.10 ........... Davie, 1914
Red Ribbon (Rose) ........................... 15.70 13.20 1.27 74.83 .......Cape Sable, 1914
1


Bourbon Cane, average 4 samples (Rose) ...... 14.~1112..U
Otahite Cane, average 3 samples (Rose) ....... 14.61 12.30
Crystalline Cane, average 3 samples (Rose) .... 13.71 10.11
D 74 (Rose) .................................. 115.95 13.18
Average, all samples, ......................... 115.06112.861


U. 9
1.09
1.92
0.79


81.68 S. Farm, Raiford,
84.17 S. Farm, Raiford.
73.19 S. Farm, Raiford,
82.63 ......Tallahassee,


1.21183.721


1916
1916
1916
1916











AVERAGE ALL SAMPLES.

.Scr ose in juice .................... .2.$6%
Glucose (invert sugar) ............... 1.21%

Available sucrose in juice ............11.65%
Available sugar in cane, 75% extraction........ 8.73
Pounds of sugar per ton of cane .............. 174.6
Value of sugar, per ton of cane at 6c .......... 10.48
One-half value of sugar, paid grower, per ton.... 5.24

Cost of cane to factory, per ton............... $ 5.24
Cost of manufacture of sugar at 50c per 100 lbs... .87

Cost of cane and manufacture to factory ........ 6.11
Gross profit per ton cane to factory............ 4.37
$10.48

AVERAGE 26 SAMPLES, BOURBON, RED RIBBON
AND "D-74."

Average available sucrose in juice .... 12.82%
Average available sucrose in cane ...... 9.52%
Average sugar in cane 75% extraction ........190 lbs.
Value of sugar, per ton of cane at 6c ............ $11.40
One-half value of sugar, paid grower, per ton .... 5.70

Cost to factory ................... ........... .. $ 5.70
Cost of manufacture at 50c per 100 lbs. ........ 95

Cost of cane and manufacture ................. $ 6.65
Gross profit to factory ...:..................... 4.75
$11.40











SEED CANE.

It requires four tons of good average cane to plant
an acre. One acre of good average cane will plant five
additional acres. The price of seed depends on the price
of syrup or sugar. Seed cane can be readily produced
at $2.00 per ton, cut and ready to haul.

VARIETIES.

The best varieties are the Bourbon, the Red Ribbon
and "D74."
CULTURE.

Cane is planted in furrows, six feet apart, planting
a continuous row of canes, well lapped; each eye or bud
produces a cane. The culture is very similar to the
culture of corn. One man and one pair of good mules
or horses will readily cultivate twenty acres of cane,
and a similar acreage in corn or other crop.

FERTILIZING.

Cane can be produced on any soil that is adapted to
corn. An intelligent application of fertilizer or manure
is economical and profitable. Fertilizer adapted to corn
is also adapted to cane, from 400 to 1000 pounds of
standard fertilizer containing eight per cent. Availa-
ble Phosphoric Acid, three per cent. Ammonia (2.47%
Nitrogen) and three per cent. Potash, is a good appli-
cation.
PLANTING.

Fall planting is to be preferred, from October 15 to
November 15. For spring planting the canes should be
"bedded"-cut, laid upon the ground like thatch each
butt end of the cane touching the ground, covered with
the leaves or fodder, and with from two to four inches
of soil.











INSECTS.

The cane borer is the only pest to be guarded against.
The remedy is clean culture, the grinding or planting of
all cane, the burning or burying (plowing in) of all
refuse cane, to destroy insects and larvae in the cane.
An old "patch" of cane allowed to "stand over" the
winter, as is frequently the case in South Florida, is
simply a nursery for borers.

All fields should be thoroughly cleaned up early in
the winter, all tops of cane burned, or buried, all stub-
ble cane should be "shaved" and the stubble ends plowed
under.

LITERATURE.

Bulletins of the U. S. Bureau of Chemistry, Nos.
70 and 75. The Bulletins of the Louisiana Sugar Ex-
periment Station. The Proceedings of the Louisiana
Sugar Planters' Association, and other technical papers,
published in the Louisiana Planter and Sugar Manu-
facturer.











ANALYTICAL FORCE.

The three analysts employed by the State Laboratory
are industrious, capable and necessarily work long hours
in the effort to promptly report upon all samples. This
report shows the number of analyses made by each: each
sample involving four to seven determinations.

I have reported the necessity of additional analysts
previously. The growers of the State are paying annual-
ly some $80,000 for protection, and are entitled to more
prompt service, which can only be given by a larger force
of competent analysts, it being physically impossible for
the present force to meet the demand's as promptly as the
consumer has a right to expect.
The same correspondent, referred to above, says:

"Many of my farmers are paying 8% interest while
waiting for these certificates of analysis, and are
also losing the opportunity to correct shortages in
plant foods in their fields."

The fertilizer laboratory is at present congested with
"special samples" from all parts of the State, which are
anaylzed and reported in the order of their receipt.

CONGESTION IN OFFICE ROOMS.

The small building occupied by the State Laboratory
and the Geological Survey is greatly congested. The
business of the State has greatly increased; and the de-
mands for public service have increased in proportion to
population and development.

Relief is imperatively demanded, and as stated before,
the people of the State are paying for this service a
much larger sum than is expended in their protection.








41

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.

I wish to extend to the analytical chemists of the State
Laboratory, Messrs. A. M. Henry, Frank T. Wilson and
E. Peck Greene, also to the Food, Feed and Fertilizer
Inspectors, Messrs. A. C. Harllee, John Mullady and J.
Frank Smith, as well as the Citrus Inspectors, Messrs.
J. T. Lewis, Reid Robson, G. T. Spear and George Heck,
the thanks and appreciation of the State Chemist for
their hearty cooperation, their constant labor and vigi-
lance in the effort to aid in the protection of the citi-
zens of the State, and the honest manufacturers and
dealers from dealers in "short weight," "adulterated,"
"misbranded" foods, feeds and fertilizers, quack reme-
dies and green fruit.
Respectfully submitted,
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.









OFFICIAL FLOUR SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


No. Reported Name and Address of Violation Seizure
Manufacturer a

I I 1 1 1
2056 April 3, 1917.. Queen City Milling Co., Lexing- Flour Misbranded. Short weight ......... 208 12-lb. sacks.
ton, Ky., .................. I
2057 April 5, 1917.. Platte Valley Milling Co., Goth- Flour Misbranded. Short weight .........688 12-lb. sacks.
enburg, Neb. ..............
20721April 9, 1917.. Portland Flouring Mills Co., Ore- Flour Misbranded. Short weight157 6-lb. & 28 12-lb. sacks.
gon-Washington ........... I
2087 June 14, 1917.. Portland Flouring Mills Co., Ore- Flour Misbranded. Short weight .......... 10 24-lb. sacks.
S gon-Was'hington ...........
2074 May 14, 1917.. Shawnee Milling Co., Shawnee, Flour Misbranded. Short weight .......... 10 12-lb. sacks.
Okla. ......................
2090 July 2, 1917... Vertrees & Co., Palatka, Fla. ... Flour Misbranded. Short weight ..........77 6-lb. sacks.
2098 August 8, 1917 Liberty Mills, Nashville, Tenn... Flour Misbranded. Short weight ......... 180 6-lb. sacks.
2144 Dec. 1, 1917... Liberty Mills, Nashville, Tenn... Flour Misbranded. Short weight ..........35 6-lb. sacks.
2037|Feb. 13, 1917.. David Stott, Detroit, Mich ...... Flour Misbranded. Short weight .........454 12-lb. sacks.
2038 Feb. 13, 1917.. David Stott, Detroit, Mich. .....Flour Misbranded. Short weight .........218 12-lb. sacks.
2055 March 30, 1917 Queen City Milling Co., Lexing- Flour Misbranded. Short weight ..........13 12-lb. sacks.
I I ton, K y. ................. ... 0__ ____
..al...76 pound


Total ..... 21,762 pounds








OFFICIAL FOOD SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


No. Reported


21451 Dec. 18, 19




2146 Dec. 18, 19




2095 -uly 18, 19


2088




2089


17


17



17


June 21, 1917



June 30, 1917


Name and Address of
Manufacturer


Material
I I


Sulzberger & Sons, Chicago, Ill. Canned
Roast
|beef.


S. M. Cohen, Jacksonville, Fla.]Canned
baked
beans.


Bridalveil Canning Co., Ronda Canned
& North Wilkesboro, N. C. apples.
1

Galo Beaumont, Calahorra, Canned
-Spain. /peas.



Schall Packing Co., Baltimore,]Canned
Md. pineapple.
j


Violation.


SSeizure
T


Adulterated. Consists in whole 39 12-oz.
or in part of filthy, putrid or[ cans.
decomposed animal or vege-
table substances.

Adulterated. Consists in whole 40 1-lb.
or in part of filthy, putrid ori cans.
decomposed animal or vege-1
table substances.

|Adulterated. Consists in whole None.
or in part of filthy, putrid ori
decomposed animal or vege-I
table substances. 1

Adulterated. Consists in whole ........
or in part of filthy, putrid or]
decomposed animal or vege-
table substances.

'Adulterated. Consists in whole] None.
or in part of filthy, putrid ori
decomposed animal or vege-]
table substances. I









2093 July 18, 1017



2091 Jilly 18, .1917



2096 July 18, 1917



2103 Sept.. 1, 1917



2132 Nov. 15, 1917



2130 Nov. 15, 1917


SSchall Packing C(., Baltimore,jCanned
Md. Pineapple.


Schall Packing Co., Baltimore, Canned
Md. pineapple.


Serv-us Pure Food Co., New]Canned
York and Chicago. pineapple.


Jones Bros. & Co., Atlanta, Ga. Raspberry
Preserves.


F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss Sale,ICanned
Jacksonville, Fla. |fruit.


F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss
Jacksonville, Fla.


Sale,.Candy.



i


Adulterated. Consists in whole] ........
or in part of filthy, putrid or|
Decomposed animal or veec-i
table substances.

Adulterated. Consists in wholeI ........
or in part of filthy, putrid or,
decomposed animal or vege-I
table substances. 1

Adulterated. Consists in whole] ........
or in part of filthy, putrid orl
decomposed animal or vege-]
table substances.

Adulterated. Consists in whole] 12 14-oz.
or in part of filthy, putrid ori cans.
decomposed animal or vege-I
table substances.

Adulterated. Consists in whole 1 case.
or in part of filthy, putrid or]
decomposed animal or vege-I
table substances.

Adulterated. Consists in whole]l hox.
or in part of filthy, putrid or|
decomposed animal or vege-l
table substances.







OFFICIAL FOOD SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL-Continued.


I I
No. Reported Name and Address of Mater
__ | Manufacturer


Nov. 15, 1917



Nov. 15, 1917



Nov. 15, 1917



Nov. 15, 1917




Nov. 15, 1917


F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss
Jacksonville, Fla.



F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss
Jacksonville, Fla.



F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss
Jacksonville, Fla.



F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss
Jacksonville, Fla.


Chocol
candy.



Shredd
cocoan


Sale, I Dried


Corn
meal.


F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss Sale,iMixed
Jacksonville, Fla.


I I
rial Violation. Seizu

I
ate Adulterated. Consists in wholell box.
or in part of filthy, putrid orl
decomposed animal or vege-1
table substances.

led Adulterated. Consists in wholell box.
ut. or in part of filthy, putrid or[
decomposed animal or vege-
table substances.
fruits Adulterated. Consists in wholell box.
or in part of filthy, putrid or|
decomposed animal or vege-1
table substances.

Adulterated. Consists in whole 1 sack.
or in part of filthy, putrid orl
decomposed animal or vege-l
table substances.

spice Adulterated. Consists in wholell box.
or in part of filthy, putrid orl
decomposed animal or vege-1
table substances. I


ire








21291 Nov. 15, 1917




2141 Dec. 1, 1917



2068 April 21, 1917


2069 May 9, 1917


2083 May 19, 1917


2084 May 19, 1917


20881 June 21, 1917


2142 Dec. 7, 1917


2148 Dec. 18, 1917


F. E. C. R. R. Old Hoss Sale,j Wheat
Jacksonville, Fla. flour.



Armour & Co., Tampa, Fla. IChick
peas.


George Dalidet, Bordeaux, ]Canned
France. peas.

Wespelear, Belgium. Canned
peas.
Wespelear, Belgium. Canned
[peas.

Wespelear, Belgium. Canned
[peas.

Galo Beaumont, Calahorra, ICanned
Spain. ]peas.

Jacksonville Vinegar & Blue- Vinegar.
ing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Jacksonville Vinegar & Blue- Vinegar.
ing Co., Jacksonville, Fla. I


IAdulterated. Consists in whole 1 sack.
or in part of filthy, putrid or
decomposed animal or vege-
table substances.

Adulterated. Consists in whole 700 100-lb.
or in part of filthy, putrid or sacks.
decomposed animal or vege-
table substances.

Adulterated. Added poisonous ........
Deleterious substances.

Adulterated. Added poisonous ........
deleterious substances.

Adulterated. Added poisonous 36 14-oz.
Deleterious substances. cans.
I I
Adulterated. Added poisonous[45 14-oz.
Deleterious substances. cans.
I
|Adulterated. Added poisonous ........
deleterious substances.

Adulterated. Added water. INone.


Adulterated. Added water. [None.
I I








OFFICIAL FOOD SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.-(Continued.)

No. Reported. Name and Address of Material Violation. Seizure
___ IManufacturer I_____
SI I
20521 Mar. 6, 1917 E. 0. Schuman, Jacksonville, Whiskey. Misbranded. No statement of ........
Fla. net content. *
2039j Feb. 21, 1917 Glasner & Barzen Distilling &[Whiskey. [Misbranded. No statement of ..... ..
Importing Co., Kansas City,j net content.
Mo.
2086[ June 7, 1917 I Lime Cola Bottling Co., Quin- Lemon Misbranded. No statement of ........
cy, Fla. Isoda. net content.
I I I I
2106 Sept. 8, 1917 Fort Stanwix Canning Co., ICanned Misbranded. No statement of 22 cans.
| Rome, N. Y. | beets. net content.
21471 Dec. 18, 1917 j Miller Bros. Co., Baltimore, MdlCanned [Misbranded. No statement of 189 cans
blackberries| net content.
2068 April 21, 1917 George Dalidet, Bordeaux, |Canned Misbranded. No statement of .......
France. I peas. net content.
20881 June 21, 1917 Galo Beaumont, Calahorra, [Canned [Misbranded. No statement of ........
Spain. Ipeas. I net content.
2107 Sept. 8, 1917 | Jones Bros. & Co., Atlanta, Ga.|Blackberry |Misbranded. No statement of[23 13-oz.
Sjam. [ net content. [cans.









21031


20411


2042


20531


20711


20731

2142|


2148!


20821


21081


21091


Sept. 1,


Feb. 28,


Feb. 28,


Mar. 30,


April 27,


May 11,

Dec. 7,


Dec. 18,


May 19,


Sept. 21,


Sept. 25,


of 12 14-oz.
cans.

of ........


I
t .......

i


1937


1917


1917


1917


1917


1917

1917


1917


1917


1917


1917


Jones Bros. & Co., Atlanta, Ga. Raspberry
preserves.

Uddo Bros. & Co., New Or- Edibtl oil.
leans, La.

Bologno & Toormina, New Or- Eidble oil.
leans, La.

A. J. Lewis, Walnut Point, Va.| Canned
tomatoes.

Griffin & Skelly Co., San Dried
Francisco, Cal. [apricots.

P. J. Guarino, New Orleans, La[ Spaghetti.

Jacksonville Vinegar & Blue- Vinegar.
ing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Jacksonville Vinegar & Blue- Vinegar.
ing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

National Bottling Works, New Beer.
Orleans, La.

Windsor Liquor Co., Montgom- Gin.
ery, Ala.

N. Goldring, Pensacola, Fla. [Gin.


[Misbranded. No statement
| net content.

Misbranded. No statement
net content.

[Misbranded. No statement
| net content.

IMisbranded. Short weight.


Misbranded. Short weight.


Misbranded. Short weight.

Misbranded. Short measure.


[Misbranded. Short measure.


|Misbranded. No statement
alcohol content.
Misbranded. No statement
alcohol content.

[Misbranded. No statement
| alcohol content.
Misbranded. No statement
alcohol content.


SNone.

None.
I None.


of] 246B 12-oz.
Bottles.

of. .......


I .
f


I










No. Reported


20401


20521


20391



2051.


21331


2135|


Feb. 21,


Mar. 6,


Feb. 21,



Mar. 6,


Nov. 15,


Nov. 15,


1917


1917


1917



1917


1917


1917


OFFICIAL FOOD SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.-(Continued.)

S Name and Address of Material Violation.
Manufacturer I
I I
Thos. Massey & Co., Philadel-I Rum. IMisbranded. No statement
phia, Pa. I alcohol content.

E. 0. Schuman, Jacksonville,] Whiskey. Misbranded. No statement
Fla. I alcohol content.

Glasner & Barzen Distilling & Whiskey. Misbranded. No statement
Importing Co., Kansas City. alcohol content.
Mo.

Overton-Hygienic Co., Chicago,! Strawberry Misbranded. No statement
Ill. flavor. alcohol content.

Ward & Co., Chicago, Ill. Vianillin Misbranded. No statement
Flavor. alcohol content.

Ward & Co., Chicago, Ill. Peppermint Misbranded. No statement
Flavor. alcohol content.


Seizure


I ~ott]es


I
of. ........


of I. . . .


of ......



of ........


of112 2-oz.
bottles.

of112 2-oz.
I bottles








OFFICIAL DRUG SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


I I
No. I Reported


21261 Dec. 1, 1917 F.
J
21251 Dec. 1, 1917 F.
J
21211 Nov. 8, 1917 F.
I J
II


Name and Address of
Manufacturer


M. Plank Medicine Co.,
acksonville, Fla.

M. Plank Medicine Co.,
acksonville, Fla.

M. Plank Medicine Co.,
acksonville, Fla.


IMa
I Material I


Violation.


Seizure


II I
Powdered [Adulterated. Below U. S. Phar- 48 pounds.
ginger. macopoeia standard.
SGranulated jAdulterated. Below U. S. Phar- 48 pounds.
senna. macopoeia standard.

Plank's Misbranded. False and fraudu-1200 car-
hog saver. lent claims for therapeutic tons.
| and curative properties. I


I I and curative properties. -I









OFFICIAL FERTILIZER AND COTTON SEED MEAL SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


Lab.
No.


Name of Manufacturer


2456 Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
Quitman, Ga.

2457 Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
Quitman, Ga.

2468 Planters Oil Co.,
Albany, Ga.


2504 Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

2505 Planters Oil Co.,
Albany, Ga.

2512 Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

2513 Planters Oil Co.,
Albany, Ga.


Date Reported
I ___


Jan.


Jan.


Mar.



Apr.


Apr.


Apr.


Apr.


1917


1917


1917


1917


Reason for Report


No inspection stamp.


No inspection stamp; deficient
in Ammonia.

Deficient in Ammonia 1.47%I
Misbranded; a second-class!
meal. Illegal.

Deficient in Ammonia.


Deficient in Ammonia.


Deficient in Ammonia.


Deficient in Ammonia.


No. Sacks
Seized.


1t4



86


I










25811



2664


2492


2493


2494


2495


2499


2500


2501


25021


The Buckeye Cotton
Co., Cincinnati, O.


Morgan H. Janin,
Vicksburg, Miss.

Federal Chem. Co.,
Louisville, Ky.

Federal Chem. Co.,
Louisville, Ky.

Thomasville Fertz. Co.,
Thomasville, Ga.

Thomasville Fertilizer
Thomasville, Ga.

Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
Blakely, Ga.

Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
Blakely, Ga.

Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
Bainbridge, Ga.

Empire Cotton Oil Co.,


Jul. 13, 1917


Oil















Co.,


Nov.


Mar.


Mar.


Mar.


Mar.


Apr.


Apr.


Apr.


Apr.


Deficient in Starch and Sugar.1
Illegal; a second-class meal;I
not properly labeled.

No inspection stamp on tag.


Not registered. No inspection
stamp.

Not registered. No inspection
stamp.

No analysis tag.


No analysis tag.


Deficient in Ammonia.


Guarantee not properly stated.


Deficient in Ammonia.


Deficient in Ammonia.


--------








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER AND COTTON SEED MEAL SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.-(Continued.)

I I I
Lab.l No. Sacks
No.1 Name of Manufacturer Date Reported Reason for Report Seized.


Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
Bainbridge, Ga.

Pulverized Manure Co.,
Chicago, In.

Cuban Guano Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
Savannah, Ga.

Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
Savannah, Ga.

Cuban Guano Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.


Apr. 17, 1917


Aug. 8, 1917


Oct. 25, 1917


Oct. 25, 1917


Oct. 25, 1917

Dec. 21, 1917

Dec. 21, 1917


1 Dec. 21, 1917 I
I Dec. 21. 1917


Deficient in Ammonia.


Not registered. No Inspectioni
stamp.

Deficient in Avail. Phos. Acid]
and Potash.

No guarantee tag.


Deficient in Potash.


Deficient in Avail. Phos. Acidj
and Potash.

Deficient in Potash. I


Deficient in Avail. Phos. Acidj
and Potash.









25201 Citra Phosphate and Fertz.
Co., Ocala, Fla.

2521 The Fertile Co.,
Cleveland, Ohio.




2522 The Fertile Co.,
Cleveland, Ohio.


Oct. 25, 1917


Dec. 4, 1917





Dec. 12, 1917


Deficient in Po'ash.


Deficient in Avail. Phos. Acid
and Potash.
Not properly guaranteed. Not
properly registered. No in-
spection stamp.

Deficient in weight, Avail.j
Phos. Acid and Potash.
Not properly guaranteed. Noti
properly registered. No in-
spection stamp.


No of sacks seized--Total.............. 1,456


I








OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


Lab.I
No.I

24411



24431


Name of Manufacturer

Milam-Morgan Co., New
Orleans, La.


E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.


2445 The Superior Feed Co.,1
Memphis, Tenn.

24461 Howell Grain & Feed Co.,
Union City, Tenn.


Memphis, Tenn.

24551 Gadsden Milling Co., Gads-I
den, Ala.

245 Sea Island Cotton Oil Co.,
Charleston, S. C.


Date Reported

Jan. 29, 1917.



Jan. 29, 1917.




Feb. 16, 1917.


Feb. 16, 1917.


Feb. 16, 1917.


Feb. 16, 1917.


Feb. 13, 1917.


] Reason for Report i

IDeficient in fat, protein, starch
and sugar. Analysis tag not]
according to law.

SDeficient in fat, starch and su-
gar; excessive in fiber. An-
alysis tag not according to
law.

Deficient in protein, starch
and sugar; excessive in fiber

SDeficient in fat, starch and su-
gar; excessive in fiber.

I Deficient in protein, starch and
sugar; excessive in fiber.
I I
SDeficient in starch and sugar;
Excessive in fiber.
I I
SMisbranded. Is a peanut feed,
] not a peanut meal. Analysis
Sis not correctly stated. De-
Sficient in starch and sugar. I


No. Sacks
Seized.









2459|


2462)

1
2464]


2472!


2476)



2477)


24841


24851


2494)


Feb. 1, 1917.


Feb. 16, 1917.


Kelly Fert. & Oil Mill Co.,
Opp, Ala.

The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-I
cago, Ill.


The John Dozier Co.,
Ocala, Fla.

The Larrowe Milling Co.,I
Los Angeles, Cal.

Gadsden Milling Co., Gads-
den, Ala.


Howell Grain & Feed Co.,
Union City, Tenn.
I
The Savannah Milling Co.,
Savannah, Ga.

J. T. Gibbons, New Or-I
leans, La.

International Sugar Feed
Co., Memphis, Tenn.


1917.


1917.


1917.



1917.


1917.


1917.


1917


Deficient in fat and protein. No!
inspection stamp.

Deficient in starch and sugar.
Guarantee not properly sta-
ted.

Deficient in fat and starch and!
sugar. Illegal.

No inspection stamp.


Deficient in starch and sugar;
excessive in fiber. Guaran-!
tee not properly stated.

Deficient in protein and starch
and sugar; excessive in fiber

Deficient in fat, protein and
starch and sugar; excessive
in fiber.
Deficient in fat, protein; ex-
cessive in fiber.

No tag or inspection stamp.


Mar.


Mar.


Mar.



Mar.


Mar.


Mar.


Apr.









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.-(Continued.)

Lab. No. Sacks
No.1 Name of Manufacturer Date Reported Reason for Report Seized.
lSeized.


ivadrid Cotton Oil Co.,
Madrid, Ala.


Madrid Cotton Oil Co.,
Madrid, Ala.


Howell Grain & Feed Co.,
Union City, Tenn.

Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
Atlanta, Ga.

McGowinBennett Milling
Co., Georgiana, Ala.

McGowin-Bentett Milling
Co., Georgianna, Ala.

The Buckeye Cotton Oil
Co., Memphis, Tenn.


Apr. 13, 1917



Apr. 13, 1917


2498



2499



2500


2514


2515,


25168


25291
1


Deficient in Fat and Protein.
Less than 1% Corn in sam-
ple. Illegal.

Deficient in Fat and Protein
Less than 1% Corn in sam-i
ple.- Illegal. (

No guarantee tag 'or inspection1
stamp. Illegal.

No inspection stamp.


No inspection stamp.


No inspection stamp. Deficient
in Fat and Starch and Sugar

No tag or inspection stamp.


1917


1917


1917


1917


1917







25441 Milam-Morgan Co.,
New Orleans, La.


z.j6 National Milling Co.,
Macon, Ga.




2565 Merchant Mills,
Montgomery, Ala.




25681 John E. Koerner & Co.,
New Orleans, La.


2569 Milam-Morgan Co.,
New Orleans, La.




2580 Russia Cement Co.,
Gloucester, Mass.


July 6, 1917



Jun. 30, 1917





July 6, 1917





July 6, 1917



July 3, 1917





July 13, 1917


Deficient in fat and starch and|
sugar.


Deficient in Starch and Sugar:.
Excessive in Fiber. Poor me-
chanical condition; coarse-
ground. Percentage of mo-I
lasses very small.

Deficient in Fat; excessive in
Fiber. Starch and Sugar not
guaranteed. Guarantee does
not comply with the Flor-
ida Law.

Deficient in Fat and Starch
and Sugar; excessive in Fi-
ber.

Short weight 7.09%.
Exceeds guarantee in
Fat ............2.39%
Protein .........2.00
S. & S...........4.41

No tag or inspection stamp.










OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.-(Continued.)
, ,


Lab.I
No.
I


Name of Manufacturer


2538 J. T. Gibbons, New Or-i
leans, La.


2584 Empire Cotton Oil Co.,j
Atlanta, Ga.



2589 The Lebanon Alfalfa Mills,
Lebanon, Kan.

2090 C. S. Woodworth & Co.,
Minneapolis, Minn.

2636 The Consolidated Grocery
I Co., Jacksonville, Fla.




26491 Chas. H. Moorhouse, Tam-
I pa, Fla.


Date Reported


July 26, 1917.



July 26, 1917.


Aug.


Aug.


Oct.


1917.


1917.


1917.


Oct. 31, 1917.


Reason for Report


1
Deficient in fat and starch andl
sugar; excessive in fiber.|
Short weight.

Deficient in fat and protein;
excessive in fiber. A second
class cotton seed meal. noti
properly labeled.

Company not registered fori
1917.

Oats. Short weight. Percent-i
age short, 6.97%.

Illegal. Misbranded and mis-1
leading. Sample rotten andl
mouldy. Deficient in fat andi
starch and sugar; excessive[
in fiber. Short weight.

Deficient in fat and starch and;
sugar; excessive in fiber. I


No. Sacks
Seized.









26511 The M. F. Gonzalez Co.,j
SPensacola, Fla.

2653 The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
cago, Ill.


26551 The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-1
cago, Ill.



2658 The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-I
cago, Ill.

26761 The Corno Mills Co., St.
SLouis, Mo.

2677 Liberty Mills, Nashville,J
STenn.

2678 Otto Weiss Milling Co.,/
Wichita, Kan.

2694 Cedar Hill Roller MillsI
I Cedar Hill, Tenn. I


Oct. 31, 1917.


Oct. 31, 1917.



Oct. 31, 1917.


Nov.


Dec.


Dec.


Dec.


Dec.


2, 1917.


3, 1917.


3, 1917.


3, 1917.


26, 1917.


Deficient in fat and protein. |


Deficient in fat and starch andi
sugar. Illegal; deficient net|
contents. Short weight. |

Illegal. Deficient in net cotn-
tents. Deficient in fat, starchI
and sugar; excessive in
fiber. Short weight.

Short weight.


Short weight.


Short weight.


No tag or inspection stamp.

Deficient in fat, protein and ex-I
cessive in fiber.


Total number of sacks seized 1..... 3247











ANALYSES MADE BY STATE LABORATORY.

Only such materials are analyzed by the State Labora-
tory as are directed by the Pure Food, the Fertilizer,
and Stock Feed Laws.

There are no fees or charges of any kind made by the
State Laboratory.

The State Laboratory is not permitted to compete with
commercial laboratories.

No commercial work of any kind is accepted.

The State Laboratory does not analyze the materials
used by, nor the products of Fertilizer, Feed Stuffs or
other factories, by which to guarantee their goods. Such
analyses are commercial problems.

The State Laboratory does not analyze samples for in-
dividual account wherein the public is not interested.
Such samples should be sent to a commercial laboratory.

ANALYSES IN CRIMINAL CASES.

The State Laboratory does not make post mortem ex-
aminations, nor furnish evidence in criminal cases, (ex-
cept as provided by the Pure Food, Fertilizer and Stock
Feed Laws). Such analyses and examinations are made
by specialists employed by the grand jury and prosecut-
ing attorney, the cost being taxed as other criminal costs,
by the court.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner of Agriculture.

Tallahassee, Fla., July 1, 1917.












STATE OF FLORIDA.
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.
JULY 1, 1917.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF SAMPLES OF COMMERCIAL
FERTILIZER AND COMMERCIAL FEEDING
STUFF TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICUL-
TURE FOR ANALYSIS BY THE STATE CHEMIST.

The following regulations for drawing, preparing and
sending samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial
stock feed, under the authority given in Section 15 of
Chapter 4983, Acts of 1901, (Chapter XXII, General
Statutes), as amended by Chapter 5660, Acts of 1907,
and Section 15, Chapter 5452, Acts of 1905, as amended
by Chapter 5661, Acts of 1907, are this day adopted.

OFFICIAL SAMPLES, drawn by State Chemist, As-
sistant State Chemists or Inspectors.

An approximately equal quantity (a pint or a pound
approximately), shall be taken from each of ten original
packages of the same brand in the possession of any
manufacturer, dealer or person, when the lot being sam-
pled contains ten or more packages of the same brand.

In case the lot contains less than ten packages of the
same brand, each package shall be sampled as directed.

Preparation of Sample.-The several samples, drawn as
above from each package, shall be carefully and thor-
oughly mixed. From this well mixed lot drawn from
each package as above, a fair sample of not less than one
pound, in the case of fertilizers, and of not less than
one-half pound in the case of stock feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can-approximately a quart can or
bottle.
The sample shall be delivered to the State Chemist,
who shall prepare the same for analysis (by properly
grinding, mixing and sifting the same). The State Chem-
ist shall retain one-half of this prepared sample for ana-
lysis; the remainder shall be placed in a glass bottle,
sealed, and identified by the laboratory number and date,












and placed in the custody of the Commissioner of Agri-
culture. These duplicate samples shall be retained for a
period of three months from the date of the certificate of
analysis. In case of appeal from analysis of the State
Chemist (within three months from the date of the cer-
tificate), the sample shall be retained indefinitely, until
the final disposition of the case.

Special Samples.-Samples drawn and transmitted by
the purchaser under Sections 9 of both the Commercial
Fertilizer and the Commercial Stock Feed Laws.

The purchaser or owner of the material to be sampled,
when the lot or shipment contains ten or more original
packages, each bearing the guarantee tag and stamp re-
quired by law, of the same brand, shall take in the pres-
ence of two witnesses, within sixty days after delivery,
an approximately equal quantity from each of ten pack-
ages of the same brand (approximately a pint or a
pound), after carefully and thoroughly mixing these
samples, a fair sample of the mixture, not less than a
pound in the case of commercial fertilizer, and not less
than one-half pound in the case of commercial stock feed,
shall be placed in a bottle or tin can, and sealed in the
presence of the witnesses.

On the sample thus drawn shall be written the name
and address of the purchaser, and the name of a disin-
terested party, who shall transmit the package to the
Commissioner of Agriculture by mail or express, properly
packed to prevent damage in transportation.

In case the lot or shipment contains less than ten orig-
inal packages of the same brand, each bearing the guar-
antee tag and stamp required by law, each package shall
be sampled as provided in the foregoing paragraph, the
samples mixed and a fair sample of the lot, "one or more
packages," shall be drawn and transmitted, as provided
in the foregoing paragraphs.

The purchaser, or sender of the sample, shall also ad-
dress a letter to the Commissioner of Agriculture, advis-
ing him of the sending -of the sample, stating the number
of original packages purchased, each bearing the guar-












anteed analysis and inspection stamp required by law,
represented by the sample, the date of purchase, and the
date of delivery of the goods.

THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE ENCLOSED IN THE PACKAGE.

The object of the sealed bottle or tin can is to prevent
the evaporation of the moisture from the sample-an
important determination.

SAMPLES IN PAPER OR WOODEN PACKAGES WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.

These regulations are adopted to secure fair samples
of sufficient size to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for three months from the date of
certificate of analysis.

The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser.

The propriety of the method of drawing and sending
samples as fixed by law is obvious.

The drawing and sending of special samples is in rare
cases in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper boxes, badly packed, and frequently in very
small quantity (less than an ounce) ; frequently there
are no marks, numbers or other means of identification;
the postmark in many instances being absent.

The attention of those who desire to avail themselves
of this privilege is called to Sections 9 and 10 of the
laws, which are clear and explicit.

NOTE: HEREAFTER, STRICT COMPLIANCE WITH ABOVE
REGULATIONS WILL BE REQUIRED. THE SAMPLE MUST NOT BE
LESS THAN ONE POUND OF FERTILIZER OR ONE-HALF POUND OF
STOCK FEED, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, SEALED AND ADDRESSED
TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE. THE PURCHASER'S
NAME AND ADDRESS, AND TIE NAME OF THE SENDER, MUST
ALSO BE ON THIS PACKAGE, THIS RULE APPLYING TO SPECIAL
SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS OR COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFF,
DRAWN AS DIRECTED.
5-Chem.













NOTE: A one-pound baking powder tin can, properly
cleaned, filled with a fairly drawn, well-mixed sample,
drawn as directed, is a proper sample. IT MUST BE SEALED
AND ADDRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE, AT
TALLAHASSEE. THE PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS, AND
THE NAME OF THE SENDER MUST ALSO RE PLACED ON TIlE
PACKAGE.

IF MORE THAN ONE SAMPLE IS SENT REPRESENTING DIF-
FERENT BRANDS, THE SAMPLES MUST BE NUMBERED SO AS TO
IDENTIFY THEM. ALL THIS SHOULD BE DONE IN THE PRES-
ENCE OF THE WITNESSES, AND THE PACKAGE MAILED OR EX-
PRESSED BY A DISINTERESTED PERSON.

NOTE: The tags off the sacks with the guaranteed
analyses and stamps, and names of manufacturers,
should be retained by the purchaser, to compare with
the certificate of analysis when received and NOT SENT
TO THIS OFFICE.

Raw Phosphates: Ground raw phosphate rock-hard
or soft-contains phosphoric acid, more or less available
hence is classed a fertilizer, when sold to consumers for
fertilizing purposes, under Section 11 of the law; and is
required to be guaranteed and stamped as required by
Section 3; listed and guaranteed under oath, as required
by Section 5, and the inspection fee paid previous to
sale as provided by Section 6.

Lim.e is not classed a fertilizer. It is not required to
be sold under guarantee, nor the inspection fee paid;
hence is not subject to free analysis by the State Labora-
tory.











OBJECT OF THE LAWS.

The object of the Fertilizer and Stock Feed laws is:
First, to protect the consumer from fraud, false repre-
sentations by illegitimate dealers who have not complied
with the law, nor filed their guaranteed analysis under
oath, and who have not paid their inspection tax fixed
by law.

Second, to protect the lawful dealer who has fully
complied with the law, by filing his guarantee under
oath, and has paid his inspection fee, and who has placed
upon each bag or other package, a guarantee tag show-
ing the minimum percentage of valuable ingredients in
the fertilizer or feed stuff, as provided by the law.

These regulations supersede and revoke all previous
regulations governing the drawing and transmitting of
samples of commercial fertilizer and commercial stock
feed.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla., July 1, 1917.
NOTE: These regulations are adopted to conform with
the decision of the Supreme Court of Florida of May 12,
1917, as follows:
"The terms of the statute in giving the special right
of action to 'any person purchasing' fertilizer clearly
contemplates that the test shall be made with at least
some degree of promptness after the delivery of the fer-
tilizer, and that more than one sample shall be taken
when the quantity of fertilizer purchased makes it expe-
dient to have plural samples to secure a fair test."












SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only state in the Union that provides
for the "Special Sample," drawn by the consumer or pur-
chaser, UNDER PROPER RULES AND REGULATIONS FIXED BY
LAW-to be sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture for
analysis free of cost. Any citizen in the State who has
purchased fertilizers or feeds FOR HIS OWN USE MAY DRAW
A SAMPLE OF THE SAME, ACCORDING TO LAW AND REGULA-
TIONS, and have the same analyzed by the State Chemist
free of cost. In case of adulteration or deficiency, the
purchaser can, on establishing the fact, receive double
the cost demanded for the goods.

The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmitting "special samples."
This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.

Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of food and drugs will be sent to
any citizen requesting the same.

"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS
MATERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE
OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FER-
TILIZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."

The form letter for transmitting special samples of
fertilizers or feeding stuffs as shown on the following
page is adopted and must be explicitly complied with in
order to obtain a legal certificate of analysis.












FORM FOR TRANSMITTING SAMPLES OF COM-
MERCIAL FERTILIZER OR COMMER-
CIAL FEEDING STUFF.



................................................. F la ., ...........................,19 1........
HoN. W. A. MCRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:
I send you today by mail (or express) a sample of
(Indicate Fertilizer, Cotton Seed Meal or Feed Stuff.)
for analysis by the State Chemist.
This sample is taken from a lot of...............packages, each
bearing the guarantee tag and stamp required by law,
purchased from a registered dealer, on the..................day of
.............................. 191........., and delivered on or about the.................
day of .......................................... ........ 191......
This sample was drawn from..................packages in the
presence of two witnesses, this day.
The guarantee tags and stamps off the packages sam-
pled are retained by the purchaser.
This sample is sent by me, one of the witnesses, for
M r. ................................. ................ ... .................... the purchaser.
Yours truly,


COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the
respective laws, including rules and regulations and
standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissioner of Agriculture, or
State Chemist. The bulletins of the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station can be had by application to
the Director, at Gainesville.












HOW TO LEGALLY DRAW, PACK AND TRANSMIT
SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS AND COMMER-
CIAL FEED STUFFS FOR ANALYSIS
BY THE STATE LABORATORY.

1. Only such samples as are drawn from original
packages, EACH BEARING THE GUARANTEE OF A LAWFUL
DEALER, AND THE INSPECTION STAMP REQUIRED BY LAW, will
be analyzed by the State Laboratory, when drawn within
sixty days after date of delivery.
2. If the lot or shipment be TEN or more packages, the
sample must be drawn from NOT LESS THAN TEN packages.
3. If the lot or shipment be LESS THAN TEN packages,
the sample shall be drawn from EACH package.
4. The sample shall be drawn in the presence of Two
disinterested witnesses, and shall be SEALED IN THEIR
PRESENCE, and TRANSMITTED by a DISINTERESTED PARTY
(one of the witnesses), to the COMMISSIONER OF AGRI-
CULTURE.
5. Not less than one pound of fertilizer, or one-half
pound of commercial feed stuff must be placed in a tin
can or glass bottle and addressed and sent, prepaid, to
the Commissioner of Agricuture.
6. The purchaser (or sender) shall address a letter
to the Commissioner of Agriculture, stating:
1. The number of original packages represented by
the sample, and the number of packages sampled.
2. That each package had attached to it the guaran-
tee tag and stamp required by law.
3. That the sample was drawn in the presence of two
or more witnesses.within sixty days of delivery.
4. THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE ENCLOSED IN THE PACKAGE.
5. The tags OFF THE PACKAGE SAMPLED, with the guar-
anteed analysis and stamps, must be RETAINED by the pur-
chaser, to compare with the certificate, and for future
evidence, if necessary, and BY NO MEANS SENT TO THIS
OFFICE.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
the sample.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla., July 1, 1917.












STATE VALUATIONS.

(B\ased on Commercial Values, Dec. 31, 1917.)

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of 1918:

Available Phosphoric Acid ....................................$ .061/0 a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ........................................ .01 a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .35 a pound
Potash (as actual potash, KO) .................... .35 a pound
If calculated! by units:
Available Phosphoric Acid .......... .............$1.30 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ................................... .20 per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) 7.00 per unit
P ota sh ........................................................................................ 7.00 p er u n it
With a uniform allowance of .'-.'.'i per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent. of a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example, a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid......G.22 per cent.x$1.30-$ 8.09
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.........1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia ....................................................3.42 per cent.x 7.00- 23.94
Potash ...........................................................3.23 per cent.x 7.00- 22.61
Mixing and Bagging ........... 2.50

Commercial value at seaports .............. .$57.44

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid ...............8 per cent.x$1.30-$10.40
Ammonia ............................................................. 2 per cent.x 7.00- 14.00
P otash .....................................................................2 per cent.x 7.00- 14.00
M ixing and Bagging ............................... 2.50

Commercial value at seaports ................ $40.90

The valuations and market prices in preceding illus-
trations are based on market prices for 1-ton lots.













MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTI-
LIZING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JANUARY 1, 1918.

"Under unsettled conditions, quotations are wholly nom-
inal."
AMMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 17% ammonia ................. ................. $102.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25% ammonia ................................. 175.00
Dried Blood, 16% amm onia ........................ .......... ................. 102.00
Cyanamid, 20% ammonia ............................. ................... 140.00

POTASH.

High-grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% sulphate,
48% K ................................................................................. N om inal
Low-grade Sulphate of Potash, 48% sulphate,
26% K O .............................. ..................... ... ................. N om inal
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% KO.............................. Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 15% ammonia,
44% potash K ,O ................................................................. N om inal

Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% ammonia,
42% potash K ,O ........................... ................................ N om inal
Kainit, potash, 12% K2O .................................................. Nominal
Canada Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 4% KO
potash .......................................... Nominal











AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High-grade Tankage, 10% ammonia, 5% phosphor-
ic acid ................................................. .......... ........................................ $90.00
Tankage, 8% ammonia, 10% phosphoric acid ............ 83.00
Low-grade Tankage, 61/2% ammonia, 12% phos-
p horic acid ...................................................................... . ............... 73.00
Sheep Manure, 31/3% ammonia, 1/2% potash .................. 31.00
Imported Fish Guano, 11% ammonia, 51/2% phos-
p h oric acid ......................................................... .............................. 90.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% ammonia,
22% phosphoric acid .................................................................. 50.00
Raw Bone, 4% ammonia, 22% phosphoric acid............ 48.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 5/%% ammonia, 2% phos-
phoric acid ................... ........................................................................... 48.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 71/2% ammonia ...................... 56.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2% ammonia .......................... 35.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High-grade Acid Phosphate, 16% available phos-
phoric acid ......................................................................................... $21.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% available phosphoric acid ...... 20.00
Bone Black, 17% available phosphoric acid .................. 26.00

MISCELLANEOUS.

High-grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 2% ammonia,
7 % p ota sh ............................................... ..............................................$55.00
High-grade Ground Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
21/2% ammonia, 8% potash ...................................................... 60.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% ammonia, 2% potash............... 32.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% ammonia, 4%
p ota sh ............................ .............................................................. . .............. 34 .00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% ammonia, 4% pot-
a sh ..................................................................................................................... 3 4 .0 0
L and P laster, in sacks, ........................................................................... 12.00
The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing
and bagging any special or regular formula are $2.50
per ton in excess of above prices.












NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
DECEMBER 31, 1917-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

"Owing to unsettled conditions quotations are wholly
nominal."
AMIMONIATES.


Ammonia, sulph., prompt per cwt. ..................
F futures ................................................... .............
Fish Scrap, dried, 11% ammonia, 14%
bone phosphate, f. o. b. delivered Bal-
tim ore, per unit ................................................
Wet, acidulated, 6% ammonia, 3%
phosphoric acid, delivered ...........................
Ground Fish Guano, imported, 10 and
11% bone [phosphate, c. i. f. New
York, Baltimore or Philadelphia...........
Tankage, 11 and 15%, f. o. b. Chicago........
Tankage, 10 and 20%, f. o. b. Chicago,
g rou n d ..................................... ..................... ............
Tankage, 9 and 20%, f. o. b. Chicago,
g rou n d ..................................... ..................... ............
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15%, f. o. b. Chicago. ..........................
B lood, f. o. b. Chicago .......................................
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago ..................
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago, per unit...............
Dried Blood, 12-13% ammonia, f. o. b.
N ew Y ork ..................................... ..................
Tankage, f. o. b. New York .......................................
Garbage Tankage, New York .................................
Nitrate of Soda, 95%, spot, per 100 lbs.
Futures, 95 % ......................... ..................


.7.25 @ 7.35
Nominal


Nominal

Nominal


Nominal
6.45 & .10


6.45

6.45


& .10

& .10


6.35 & .10
6.60 @--
5.00 10 1.50
6.30 @-

6.60 @ 6.80
6.60 @ 6.80
5.50 10 1.50
4.571/2@ 4.60
4.60 @--












PHOSPHATES.

Acid Phosphate, per ton ......................................... 16.00 @ 18.00
B ones, rough, hard ........................................................... .30 @ .32
Soft, steamed, unground ................................. 26.00 @-
Ground, (steamed, 11/4% ammonia,
and 60% bone phosphate .............................. 27.00 @35.00
D itto, 3 and 507 ........................................ ...... 33.00 @ 36.00
Raw, ground, 4% ammonia and 50%
bone phosphate .................................................... ... 35.00 @ 40.00
South Carolina Phosphate Rock, kiln
dried, f. o. b. Ashley river .......................... Nominal
Florida Land Pebble Phosphate Rock,
68% f. o. b. Tampa, Fla. ................................. 3.25 @ 3.50
Florida High-grade Phosphate Hard
Rock, 77%, f. o. b. Florida ports............... 5.50 @ 6.00
Tennessee Phosphate Rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 7-" ,'I,. per ton 5.50 @ 6.00
75% guaranteed, per ton, 2240 lbs.......... 5.50 @ 6.00
7' per ton, 2240 bs. ..................................... 6.00 @ 6.50
68 T7', ground so that 90% will
pass through 100-mesh screen, per
ton, 2000 lbs. .... ................. .................... ... 6.00 @ -

POTASHES.


Muriate of Potash, 80@85%, basis 80%,
in bags, per ton ......................................................350.00
Muriate of Potash, min. lli .,, basis
80 7 in bags ............................ ........ ................
Muriate of Potash, min. 98%, basis 80%,
in b ags ........................................ ......... .................
Sulphate of Potash, 90@95%, basis 80%,
in bags ..................................................................... 3.50
Double Manure Salt, 48@53%, basis
48%, in bags ......................... ............
Manure Salt, min. 20%, K,0, in bulk ........
Hardsalt, min. 16%, KO, in bulk ................
Kainit, min. 12.4%, KO, in bulk .....................


Nominal

Nominal


@ 4.00
Nominal
@ 4.00

Nominal
Nominal
Nominal
Nominal












COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED STUFF
FOR 1918.

For the season of 1918 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation January 1.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

Indian corn being the standard at $73.50 per ton.
($3.65 per sack of 100 lbs., $2.04 per bu. 56 lbs.)
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.
Protein, 7.60c per pound ................. .$1.52 per unit
Starch and Sugar, 3.50c per pound ....... .70 per unit
Fats, 7.90c per pound ................... 1.58 per unit

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

CORN AND OATS, EQUAL PARTS-
Protein .................. ......11.15 x 1.52, $16.95
Starch and Sugar ............... 64.65 x .70, 45.25
Fat ............................ 5.20 x 1.58, 8.22

State value, per ton ....................... $70.42

EXAMPLE NO. 2.
CORN-

Protein ........................10.50 x 1.52, $15.96
Starch and Sugar......:......... 69.60 x 70c, 48.72
Fat ............................ 5.40 x 1.58, 8.53

State value per ton......................... $73.21











STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
"season." They may, but seldom do, vary from the
market prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight
advance or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial
reports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is Smith's
Fruit and Vine worth per ton?" Such a question can-
not be answered categorically. By analysis, the am-
monia, available phosphoric acid and potash may be de-
termined and the inquirer informed what the cost of the
necessary material to compound a ton of goods similar
to "Smith's Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but
accepted and well-known materials of the best quality.

State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
-"State values," January 1, 1918, are nominal.













COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Total
Ammonia. Phosphoric Potash.
Acid.
Nitrate or Soda.......... 17 to 19 ............ ............
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 26 ............ ...........
Dried Blood ............ 12 to 17 ............ ..........
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1 to 4 ........
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap........ 6 to 11 3 to 8 ...........
Cotton"'Seed Meal........ 7 to 10 2 to 31 1 to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13 to 17 1 to 21 1 to 2
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds per Hundred.
A o. Available Insoluble.
Ammo Phos. Acid. Pos. Acid

Florida Pebble Phosphate. .. ..... .. .. ....... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ............ ........ 30 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ........... 14 to 45 1 to 3
Ground Bone ............ 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed B'one .......... 1 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone .......... 2 to 4| 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
Pounds Per Hundred.
Actual Am'onia. hos. Lime.
Potash. mnaI Acid.

Muriate of Potash...... 50 to 62 .................. .......
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 ......... ......... .........
Carbonate 'of Potash.... 55 to 60 ...... ......... ...
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ................
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag. 25 to 30 .........................
K ainit ................. 12 to 13 ......... ...........
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20 ......... ...... ...
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes.. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to8 ......... 1 to 2 ...
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 I......... 1 to 1I35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 3 to 9 2 to 4 ......... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.50 0.30 0.30
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.50 0.60 0.25 0.30
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.60 1.00 0.35 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.501 0.751 0.50 0.70











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To Convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by.............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by. ....... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by .............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent nitrate of soda and
want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent, the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent actual potash (K20).










80

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.



NAME OF FEED. d W

:3 W Ce WQ
0 FW M&Qh 44 <.

Maiden Cane Hay..... 28.60 11.60 42.40 2.60 4.20

Natal Grass Hay...... 36.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00

Para Grass Hay ...... 31.20 8.00 45.70 1.60 6.20

Rhodes Grass Hay.... 41.10 7.70 36.80 1.30 6.60

Beggarweed Hay...... 24.30 21.60 35.10 4.10 4.00

Kudzu Vine Hay...... 32.30 15.90 33.00 1.60 6.80

Cow Pea Hay......... 20.50 13.00 45.90 4.20 7.50

Velvet Bean Hay..... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70

Velvet Beans ......... 7.00 21.00 53.10 5.40 3.60

Velvet Bean Hulls.... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30

Velvet Beans and Hulls 10.70 9.40 50.60 4.50 3.50

Cow Peas ............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.20

Soy Bean Meal....... 4.50 48.40 27.50 6.40 4.40

Peanut Vine Meal..... 29.60 9.90 38.40 6.30 6.60

Cotton Seed.......... 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 3.50

Cotton Seed Hulls.... 44.40 4.00 36.60 2.00 2.60

Bright Cotton S'd Meal 9.40 38.62 28.60 7.80 5.80
____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ___ .60 .S0












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continued).


NAME OF FEED.




Dark Cotton Seed Meal 20.00

Corn Grain........... 2.10

Corn Meal ............ 1.90

Hominy Feed......... 4.00

Corn and Cob Meal.... 5.80

Ground Corn Shucks.. 30.20

Ground Corn Cobs .... 30.00
Equal parts, Corn in
Shucks & V'lv't Beans 16.03

Oats (grain) ......... 9.50

Rice (grain) ......... 0.20

Rice Bran............ 9.50

Wheat (grain) ....... 1.80

Wheat Bran.......... 9.00

Wheat Middlings ..... 5.40

Wheat Mixed Feed.... 7.80

Wheat Ship Stuff..... 5.60

Dry Jap Sugar Cane.. 26.20
1


ta-

a a

I Cj I us I
C-i taif fa *


23.15

10.50

9.70

10.50

7.50

2.80

3.00

12.56

11.80

7.40

12.10

11.90

15.40

15.40

16.90

14.60

2.30


37.10

69.60

68.70

65.30

70.80

54.60

56.60

53.71

59.70

79.20

49.90

71.90

53.90

53.90

54.40

59.80

62.60o


5.00

1.50

1.40

2.60

1.20

1.90

1.60

4.33

3.00

0.40

10.00

1.80

5.80

5.80

5.30

3.70

2.80


6-Chem.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917. FRANK T. WILSON. Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.

Phosphoric Acid

NAME, OR BRAND. 0 FOR WHOM SENT.




Mixed Fertilizer ...............4019 11.02 6.15 2.95 9.10 3.80 2.081W. S. Thornton, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 40201 6.721 4.48' 5.02 9.50 5.20 2.66 John Bolly, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 402111.73 5.30 3.30 8.60 4.03 4.42 G. F. Smith, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 402210.66 4.85 3.30 8.151 4.20 2.80 G. F. Smith, Sanford.

Blood and Bone ................ 4023 11.28 3.u 5.15 8.801 8.90..... G. F. Smith, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 40241 6.941 4.781 5.42110.201 4.10 2.181 W. R. Pell, Sanford.

Blood and Bone ................ 4025 5.871 3.30 4.70 8.00, 9.80 ..... W. R. Pell, Sanford.

Blood and Bone ................ 40261 7.121 4.051 4.45 8.50 9.55 ..... Dr. T. A. Neal, Sanford.

Dried Blood ................... 4027 ..... ......... ..... 15.00 ..... Dr. T. A. Neal, Sanford.







SPECIAL FIRTILIEER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. c5 d C FOR WHOM SENT.


S. E P- 4


Dried Blood ....

Dried Blood ...

Dried Blood ...

Pulverized Tobac

Tankage .......

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer


............... 4028 .... .

.............. . 4031 .....

............... 4032 .....

co Stems...... 4033 .....

............... 4034 10.081

.............. 4035 11.911

............... 4036 9.58I

............... 40371 9.781
.. .. . 4037 9.78

............... 4038 10.821

.............. .40391 9.371


. . . . . . ..

3.401 5.20 8.60

7.451 2.35 9.80

3.88 1.02 4.90

6.131 2.77| 8.90

4.901 0.70 5.60

5.251 0.45 5.70


14.78 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

14.781..... R. B. Monroe, Sanford.

13.911..... IG. F. Smith, Sanford,

2.60 7.99 John Meisch, Sanford.

9.35 ..... John Meisch, Sanford.

4.48 2.211 John Meisch, Sanford.

10.40 1.431 Roy F. Symes, Sanford.

3.701 2.011 Joe Meisch, Sanford.

4.95 3.031 T. W. Bryden, Sanford.

4.80 2.761A. H. Moses, Sanford.








Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4040110.141 5.65| 0.90 6.55 5.05 2.781 Harry Wolff, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4041 12.791 4.60 2.451 7.051 4.30 3.001 T. F. Adams, Sanford.
Sheep Manure ................. 14042 12.831 2.12 0.18 2.30 2.65 1.56 Joe Meisch, Sanford.
Tankage .................... 4043] 9.37] .05 3.55] 7.60110.80 ..... Joe Meisch, Sanford.
Tankage ....................4044 9.77 5.551 5.0010.55 9.30..... T. W. Bryden, Sanford.
I I I 1 I I
Tankage ...................... 4045] 9.23] 4.951 3.80] 8.75 10.50 ..... A. H. Moses, Sanford.
I I I I I
Tankage ..................... 4046] 8.761 4.53 4.22] 8.7510.45 ..... Henry Nickel, Sanford.
Blood and Bone .............. 4047] 6.481 4.20] 5.00 9.20 9.50 ..... Carl Carlson, Sanford.
Dried Blood ................... 4048 ..... ....... 16.20 ..... Roy F. Symes, Sanford.
II l I I
Acid Phosphate ................ 4049 .....15.881 2.62118.50 .......... E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.
11 | |
Pebble Phosphate (from Arcadia) 4050 ..... .........28.15 ..... ..... M. E. Pelot, Tallahassee.
Fertilizer ..................... 4051110.281 5.48 2.72[ 8.20 5.35 2.17 John Parrish, Parrish.
Dried Blood (No. 2)............ 4052 ........ .... . .. .. 15.20 .... B. E. Squires, Sanford.
I I I I I r I I
Tobacco Dust (No. 1)......... 4053 ..... ............... 2.55 7.40 Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.
Blood and Bone (No. 2)........ 4054 ..... 4.05] 5.251 9.30110.15..... Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.
Tan9.40... A. T. Rossetter & Son Sanford.
Tankage ...................... 4055] ...I 3.081 5.821 8.90] 9.40 .. I A. T. Rossetter & Son, Sanford.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. S FOR WHOM SENT.


I l i e i l i
V F V Fg


Fertilizer ......................


4056 ..... 6.35

4057 ..... 4.65

4058! 9.87 5.301

4059| 9.721 4.08

4060 9.581 4.98

406110.06 4.80

4062110.781 6.381

4063 5.781 6.001

4064110.33 5.48

4065 12.10|10.58!


9.60115.95 6.80 ..... L.


I i1
4.351 9.00|10.30I..... L.
2.75 8.05 3.751 3.16 L.

3.27 7.35 3.90 3.58 B.

2.62 7.60 3.75 3.59 T.

2.75 7.55 4.05 3.86 R.

2.321 8.70 4.051 2.07 R.

6.75112.751 4.001..... R.

2.72 8.201 4.251 3.40 T.

1.82112.401 5.32 .....I H.


A. Brumley, Sanford.

A. Brumley, Sanford.

A. Brumley, Sanford.

E. Squires, Sanford.

L. Mead, Sanford.

O. Meriwether, Sanford.

O. Meriwether, Sanford.

L. Garrison, Sanford.

J. Miller, Sanford.

A. Perry, Pomona.


Blood

Blood

Mixed

Mixed

Mixed

Mixed

Mixed

Mixed

Mixed


1)........

2)........

3)........

1) ........



1) ........

2)........


and Bone

and Bone

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer








Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 40661 8.531 4.901 3.151 8.05 3.67 5.43 G. W. Spencer, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)....... 4067 9.56 9.95 3.05113.00 4.00 3.17j G. W. Spencer, Sanford.

Goat Manure .................. 4068118.671 1.45 0.20 1.65 2.05 3.43 Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.

Ground Tankage (No. 2)........ 4069 ..... 4.251 4.75 9.00 10.15....J. E. Pace, Sanford.
Tobacco Dust .................. 4070 ..... ..... ..... ..... 2.451 6.89 R. O. Meriwether, Sanford.
Ground Tankage ............... 4071 ..... 3.10 3.251 6.35 10.75 ..... Irving Post, Sanford.

Blood and Bone (No. 3)........ 4072 ..... 4.101 7.2011.30 9.20..... G. W. Spencer, Sanford.

Blood and Bone (No. 2)........ 4073 ..... 4.33 7.32 11.65 10.50 ..... Ed Putnam, Sanford.
Nitrate of Soda (No. 1)......... 4074 .... ........ .....18.50 ..... J. E. Pace, Sanford.

Nitrate of Soda (No. 1)......... 40751 ..... ... ....... ... 18.65 ..... Ed Putnam, Sanford.
Fertilizer (Bone Meal) ......... 4076 ..... 7.50116.05123.55 3.05 ..... Nocatee Fruit Co., Nocatee.

Palmetto Ashes ................ 4077.... ......... .. .... 3.27 E. B. Savage, Ocala.
SI I
Fertilizer ...................... 4078111.871 6.901 3.75110.651 4.271 0.63|C. A. Peurifay, Grand Island.

Fertilizer ...................... 40791 8.871 7.431 1.72 9.151 4.25 4.251S. J. Hilburn, Palatka.

Fertilizer ...................... 4080 6.551 7.43 2.42! 9.85 4.401 0.901 H. P. Peterson, W est Tocoi.

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 40811 8.901 7.181 2.97110.15 3.75| 2.16IMrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. o C M
Z Z BFOR WHOM SENT.

So
Z C


Blood and Bone (No. 2)........

Blood and Bone (No. 1)........

Blood and Bone (No. 2).......

Tankage (No. 2) .............

Tankage .....................

Ground Tankage ..............


10. 86] 6.03i
110.131 7.23

F 8.55 5.131

1 8.621 t.301

9.01 5.00

8.281 1.951

4.57 12.15

i 7.721 1.681

3.771 3.72

7.861 4.40


1.271 7.301 3.90 2.961 C. M. Stowe, Sanford.

1.871 9.10 3.53 1.80 Rex Packard, Sanford.

3.771 8.901 4.05 3.04 M. Fleischer, Sanford.

4.151 9.45 4.001 2.061 A. K. Powers, Sanford.
5.30.3010.30 9.90.. Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

3.35 5.30 10.30 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

6.25118.40 6.85 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

1.12 2.801 9.85 ..... H. H. Chappel, Sanford.

5.38 9.10110.501.....| L. S. Robb, Sanford.

3.951 8.35110.20 .....I Carl Carlson, Sanford.


iiixed

Mixed

Mixed

Mixed


Fertilizer
Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


'''''''''''''"








Blood and Bone ............... 4092 7.651 3.55 3.30 6.85 9.50 .....
Blood and Bone .............. 4093 6.48! 6.031 6.37112.401 7.20 .....

round Tankage ....... ....... 4094 8.98! 6.20 4.10 10.30 9.60 .....

Blood and Bone (No. 1)........ 4095 7.76 5.05 3.15 8.20 9.40.....

Tobacco Dust (No. 3).......... 4096 ..... ..... ..... ..... 1.701 5.36

Tobacco Dust (No. 1).......... 4097 ....... .......... 1.151 4.39

Cotton Seed M eal .............. 4098 ..... .... .... .[.... 7.85 .....

Nitrate of Soda (No. 4)........ 4099 .... ..... ..... ..... 19.10 .

Dried Blood (No. 1)............ 4100 . .. .. .. 17.25 .
I I I I16
Dried Blood (N o. 1)............ 14101 ..... ..... ..... ..... 16.70 .....
I I I I I I
Dried Blood (No. 2)............ 14102 ..... ..... ..... ..... 17.20 .....
Fertilizer ...................... 4103 4.67 8.60 0.35 8.95 3.30 4.35
I I T I
Fertilizer ......................41041 9.43 8.901 2.70 11.601 4.151 1.93
I I I I I
Cotton Seed M eal ............. 41051 8.39 ..... ..... ..... 6.281 .....

Fertilizer (Raw Phosphate)..... 4106\ 0.54 1.91129.69131.60[ .... I.....
r 7. 0 I .60 .1 .....
Fertilizer ....................... 4107 9.54 7.80! 0.801 8.601 4.17! .....


R. B. Monroe, Sanford.

C. B. Bell, Sanford.

Rex Packard, Sanford.

A. K. Powers, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

Fish & Fish, Sanford.

Fish & Fish, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

H. H. Chappel, Sanford.

Fish & Fish, Sanford.

J. H. Wendler, Bulow.

J. J. Hall, Green Cove Springs.

J. B. Williams, Citra.

S. J. Forny Duval, Live Oak.

O. H. Brinson, Live Oak.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSIS, 1917-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ....................... 410812.31

Fertilizer ...................... 4109 6.401

Fertilizer (No. 1) .............. 4110 8.241

Fertilizer (No. 2) .............. 41111 4.321

Fertilizer (No. 1) .............. 4112 7.75

Fertilizer (No. 2, C. S. M.)..... 41131 8.171

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1).........4114 10.181

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 4115110.621

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 3)........14116 9.45|

Mixed Fertilizer .............. .141171 7.121


Phosphoric Acid.




0
M
0)
P3 E-


7.651

8.711

8.531

8.232

8.281

6.931

5.551

5.201

4.851

6.40o


1.851 9.50|

2.37111.08

0.721 9.251

0.97 9.20

2.72111.00o

0.22 7.15[

4.75 10.30[

3.50o 8.70

1.35j 6.201

3.30[ 9.70


FOR WHOM SENT.


2.231 W. A. Weisensale, Sarasota.

1.601 J. P. Whitehurst, Gainesville.

..... J. A. Ross, Live Oak.

..... J. A. Ross, Live Oak.

1.39 T. M. Waldron, Palatka.

1.261 T. M. Waldron, Palatka.

1.831 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.
2.88 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

0.881 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

1.951 W. B. Miller, Sanford.


- -





Mixed Fertilizer ............... 41181 7.86

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4119 8.23
I I
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 41201 8.63

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 412111.65

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 4122 10.35

Tankage (No. 1) ............... 14123 5.85

Blood and Bone (No. 3)........ 4124 7.06

Tankage (No. 4) .............. 4125 4.53

Acid Phosphate ................ 4126 .....

Nitrate of Soda (No. 2)......... 4127 .....

Dried Blood (No. 1)............ 4128 ....

Dried Blood (No. 2)........... 4129 .....

Dried Blood (No. 2)............ 4130 .....

Complete Fertilizer ............14131 5.15

Commercial Fertilizer (No. 1)... 141321 3.09

Commercial Fertilizer (No. 2)... 4133 7.38


I 8
S8.30|

[ 7.881

I 8.181


6.451

6.651

4.301

5.38

1 5.501

3.901

S4.201

| 3.701
119.621


S..... 115.44 ....
..I 15.18 ..
..... 15.18 ... I


I G. F. Smith, Sanford.

SA. T. Rossetter & Son, Sanford.


2.251 8.70 4.43 4.30

7.25113.901 5.10 2.59

3.801 8.10 4.10 3.01

5.22110.60 4.05 1.87

0.85 6.35 4.95 3.28

5.65 9.551 9.70 ....

5.55 9.75|10.90 .....

5.051 8.75110.80 ....

0.43120.051..... ....
I I
S... .. .. .18.90 .....

.... ..... 17.05 ...


1.75110.05 4.681 1.45 W. G. Whitehurst, Raleigh.
I I 1 I
3.47111.35 3.30 2.531 J. P. Allen, Lithia.

1.621 9.801 3.60 2.281 J. P. Allen, Lithia.


....


A. H. Stone, Sanford.

B. L. Squires, Sanford.

W. A. Fitts, Jr., Sanford.

W. A. Fitts, Jr., Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

Ed Putnam, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

L. B. Squires, Sanford.

A. H. Stone, Sanford.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917.-(Continued.)

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. FOR WHOM SENT.

;.S 5 0 |
0- cs -3
.0*S 5,-S S a
c^ Z I .^ 5 _________


Fertilizer ......................

Cotton Seed Meal ..............

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer (No. 190448)..........

Fertilizer (No. 190449)..........

Fertilizer (No. 190450)..........

Fertilizer (No. 190451)..........


41341 6.001

4135 .. ..

4136 4.08o

4137 5.231

14138 11.761

4139 8.731

4140 3.241

4141 4.221

4142 4.56

4143 4.831


..... I..... .....
..... . . . . .

5.95{ 8.90114.85

7.00 1.401 8.40

5.931 1.42 7.35

9.60 1.80111.40

3.901 0.95 4.85

4.781 0.671 5.45

6.541 1.361 7.901

6.301 1.051 7.351


..... 43.85 Vuelta Sumatree Co., Havana.

7.38 ..... J. & O. Altschul Tobacco Co., Quincy.

4.02 5.421J. B. Stetson Estate, DeLand.

5.851 1.991R. E. VanNess, Hernando.

4.30 3.271 J. H. Herlong, Princeton.

2.87 1.761 S. S. Mobley, Live Oak.

3.57' 4.04 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

5.37 5.82 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

2.95 3.77 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

3.561 5.241 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.







Fertilizer (No. 190452).......... 4144 5.78 7.33

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4145 9.231 5.75
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 4146 12.27 4.58

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4147 10.681 5.901

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4148 5.05 7.351

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4149 8.431 5.901

Goat Manure (No. 3)........... 4150 15.16 1.05

Blood and Bone (No. 1)........ 4151 9.38 2.601

Blood and Bone (No. 1)........ 4152 6.70 3.15!

Acid Phosphate (No. 2)......... 4153 ..... 17.321

Blood and Bone ................ 4154 6.43 2.55
1


1.421 8.75, 4.50|

3.90 9.65 4.38

3.721 8.30 4.081

2.70! 8.601 4.25
I I
1.23 8.68 4.75

6.45 12.35 6.13.

0.30 1.351 1.75

2.55 5.15 9.88.

7.20 10.35 9.50 .

0.28117.60 ..... .

7.25 9.80110.30.
1''"


Ground Phosphate (No. 2)...... 41551 ..... 0.90 31.20132.10

Tobacco Dust (No. 2)........... 4156 ..... .. .. .. .

Cotton Seed Meal ............. 4157 ...................

Fertilizer ...................... 41581 4.48 8.00 2.20110.20
Fertilizer ...................... 41591 7.38112.831 1.77114.601


2.95


5.35 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

2.36 John Pezold, Sanford.
I
2.80[ John Pezold, Sanford.

2.861 T. E. Wainwright, Sanford.

1.171 A. E. Sjoblom, Sanford.


7.59


R. B. Monroe, Sanford.
R. B. Monroe, Sanford.

C. Bell, Sanford.
L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

L. A. Brumley, Sanford.
E. E. Brady, Sanford.

R. B. Monroe, Sanford.

C. Bell, Sanford.


I
7.72 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

2.83 2.36 D. P. Nobles, Live Oak.

2.431..... J. C. Smith, DeFuniak Springs.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSIS, 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. o FOR WHOM SENT.

.n Cd
1 n I
_Z g

Cotton Seed Meal ..............14160 ..... .....

Fertilizer .................... 4161 7.37 12.20
I I I
Fertilizer ...................... 4162 8.52112.551

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4163 7.71 6.C0

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4164 6.1 6.25

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4165 S.83 5.40

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2).. ..... 4166 8.716 9.35

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ........ 4167 10.02 5.65

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4163 8.47 8.05

Taniage (No. 1) ................ 4169 7.5,1 3.':3


.......... 6.98 ..... J. M. Freeman, Havana.

2.05 14.25 4.38 ..... T. J. Adkison, Glendale.
1.65 14.20 2.40.....L. Adams, Glendale.

2.50 9.10 3.S5 2.61 A. Van Ness, Sanford.

1.95 8.23 3.85 2.76 C. F. Brrn&n, Sanford.

2.8 5 8.25 4.2 5.20 G. F. Smith, Sanford.

1.95 11.30 4.58 2.17 .W. H. Peters, Sarford.

4.65,10.30 3.90 1.72 Henry Witte, Sanford.

2.3010.35 5.48 2.49 E. D. Oglesby, Sanford.

7.85 11.781 8.50 ..... W. H. Peters, Sanford.







Tankage (No. 1)................ 41701 G.1C 3.S3 5.17 9.00110.30 ..... Henry Witte, Sanford.
Blood and Bone (No. 2)........ (1711 6.3 3.43 6.32 9.T7 10.70 ... G. F. Smith, Sanford.
Blood and Bone ................4172 7.64 4.951 8.65 13.60 7.50 ..... W. B. Miller, Sanford.
Tobacco Dust (No. 2) .......... 4173 ..... ..... ....... 2.65[ 7.701 E. D. Oglesby, Sanford.
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 41741 .......... 7.301..... J. T. Taylor, Quincy.
Fertilizer No. 1 (Acid Phos.) ... 4175 ..... 17.20 0.20117.40 ..... ..... J. M. Stewart, Westville.
Fertilizer (No. 2) .............. 41761 7.77 11.90 1.25j13.15 2.48 .....I J. M. Stewart, W fstville.
Guano ......................... 41771 9.98 11.251 1.05 12.301 2.351 1.271 T. M. Hudson, Westville.
Acid Phosphate ................ 41781 ..... 17.95 0.15 18.10 ..... ... T. M. Hudson, W estville.
Nitrate of Soda (No. 1) ........ 41791 ..... .......... 119.301 .....I G. F. Smith, Sanford.
I I I I
Bone Meal (No. 2) ............. 4180 3.881 6.95 16.85123.80 5.00 ..... G. F. Smith, Sanford.
Blood and Bone (No. 3) ........ 4181 5.78j 4.00 6.70 10.70 9.90 .... G. F. Smith, Sanford.
i I I I I
Dried Blood (No. 4) ............ 4182 ..... .......... ..... 17.50 .. G. F. Smith, Sanford.
I I F I
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 5) ........ 41831 6.981 6.831 2.32 9.151 5.08[ 3.13| G. F. Smith, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer ............... .41841 5.871 6.58 1.17 7.75 4.38 3.86! W. H. Byers, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1) ........ 6.55 6.95 4.9011.85 3.00 1.06 J. W. Flt, Geneva.
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1) ........41851 6.551 6.95 4.90111.85 3.00' 1.061 J. W. Flint, Geneva.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSIS, 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. & | .3 c FOR WHOM SENT.

0Z 0 .I
i- < iS


MiVxed ertilizer (No. 2) ........ 4186i '.5b1 7.58
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4187 6.98 6.13

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4188 7.78] 3.63

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 14189 7.371 6.45

Fertilizer ...................... 4190]10.12[ 4.351

Fertilizer (No. 1) .............. 14191[ 3.83 7.481

Fertilizer (No. 2) .............. 141921 5.01! 7.401

Fertilizer ................. .... 41931 4.03 6.101

Composted Sea Moss ........... 4194110.98 0.88]

Carbonate of Potash ........... 41951 .... ..... .


1.871 9.45 5.13 0971 J. W. Flynt, Geneva.

3.47 9.60 6.10 5.801 R. Muse, Sanford.

1.57 5.20 10.95 1.91 B. H. Squires, Sanford.
2.80 9.25 4.47 3.66 Mahoney, Walker & Mahoney, Sanford

4.80 9.65 4.38 4.26 R. W. Rhodes, Miami.

6.S7 14.35 5.55 ..... J. R. Davis, Bartow.

1.0S 9.20] 4.52 2.81 J. R. Davis, Bartow.

8.0514.15 6.73 ..... J. R. Davis, Bartow.

5.12 6.00 1.53 0.50 E. W. Amsden, Ormond Beach.

.... ..... ..... 25.64] Swift & Co., Chicago, Ill.


. I 1 _(







Fertilizer ...................... 41961 6.971 7.65 1.651 9.30 5.051 1.931 N. P. Canthen, W aldo.

Ground Phosphate .............. 4197 ..... 1.10 29.40 30.50..... ..... J. Hinton Pledger, Ta

16% Acid Phosphate............ 4198 ..... 16.60 4.70 21.30 ..... ... J. Hinton Pledger, Tal

Tobacco Dust (No. 1).......... 4199 ..... .... ...... 2.C5 6.S01 Joseph Camerion, Sanr

Cotton Seed Meal (No. 3)......4200 .......... ........... 7.15 .... Joseph Cameron, Sani

Blood and Bone (No. 2) ......... 4201 7.10 3.75 6.55 10.30 10.40 ..... Joseph Cameron, San

Blood and Bone ................ 4202 6.S8 4.35 10.00 14.35 7.15 .... 11. H. Muirhead, Sanf

Blood and Bone ................ 4203 5.56 3.30 8.00 11.3010.85..... 'ish & Fish, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4204 4.22 9.33 0.6710.00 3.93 ..... H. A. Vivian, Orla.d

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4205 7.37 7.93 2.9710.90 3.80 0.48 Chuluota Co., Sanford

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)....... 4206 6.9S 6.33 0.87 7.20 5.05 1.03 Chuluota Co., Sanford

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 3)......... 4207 8.06 11.20 3.20 14.40 2.48 ..... Chulu'ota Co., Sanford

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4208 7.03 5.90 2.95 8.85 4.32 5.01 G. F. Smith, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer ................ 4209 7.28 5.801 2.75 8.55 4.18 4.48 C. E. Wainwright, San

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4210 (i .22 6.30 1.501 7.80 3.75 2.S9 Robt. S. Shimmons, S

Mixed Fertilizer ................ 4211 7.05 6.45 6.35112.80 6.40 0.67 R. B. Monroe, Sanfor


llahassee.

lahassee.

ford.

ford.

ford.

ord




0.


L.

[.



ford.

anford.

d.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. a d FOR WHOM SENT.


1 z *P"
1*1 ! i h


hate ..... .... .... 4212 ..... 18.85 0.30 19.15

phate ................ 421 ..... 19.40 0.401 9.80

hate ................. 14214 ... 18.68 0.62 19.30

phate ................ 4215... 19.20 0.40 19.60

........................ 42161 3.9 5.95 5.50 11.45

.................. 4217 8.9 7.58 1.07 8.65

Fertilizer ............ 4218 5.98 3.50 8.60 12.10

...................... 4219 8.93 3.18 7.17 10.35

(Bone Meal) ......... 4220 4.07 4.60 19.00 23.60

(No. 1) .............. 4221 7.621 9.85 3.20113.051


.............L. M. Owens, Quincy.

..... ..... C. S. Lambert, Quincy.

..... ..... W. C. Lambert, Quincy.

..... .. W. M. Owens, Quincy.

4.10 2.271 R. W. Rhodes, Miami.

5.23 2.431C. H. Wilson, Clermont.

7.281 0.921H. A. Perry, Pomona.

5.321 1.92!C. O. Roe, Clermont.

5.10 .....I Nocatee Fruit Co., Nocatee.

5.681 0.471J. R. McKibben, Orlando.


Acid Phos

Acid Phos

Acid Phos

Acid Phos

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Complete

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


1



sI








Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ........ 4222 6.86 8.231 7.37115.601 4.331 2.30] E. Curlett, Geneva.
Fertilizer ...................... 1422311.31110.43 1.62 12.05[ 2.251 2.141 J. M. Stewart, Westville.
I F I I I I I
Orangewood Ashes ............. 4224 ..... .... .... 4.10 ..... 5.50 W. S. DuPree, Citra.
Blood and Bone ................4225 5.53 3.60 9.00 12.60 10.60 ..... Mahoney, Walker & Mahoney, Sanford
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 4226 ........ .. ..... 6.90 .. S. H. Bass, Milton.

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4227 11.14 4.78 4.30 9.08 3.90 1.89 Henry Nickel, Sanford.

Phosphate Rock ............... 4228 ..... ..... ..... 10.70 ..... ..... Mrs. S. Slaugh, Summerfield.

Sheep Manure .................. 4229 8.37 1.73 0.12 1.85 3.60 2.00 W. A. Raynor, Sanford.
Fertilizer .................. ... 4230 10.83 7.28 1.82 9.10 4.60 2.17 E. Stafford, Enterprise Junction.

Fertilizer ..................... 4231111.91 7.43 2.62 10.05 4.58 1.90K. S. Parrish, Parrish.
Fertilizer ........................ 4232 10.28 2.85 4.00 6.85 10.25 0.461W. A. Dormany, Dade City.

Goat Manure ................... 4233113.68 0.83 0.121 0.95 1.95 3.57 E. L. Perkins, Punta Gorda.
Complete Fertilizer ............ 4234112.121 4.63 3.57 8.20 5.00 3.58 J. E. Breckenridge, Cateret, N. J.
Sheep Manure (N'o. 1) ......... 4235 8.12 1.20 0.10 1.301 2.13 2.53! D. Leach, Sanford.

Mixed Manure (No. 2) .......... 4236 8.33 1.53 0.07 1.60 2.30 2.78D. Leach, Sanford.

Mixed Manure ..................,4237 8.04 1.43 0.07 1.501 2.40 2.731 Mike Boys, Sanford.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSIS, 1917-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ...................... 4238110.911

Fertilizer ...................... 142391 3.78
I I I
High Grade Fertilizer .......... 4240 8.57

Fertilizer ..................... 4241 7.181

Fertilizer ..................... 4242 7.81

Ammonia Salt ................ 424315.33.

Tankage ...................... 4244 5.78

Fertilizer .....................424510.68

Fertilizer "A" ................. 4246 12.46

Fertilizer "B" ................. 4247 9.05


Phosphoric Acid



iS &
i'S 0
'> S 0


8.351

7.101

3.88

1.78

7.13



2.80

6.18

6.75

5.60


0.801 9.15

2.15 9.25

4.72 8.60

1.87113.65

1.72 8.85



5.30 8.10

4.47 10.65

2.05 8.80

3.25 8.85


FOR WHOM SENT.


3.851 6.22 A. H. Brown, Manavista.

6.05 0.52 M. Juergan, West Palm Beach.

5.15 0.35 K. S. Parrish, Parrish.

6.22 0.34 J. W. Jernigan, Orlando.

3.95 0.46 C. L. Parrish, Parrish.

3.55 ..... Robert Ranson, St. Augustine.

6.30 ..... Carroll Dunscombe, Stuart

5.05 0.98C. W. Field, Orlando.

3.951 3.701W. W. Waters, Delray.

5.40 2.90 G. A. Sparks, Delray.


" '




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