• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of state of Florida
 Part I
 Part II. Crop and live stock...
 Part III. Fertilizers, feeding...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00045
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00045
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Rhodes grass
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
        Beans
            Page 12
            Page 13
        Egg plants
            Page 14
            Page 15
        Peppers
            Page 16
        Okra
            Page 17
            Page 18
        Fall plantig dates
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
        A Florida specimen & Pastures and forage for hogs
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Leguminous hays best for dairy cattle
            Page 27
            Page 28
        Weights and measures
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Farm loans
            Page 33
        Maketing and storage & Fall and winter crops
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
    Part II. Crop and live stock condition
        Page 37
        divisions of the state by counties
            Page 38
        Department of agriculture
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
    Part III. Fertilizers, feeding stuffs, and foods and drugs
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Department of agriculture - Divisions of chemistry
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
Full Text





SVolume 27. Number 3



FLORIDA4

QUARTERLY


BULLETIN

OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


JULY 1, 1917.

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

Part 1-Rhodes Grass; Beans; Egg Plants; Peppers; Okra;
Miscellaneous.
Part 2-Crop and Live Stock Condition.
Part 3-Fertilizers, Feeding Stuffs, and Foods and Drugs.

Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.
THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED FREE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM

T. J. APPLEYARD, STATE PRINTER
TALLAHA88E, FLORIDA






























COUNTY .
MAP OF

STATEoF FLO RIDA
SHOWING SUBDIVISION S


C
KEY WEST



















PART I.

Rhodes Grass; Beans; Egg Plants; Peppers;
Okra; Miscellaneous.













RHODES GRASS.

By PROF. P. H. ROLFS.

The value of this grass was discovered by Cecil Rhodes,
whose name it bears. This was about 1895, at Cape
Town, South Africa. March 8, 1903, Messrs. Lathrop and
Fairchild secured a small quantity of the seed and for-
warded it to the U. S. Department of Agriculture. At
that time Dr. Fairchild wrote, "The grass has done well
there [Mr. Rhodes' farm near Cape Town] forming a
heavy sod of good herbage, and the manager of Mr.
Rhodes' farm has had the seed collected and distributed
among the planters of the colony, by whom it is called
'Rhodes Grass'. From what I saw of these patches on
the slopes of a hillside, I do not believe it is a drought
resistant form; at least it is not able to withstand very
severe dry weather. * it need be tested only in the
frostless or nearly frostless regisions." This seems to
have been the first time this grass seed was brought into
the United States and tested for forage purposes.

TESTING AT THE EXPERIMENT STATION.
In 1909 a larger amount of seed was obtained by the
OfficeOffice of Seed and Plant Introduction. On April 6
of that year a small packet of about an ounce was sent to
the Experiment Station by Prof. C. V. Piper, Agros-
tologist, Bureau of Plant Industry. On April 12, 1909,
one-half of this seed was sown in a flat in the greenhouse.
On April 15 the seedlings were showing above the ground.
On April 28 these seedlings were transplanted to the
grass garden. The other half of the seed was sown
directly in the grass garden on April 15. On May 5 these
were coming up and by June 5 some plants were 6 inches
tall. On July 2, 1909, both rows were sending up seen
stalks and were about equally vigorous. On August 3
seed had ripened and was saved. The grass at this time
was about 4 feet tall. No cuttings were made from these
plots, as it was desired to get as much seed as possible.
On December 10, 1909, the temperature went down to
28 F. The grass passed thru this without injury. During











the latter part of December the temperature went down
to 170 F., and all the leaves were killed to the ground.
February 4, 1910, green shoots began to come out and
by April 5 it had recovered sufficiently to make good
grazing. The first cutting was made June 26, when the
stalks stood from 11/2 to 3 feet tall. On September 1 it
again stood about 3 feet tall and a second cutting was
made. On October 1 it was again about 3 feet tall. On
the 30th of October the temperature went down to 32 F.,
without injuring the grass. On December 3 the tem-
perature went down to 230 F., killing off all the leaves,
but the roots were uninjured. On February 23, 1911, we
experienced a temperature of 25 F., killing back all
growth made, but not injuring the roots materially. By
April 7, some of the plants were 15 inches tall, and by
the middle of the month were sending up seed stalks.
During the summer of 1911 the growth was better than
during 1910. The stalks reached a height of 4 feet. A
cutting for hay was made at late as October 24.

WINTER-KILLED IN 1912.

During the winter of 1911-12 we had comparatively
little freezing weather. The lowest temperatures occurred
on December 30 and on January 16. The thermometer
went down to 290 F. on the former date and to 25' on
the latter date. Nearly all the plants of the 1909 sowing
were killed. It is probable that the late cutting left the
plants weakened, or it may be that the warm moist winter
caused the roots to be less resistant to cold.
During 1911, enough seed was furnished by Prof. Piper
to sow about one-third of an acre. This was sown August
12, and a fair stand obtained, but the winter of 1911-12
proved very severe on it. The stand being quite imper-
fect, the field was plowed and re-sown. In the fall of
1912 and the spring of 1913 more seed was secured from
commercial sources, but this all proved to be very low
in germinating quality.

WITHSTANDS SHORT COLD PERIODS WKEN SOIL IS MOIST.

During succeeding years experiments were continued to
test its adaptation to various kinds of soils and the effects
of cold weather. The effects of cold varies greatly under











varying moisture and temperature conditions. The winter
of 1911-12 was particularly severe on the plants, though
not excessively cold at any time. The rainfall was rather
light and the temperature went below 250 F. several
times, but not below 20 F. In the winter of 1916-17
there was a well distributed rainfall and an excessively
low temperature. The lowest record being 17' F. on
February 3. The roots lived thru the winter and made
a fair growth during March. This experience indicates
that Rhodes grass may survive a temperature of 17 F.
if abundance of moisture is present and the cold of only
short duration-a week or so-as was the case in 1917,
while frequent cold spells, when the soil is rather dry,
are likely to prove killing even when the temperature
does not go much below 250 F. A temperature of 260 F.
is likely to kill the plants to the roots, while a tempera-
ture of 320 F. is not likely to damage the tops materially.

SEED SAVING.

Seed has been gathered from our test plots from time to
time. This has been found to keep well and have a good
germinating quality. It seeded abundantly and the seed
is harvested quite readily, tho not as easily as the seeo
of timothy and some other good hay grosses. It would
seem possible for persons located in regions where this
grass grows readily to produce, profitably, all the seed
needed. No difficulty has been encountered so far in the
matter of producing and saving the seed. It matures
quite uniformly in the head and holds fairly well against
shattering. The grass with ripened seed may be cut and
bound into convenient sized bundles. This is then cured
in the most convenient way. After the bundles have been
thoroly dried the seed can be easily beaten out. This way
of saving seed will suffice for experimental test, but for
commercial purposes machinery will have to be used to
eliminate much of the costly hand labor.
Mr. E. W. Amsden, of Ormond, wrote us on November
4, 1912, that he cut a piece 40 by 60 feet, from which he
got fourteen sheaves. From two of these sheaves he
pounded out an eight-quart pan level full of seed, weigh-
ing from a pound to a pound and a half. An acre at this
rate would have yielded over one hundred pounds of seed.
These figures are based on too limited data to be made a











basis of calculation, but serve in a general way as an
index of what may be expected under favorable condi-
tions. The important seed, received mainly from Aus-
tralia, has been sold at $1.00 to $1.50 per pound. The
seed is very light, weighing only about 71/2 pounds per
bushel.

YIELD OF HAY.

Very large yields oi hay were secured during the sum-
mer of 1912. The very low germinating quality of the
seed sown in 1912 has greatly discouraged the extensive
planting of this grass.
Reports of enormous yields have been published from
time to time. It has been sufficiently tested to show that
much larger yields of Rhodes grass hay can be produced
annually in Florida than is possible from grass in the
hay-producing states. "There are authentic reports of
total yields per season of six tons per acre of well-cured
hay secured from three cuttings, the first cutting being
made in May, the second in July, and the third in Sep-
tember." (Yearbook, 1912, page 498, U. S. Dept. Agric.)
In South Florida on the drained lands it has made an
especially fine showing as a forage and hay grass. In
some instances extremely large yields of hay have been
produced. The cold weather in this region is rarely suf-
ficnent to damage it and in many localities good grazing
may be had from it at all times of the year. It is
especially valuable in this section during the winter,
when it affords an abundance of succulent grazing. Other
grasses, such as Para and Carib, are more affected by
the dry and cool weather.
In Queensland, according to the Agricultural Gazette
of New South Walese, for April, 1911, as much as five
and one-third tons of hay per acre have been produced in
a year.
According to the Annual Report of the Arizona Ex-
per-iment Station, it has been tested there for six years
and there passed a temperature of 17' to 20 F. without
injury, but it is not recommended as an arid region grass.
Under irrigation it produced one and a half tons of hay
at each of two annual cuttings.











REGIONS IN WHICH TO TRY RHODES GRASS.

It should be tested by all farmers of Florida in an
experimental way. It has been generally successful in
the region from Gainesville southward. Those farmers
who are in a position to do so should try it on a one to
five acre extent. In the region from Gainesville north-
ward and westward it would be advisable to try it on a
smaller scale. In a general way, in those places where
the winter temperature does not go below 23 or 22 F.,
this grass may be sown with a fair prospect of not having.
the roots winter-killed.

TIME OF SOWING.

In Central and South Florida it would seem advisable
to sow during October and November, or during Feb-
ruary, March or April. The seed is very small and con-
sequently the seedlings are weak. It germinates quickly
under favorable conditions. Under perfect conditions
we found that seed sown on April 12 was coming up on
the 15th. and on the 28th the seedlings were large enough
to transplant to the test plot. A sowing in the test plot
made on March 15, 1912, gave grass four feet tall by
June 25, and was ready for the first cutting approxi-
mately one hundred days from time of seeding. The
following year, 1913, the grass on these plots was ready
for making into hay on May 1.
If the soil is in first-class condition, seed sown in
October or November will become well established before
winter and give early spring pasturage, or an early crop
of hay.
In South Florida on the drained lands it may be sown
at any time of the year, but preferably from October to
March. At this time of the year the seedlings are less
liable to be smothered by weeds and native grasses.
In North and West Florida, the seed should be sown
in the spring after the soil has become warm enough for
corn planting. This will give sufficient time to get two
or three mowings for hay and also some late fall
pasturage. During favorable winters the grass may live
thru and be useful for pasturage in the spring and for
having during the summer and fall.











PREPARATION OF THE SOIL.

It should be remembered that this seed is much smaller
than either oats or rye, and consequently the seed bed
will need much more careful preparation. The land
should be plowed deeply and thoroly. The surface should
be left as nearly level as possible. After the plowing has
been done the field should be leveled further by the use
of a smoothing harrow or plank. The seeds should not be
sown until sufficient moisture is near the surface of the
.soil to cause them to germinate quickly and to grow
strong seedlings. On compact soils it is usually sufficient
to go over the land a time or two with a weighted plank.
This will cover the seed a half inch or less. On the more
fibrous soil a roller will be better. The points that must
be borne in mind are that enough moisture must be near
the surface of the soil to germinate the seed and then
the moisture must be held there until the seedings have
become established.

KIND or SOIL.

The best crops have been produced on the best farm
lands. Good hammock land with a clay foundation will
be found excellent. These occur in many parts of the
State, especially around Brooksville. Fine crops have
been produced at St. Augustine, Ormond, Dunedin and
Miami, where there is less clay in the soil. Many ex-
cellent crops have been grown on well-drained lands.

CHARACTER OF THE GRASS.

The general character of the plant is nearly ideal. The
forage and stalk grow upright, making it easy to mow.
It does not bunch or tangle in mowing. The plants stool
out very much like timothy. In addition to the stooling
it also produces rattoons that root at the joints and form
new plants, these again stool like the parent plant. These
rattoons will sometimes grow as much as six feet long in
a single season. This habit of producing rattoons enables
the grass to cover the ground quite completely, although
tho catch from seeding may be irregular. The Agricul-
tural Gazette of New South Wales for July 2, 1909, pub-











listed the picture of a plant grown from a single seed.
At eight months it spread over an area of four feet, three
inches in diameter.
Rhodes grass can be easily killed by ordinary farm
methods. It has no underground rattoons and dies read-
ily when plowed up, so no one need fear that it will ever
become a farm pest. It does not spread rapidly from
seed under natural conditions.

COMPOSITION OF RIODES GRASS HAY.
TABLE 11.
SNitrogen- i
Moisture Protein Fat Frr o- Crude A A mid
I IFat Ire Fiber N.
__Extract N.
Rhodes Grass*.. 11. 6.1 2.3 42. r 30.2 7.2 0.21
(2 analyses) | 9.) | 7.3 1.4 44.6 ] 20.2 7.6 0.20
Crab Grassf .... 10.3 | 6.9 | 1.6 41.0 | 32.9 7.3 | ....
Timothy? ...... 13.2 5.9 2.5 45.0 I 29.0 4.4 I .
I I I
Hawaii Report, 1908, pp. 58-59.
t Florida Report. 1900. p. xix

The protein, fat and nitrogen-free extract are the sub-
stances that are of special value in a feed. The table
shows that these substances are present in Rhodes grass
in approximately the same ratio as in crabgrass and
timothy. The selling price of Rhodes-grass hay should be
the same as that of timothy. As a matter of fact we do
not get the best quality of timothy in our markets, and it
is therefore likely that the timothy hay offered to us is
really not as valuable as is Rhodes-grass hay.

STES FOR RHODES 'GRASS.

Rhodes grass has been introduced into Florida so re-
cently that there has been no opportunity to test it out
in feeding experiments nor for grazing purposes. It has
been tested much more extensively and thoroly in Aus-
tralia, where it is highly recommended both as a grazing
grass and as a hay grass. Their stock prefer it to the
American paspalum (PaspalIum dilatatuin). It is espe-
cially useful in the moister regions where the temperature
does not go much below freezing. In the dryer regions it
does well under irrigation.










ACKNOWLEDGMENT.

Thanks are due to Prof. C. V. Piper, Agrostologist,
Bureau Plant Industry, for supplying much of the seed
used in these experiments. The U. S. Bureau of Plant
Industry has distributed packets of Rhodes grass seed to
all sections of the State and has aide dthe farmers in
securing larger quantities of seed where they wished to
try it on an extensive scale. Seedsmen of the South are
now advertising it in their catalogues so that everyone
wishing to do so can try it out for themselves. The
Experiment Station has none of the seed or plants for
sale or distribution.

BEANS

This vegetable is specially adapted to Florida soil and
climate and does well in most any part of the State. In
the northern and central sections they Jplant beans for the
fall crop in August and September; for the spring, from
the middle of January until April. In Southern Florida
they plant any time from the first of September until
February. It requires one bushel of seed to plant an acre.
Beans usually sell well and sometimes command ex-
treme prices, selling as high as 95.00 to .$9.00 per crate;
but this is only when they are very scarce.
PREPARATION OF LAND.-Plow it two ways not less than
six inches deep. Disc it across the way it was plowed
last, and then lay it off in furrows the width you wish the
rows apart, which is usually from two to two and one-
half feet. If to be cultivated with a horse plow, about
three feet. We prefer to plant beans in double rows, hav-
ing the double rows three feet apart, and allowing eight
to ten inches between the rows; however, every grower
has his preference. In this way it is considered, you
not only get more beans to the acre, but the rows shade
death other, and give a better yield. Apply th fertilizer
in the furrow, using any bean special, which will analyze
as follows: Ammonia, 5%; available phosphoric acid,
6%; and potash 5%, using from 500 to 1,000 pounds to
the acre. Cover this fertilizer well, mixing thoroughly
with the soil. Drill the seed in the furrows dropping
about three inches apart and packing the soil on top of
them. In the absence of chemical fertilizer, well scat-












tered stable manure at the rate of one ton to 500 pounds
of acid phosphate 16;% thoroughly mixed will make a
good fertilizer applied in drill; its efficiency is greater
than its analysis indicates.
PLANTING.-YOU should wait at least a week to ten
days after applying the fertilizer before sowing the seed,
for if planted before this time the fertilizer will be apt
to burn them.
VARIETIES.-The principal shipping varieties of beans
are the 1,000 to 1 Refugee, which seem to be tle most
popular of the green pod bush varieties, but the Early
Refugee, the Red and Black Valentine, Burpee Green Pod
are also planted extensively. Of the wax varieties we
consider the Hodson Wax one of the finest wax beans for
planting in Florida. It is nearly immune to rust and is
a very heavy bearer. The Davis Kidney Wax and the
Wardwell Kidney Wax are very popular among the ship-
pers on the East Coast. On the West Coast and in Cen-
tral Florida they seem to prefer the German Black Wax.
The wax beans, however, are more subject to diseases,
and are not as hardy as the first named.
CULTIVATION.-As soon as the plant has formed two
leaves begin to cultivate, being careful to work the beans
only when they are dry; for if worked in the early morn-
ing while the dew is on them or immediately after a rain,
it is apt to cause them to rust. It is a good idea to give
them a shallow working every week, and apply a little
bean special fertilizer each time, drilling it in the rows
about six inches from the plant. If at any stage of the
plant's growth it stops growing or turns yellow, give it
an application of nitrate of soda, applying it in the rows,
being careful not to get it on the plants as it will burn.
Use from 150 to 200 pounds to the acre.
PICKING.-In picking, do not wait until the beans show
in the pod, but pick them when they are well rounded out,
which is usually from sixty to seventy days after plant-
ing. It is best, if you have to hire them picked, to pay
by the crate. If the beans are worm eaten or blighted,
spread them out in a cool place and pick out the damaged
stock. The patch will be apt to require picking about
once in every three to five days. Care should be used in
pulling them off the bush as it always has blossoms, young










beans and matured pods on it at the same time, and if
roughly handled, a large part of the immature beans and
blossoms will be destroyed.
PACKING AND SHIPPING.-Pack in bushel hampers. If
dirty it is a good idea to wash and drain them before
picking. Be careful to see that there are no dead leaves
or other trash among them. We prefer to pick beans in
the afternoon, packing them in the crate and setting
them in the shade until the following morning. In this
way beans shrink all they ever will, and when you fill
the crate up again it will go into the market full and will
be apt to net you an extra price. Make two grades of
them, marking the best ones, if fancy, with your trade
mark.
HOME UsE.-The Burpee's Stringless Green Pod makes
a fine variety for home use or for local market.
INSECTS AND DISEASEs.-The principal insects that at-
tack the bean crop are the rolle rworm and the green
cabbage worm or looper, bu these can easily be destroyed
by spraying with arsenate of lead. The principal diseases
of the bean are the mildew, rust and blight. Use sulphur
and lime dust spray just as the beans are blooming, and
again after the first crop is picked, for the mildew. Spray-
ing with Bordeaux mixture will usually check the rust
and blight. A great many farmers prefer to spray the
plants from the time they form their third leaf, until
they begin to put on beans, as it is much easier to pre-
vent the disease than to cure it.

EGG PLANTS.

While egg plants are not hard to grow, they are one
of the most uncertain crops the trucker can plant. They
will not only fail for the amateur, but will sometimes fail
for the most experienced egg plant grower; but they pay
well for taking the risk, and are certainly a clean crop
to raise.
PLANTING.-In Northern and Central Florida, they are
planted for a fall crop in July and August, raising the
plants in seed beds and transplanting them when from
six to eight inches high. You can raise the fall plants in
the open air, using a half shade of laths to keep the full
strength o fthe sun off of them. Under a shed of slats
where the spring crop consisted of tobacco, is an ideal











soil and location. For a spring crop, to have them early,
they should be planted in December or January, sowing
the seeds in hot beds or cold frames to protect the plants
from the slightest frost, as they are very easily killed. In
Southern Florida, plant th eseed any time from Septem-
ber 1st ,until January. It will not be necessary to raise
the plants in hot beds, although it is well to have the
beds so that a cloth cover can be stretched over them in
case of a cold spell. It will take from four to six ounces
of seed to raise enough plants to set an acre.
SoIL.-The egg plant is adapted to a sandy soil, but
prefers it rich and deeply cultivated. High hammock
land is excellent for them. This is one crop which stands
dry weather exceedingly well; in fact it will stand more
than most crops we plant in this State. It is impossible
to get the land in too good a condition for them.
VARIETIEs.-The Florida grown seed of this vegetable
is the finest obtainable, and if you care to go to the
trouble, you can save your own seed, but it will hardly
pay to do this. The New York Improved LargePurple is
the most popular variety, although the Florida High Bush
is planted extensively, and seems to be gaining in pop-
ularity each season. Its best feature is that the fruit is
set well above the ground, therefore it does not rot as
badly. as the other varieties, which are apt to touch the
ground, but the color, size and shape of this fruit is not
equal to the New York Improved Large Purple. Another
variety which is well liked in all parts of the State is the
Black Beauty, and the more it is planted, the better it is
liked.
FERTILIZING.--This is one crop which requires plenty
of potash fertilizer, and you will find it will pay to broad-
cast the field with a ton of kainit, harrowing it in. Next
lay the field off in furrows, the width you wish the rows
apart, which is from four to five feet, setting the plants
about three feet apart in the row; using 1,500 pounds of
fertilizer in these furrows which should analyze as fol-
lows: Ammonia, 5%; available phosphoric acid, 4%;
potash 9%. Cover it well and see that you get it well
mixed with the soil. If chemical manures are not availa-
ble, use the manure suggested for beans on a preceding
page.
TRANSPLANTING.-After the fertilizer has been in the
ground about ten (lays or two weeks, you may set tI:e










plants. This should be done with great care, as the egg
plant will not stand rough handling. Water immediately
after planting, pouring it on the ground by the side of the
plant and not on it.
CULTIVATION.-This vegetable requires less work than
any you can plant. All that is necessary is to keep the
ground well stirred and the weeds down, giving the plants
from 200 to 300 pounds of fertilizer, the same as you used
the first time, at each working, until you have used about
1,000 pounds to the acre.
PACKING AND SHIPPING.-Gather the fruit as soon as
developed, cutting from the plant with a pair of clippers,
the same that are used for pruning orange trees, as the
stems are tough and will require a pair of strong ones
for this work. Clip the stem about two inches from the
egg plant, but before packing take a sharp knife and trim
off close to the fruit to keep them from bruising each
other in transit. Look the fruit over very carefully to see
that there are no spots on it, as it is from these spots
that they start to decay, and the damaged ones must be
thrown out. Have a paper or feather duster and dust egg
plant very carefully; then wipe them off with a soft
cloth. You will find that egg plants will carry to market
better if wrapped in strong brown paper. Pack tightly in
the crate, but do not bruise. There is no other vegetable
or fruit that requires the careful handling than this one
does, and when delivered in good condition, no vegetable
yields a better profit.

PEPPERS.

This crop is being grown more and more extensively in
Florida every season and is proving one of the best money
crops. It can be grown on most any kind of soil, and if
given a little fertilizer every ten or fifteen days it will
bear continuously throughout the season.
PLANTING.-In the Northern and Central parts of the
State, for a fall crop, if you prefer, you can plant the
seed in the field where you wish the crop to grow. sowing
the seed any time from July 15th to the middle of August.
VARIETIEs.-The Ruby King is really the most popular
of all the different kinds, being well liked by both the
trucker and the consumer. The Chinese Giant, a new
variety which is larger than the Ruby King, is gaining










in popularity very fast. The Bull Nose is also a popular
kind. If you wish to raise any hot peppers for home use,
plant the Long Red Cayenne.
FElTrILIZINI AND CULTIVATION.-Prepare the land as you
would for tomatoes, putting the fertilizer in furrows
under the rows where you wish the plant to grow, using
about 1,000 pounds to the acre. Use fertilizer that will
analyze as follows: Ammonia, 5% ; potash, 9%; available
phosphoric acid, 4%. Should it be impossible to obtain
chemical man ule, use stable manure and acid phosphate
as suggested for beans. Make the rows two and one-hall
to three feet apart, setting the plants from one to one
and one-half feet apart in the row. Cultivation should
be carried on thoroughly and deeply until the plants begin
to put on fruit, after which time culttivate just as con-
stantly, hut not so deeply; all that is necessary is to keep
the top layer of sold well stirred. It is a good idea to
give tile plants from 300 to 400 pounds of fertilizer to
the acre every fifteen days from the time they start to
bear until they finish. Being a continuous bearer, they
require constant feeding. An acre of peppers well worked
and fertilized will yield a thousand crates or more to
the acre.
PICKING AND PACKING.-Pick the fruit as soon as it is
plump and hard; but under no condition pick it before it
is well developed, for one or two undeveloped peppers in
a crate hurts the sale of the entire lot, as they wither
and rygt very quickly. Do not pull them from the plant,
but cut with a pair of shears. Sort the peppers carefully,
throwing out any which show defect. If they are bringing
high prices on the markets, pack in six-basket tomato
crates, but if they are bringing a small price, pack them
in bushel hampers. In packing, jar the crate frequently
to shake them down, then fill it up again so it will go into
market full.

OKRA.

While you will not make the money out of this that
you will out of some other vegetables you can plant in
this section of the country, you will make about as much
as you can on any other, taking into consideration that
it is nearly a sure crop, and does not require the work,
spraying and fertilizer that others do. It can be raised
2-Bul.











on land that is not irrigated, although you can make a
better crop if you have irrigation. It grows on any rind
of Florida soil, and in any section of the State. In the
Southern part it will grow the entire season, making to
perfection in the middle of the summer when it is nearly
impossible to grow other kinds of vegetables. In the
Northern and Central part of the State, plant the seed
any time after the first part of February till the middle
of August. You can keep the plants bearing continuously
with a little work and fertilizer until the cold kills them
in the fall. Okra is not known on all of the different
markets, but you will find all of the Southern markets
and a majority of the Northern and Eastern markers pay-
ing a good price for it most of the time. If you are
farming near any of the Florida cities, you will not have
any trouble in disposing of your entire yield at home.
PLANTING AND FERTILIZING.-Okra does not require
transplanting. Plant the seeds in the field where you
wish the crop to grow. Plow deeply, then harrow, level
and lay the field off in furrows three feet apart, drilling
the fertilizer in these, mixing thoroughly with the soil.
The following makes an excellent analysis: Ammonia,
4%; available phosphoric acid, 5%; potash, 6%, using
about 800 to 1,000 pounds to the acre. If chemical
manure are not available, the mixture of stable manure
and acid phosphate as suggested for beans will do as
well. In about two weeks time after you have applied
the fertilizer, you can plant the seed, planting in the fur-
rowes, two feet apart in the row. It is best to put at
least three seed to the hill. When the plants are about
six inches high, thin down to one plant. You can trans-
plant the ones you pull up or sell them to one of your
neighbors who wishes to try this crop.
CULTIVATION.-Okra only requires enough cultivation
to keep the weeds and grass down. After a heavy rain,
it is a good idea to run through the patch with a tooth
cultivator to open up the soil and let the worm air and
sunshine in.
VARIETIES.-The White Velvet and the Perkins Mam-
moth are the leading varieties. The Velvet is the best for
home use, while the Perkins Mammoth is preferred for
shipment. Either onese make to perfection here.
PICKING AND PACKING.-Okra will demand your con-
stant attention from the time it starts bearing until it










quits, as the pods become hard very quickly. It is best
to go through the patch daily. You can tell whether it is
too hard by sticking your finger nail into it. Pack in
bean hampers.
INSECTS. The only insects that bother this crop is the
cut worm and he is easily handled with bran mash.
Spread this on the ground around the plant about three
inches from it.
Following are numerous crops that are adapted to fall
planting. Select those you prefer to plant and be guided
by the suggestions made herein.

FALL PLANTING DATES.

NORTH AND WEST FLORIDA.
AUGUST.-Beans, beets, cabbage, cauliflower seed, car-
rots, cow peas, cucumbers, collards, egg plants, Irish po-
tatoes, kale, kohlrabi, okra, onions, rape, rutabagas, sal-
sify, spinach, squash, tomatoes, turnips, celery seed.
SEPTEMBER.-Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots,
cauliflower plants, celery plants, collards, cow peas, Eng-
lish peas, Irish potatoes, kale, leeks, lettuce, mustard,
onion sets, parsnip, radishes, rape, rutabagas, salsify,
spinach, turnips.
OCTOBER.-Beets, Bermuda onion seed, Brussels sprouts,
cabbage, carrots, cauliflower plants, celery plants, col-
lards, kale, leeks, lettuce seeds and plants, mustard, onion
sets, parsnips, radishes, rape, spinach, turnips and straw-
berries.
NOVEMBER.-Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage seeds and
plants, carrots, collards, kale, lettuce, mustard, onion sets,
parsnip, radishes, rape, spinach, turnips, oats, rye, straw-
berry plants, vetch, crimson clover and wheat.
DECEMBER.-Cabbage plants and seed, collards, leeks,
lettuce plants and seed, mustard, onions, radishes, rape,
oats, rye, strawberry plants, vetch, crimson clover and
spring wheat.
CENTRAL FLORIDA.
AUGusT.-Beans, beets, cabbage, cauliflower seed, car-
rots, cow peas, cress, cucumbers, collards, egg plant, Irish
potatoes, kale, kohlrabi, okra, onions, rape, rutabagas,
salsify, spinach, squash, tomatoes, turnips, Windsor beans'
and celery seed.










SEPTE.MIBER.-Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots.
cauliflower plants, celery plants, collards, cow peas, cu-
cumbers, English peas, Irish potatoes, kale, leeks, lettuce,
mustard, onion sets, parsnip, radishes, rape, rutabagas,
salsify, spinach, squash, turnips.
OcTQIiER.-Beets, Bermuda onion seed, Brussels sprouts,
cabbage, carrots, cauliflower plants, celery plants, col-
lards, kale, leeks, lettuce seed and plants, mustard, onion
sets, parsnip, radishes, rape, spinach, turnips, strawberry
plants, wheat.
NOVEMBER.-lheets, Brussels spronis, cabbage seed and
plants, carrots, collards, kale, lettuce, mustard, onion sets,
parsnip, radishes, rape, spinach, turnips, oats, rye straw-
berry plants, wheat.
])ECE.MBER.-Cabbage plan s and seed, collards, leeks,
lettuce plants and seed. mustard, onions, radishes, rape,
strawberry plants, oats.
SOUTHERN FLOOR IDA.
(T.A\ PA, O(IANDO, TIT'-svi.rLE AND SOUTHlnWARD.)
AUGusT.-Beans (snap), cabbage seed. cantaloupes, car-
rots, cauliflower seed, collards, cow peas, cucumbers, egg
plant, English peas, Irish potatoes, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce,
mustard, onions, peppers, pumpkins, radishes, rape, ruta-
bagas, spinach, squash, swiss chard, tomatoes, turnips,
Windsor beans.
SEIPTEIMBEl.-- eels, Brussels sprouts, cabbage plants,
and seed, carrots, celery seed and plants, collards, cow
peas, cucumbers, Eniglish peas, Irish potatoes, kale, let-
tuce, mustard, onion sets, radish, rape rutabagas, spinach,
squash, Swiss chard, turnips.
OcToElR.-Beetss.Bermuda onion seed, Brussels sprouts,
cabbage plants and seed, carrots, celery seed, collards,
kale, lettuce plants and seed, mustard, onion sets, rad-
ishes, rape, rutabagas, spinach. Swiss chard, turnips.
strawberry plants, oats.
NOVE IBER.-Beets, Brussels sprouts, cabbage plants
and seed, carrots, celery seed and plants, collards, kale,
lettuce, mustard, onion sets, radishes, rape, rutabagas.
spinach, Swiss chard, turnips, oats, strawberry plants.
Drceinber-Cabbage Plants and Seed, Celery Plants.
Collards, Lettuce Plants and Seed, Mustard, Onion Sets
and Plants, Radishes, Rape, Spanish Onion Seed. Swiss
Chard, Oats, Strawberry Plants.













Should there be any doubt as to whether there is time
enough for plants or seeds in the foregoing list to mature
before winter, just consul the following tables. You can
then be reasonably certain as to date of maturity of your
crops, and avoid the Ieli ..1 of frost.

LEN(GT OF TIME R'Iil l IRED 'FOIR Vl0 ; V ETABLI.E' SEED
TO GEill INATIE.

The following pielilods are about the time it lakes Ilhe
seeds mentioned to sproul after being sown ; of!' oftirse,
these periods vary somewhat according to the agez of the
seed, but more so uponi the conditions of tle weather and
the soil :
IBeans ........... ..... .......... from 4 lo 8 days.
('Cibage and (aulitlower ........... from 4 to S days.
Beetly ............................... froli S to 1.) dayvs.
Collards .......................... from 4 to 8 days.
Carrots ..............................from 14 to 20 days.
Celery .................. ......... from 12 to 20" dlays.
Corn ................... .. ...............from 5 to 9 days.
'lkes .............. .. ............... from 4 to 10 day s.
Egg Plants ...... ........... flro: 7 to 20 days.
Let(luce ........ ....................... rom : to 5 days.
Muskmelon and (anntaloupe ....... from 5 to 10 days.
Egg Plants .......... ............. from 7 to 20 days.
W a termelons ..................... from ( to 12 uays.
M mustard .............................from :8 to 5 days.
Onions .......................... (from i to 12 days.
Parsley .................. ........... from 20 to ::0 days.
Peas ............................. from 5 to 10 d lays.
Pepper ...............................from 8 to 15 days.
RIladishes ........... ............. fro. m 3 to .5 da~ys.
Spinach ...............................from Sto 15 days.
Squash ........ .. ................ from (i to 9 days.
Tomatoes ........... ..............from (i to 12 days.
Turnips ............................from :3 to 5 days.

THE AVERAGE TIME IN FAVORABLE SEASONS FOR PLANTS
TO MATURE, FROM THE SOWING OF THE SEED.

Bush Beans, from 40 to 50 days, according to variety.
Pole Beans, from 60 to 9 Odays, according to variety.
Beets, from 60 to 75 days, according to variety.











Cabbage, from 60 to 100 days, early varieties.
Cabbage, from 150 to 190 days, late varieties.
Carrots, from 60 to 75 days, according to varieties.
Cauliflower, from 100 to 150 days according to variety.
Celery, about 150 days, Golden Self Blanching variety.
Corn, from 70 to 90 days, according to variety.
Cucumbers, from 60to 80 days, according to variety.
Egg Plants, about 120 days.
Lettuce, from 60 to 90 days, according to variety.
Melons, from 80 to 90 days, according to variety.
Mustard, about 35 days.
Okra, about 70 days.
Onions, from 120 to 130 days, according to variety.
Peas, from 60 to 70 days, according to variety.
Pepper, from 100 to 120 days, according to variety.
Potatoes, from 85 to 100 days, according to variety.
Radishes, from 25 to 35 days, according to variety.
Squash, about 60 days for earl varieties.
Squash, about 120 to 150 days for late varieties.
Spinach; from 50 to 60 days.
Tomatoes, from 110 to 130 days, according to variety.
Turnips, from 60 to 90 days, according to variety.

QUANTITY OF SEED REQUIRED FOR GIVEN NUMBER OF PLANTS.

Cabbage ................... 1 ounce for 2,000 plants.
Cauliflower ......................1 ounce for 2,000 plants.
Collards ....................1 ounce for 2,000 plants.
Celery ............... ....... 1 ounce for 7,500 plants.
Egg Plant ....... .........1 ounce for 1,500 plants.
Lettuce ....................... 1 ounce for 3,000 plants.
Pepper ...................... 1 ounce for 1,500 plants.
Tomatoes ...................... 1 ounce for 3,000 plants.

NUMBER OF PLANTS TO THE ACRE AT GIVEN DISTANCES.

12 inches by 3 inches ..................174,240 plants.
12 inches by 12 inches.................. 43,560 plants.
18 inches by 3 inches ................. 116,160 plants.
18 inches by 12 inches.................. 29,040 plants.
18 inches by 18 inches................ 19,360 plants.
24 incehs by 18 inches.................. 14,520 plants.
24 inches by 24 inches.................. 10,890 plants.
30 inches by 12 inches ................ 17,424 plants.








23

30 inches by 20 inches.................. 10,454 plants.
30 inches by 24 inches.................. 8,712 plants.
30 inches by 30 inches................. 6,970 plants.
36 inches by 3 inches ................ 58,080 plants.
36 inches by 12 inches.................. 14,520 plants.
36 inches by 18 inches ................. 9,680 plants.
36 inches by 24 inches.................. 7,260 plants.
36 inches by 36 inches ................. 4,840 plants.
48 inches by 24 inches ................. 5,445 plants.
48 inches bv 30. inches ................. 4,3516 i ants.
48 inches by 36 inches ................. 3,630 plants.
48 inches by 48 inches................. 2,723 plant..
60 inches by 36 inches.... :............. 2,901 plant.
60 inches by 48 inches............. ..... 2,178 plans.











A FLORIDA SPECIMEN.

The above picture is that o( a hog which appears on
page 32 of tl;e 14th biennial report, part 2, of tle Depart-
ment of A.' ricultule. The description of this hog was
unintentimailly emittedd Thle description follows:
The animal was narrowed Januammry 21h. 1!)12, near Sell-
man, in ('aihoun County, Florida. lie was exhibiled
November ( li, ll16. at the West Florida Fair, at
Ma3ianna, and weighed one ihousaind l;ree hlindred and
twenity-six pIundls.
lie is an Essex-1 )in ro cross and is nine feel and three
i.ihes fr(m itie Ioot of his 1til to tlhe back ol' his head.
The smallest ),;"t ( I one of 1'is hind feel is 1\vwve inches
in circnllll'elioreln, :nd lie measures tixe feet and eight
inches around his neck. It takes an eihlit-foot four-inch
line to go arii:1 his check. His heiIgh may ie gathered
from a glance at the picture showing the man just beyond
himi. The sow seen at the lelf of Ihe barrow is a two hun-
dred and fifty mound liog. The barrow is by no means
i'ait, and hila sock meni say liat lie con'l5i have 'wen llmade
to weigh two or three ihundred pounds iore.
\When this hog was lbutchered tlie carcass produced 17
ce;ns of lard weighing 50( pounds each and all sold for a
tolal of more than S.'I 1111 t

PASTURES AND FORAGE FOR HOGS.

Hogs .lMaj IH I'litisc'r on Less Grail In ith, PI', lr of
FIoraI'!--JBeltc tto Feed SNoitn (
I'atstring hogs reduces the amount of grain needed to
bring hIem to a profitable weight and marketable condi
l ion. Either permanent pasture or temporary crops afford
such a grain reduction. The amount to reduce the grain
ration is a problem for lte individual farmer.
Pasturage, however, does not furnish a complete food,
because a sufficient quantity of roughage can not be con-
sumed and digested to supply all the nutrients required
for rapid growth. The forage, especially from leguminous
pastures, furnishes a cheap source of protein, supplies ash
for hone making, adds bulk to the ration, and acts as a
mild laxative and tonic and keeps the hogs' system in
condition to utilize profitably the concentrated feeds.











Pasture crops alone, however, make a pig's fat thin and
soft and grain is required to remedy these defects. Even
with the present high prices of grain it pays better not
to cut the grain ration more than half, feeding at the
rate of 2 pounds daily per 100 pounds live weight to pigs
on posture, instead of the usual 4 to 5 pounds when they
are in a dry lot. That this cut will pay better than a
greater cut is fully established by records of the rate and
cost of gains made by thousands of pigs under such
treatment.
The concentrated feeds to use should be carefully con-
sidered. By-product feeds and feeds unsuited for human
consumption are preferable. Many feeds formerly con-
sidered too high-priced are comparatively cheap now. On
alfalfa pasture the grain should be largely carbonaceous
in character. With nonleguminous pastures more protein
supplement will be required.
Pigs, grain-fed on pasture, will gain a pound or more
a day from weaning to a weight of 200 to 250 pounds,
while those getting little or no grain will gain but one-
half to three-fourths pound per day. This will bring
spring pigs to a marketable weight in early fall, at the
period of high prices, whereas those being pastured only
are not.ready for market until a month or two later. A
grain ration, by bringing the hogs to an earlier market,
reduces the time of feeding, the risk, and the interest on
the investment. The animals are in higher condition
with a finer and more palatable meat and fat.
Farmers substituting pastures entirely for grain and
other concentrated feeds to their market hogs through the
summer will find that before marketing in the fall it will
be advisable to feed grain to harden the soft fat and meat
and put on additional weight. Light but steady grain
feeding on pasture, however, gives better results than a
heavier feeding during a shorter finishing period.
Now is the time to prepare forage for feeding hogs so
that there will be a continual supply of fresh, green suc-
culent feed in late summer when growth in permanent
and other pastures begins to slacken.

RAPE.

Rape, which may be planted from April until the
fidd:e of July, requires an abundance of moisture, tem-











operate growing weather, and rich soil. It is ready to
pasture when about 8 inches high or six to eight weeks
after sowing. One acre will graze from ten to fifteen 100-
pound shoats per month, and if not too closely grazed
will make a second growth for late fall grazing.

SoY BEANS AND Cow PEAS.

These two legumes may be planted from directly after
corn-planting time until the middle of July and ordi-
narily would be ready to graze about three months after
planted. Pasture these when the pods are almost mature,
as the beans supply the most important forage element.
An acre of pasture will graze from fifteen to twenty
100-pound pigs for six weeks, provided it is supplemented
with a heavy corn ration.

LEGUMINOUS HAYS BEST FOR DAIRY
CATTLE.

HOME-GROWN HAY MOST ECONOMICAL FOR DAIRY FARMERS.
The dairyman who raises and abundance of leguminous
roughage establishes a basis for an economical home-
grown ration which makes it unnecessary for him to pur-
chase protein-rich feeds. Good, properly cured hay from
any of the common legumes has a high percentage of di-
gestible protein. The following table shows the compara-
tive values of several common roughages and concen-
trates:








Cowpea hay ................ | 1 2 39. | 1,011 3( 1,471
Red-clover hay ... ........... 1/ 190 | q82 45 | 1.273
Peanut vines, nuts removed...| 1 132 740 00 [ 1,007
Soy-bean hay ............... 1 2 2 0 30 1,:3m
Sweet-clover hay ... 4 1,38 2 [ 2,33
ITons. | Lbs. | Lbs. | LlCs. I Lbs.

oat-and-pea hay ............ 1 3 207 1.0117 38 1,710
Corn silage ............... 176 2,400 114 I 1 2.2.
Peanut vines, nuts removed...I 1 132 740 O |0 1.007
Soy-bean lay................I 1% I 202 I )KO 30 I 1,8{
Sweet-clover hay ............. 2 436 I .6 25 2,337
Oat-and-pea hay ... .......... 1 1)17 335 1.200
Corn silage..................I 8 176 2,400 112 2.S28
One ton bran............... . 250 832 60 1,217
One ton corn meal .... ...... 138 1,380 70 1,676
Velvet beans ............... 1i/ 360 1,209 42 1,663












When the ration consists of an abundance of silage and
good legume hay, cows of moderate production often re-
quire but little grain. (ows which give more than 25 or
30 pounds of milk daily require the addition of concen-
trates if high production is to be maintained. In view of
the probable shortage in grains all dairymen should make
every ellort to provide an abundance of leguminous hay
by growing legumes suitable to their soils and sections.

RATIoNS AND IloME-(ROWN FEEDS.
(1) Velvet beans in the pod .......... .... 10 pounds
Jap;ancse cane, cured in shock .......... 1( pounds
('owpea may ........................... 8 pounds

(2) V\'elvel be;a in the pod ................. 10 pounds
Cottonsee(l meal .................. . 2 pounds
Jalpanese ne ................... ... 12 pounds

(3) Velvet Ihc ns ill the pod ............... S pounds
Cowpea ha) .......... .............. 10 pounds
Japanese cane ....................... 10 pounds

(4) Corn .............................. 3. pounds
Velvet beans in the pod ............... 7 pounds
('owvpea hay .......................... ) pounds
Japanese cane silage. .................... 20 pounds

( ) Velvet beans in the pod ............... 8 pounds
('oiwpea hay .......................... 10 pounds
Sorghumi, green ...................... 20 pounds

(6) Velvet Beans in the pod ............. 8 pounds
Cowpea hay ......................... 8 pounds
Crabgrass hay ....................... 8 pounds
Sweet potatoes (or cassava) ........... 25 pounds
The above are well-known home-grown feeds, or feeds
that can be grown at home. Feeds can be grown more
cheaply than they can be bought on the market. In these
rations, cowpea hay can be replaced by an equal weight
of beggar-weed hay, velvet bean hay, or any other good
legume hay. Which of these hays should be used will
depend largely on the cost of the hay on the market, or
rather on what it will cost to produce it. One may be so










situated as to be able to grow beggar-weed hay, or velvet
bean hay, to better advantage than cowpea hay. All of
the hays ill these rations are expected to be of good
quality, cut at the proper stage of maturity, and properly
cured.

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

SOME INFORMATION THAT HOMESS IN HANDY TO MOST
GOOD FARMERS.

WEIGIITS OF EVERYDAY TIIIN(;S.
A ,b rrel of flour weighs ................... 196 pounds
A barrel of salt weighs ................... 280 pounds
A barrel of beef weighs ...................200 pounds
A barrel of pork weighs ...................200 pounds
A barrel of fish weighs .................. .200 pounds
A stone of lead or iron equals ............. 14 pounds
A pig of lead or iron equals .211/: stone.
Anthracite coal broken-cu. ft. averages 54 pounds.
A ton loose occupies 40 to 43 cubit feet.
Lituminous coal broken-cu. ft.. averages 4)! pounds.
A ton loose occupies 40 to 48 cubic feet.

M1EASUlHEMENTS OF IHAY.

The onl exact method of measuring limy is to weigh it,
lint the rules .given below will be found sufficient for or-
dinary practical purposes: To find the number of tons
of meadow hay in windows, multiply together the length,
breadtll and height in yards, and divide the product by
25. The quotient will be the number of tons in the wind-

To find the number of tons of hay in a mow, multiply
the length, height and width in yards, and divide by 15,
if the hay is well packed. If the mow be shallow and
lhe hay recently placed therein; divide by 18, and by any
number from 15 to 188, according as the hay is well
packed.
To find the number of tons of hay in square or long
stacks, multiply the length of the base in yards by the
width in yards, and that by half the height in yards, and
divide by 15.









30

To find the number of tons of hav in a load multiply
together the length, width and height in yards and divide
the product by 20.

DRY MEASURE.
2 pints .........................1 quart.
8 quarts .........................1 peck.
4 pecks ........................1 bushel.
36 bushels .................... chaldron.
RULE FOR MEASURING CORN.
A heaped bushel contains 2,748 cubic inches. To find
the number of bushels of corn in a crib it is therefore
necessary merely to multiply together the length, width.
and height in inches and divide the product by 2,748.
The number of bushels of shelled corn will be two-thirds
of the quotient. If the sides of the corn crib are slanting,
it will be necessary to multiply together one-half the sum
of the top and bottom widths, the height and length.
TO MEASURE GRAIN IN BINS.
To measure grain in bins, multiply the length of the
bin in inches by the width in inches and that by the
height in inches, and divide by 2,150 for struck bushels,
and by 2,748 for heaped bushels. The quotient will be
the number rof bushels contained in the bin.

AVOIRDUPOIS WEIGHT.
27 11-32 grains .......................1 dram
16 drams ......................... ... 1 ounce
16 ounces ............................1 pound
25 pounds ........................ 1 quarter
4 quarters ............................1 cwt.
2,000 pounds ...................... 1 short ton
2,240 pounds ......;..............1 long ton
SQUARE MEASURE.
144 square inches ...............1 square foot
9 square feet .................. 1 square yard
301/4 square yards ................ 1 square rod
40 square rods .......................1 rood
4 roods ..............................1 acre
640 acres ................... . 1 square mile











LAND MEASURE.
One side of a square tract or lot containing-
1 acre is 208.7 feet.; equal 43,560 square feet.
11/2 acres is 255.6 feet; equal 65,340 square feet.
2 acres is 295.2 feet; equal 87,120 square feet.
21/2 acres is 330 feet; equal 108,900 square feet.
3 acres is 361.5 feet; equal 130,680 square feet.
5 acres is 466.7 feet; equal 217,800 square feet.
10 acres is 660 feet; equal 435,600 square feet.
1-10 acre is 66 feet; equal 4,356 square feet.
1-8 acre is 73.8 feet; equal 5,445 square feet.
1-6 acre is 85.2 feet; equal 7,260 square feet.
1-4 acre is 104.4 feet; equal 10,890 square feet.
1-3 acre is 120.5 feet; equal 14,520 square feet.
1-2 acre is 147.6 feet; equal 21,780 square feet.
3-4 acre is 180.8 feet; equal 32,670 square feet.

GOOD PLOWING.

The foundation of farming operations is turning the
soil-plowing. Therefore, a few words on this important
subject will not be out of place.

WHEN TO PLOW AND How.

Plow, if possible, when the soil will drop from the
moldboard in a mellow, friable condition.
It is better to plow when too dry than when too wet,
and don't delay the work too near seeding time.
Plow as long before planting as possible, so the soil
will have ample time to settle into good seed-bed condi-
tion and store up moisture for the coming crop.
Deep plowing enlarges the moisture reservoir and gives
more root room.
Late fall and winter plowing destroys weeds and many
insects.
When a green crop or heavy coat of manure is to be
turned under, plow early so the organic matter will have
time to decay and the soil to become settled before seeding.
Have the seed-bed loose and well pudverized on top, but
firm and well packed underneath.
Good plowing breaks up and mellows the soil. Well
pulverized soil will grow larger crops than a lumpy olne
containing the same proportion of plant food for the











reason that it holds more moisture-and it is the moisture
which carries the plant food to the growing crop. It
gives plant roots a larger feeding area and has a more
constant temperature.
In finishing a land, unless the purpose is to leave a
deep dead-furrow for drainage, turn a shallow furrow
back into the dead-furrow. The bare subsoil will produce
little or no crop.
Poorly drained fields, or those in regions of great rain-
fall, may be plowed in narrow lands, making high back-
' furrow ridges and deep dead-furrows. If necessary, such
lands may be plowed this way two or three years in suc-
cession. This elevates a large portion of the surface and
gives better drainage over the whole area.
When your plowing is complete, don't leave your plows
or other implements in the field exposed to all sorts of
weather to rot and fall to pieces, but have a place to
store them.

CARE OF IMPLEMENTS.

So far as we know, nobody has undertaken to estimate
how much money the farmers of the United States lose
yearly because of farm machinery and vehicles being
stored "under the blue sky." Certainly it runs into mil-
lions of dollars annually. This wastefulness would ap-
pall the thrifty farmer of Europe who, under stress of
stern necessity, has learned that "a penny saved is a
penny earned." It does not cost a great deal to build a
shed which will protect implements and vehicles form the
sun and rain and the money so invested will pay a much
higher rate of interest than you pay your local bank.
Have a shed or storehouse for your implements and
vehicles. As soon as yon are through with the plow or
cultivator for the season, spread hard oil or axle grease
over the polished steel parts so they will not gather rust;
then put the machine under cover. In the case of a wagon
or spring vehicle, keep the tires tight; and in the fall, if
the paint has been worn from the felloes, brush in linseed
oil and after it has dried cover the felloes with paint.
Do 1his and you will save much money and many cuss
-words.










FARM LOANS.

In a former Bulletin we published the Federal Farm
Loan Act for the information of those of our citizens
who for various reasons found it necessary or convenient
to borrow money on long time.
Below we submit the location of the twelve districts
into which the country has been divided.

FARM LOAN BANKS.

The twelve districts into which the country has been
divided by the farm loan bank board and the cities at
which banks will be located have been announced as
follows:
District No. 1-Maine, New Hampshire. Vermont,
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and
New Jersey; bank at Springfield, Mass.
District No. 2-Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland,
Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia;
bank at Baltimore, Md.
District No. 3- North Carolina. South Carolina,
Georgia and Florida; bank at Columbia, S. C.
District No. 4-Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennes-
see; bank at Louisville, Ky.
District No. 5-Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana;
bank at New Orleans, La.
District No. 6-Illinois, Missouri and Arkansas; bank
at St. Louis, Mo.
District No. 7-Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and
North Dakota; bank at St. Paul, Minn.
District No. 8-Towa, Nebraska, South Dakota and
Wyoming; bank at Omaha, Neb.
District No. 9-Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado and New
Mexico; bank at Wichita, Kans.
District No. 10-Texas; bank at Houston, Tex.
District No. 11-California, Nevada, Utah and Ari-
zona; bank at Berkeley, Cal.
District No. 12-Washington, Oregon, Montana and
Idaho; bank at Spokane. Wash.
The banks will be established as soon as practicable.
Under the law each will have a capital of $750,000. Appli-
cations for loans have been pouring into the board in
great volume recently n,'1 it is estimated that a sum
S-lHul.










more than twenty times in excess of the combined capital
stock could be used in making loans. Almost the first
work of the banks after approving and issuing loans will
be the issuance of farm loan bonds, a ne.w form of secur-
ity in this country. The bonds will be issued in denomi-
nations as small as $25, it is expected, and will bear in-
terest at a rate 1 per cent less than the interest rate
charged farmers on their loans. What this interest rate
will be has not definitely been determined. It is limited
by law to a maximum of 6 per cent. The expectation is
that it will not exceed 51/ per cent. at first and subse-
quently may be lowered.
Loans on farm land are limited by the law to 50
per cent. of the value of the land, and may be payable in
from 5 to 40 years. The head of each bank will be desig-
nated as the registrar.

MARKETING AND STORAGE.

MARKET CROPS SLOWLY OR TAKE SMALL PRICES.
Prepare storage facilities so as to be able to hold pro-
ducts for better prices when market appears to be over
supplied the slower products are marketed consistent
with demands, the greater will be the profits-if the mar-
ket is glutted or kept crowded, small prices will be re-
ceived. If prices are low in the fall and winter through
overstocked markets, and producers have sold out, then
it is certain that high prices will be demanded and re-
ceived by speculators. Thus the producer will be com-
pelled to buy back at such high prices as to make farm-
ing unprofitable and discourage production.
Our advice is to provide ample storage for all pro-
ducts and thus protect yourself in the ability to fix your
own price for your products and maintain them.

FALL AND WINTER CROPS.

This is the season of the year when quite a number of
the best food crops for man and beast can be successfully
grown, and in view of the economic conditions confront-
ing the country, we offer the suggestions that every one
who can, plant fall and winter food or feed crops. That all
who can, make a determined effort to grow some live
stock, poultry, etc., for meat. Almost any one of the










smallest farmers can grow hog meat enough and more to
support his needs, and with the refuse forage from his
fields in connection with sweet potatoes, stock beets and
turnips he or she can keep a milch cow in good shape.
Milk is almost a perfect food. Likewise any farmer,
large or small, should plant a moderate acreage in grain,
say wheat and oats and barley. Practically all of the
north central, northeastern, north and western Florida
is well adapted to the growing of wheat, oats and barley.
In earyl times wheat was grown through the sections of
the Sttae above mentioned successfully; it is being grown
in Southern Georgia and Alabama just over the Florida
line now, and there is no reason why it cannot be grown
o nthe Florida side. The soils are the same and just as
productive.
There are several varieties that are well adapted to
Florida soils that can be had in nearby southern markets.
Therefore this Department urges the growing of wheat
by farmers, for with his own flour and meat, there can
be no want. RAISE WHEAT and MEAT and be independent.
Thus we will prove that "No matter how the tides of
bal tle ebb or flow, war's greatest weapon is the plow."

















PART II.

Crop and Live Stock Condition.













DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the sub-divisions of the State, and the
Counties contained in each:


Western Division
Bay,
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-9.


Northeastern Division.

Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns,
Suwannee-10.


Broward,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Lee,


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Lafayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Taylor,
Wakulla-10.

Central Division.

Brevard.
Citrus,
Hernando,
Hillsborough,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Osceola,
Pasco,
Pinellas,
Polk,
Seminole,
Sumter,
Volusia-15.


Southern Division.

Manatee,
Monroe,
Palm Beach,
St. Lucie-8.













DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIVISIONS.

NORTHERN DIVISION.-Reports from our correspondents
throughout this Division indicate that the present season
has been one of the most favorable, with scattering excep-
tions, at the same time one of the most variable, for
general crops of all kinds. The conditions for corn, gen-
erally, have been unexcelled in the entire Division, and
it is likely that this crop will be the largest ever made in
this section of the State, as comparatively few crops
of early corn were damaged by drought in May.
Cotton has also fared well, as the seasons have been good
for both crops. The acreage of cotton in the real cotton-
growing district of the State indicates an increase of
about 10%. The damage from boll weevil has been slight;
in some localities where they were very destructive in
1916, little damage has been done this season. If the nor-
mal acreage had been planted to cotton it is not unlikely
that the largest cotton crop in the history of the State
would have been produced this year. Of course, the same
conditions are advantageous to the growing of all field
crops. There has been a great deal more interest in the
growing of live stock and their general management than
at any period of time prior to this date. More cattle
and of better breeds and more hogs are being grown than
for many years. This is also demonstrated as regards
interest in the use of silos and the feeding of silage. The
number of such plants being constructed is continually
increasing throughout the district as also the State. In
this district there are few complaints of diseases among
hogs and mostly good reports concerning live stock.
WESTERN DIVISION.-As a matter of fact, conditions in
this division are very much the same as in the previous
one. Practically the same climatic conditions prevail to











a great extent over this section also, and its effect on
crops generally is about the same as in tile first instance.
The boll weevil has greatly diminished in numbers and in
operation in this district to about the same degree as in
the northern. Some complaints are made, but these are
scattered. A number of the crops in this section are in
an unusually good condition, corn in particular, and will
produce, barring accidents, greater results than ever be-
fore. In this district the corn will, probably, be larger
than ever before; so will sweet potatoes, peanuts, velvet
beans and numbers of other crops. Live stock in this
section is in good condition, as was stated in the previous
ones. The pasturage is unusually good, which, of course,
adds to the conditions as well as the health of the ani-
mals.
NORTHERN DIVISION.-The same conditions exist
throughout this district as in the two previously men-
tioned. The crops, many of them are increased and are
in better condition than is usual at this season of the
year. The Irish potato crop of this district has been the
largest and most profitable ever grown, yielding near a
million bushels, worth $6,000,000. In almost every local-
ity the condition of corn and cotton is much above the
normal, and both corn and cotton will be unusually good.
No boll weevil has, as yet, made its appearance in the
sea island cotton region. In fact all the crops planted
throughout this division are in good condition and prom-
ise good yields. Pastures are good and cattle are in fine
condition-far better than usual at this season of the
year-and very little complaint of disease.
CENTRAL DIVISION.-In this division the climatic con-
ditions have been generally favorable. In some local-
ities they have not been so because of drought, but tak-
ing the section as a whole, conditions have been favora-
ble to most of the crops. There will be a very consid-
erable shortness of citrus fruits. The crop will hardly
reach over 40% of a normal crop. Apparently, while
the trees are in fair condition only, they do not have as
much fruit on them because of the February cold. Gen-
erally the vegetables and standard crops have yielded well
in this section, and live stock has also done well. In fact,
in every section of the State live stock has improved and
has, we may say, also kept in good condition throughout
the winter, better than usual. The greatest disturbing











influence was the cold snap of the first week in Febru-
ary which did very material damage to fruits, fruit trees
and tender vegetables.
SOUTHERN DIVISION.-There is no appreciable differ-
ence in climatic conditions in this section and others.
In fact, the whole State seems to have had favorable
weather conditions on the average, except for the cold of
February, which was destructive to fruits and vegetables
in the upper part of the district, and also very consid-
erable damage in the southern portion of the district.
Live stock in this district is also in a flourishing condi-
tion and the interest centered in this industry, not only
in this but in the preceding sections, has greatly in-
creased. In connection with this there has been a con-
tinuous widespread interest in the construction of silos
and the making of silage for the feeding of live stock.
This is an idea that has taken firm root in the minds of
the people in all sections of the State, and, undoubtedly,
is adapted to every section of the State, even in the far
south. It is an erroneous idea that silos and silage feed-
ing will not succeed in the far south. Those who have
had experience with it are satisfied that this is true, oth-
erwise there would not be such a great increase in silo
construction. The value of silos and silage is not a
theory. It is an established fact. If heat were an ob-
jection or a bar to the successful use of silage, then the
middle states far north of Florida could not possibly pro-
duce silage as successfully and satisfactorily as they do.
as it is a well known fact that temperatures are very
much higher in the middle inland sections of the country
than in the sea coast sections.











42

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD OF CROPS,
FRUIT AND FRUIT TREES, AND CONDITION OF LIVE STOCK,
FOR QUARTER ENDING JUNE 30, 1917, AS COMPARED WITH
SAME PERIOD FOR 1916.


TUpland Sea Island 0 'Hgar
COUNTY Cotton Cotton (Cone

Western Division. Condition Condition | Condition Condition
Bay .................. |100 I 100
Calhoun .............. 60 . 100 | 100
Epcambia ............. 55 100 100
Holmes ............... 90 100 100
Okaloosa ........... 100 . 100 09
Santa Rosa ............I 6 ... 100 100
W alton ...............I 60 I 100 I 100
Washington ............ 1 60 ... 100 I 100
Div. Av. per cent....... 69 ... 100 I 99
northernn Division.
Franklin ..............I .. 100 i 100
Gadsden ...............| 60 .. 100 I 100
Hamil on ............. 90 I 100 100
Jefferson ..............| 40 .. I 100 90
Lafayette ............. ... 80 100 100
Leon ................ 85 100 100
Madison .............. 100 90 100 100
Taylor ................ .. 85 100 100
W akulla ..............| 25 | 100 I 90
Div. Av. per cent...... 62 S86 100 I 98
Northeaslern Division.
Alachua ............... 90 100 90 75
Baker ................ ... I 1 0 95 100
Bradford .............. I ... 80 90 85
Clay .................. 80 95 100
Columbia .............. ... 80 100 95
Duval ................. ... 100 100 100
Nassau ................ 75 75 95 85
St. Johns ............. ... ... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ...... 83 88 96 | 93
Central Division.
Brevard ............... .. 100
Citrus........... ... 100 100 75 | 75
Hernando ............... . 100 100
Hillsborough ........... ... I ... | 100 90
Lake .................. ... 90 100
Marion ................ 100 100 100 100
Orange ................ ...... | 50
Osceola ............... ... . I 50 5 50
Pasco ................. ... 90 70 80
Polk ..................I ... ... 90 90
Saminole .............. 100 .. 95 |
Volusia ...............100
Div. Av. per cent ....... 100 97 I 1 ,.,
Southern Division.
Dade ................. ... . I 100 100
DeSoto .............. .. I ... I ... 100 1 100
Lee .................... ... ... | 100 1,00
Palm Beach ........... . I . | 100 | 100
St. Lucie .............. .I .. ... I 95 85
Div. Av. per cent....... .. ... 99 97
State Av. per cent....... 79 | 90 I 96 1 94















REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Rice Seet Field
Potatoes Peas Plants

Western Division. Condition Condition Condition Condition
Bay .................. 90 I 100 100 ...
Calhoun ............... 100 100 100 .
Escambia ............. 100 80 90 | 50
Holmes ............. 100 100 100 .
Okaloosa ............... .. 90 90 1
Santa Rosa ............ 100 101) 60
W alton ...............I 100 90
Washington ............ 100 100 100
)iv v. per cent....... 9S 06 9 55
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 100 100 90
(Iadsden .............. 100 75 300
Hamilton .............I ... i 100 1 300
Jeff.rson .............. I ... I 9 i 100
Lafayette ............. . . 100 (10)
Leon ................. 100 100 100
M adison .............. 100 100
Taylor ................ .. 100 100
W akulla .............. 75 90 90
Div. Av. per cent....... 1 2 94 9990
Northeastern Division._.
Alachua .............. |. 100 I 100 | 80
Baker .................. 100 90 95r
Bradford .............. . 100 100 |
Clay ................. 100 100 100
Columbia ........ .... . 100 100
luval ................ 100 100 o 100 I 100
Nassau ............. .... 85 100 100 I 100
St. Johns ............. 100 100 I 100 I 100
Div. Av. per cent .......I 97 99 9 |
centrall Division.
IBrevard ............. 1 100 100 100
Citrus ................ . 100 g90 |
Hernando .............I 100 100 100 |
IIillsborough .. ........ 100 100
Lake .......... ...... 00 100 100 190
Marion ............... .. 100 100 100
Orange ................ . 100 100
Osceola ................ 100 100
Iasco ................. 70 9 0 100
Polk .................. I . 100 100
Seminole ............. . 100 100 5
Volusia ............... . 100 1040 1 0
Div. Av. per cent....... 83 S: 99 998. 9S3
Southern Division.
Dade .............. ... I 100 | 100 I IT0
DeSoto ............... 100 ) 100 100 |
Lee ................ ...[ 100 100 100 | 100
Palm Beach .......... . . 100 100
St. Lucie .............. 4 100 SI 8
Div. Av. per cent ....... 100 100 97 1 100
State Av. per cent .......I 94 97 I 98 I 84












44

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Onions Cassava Tobacco Peanuts

Western Division. Condition Condition I Condition Condition
Bay .................. 95 ....
Calhoun .............. 100 ... I100
Escambia ............. 100 75 50 100
Holm es ............... . 100
Okaloosa .............. . 90
Santa Rosa .. . ..... . 90 I .. 100
Walton ............... 90 .. 100
Washington .. . . .. . . 100 100
Div. Av. per cent....... | 95 75 75 s
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 100 . . 5-
Gadsden .............. . 100 00
Hamilton ............. . .0 I 100
Jefferson .............. .. 100
Lafayette ............. ... . I 100
Leon ................. . .. 100 100
Madison .............. .. I 100 100
Taylor ................ . . 100
W akulla ............... .I I I 100
Div. Av. per cent....... 0 100 100 97
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. 90 ... .. 00
Baker ................ ... ... . 100
Bradford .............. ] .... 100
Clay ..................I . . 100
Columbia ........... . 100
Duval ................ 100 .. .. 100
Nassau ............... 75 . ... 100
St. Johns ....... ....... 100
Div. Av. per cent....... 88 100 100
Central Division.
Brevard ............... ... .. 1 o
Citrus ................ . ... 100
Hernando .............I ... ... I . 100
Hillsborough .......... ... I . 100
Lake .................. 90 85 ... 100
M arion ............... 100 ... 100
Orange ............... I ... ..
Osceola ...............I 100 75 .. 75
Pasco ................ . ... 90 90
Polk ........... .
Seminole .............. 95 ... 100
Volusia ............... | ... 100
Div. Av. per cent....... I 96 80 90 98
Southern Division.
Dado .................I 100 .. ... 100
DeSoto .............. I
Lee .................. I 90 90 .. 100
Palm Beach ........... 100
St. Lucie .............. ...
Div. Av. per cent....... 97 90 _I .. 100
State Av. per cent....... 97 84 88 98











45

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY PastureCs e Alfalf

Western Divisionl. Condilion C(ondiion Condition
Blay ....... .................. .... 100 100 ...
Calhoun .......................... 100 100
Escambia ........................ 100 100
Iolm es ............................ 100 100
Okaloosa ......................... 90 | 90
anuta Rosa ...................... 100 100
W alton .......................... 00 100
W ashington ...................... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent ................. 08 009
Southern Division.
IFranklin ......................... .. I 0 100
Gadsden ........................... 100 100 .
Iam ilton .......................... [ 100 100
Jefferson ........................... 90 [ 0)0
Lafayette ........................ !90 l 100
Leon ............................ 100 |) 100
M adison ......................... 100 I 100
T aylor ........................... 100 | 110
W akulla ......................... 0 1 OO I
Iiv. Av. per cent.... ........... ... | | .
A orlheastern Division.
A lachl ua .. ...... ................ I 0 100
B aker ............................ !)0 100
Bradford ........................ 75 00
Clay ... ....................... .. . 0 1 00
Column bia ........................ 90 | 100
I D uval ............................ 100 1)0
N ass;al ............................. 100 10
St. .lohns ........................ i !0 100 .
Div. Av. per cent................ .. 12
( en'tr l I)irision.
iBre'vard ...........................I 100 I 100
Citrus ........................... 0))0 100
H ernando ............................ 100 100
H illsborough ....................... ... 1 O1
Lake .......... ................... so 100
M arion ..... ....................... 1 .00
O range ........................... 10)0 100)
O sceola .......................... 90 100)
Pasco ............................ 90 0
P olk ............................ 100 (100
Sce inole .......................... 1110(
Volusia ............................. !) 1 I)
Div. Av. per cent ........ ... ... 9 4 11
Notthe'rn Dirision.
Iad(e ............................ n0,o )17 l }n- -
D eSoto .......................... ... 1 o0
LP i .............................. 1.i ( ) 10 0i
Palm HBeac'h ...................... ... 100
St. li'ic e ........................... S. 1()0)
)Div. A v. lper tent................ )5 I | 1-
State Av. per cent. .................. | o ) o-











46



REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Gaucus Avocado Pears

Western Division. Condition |Prospective UIondition Prospective
i Yield 1 Yield
B ay .................. I .. ]
Calhoun .............. .
Escam bia ............. ... .... .
I olm es ............... . I . I
O kaloosa .............. .. ... .
Santa Rosa ............ .. .
W alton ............... . I .
W ashington ...........| .. .. I
Div. Av. per cent ...... .
Northern Division .
Franklin ..............|. ..
Gadsden .........::: : ...
Hamilton .............. .. .
Jefferson .............. ... . .
Lafayette ............. ... .
Leon .................I . I ...
Madison .............. .
Taylor ................. ...
W akulla .............. ...
Div. Av. per cent....... | . I
Norllheastern Division.
A lachui a ............... | ..
B aker ................. ... I ... I I
Bradford .............. ... . I
C lay ..................I .. I ... I
Columbia ............. .
D uval ................ ...
Nassau ............... ...
St. Johns ............. I .. ... I I
Div. Av. per cent ..... . ... I .
Central Division.
Brevard ............... 75 60
Citrus ................ .
IIernando ............. I
Hillsborough .......... . ..
L ake ................. I
M arion ...............I .. . I
Orange ...............I .
Osceola ........ .. ..... I
P asco ................. ..... I .
Polk ................. I .. I
Sem inole .............. . I . .
V olusia ............... I ...
Div. Av. per cent....... 75 I "60 .. I
southern Division.
Dade ................. I 75 70 I 50 25
DeSoto ............... I 75 50 ...
Lee ................ .. 75 65 60 30
Palm Beach ........... 75 65 s 80 90
St. Lucie .............. ...
Div. Av. per cent ...... 75 I 63 63 4S
State Av. per cent....... i 75 I 62 | 63 48











47

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Bananas Mangoes

Western Division. C t Prospectiveondition Prospective Coditio Prospective
Yield | Yield
B ay .................. ...
Calhoun .............. ....
Escambia ............. ... .
H olm es ............... .... ..
Okaloosa ..............I ... ..
Santa Rosa ............ ...
W alton ............... ...
W ashington ............. ..
Dnv. Av. per cent...... ...
Northern Division.
"Franklin .............. ... ...
Gadsden .............. ... . i ...
Ham ilton ............. . . .
Jefferson .............. . . .
Lafayette ............. | .. .. .
Leon ................. ... . .
M adison .............. | . . .
T aylor ............. .. | . |.
W akulla .............. | .
Div. Av. per cent ...... .
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. .. ..
Baker ............... .. ... .
Bradford .............. ... ..
Clay .................. . .
Columbia .............. ......
3uval .................
N assau ............... ... ...
St. Johns ............. ... ...
Div. Av. per cent....... .. .. .
Central Division.
irevard .. .. ....... I -50 20 1 I


Citrus ................
Hernando .............
Hillsborough ..........
Lake .................
M arion ...............
Orange ...............
Osceola ...............
Pasco ................
Polk .................. .
Seminole .............. .
Volusia ...............
Div. Av. per cent .......
Southern Division.
D ade ................. I
DeSoto ................
L ee ................... I
Palm Beach ...........
St. Lucke ..............
Div. Av. per cent ..... ..
State Av. ner cent ...... I


50

50 I

65
85

67 |
56 I


S.- | ..

S. I .
... ...

I .....
. ....



20 | ... ..

35 40 j 20
I .. I +
50 50 35
75 95 60

53 62 3S
31 I 62 38


I
f











48

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Orange Trees Lemon Trees

llWestern, Division. Condition Prospective Condition Prospective
S_ Yield | Yield
Bay .................. 60 40 75 | 40
Calhoun .............. 60 40 ..
Escam bia ....... .....- ... ..
H olm es ............... .. .
Okaloosa .............. I
Santa Rosa ............ I
W alton ............... 0 40 .
Washington ........... ___ __
liv. Av. per cent ....... 57 | 40 7i 40
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 40 I 40 . .
Gadsden ............ ...
Hamilton .............
Jefferson .............. . I .
Lafayette ..............
L eon ................. -
M adison .............. . I I
T aylor ................
W akulla ............... I
Div. Av. per cent ...... 4( I ) 40
Norlheaslern Division.
Alachua ............... 50 I 10 ...
Baker ................I 50 I 40 ..
Bradford .............. . I . .
C lay . .. .. . .. .. . . . I . . .
Columbia .............. .
Duval ................ I 60) 40
N assau ............ ...I I ...
St. Johns .... .......... .I ..
Dlvy. Av. per cent. ...... 5 4 I I
Central Division.
lir vard ........... .... . (,I 30 I
C itrus ................ ..
Hornando .... . . .. 50 10
Hillshorough ........... 5 45. .
Lake ............ ........... 40 30 10
Marlon ................... I0 25 40 20
Orange ............... 25 25
Osceola ........... . 75 60 I 4 2
l as'co ......... ........ .I 20 . .2
P olk ......... ......... . | . .
Seminole .............. 50 50 .
Volusia ........ ...... 410 i0 .
liv. Av. per 'cent ....... -5 5 I 38 7 i
ofllihern Dirision.
a(lte '. .... ............ I l) I) 90 i .0
DleSoto ..... ......... 75 (0 ..
Lee ..................... .. )5 5 I.
l'alm Beach .. . ....... .)90 . .. .
St. Lucic ....... .... I 70 00 ... ..
Div. Av. per cent....... S7 77 10() H5
Slate Av. per cent ....... 1 50.) 044 1









49

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Lime Tr ees Grape Fruit Trces

Western Dirision. Condition IProspective I Condition [ Prospective
I Yield I I Yield
Bay ................. . ... 0 0
Cnlhonu ................. .. ... 60 50
f seaum bia ............. ... ..
IIolm es ...............
Okaloosa .............. .
Santa Rosa .............
Walton ................
Washington ........... .
Div. Av. per cent ...... . . 5
Northern Division.
Franklin ............. ... I .. I 4 40
Gadsden .............. . ... . .
Iamilton ............. ... ..
Jefferson ................. ..
Lafayette ............. .. .
L eon ................. ....
M adison .............. .. ..
T aylor ................ ... ...
W akulla .............. ._
liv. Av. per cent....... .. ... 40 40
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............... .. .. 75 10
Baker ................ . ... 50 50
Bradford .............. .. ...
Clay .................. ... ... I ...
Columbia ............. .......
Duval ................ .. 0 0 4o
N assau ............... ... ... ..
St. Johns ............. . . .
Div. Av. per cent ...... . .. 62 | :,1
Central Division.
Brevard ............... .. .. 7'5 7 2"
C itrus ................ ... ... .
Hernando ............. . . 50 5
IIillsborough ..... .... ... 60 I 40
Lake ................. 20 5 o 60 40
M arion .................. .. ... 50 25
Orange ............... ... 25 1 o
Osceola ............... .. I ... 75 io
P asco .................. .. .
Polk .................. ... 80 ,6
Seminole ............... ... ... 50 .o
Volusia ...............I ... 35 40
Div. Av. per cent....... 20 5 I 61 36
,Nouthern Division.
Dade ................. 100 00 | 85 F
DeSoto ............... . .. 75 o
Lee .................. .. 90 7
Palm Beach ........... 95 | 100 90 90
St. Lucle ..............I . I 70 5
Div. Av. per cent ....... 98 I 95- 82 71
State Av. per cent ....... 59 | 50 I 60 46


4-Bul.









50


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Japan Persimmon Plum

Western Division. Condition Prospective Condition Prospective
S___Yield I I Yield
Bay .................. 75 50 75
Calhoun .. .
Escambia ............. ... I ... 55 50
H olm es ............... ... . .. i
Okaloosa .............. . ]
Santa Rosa ............ I ... 60 60
Walton ..........
Washington .......... ____ .
Div. Av. per cent ....... 75 50 i 63 I
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. 90 I 0 I 100 Sir
Gadsden .............. .... .. .
Hamilton ............. ... ...
Jefferson ............ ... .. ..
Lafayette ............. ... I . .
Leon ................. 85 i 40 00 !1
Madison .............. ... I . 50 50
Taylor ................ ... .
W akulla .............. ... .. I 50 .50
Div. Av. per cent....... 8S 1 50 73 68
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. .. ..
Baker ................. 100 100 100 100
Bradford ............. . ... .
C lay .................. ... ... ...
Columbia .............. . . .
Duval ................ I 100 100 75 75
Nassau ................ S80 50 50
St. Johns ............. 1 100 65 I__ ...
Div. Av. per cent.......l 95 S 7 I 77
Central Division.
Brevard ............... T ... I ... 75- 75
Citrus ................ 100 25
Hernando .............
Hillsborough . . . . ... .
Lake ......... ..... .....
M arion ............... .. ...
Orange .............. . .
Osceola ............... 100 100 100 100
Pasco ................. I ... ... 75 50
P olk .................. ......
Sem inole .............. .....
Volusia ............... 1i 00 10
)iv. Av. per cent....... I 10) 75 8 8 75
Southern Division.
D ade ................. I ... ... .
D eSoto ...............I ......
L ee ................... ... ... I
Palm Beach ........... .. . I
St. Lucie ............. .
Div. Av. per cent....... 85 I S8 .
State Av. per cent ....... I KS) 6 8 7 --- 7-











51

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Pears Peaches

Western Division. Condition IProspective Condition Prospective
S Yield |Yield
Bay .................. 90 I 7 100 100
Callioun ... ... .
Calhoun .... ......... ... .. .
Escambia ............. ... ..
Iolmes ............... .... 9 0 100
Okaloosa .............. .. ..
Santa Rosa ............ ... ... 50 40
W alton ............. 50 40
Washington ......... .. I. __.. : .
Div. Av. per cent .......I 70 58 I 0 So
Xorthlera Division.
Franklin . ......... 90 1010 | so 100
Gadsden ............. ... ... 90 75
I amnilton .............. . ...
Jefferson .............. ... ... I 75 85
Lafayette .............I .. . 75 75
Leon ... ............. 75 50
Madison ............... 5 50 0 | 50 50
T aylor ................ .... ..
W akulla ..............I ...0. _0 100
Div. Av. per cent. ...... I 70 75 1 76 I 7i
ANortheastern Division.
Alacllua ............... .50 | 10 570 00
B aker ...............I .. I . . I
B radford ..............I . I ..... I
C lay ........ .......... .
Colum bia .............. ..
I)uval ................. ... I ... i SO s[
Nassau ............... 40 40 25 2 25
St. Johns .............. 100 i 65 75 | 55
Div. Av. per cent ....... 63 I 38 5 ,8 55
centrall Division.
irevard ............... I .... -. I .
Citrus ................ 40 25 40 10
H ernando .............I . ..
II llsborough .......... I .. ...
Lake ................. 60 50 70 75
Marion ............... I SO 85 | SO 6O
O range ................ .. I .
O sceola ...............I . I .. I T75
'asco ................. ... 75 40 75 50
P olk .................. .. .. |
Sem inol .............. ... I
Volusia ............... 30 5 i ;' 5
Dliv. Av. per cent ....... I 41 I 2 I 47
Noutheru Division.
Dade ................. ...... ...
D eSoto ................ .. ..
L ee .......... ........ ... ... ...
Palm Beach ........... . .. ....
St. Lucie ............ ... ... .
Div. Av. per cent ....... .. .. .
State Av. per cent. ...... 6 5 53 69 I 64










52

ItEPIORT O'F CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


(O I'NTY \ liacrncfloms ('uintaloupes

IWestern Dirision. condition n |l'rosp(ectirvc Condition Prospective
SI Yielrd I Yield
iay ...... ............ 100 110 r100 1o00
Calhoun ............... I 100 125 .
Escambia .......... ... 75 l I 75" 1)'0)
lIolm es .............. . 8 110()1 | 100)
Okaloosa .............. !1.ll) 10( .
Santa IRosa ........... . . ... ...
W alton ............. .... 90 110 .
W ashington . ........ 1 f 511 "" '
Div. Av. per cent ....... I S.) .04 S;i !)
Northern Division.
Franklin ................ 0 Iwi 1700
Gadsden ......... .... 100 12 5 I 9 1111
H am ilton .............. l o 1 0 ...
Jefferson .. . .......... i 100 Ill 100f
Lafayette ............. 0 1 1 I . .
Leon .................. 100 125 1 0 100
M adison ................ 100 I 1()( 10( 101
Taylor .... .......... I l l ..
W akulla .............. .. l I(.If ... .
liv. Av. per cent ....... l:; 1(11 914 10"2
Northeastern Division.
Alacnua ............... I I 5 I 90 I 8 "
Baker ................. 1010 1010 .
Bradford .............. 90 )I 100 I .
(lay .................. 100 1 Il ...
Columbia ............. 10 100
Duval ................i 1100 100 100 101)
Nassau ................ I !15 100 7| 7 85
St. Johns ............. I 1o001 1 ...
Div. Av. per cent. ......I ) 95 I 8S 88
Central Division.
Brevard ................ 100 100 |.
Citrus' ................ .. 1 100 I 100 .
Hernando ............. 110 1 0 .
HIllsborough ........... 1000 100 I 100 100
Lake ................. 10 I 7 75 T 70
Marion ............... I 100 100 100 100
Orange .......... .... I 0 .
Osceola ............... 100 100 100 200
Pasco ................. .0 80 | 0i 70
Polk .................. i 100 10 f 100 100
Seminole ............. .I 10 100 1 00 100
Volusia ............... 100 100 .
Div. Av. per cent....... 04 2 1 1001
Noutiern Division.
Dade ............ ....... 10)0 100 i ....
DeSoto ................ 100 100 .
L ee ................... i .. I ..
Palm Beach ........... 9.5 I 100 .
St. Lucie ............. 85 85 I ... ..
Div. Av. per cent ....... ] I
State Av. per cent ....... I ,14 I I) 1I 0 I 90










53

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY 1 ineapples Grapes

Western Driision. Condition l'rospectivel Condition (Prospective
Yierl I I Yield
Bay ................... .. ... 100 0Ti 1
Calhoun .............. .... 100 100
Escambia ........... .
Holmes ............... . ... 75 90
Okaloosa .............. .. ..75 i 9
Santa Rosa ............ .. . .
W alton ............... ...... .
W ashington ...........I ... ... .
Div. Av. per cent....... .. I .
Northern Division.
Franklin .............. ... ... I 00 10
Gadsden ..............I ... .
H am ilton .............. . .. .. .
Jefferson .............. ... .. F
Lafayette ............. I ... I ..
Leon ................. .... 10 I 100
M adison ............... . . 100 100
Taylor ................ . 0. | 90
W akulla .............. I 100 100
Dlv. Av. per cent ....... ... .)S
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .............. ... i 00 1 77-
Baker ................ . 100 | 100
Bradford .............. ... .. 100 | 100
Clay .................. ... .. 0 | 100
Columbia .............. ... .. 9 o0 100
D uval ................. . .. ... I
Nassau ............... ... . 100 I 100
St. Johns ............. ... .. 10(01 100
Div. Av. per cent ....... I ... 96 I 100
Central Division.
Brevard .............. .. ...
Citrus ................ ...
Hernando .............. ... . 100 100
Hillsborough ........... . ..
Lake .................. ... .
M arion ............... .. ...
Orange ............... .
Osceola ................ 75 50 100 100
P asco ................ ....
P olk .................. .....
Seminole .............. .. 00 60
Volusia ............... ... ... 100 100
Div. Av. per cent....... 75 F 50 F 90 90
Southern Division.
Dade .................. 50 | 25- ... ..
DeSoto ............... ... ......
Lee .................. .. ... .
Palm Beach .......... 60 50 ..
St. Lucie ............. 20 F 10 ... ..
Div. Av. per cent...:... 43 28 ..
State Av. per cent. ...... | 59 I 39 :93 96









54

REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.

Horses
COUNTY and Cattle Hogs Sheep
Mules
Western Division. Condition Condition |C condition | Condition
Bay .................. 100 100 1 100
Escambia .............. .. 90 100 60 SO
IIolm s ........... 100 110 115 100
Okaloosa ... ......... .. .5 I 100 90 00
Santa Rosa ............ 90 100 60 )90
Walton ...... ......... 100 10) 100 100
Washington ...0......... 0 105 100-1 105
Div. Av. per cent.. ii 103 01 I 9
Northern Division.
Franklin ................. 1)00 100 1 100 100
Gadsden .............. . 5 ISO ) 100 100
Hamilton ............ 100 100 100 100
Jefferson .............. . 5 100 !10 100
Lafayette .... ........ 0 0 00
Leon ............... 10 100 i 10)
Madison . ..... ...... 100 125 125 100
Taylor ......... 100 100 00 90
Wakulla ............. .. 100 0 7l5 1(00
l)iv. Av. per cent ....... 7 t) i )4 9 0
Northeastern Division.
Alacliua ............. . 100 0 5 i 0
Baker ................ 100 100 SO 100
Bradford .............. . .0 90 00
Clay ........... 10 0 100 ,O 100
Columbia ........ ..... 100 100 10 100
Duval ................. 100 1100 100 10
Nassau ............... I 10 00 1 0 0 100
St. Johns ...... .... 10. 0 100 100 100 100
)iv. Av. per cent ....... !) S 1 9S
centrall Division.
Brevard ............... . 100 10) .
Citrus ................I 7i5 75 75 i7
Ilernando ............ . . 1010 10 0 00
IIillsborough ........... 100 100 90 ) 100
Lake .................. .. i 70 7-,
M arion ............... 1 0 | 95 100 .
Orange ............... 100 100 100
Osceola ...............I 100 S 100 100
Pasco .............. ... .. 0 90 sO 60
Polk ................... 0 90 90
Seminole ............ .. 100 100 100 1110
Volnsia ...............I 95 00 80 90
Div. Av. per cent ....... 2 9 I 91 | 1)
Southern Division.
lade .................I 100 100 100 100
D oeoto .............. 100 100 I 100 100
Lee ........ .............. 100 100 90 .
Palm Beach ........... 1)0 100 10 I 100
St. Lucie .......... ... 9. 5 -0 0 I
Div. Av. per cent ....... I I ) 04 I 100
State Av. per cent....... 97 97 I 92 I 96










55


REPORT OF CONDITION AND PROSPECTIVE YIELD-Continued.


COUNTY Tobacco Honey Wool

Western Division. Pounds Pounds Pounds
Ba ............... ... ........ 00 3,000
Calhoun ......................... 175,000 5,000
Escambia .......................... ....... 50,000 20000
Holmes .......................... ........ 16,000 26,000
Okaloosa .......................... .. 1 6.C.0,000
Santa Rosa ....................... 50,000 30,000
Walton .......................... 0 6,000 130,000 60,000
Washington ............. ........ ...... 3,000 10,000
Division Total ................... 6,000 I 424,600 214,000
Northern Division._

Gadsden ......................... 3,000,000 20,000 0 5.00O
H am ilton ........................ I ........ ........ ........
Jefferson .........................I ........ ....... .......
Lafayette ...................... . ....... . ........ ........
Leon ......... .... ........ 100,000 ........ ........
M adison ......................... 150,000 ........ .......
T aylor .......................... ...... ....... .... ....
W akulla ................... ..... .1 . ....... . ........
Division Total ................... 3,50.000 45.000 00
Northeastern Division.
A lachua .........................] ........ ...... ....
Baker ........................... I ...... 10,000 8,000
B radford .........................I ........ ........ ........
C la y .. . .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .I .. .. . .. . ... . .
Colum bia ........................I ........ ........
Duval ...........................I........ ........ ....
N assau .......................... ........ ........
St. Johns ................... .. ... .. .... I ........ ........
Division Total .................... ...... I 10.000 I 8.000
Central Division.
B revard ......................... I ......... 1,000 I ...
C itru s .. . .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. . .. .. ..
H ernando ...................... ...... 500 :.000
H illsborough ..................... ........ ........ ..
Lak ....................... .... ..... ....... .
Marion ........................... ....... 2,000 I 25.000
Orange .......................... I ........ 25,000 .....
Osceola .......................... ........ 2,000 15,0 00
Pasco ............................ 125,000 1,000 I 3.000
P olk .. . .. . ... .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. . . .. ... . . ... .
Seminole ......................... .... ... 3,000 500
Volusia .......................... I ........ 14,000 8.000
Division Total .. .............. .. 125,0 0 58,500 ] 54.500
Southern Division.
D ade ............................ ....... .... .... ........
D eSoto .......................... I ........ ........ ........
L ee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I . . . . . . . . . . . .
Palm Beach ...................... I ........ ....... ........
St. Lucie ....................... . ....... ........ ........
Division T otal .................... I ....... ........ . ......
State Total ................... .. 3.381.000 53S.0oo 2 r1.500

















PART III.

Fertilizers, Feeding Stuffs, and Foods and Drugs.













HOW TO LEGALLY DRAW, PACK AND TRANSMIT
SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS AND COMMER-
CIAL FEED STUFFS FOR ANALYSIS
BY THE STATE LABORATORY.

1. Only such samples as are drawn from original
packages, EACH BEARING TIE GUARANTEE OF A LAWFUL
DEALER, AND THE INSPECTION STAMP REQUIRED BY LAW, will
be analyzed by the State Laboratory, when drawn within
sixty days after date of delivery.
2. If the lot or shipment be TEN or more packages, the
sample must be drawn from NOT LESS THAN TEN packages.
3. If the lot or shipment be LESS THAN TEN packages,
the sample shall be drawn from EACH package.
4. The sample shall be drawn in the presence of Two
disinterested witnesses, anl shall be SEALED IN THEIR
PRESENCE, and TRANSMITTED by a DISINTERESTED PARTY
(one of the witnesses), to the COMMISSIONER OF AGRICUL-
TURE.
5. Not less than one pound of fertilizer, or one-half
pound of commercial feed stuff must be placed in a tin
can or glass bottle and addressed and sent, prepaid, to
the Commissioner of Agriculture.
G. The purchaser (or sender) shall address a letter
to the Commissioner of Agriculture, stating:
1. The number of original packages represented by
the sample, and the number of packages sampled.
2. That each package had attached to it the guaran-
tee tag and stamp required by law.
3. That the sample was drawn in the presence of two
or more witnesses within sixty days of delivery.
4. THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE ENCLOSED IN THE PACKAGE.
5. The tags OFF THE PACKAGES SAMPLED, with the guar-
anteed analysis and stamps must be RETAINED by the pur-
chaser, to compare with the certificate, and for future
evidence, if necessary, and BY NO MEANS SENT TO THIS
OFFICE.
The State Chemist is not the proper office to receive
the sample.










We suggest a form of the letter of transmittal to the
Commissioner of Agriculture on this page.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.
Approved
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Fla., July 1, 1917.



............. Fla......... 191..
Hon. \W. A. McRae,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:
I send you today by mail (or express) a sample of

(indicate fertilizer, cotton seed meal or feed stuff) for
analysis by the State Chemist.
This sample is taken from a lot of......packages, each
bearing the guarantee tag and stamp required by law,
purchased from a registered dealer, on the......day of
............ 191. ., and delivered on or about the .....
day of............, 191...
This sample was drawn from......... packages in the
presence of two witnesses, this day.
The guarantee tags and stamps off the ....... packages
sampled are retained by the purchaser.
This sample is sent by me, one of the witnesses, for
Mr ...................... the purchaser.
Yours truly,

NOTE: These regulations are adopted to conform with
the decision of .the Supreme Court of Florida of May 12,
1917, as follows:
"The terms of the statute in giving the special right of
action to 'any person purchasing' fertilizer clearly con-
templates that the test shall be made with at least some
degree of promptness after the delivery of the fertilizer,
and that more than one sample shall be taken when the
quantity of fertilizer purchased makes it expedient to
have plural samples to secure a fair test."











STATE VALUATIONS.


(Based on Conmmercial Values, Dec. :31, 191(.)

For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of li17.
Available Phosphoric Acid ................ 5c a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid .............. Ic a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .22.75c a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K20) ......... ::O)c a pound
If calculated by Units:
Available Phosphoric Acid .............. ..1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............... .20 per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) .. 4.55 per unit
Potash ................................. 6.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.5I1 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, lake for
example, a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid. .6.11 per cent. x .-1.00- (i.ll
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.. 1.50 per cent. x .20- .30
Ammonia ................ .3.42 per cent. x 4.55- 15.56
Potash .................. .. 3.23 per cent. x 6.00- 19.38
Mixing and Bagging ....... 1.50

Commercial value at seaports ................... . .5.
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid ... 8 per cent. x $1.00--$ 8.00
Ammonia ..................... 2 per cent. x 4.55- 9.1(
Potash .....................2 per cent. x 6.00- 12.00
Mixing and Bagging .......... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports ................. .130.60
The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.

MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA-
PORTS, JULY 1, 1917.

"Under unsettled conditions, potash quotations are
wholly nominal."










AMMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 19% Ammonia .............. $ 85.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25% Ammonia ........ 120.00
Dried Blood, 17% Ammonia ................. 94.00
Cyanamid, 21% Ammonia ................... 82.00

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% Sulphate
48% K2O .............................. Nominal
Low Grade Sulphate of Potash, 53% Sulphate,
29% K1 .............................. $188.00
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% K0,O............ Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 17% Ammonia,
14% Potash K20 ....................... $167.00
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% Ammonia,
12% Potash KO ....................... Nominal
Kainit, Potash, 12% KO .................... Nominal
Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 3% KO Potash ... $ 19.00

AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Tankage, 10% Ammonia, 5% Phos-
phoric Acid ............................. 62.00
Tankage, 7% Ammonia, 15% Phosphoric Acid 50.00
Low Grade Tankage, 61/2% Ammonia, 15%
Phosphoric Acid ....................... 46.00
Sheep Manure, 3% Ammonia ................ 28.00
Imported Fish Guano, 11% Ammonia, 51/2%
Phosphoric Acid ........................ 45.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% Am-
monia, 24% Phosphoric Acid ............ 42.00
Raw Bone, 41/% Ammonia, 22% Phosphoric
A cid ................................... 44.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/2% Ammonia, 1%
Potash ............................ ... 36.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 71/%% Ammonia .... 42.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2% Ammonia...... 35.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16% Available
Phosphoric Acid ........................ 17.00









Acid Phosphate, 14% Available Phosphoric Acid 16.00
Bone Black, 16% Available Phosphoric Acid.. 25.00
MISCELLANEOUS.
High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 21/2% Am-
monia, 8% Potash ...................... 58.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% Ammonia, 2% Potash 30.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% Ammonia,
4% Potash ............................. 34.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash ................................ .34.00
Land Plaster, in sacks .................. .... 12.00
The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing
and bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50
per ton in excess of above prices.

NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
JULY 1, 1917-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
AMMONIATES.
Ammonia, sulph., prompt, per cwt. .......$ 6.00 @
Futures ........................... 6.00 @
Fish Scrap, dried, 11% ammonia, 14%
bone phosphate, f. o. b. delivered Bal-
timore, per unit ................... 4.50 & 10
Fish Scrap, wet, acidulated, 6% ammonia,
3% phosphoric acid, delivered ...... 4.25 & 10
Ground Fish Guano, imported, 10 and
11% bone phosphate, c. i. f. New York,
Baltimore or Philadelphia ......... .....
Tankage, 11% and 15%/, f. o. b. Chicago.. 5.95 & 10
Tankage, 10 and "1',, f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ............................ 5.75 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20%/, f. o. b. Chicago,
ground ........................... 5.95 & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago, 14
to 15% ........................... 5.85 & 10
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago ....... 18.00 @ ..
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago, per unit ...... 5.00 @
Dried Blood, 12 and 13% ammonia, f. o. b.
New York ........................ 6.10 @ ..
f. o. b. Chicago, per unit............ 5.95 @ .
Nitrate of Soda, 95%, spot, per 100 lbs ....... 4.15
Futures ..................... ..... 4.05 @ ...










PHOSPHATES.


Acid Phosphate, per ton ............ $15.00 @
Bones, rough, hard ................. 26.00 @
Soft, steamed, unground ........ 21.50 @
Ground, steamed, 11/4% ammonia
and 60% bone phosphate ........ 23.00 @
Ditto, 3 and 50% ............... 26.00 @
Raw, ground, 4% ammonia and
50% bone phosphate ............ 32.00 @
South Carolina phosphate rock, kiln
dried, f. o. b. Ashley River...... 3.50 @
Florida land pebble phosphate rock,
68%, f. o. b. Tampa, Fla ......... 2.00 @
Florida high grade phosphate hard
rock, 77%, f. o. b. Florida ports. 5.00 @
Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80% per
ton ........................... 5.00 @
75% guaranteed ............... 4.75 @
68@72% ....................... 4.25 @


$16.00
27.00
22.00

23.50
27.00

35.50

3.75

2.25


5.50
5.00
4.50


POTASHES.


Muriate of Potash, 80@85%, basis
80%, in bags, per ton ......... $350.00 ( $360.00
Muriate of Potash, min. 95%, basis
80%, in bags, per ton ......... 360.00 @ .......
Muriate of Potash, min. 98%, basis
80%, in bags, per ton ......... Nominal
Sulphate of Potash, !,i.; u',,, basis
80%, in bags, per ton ......... 275.00 @ 300.00
-Double Manure Salt, 48@53%: basis
48%, in bags, per ton ......... 105.00 .......
Manure Salt, mmin. 20%, KO, in bulk 50.00 @ 60.00
Hard Salt, min. 16%, KO, in bulk 40.00 ( 50.00
Kainit, min. 12.4%, K20 in bulk... 40.00 @ 50.00

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED
STUFF FOR 1917.

For the season of 1917 the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation, January 1.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,










which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:
Indian corn being the standard at .-r4:'.11. per ton.
(.$2.15 per sack of 100 Ibs., .$1.20 per bu. 56 lbs.)
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1 / ) of a ton.
Protein, 4.45c per pound ................... 89c per unit
Starch and Sugar, 2.05c per pound ......... 41 per unil
Fats, 4.6c per pound ...................... 92c per unil

EXAMPLE NO. 1.
Corn-
Protein ............ ................. 10.50 x S!c $ 9.34
Starch and Sugar .................. 6!).(90 x 41c 28.5:
Fat ................................. 5.40 x 92c 4.97

State value, per tonl ........................... 42.8

ICXAMP'LE NO. 2.

Corn, and Oats, Equal Parts-
Protein ............................. 11.15 x S!c .$ 9.92
Starch and Sugar ................... 64.65 x 41 c 26.50
Fat ................................. 5.20 x !2c 4.78

State value, per ton ........................ $41.20

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
"season." They may, but seldom do, vary from the
market prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight
advance or decline.
They .-re compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is Smith's
Fruit and Vine worth per ton?" Such a question can-
3--lul.










not be answered categorically. By analysis, the am-
monia, available phosphoric acid and potash may be de-
termined and the inquirer informed what the cost of the
necessary material to compound a ton of goods similar
to "Smith's Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but
accepted and well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
had bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price, at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These prices lists published in this report, with the
"State values," July 1, 1917, are nominal.

SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only State in the Union that provides
for the "special sample" drawn by the consumer or pur-
chaser, UNDER PROPER RULES AND REGULATIONS FIXED BY
LAW-to be sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture for
analysis free of cost. Any citizen in the State who has
purchased fertilizers or feeds FOR HIS OWN USE MAY DRAW
A SAMPLE OF THE SAME, ACCORDING TO LAW, and have the
same analyzed by the State Chemist, free of cost. In
case of adulteration or deficiency he can, on establishing
the fact, receive double the cost demanded for the goods.
The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmitting "special samples."
This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.
Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of food and drugs will be sent to
any citizen requesting the same.







67

"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS
MATERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE
OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FER-
TILIZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."











COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.


Nitrate of Soda...........
Sulphate of Ammonia...
Dried Blood ............
Concentrated Tankage...
Bone Tankage..........
Dried Fish Scrap........
Cotton Seed Meal.......
Hoof Meal ..............


Pounds Per Hundred.
Total
Ammonia. Phosphoric Potash.
Acid.
17 to 19 .......................
21 to 26 .......................
12 to 17 ............ ...........
12 to 15 1 to 4 ...........
6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
6 to 11 3 to 8 ...........
7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
13 to 17 1 to 2 1 to 2


PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Ammonia. Available Insoluble.
I Phos. Acid. I


Florida Pebble Phosphatel ............ ............
Florida Rock Phosphate.1 ......... ..........
Florida Super Phosphate.. ........... 14 to 45
Ground Bone ........... 3 to 61 5 to 81
Steamed Bone .......... 1 to 41 6 to 9
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 41 13 to 15


26 to 32
30 to 35
1 to 3
15 to 17
10 to 20
2 to 3


POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Actual Phos.
Potash. Am'onia. Acid. Lime.

Muriate of Potash...... 50 to 62 ......... ...............
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 ......... ......... .........
Carbonate of Potash.... 55 to 60 I...... ..................
Nitrate of Potash. ...... 40 to 44 112 to 16 |......... .........
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag. 25 to 30 ......... .. ........ .........
Kainit ................. 112 to 13 .......... .. ..............
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20 ......... ... .. .. .
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to 30 (......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8 ......... 1 to 2 .........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 ......... 1 to 1,(35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ........ 3 to 9 2 to 4 1......... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.451 0.501 0.30 0.30
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.501 0.601 0.25 0.30
Sheep Manure (fresh)..i 0.601 1.001 0.351 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.50 0.75) 0.50 0.70










FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.
To Convert-
Ammnonia into nitrogen, multiply by .......... 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by ............ 5.15
Nitrogen inlo ammonia, multiply by ............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by. ....... .0.1(47
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by .............. (..25
Bone phosphate inlo phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.(i:2
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by ..... 0.1:!)
Carbonate of potasl into actual potash, nmltipll (0.li81
Actual potash into carbonate of potash. multiply 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit" multiply potash (K>0) by 2.33:

For instance you bnuy 95 per cent nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply !95
per cent by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia Ihis nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent by 1.214 and
you get 18.!) per cent, the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent carbonate of potash into
actual potash ( K,()), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent actual potash (KO).









AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.



NAME OF FEED. .



Maiden Cane Hay .... 28.60 11.60 42.40 2.60 4.2i,
Natal Grass Hay ...... : 6.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00
Para Grass Hay ...... 31.20 8.00 45.70 1.60 6.20
Rhodes Grass Hay .... 41.10 7.70 :36.80 1.30 6.60
Beggarweed Hay ...... 24.30 21.60 35.10 4.10 4.00
Kudzu Vine Hay ..... 32.30 15.90 33.00 1.60 6.80
Cow Pea Hay ........ 20.50/ 13.00 45.90 4.20 7.50
Velvet Bean Hay ...... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70
Velvet Beans ......... 7.00 21.00 53.10 5.40 3.60
Velvet Bean Hulls .... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30
Velvet Beans and Hulls 10.70 9.40 50.60 4.50 3.50
Cow Peas ............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.20
Soy Bean Meal ...... 4.50 48.40 27.50 6.40 4.40
Peanut Vine Meal .... 29.60 9.90 38.40 6.30 6.60
Cotton Seed ......... 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 3.50
Cotton Seed Hulls.... 44.40 4.00 36.60 2.00 2.60
Bright Cotton S'd Meal 9.40 38.62 28.60 7.80 5.80
[_ I l I








AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS- (Continued).


NAME OF FEED.

0 P
Dark Cotton Seed Meal 20.00 23.15 37.10 5.50 5.00
Barley (grain) ....... 2.70 12.40 69.80 1.80 2.40
Corn Grain .......... 2.10 10.50 69.60 5.40 1.50
Corn Meal ........... 1.90 9.70 68.70 3.80, 1.40
Hominy Feed ....... 4.00 10.50 65.30 7.80 2.60
Corn and Cob Meal ... 5.80 7.50 70.80 3.10 1.20
Ground Corn Shucks 30.20 2.80 54.60 0.60 1.90
Ground Corn Cobs ... 30.00 3.00 56.60 0.701 1.60
Oats (grain) ......... 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.001 3.00
Rice (grain) ........ .0.20 7.40 79.20 0.40 0.40
Rice Bran ........... 9.50 12.10 49.90 8.80 10.00
Wheat (grain) ....... 1.80 11.90 71.90 2.10 1.80
Wheat Bran ......... 9.001 15.40 53.90 4.00 5.80
Wheat Middlings ..... 5.40 15.401 53.90 4.00 5.80
Wheat Mixed Feed .... 7.80 16.90 54.40 4.801 5.30
i I
Wheat Ship Stuff ... 5.601 14.60 59.80 5.00 3.70
Dry Jap Sugar Cane..1 26.201 2.30 62.60 1.50 2.80
i I _









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Mixed Fertilizer .............. .4163| 7.71
Mixed Fertilizer ............ 4164 6.911
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)....... 4165 8.83
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 4166 8.76
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) .......4167110.02
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)....... 416S S.47
Tankage (No. 1)............... 4169 7.581
Ground Tankage (No. 1) ....... 4170' Ci.l:
d d Bone I
Blood and Bone (No. 2).......|4171| 6.36|


Phosphoric Acid


Cd :
? I
-05


FOR WHOM SENT.


I I


6.60 2.50| 9.10 3.S-I 2.61 A. Van Ness, Sanford
6.25 1.951 S.20 3.85 2.76 C. F. Branan, Sanford
5.40 2.851 8.25 4.22 5.20 G. F. Smith, Sanford.
9.35 1.95 11.30 4.58 2.17 W. H. Peters, Sanford
5.65 4.65 10.30 3.90 1.72 Henry Witte, Sanford
S.05 2.30 10..35 5.48 2.49 E. D. Ogleshy, Sanfor(
3.93 7.85 11.781 8.50..... W. H. Peters, Sanford
.8 5.17 9.00110.30 ..... Henry Witte, Sanford
:3..4I l(.:32[ .75i10.70| ..... G. F. Smith, Sanford.


I.


1.


, r


f










Blood and Bone................ .41721 7.641 4.951 8.65 13.(01 7.501 ..... .
I II
Tobacco Dust (No. 2) .......... 14173 .. ... ........ .... 2.(;5 7.701

Cotton Seed M eal.............. 14174 ....... . ..... .. 7.30 .....

Fertilizer No. 1 (Acid Phos.) .... 4175 .... 17.20 0.20 17..40 ..
SI I I
Fertilizer (No. 2) .............. 41761 7.77111.90 1.25 13.15I 2.4S .....

Guano ........................ 4177 9.98111.251 1.05 12.30 2.351 1.27

Acid Phosphate ........ . . .4178... .117.951 0.1518..10. . .... ..

Nitrate of Soda (No. 1) ........ 4179 ... . ..... 1 .30 . .

Bone Meal (No. 2) ............. 4180 3.-88 6.05 16.85 '3.80 5.00 ....

Blood and Bone (No. 3)........ 4181 5.78 4.00 U6.70 10.70 9.90 .....

Dried Blood (No. 4)............ 4182 ..... ....... 17.50 ..

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 5)........ 141831 6.98 S3! 2.32' ..15! 5.08 3.131
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 141841 5.871 6.58 1.171 7.751 4.38 3.861
1 I i I I I I
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........14185 6.55' 6..95i 4.90 11..85 3.001 1.06I
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ........ 14186 7.56 7.58 1.S71T .45 5.13' 0.97
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 41871 .98 6.13 3.471 .(0o| G.10 5.801


W. B. Miller, Sanford.

E. D. Oglesby, Sanford.

J. S. Taylor, Quincy.

J. M. Stewart, Westville.

J. M. Stewart, Westville.

S.. M. Hudson, Westville.

S. M. Hudson, Westville.

G. F. Smith, Sanford.

G. F. Smith, Sanford.

G. F. Smith, Sanford.

G. F. Smith, Sanford.

G. F. Smith, Sanford.

W. H. Byers, Sanford.

J. W. Flynt, Geneva.
J. W. Flynt, Geneva.

II. Muse, Sanford.








... .... A4BAL FERTILIZER ANALY-SE, 1 -17-COninAed,

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. 0 S FOR WHOM SENT.
0 1 0 o
-t 4
e5 .C O E3 a
5^ ^ | a
>-1 g < ,S E-I <<


Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4188 7.78 3.63 1.57 5.20 10.95 1.91
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4189 7.37 0.45 2.80 9.25 4.47 3.
Fertilizer ..................... 4190 10.12 4.85 4.80 9..65 4.38 4.2
Fertilizer (No. 1).............. 4191 3.83 7.48 6.87114.35 5.55 .....
Fertizer (No. 2)............... 4192 5.01 7.40 1.80 9.201 4.52 2.81
Fertilizer ..................... 41931 4.03 6-10 8.05 14. 0.73 .
Composted Sea Moss........... 14194 10.981 0.88 5.121 0.001 1.531 0.50
Carbonate of Potash .......... 41951 ..... I .... ..... ..... . 25.4
Fertilizer ..................... .4196 6..971 7.651 1.65 9.301 5.051 1.93
Ground Phosphate... ......... 4197 .. 1.10 29.40 30.501..... .....
I I I I I


B. H. Squires, Sanford.
Mahoney, Walker & Mahoney, Sanford
R. W. Rhodes, Miami.
J. R. Davis, Bartow.
J. R. Davis, Bartow.
J. R. Davis, Bartow.
E. W. Amsden, Ormond Beach.
Swift & Co., Chicago, Illinois.
N. P. Canthen, Waldo.
J. Hinton Pledger, Tallahassee.








16% Acid Phosphate........... |4198 .... 16.0 4.70 21 .3 ...... ..... J. Hinton Pledger, Tallahassee.
Tobacco Dust (No. 1) .......... 4199 ....... ...... .. 2.(1 6.801 Joseph Cameron, Sanford.
Cotton Seed Meal (No. 3)...... 4200 .1.. ....... ..... .... 7 .15 ....Joseph Cameron, Sanford.
od and one (N. 2)........ 4201 7.1o 3.7 I I I
Blood and Bone (No. 2).. ....4201 7.10 3.75( 6.55 10.30 10.40 ..... Joseph Cameron, Sanford.
Blood and Bone.......... ...... 4202 .88 4.3510.00114.35. 7.15 .... R. H. Muirhead, Sanford.
20I I
Blood and Bone................ 4203 5.561 3.301 s.00 11. :(110. ..... Fish & Fish, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4204 4.22 9.33 0..67110.00 3.03 ..... H. A. Vivian, Orlando.
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)....... 4205 7.371 7.93 2.97110.!0 3-801 0.48 Chuluota Co., Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2) ....... |420 6.981 6.33 0.87 7.201 5.051 1.031 Chuluota Co., Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 3) ....... 4207 8.0611.20 3.20 14.401 2.48 ..... Chuluota Co., -Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4208 7.03 5.90 2..951 8.85 4.32 5.01 G. F. Smith, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer............... 4209 7.28 5.80 2.751 8.551 4.18 4.48 C. E. Wainwright, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4210 6.22 6.301 1.501 7.,S'0 3.75 2.89 Robt S. Shimmons, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 42111 7.051 6.45 6.35112..0 6.401 0.67 R. B. Monroe, Sanford.
I I I I
Acid Phosphate ............... 142121 ..... 18-.85 0.3011).151 ... .. M. L. M. Owens, Quincy.
Acid Phosphate ............... |4213 .. 10.401 0.4 1 .0 .. C. S. Lambert. Quincy.
4213! q.,0in 19 -- .. I C .Lmet uny









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


< S


FOR WHOM SENT.


Acid Phosphate ............... 4214 ..... 1.8 0.62 1..30 ....... W. C. Lambert, Quincy.
Acid Phosphate ............... 4215 .... 19.20 0.401.0 ..... ..... W. M. Owens. Quincy.

Fertilizer ...................... 14216| 3.93| 5.951 5.50 11.41 4.101 2.27 R. W Rhodes, Miami.
Fertilizer ..................... 4217 8.91 7.58 1.071 S.;5 5.231 2.43 C. H. Wilson. Clermont.

Complete Fertilizer ............ 14218 5.9 3.50 8.60 12.10 7.28 0.92 II. Perry, Pomoi7n.

Fertilizer ...................... 42191 S.930 3.181 7.17 10.::51 '5.32] 1.92 C. O. Roe, Clermont.
Fertilizer (Bone Meal) ............ 4 4.07 4.(0 19.00 23.(0 5.10 .... Nocatce Fruit Co., Neoatee.
e, 42201 4.071 4.G019.00 230 10 .47
Fertilizer (No. 1) ..............42217.62 9.85 3.20 13.05 5.8 0.47 J. R. McKibblen Orlando.
II I
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)....... 4220 6.86 8.23 7.37115.(!0 4.331 2.30! E. Curlett, Geneva.
I I .....................422 11. 10.4 1. 12.0I I I
Fertilizer ..................... 14223111.31110.431 1.C2112.051 2.251 2.141 J. M1. Stewart. Westville.
I I I I I I I


NAME, OR BRAND.









Orangewood Ashes ............ 4224| .. . ..... .... 4.10] ..... i.50i
I I i
Blood and Bone................ 14225:i .5 3. ;0[ 9.00 12.(i0 10.00. ....

Cotton Seed M eal.............. 4226 .. .... . ... ... .. (.!i ....
I I I I
Mixed Fertilizer. .............. 14227 11.141 4.78 4.30 9.OSI 3:.110 l.SOt
I hoha e Rock .I. 4228 . 0.70 .
Phosphate Rock ............... .4228'..... ..... ..... 10.70 ..... ..... .


Sheep Manure ................ 4229) S.:37

Fertilizer .................. 4231110..S3
I I
Fertilizer ..................... 41231 11 .1i

Fertilizer ..................... 4232; 11 .2N

Goat Manure .................. 42332[l:3.isl

Complete Fertilizer ........... 4234 12.121

Sheep Manure (No. 1) ......... 14235. S.12

Mixed Manure (No. 2)......... 4231i S.3:1

Mixed Manure ................ 14217' S.O l

Fertilizer .................... ..423,8!10. 1


1.731 0.12| 1 .s,. :00 2.00


7.28S

7.42:

2.55

o..Q5P

4. ;3

1.201

1.52!

1. I'

s.3.5


Fertilizer ............. .. ...... i42321 3.7Ns 7.10!


1.821 9.10 4.(;0

2.12 10.051 4.5 [

4.00i (.5' 1() .251

0 .12 .( 5.| 1 .!)')

3.57i s.201 .00!

0.10) 1 .i0| 2.13

0.07| 1.CiO 2.30[

0(.07 1 ..O! 2.40'

(.s0 11.15 3.N51


2.171

1 .o00

0.4(|

3. 57)


2. .53


2.7S

2.77:1

(.221


W. S. DuPree, Citra.

Mahoney, Walker & Mahoney. Sanford.

S. II. Bass, M;lton.

Ienry Nickel. Sanford.

Mrs. S. Slaugli. Sumnertioll.

W. A. Raynor, Sanford.

E. Stafford. Enterprise functionn.

K. S. Parrish. Parrish.

W. A. Dormany, Dade City.

E. L. Perkins. Punta Gordn.

.T. 1. Breckenridge, Carteret, N. J.

1). Leach. Sanford.

D. .Lench, Sanford.

Mike Boys, Sanford.

A. IT. Brown, Manavista.


2.15 .25 (.I0.51 0..52 M.. J erran. West Palm BRea:h.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1917. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspectors Under Sections 1, 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1905.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND. NAME AND ADDRESS OF
S, OR B MANUFACTURER.

i I I I i I i
Just Dairy Feed.............. 2507 Guaranteedi 15.00 20.001 54.001 3.25 ......iJust Mills, Nashville, Tenn.
Found..... 13.62 20.36 43.46 2.29] 8.271
Corno Dairy Feed............. 2508 Guaranteed 15.00I 15.00 50.00 3.501...... The Corno Mills Co., St.
I Found..... 15.67 17.771 46.631 2.901 5.221 Louis, Mo.
Derby Horse and Mule Feed... 2509 Guaranteed 12.00 8.001 50.001 2.501 ...... John E. Koerner & Co.,
Found..... 16.711 9.09 49.891 2.211 9.891 New Orleans, La.
Pawnee Sweet Feed........... 2510 Guaranteed 19.00 10.001 50.00] 2.001...... National Oats Co., St. Louis,
I Found..... 13.80 10.41 53.73| 1.801 6.55| Mo.
Red Horse Feed.............. 2511 Guaranteed 16.001 9.001 52.001 1.501...... John Wade & Sons, Mem-
S Found..... 14.261 9.34 55.331 1.541 7.421 phis, Tenn.
Cotton Seed Meal............. 2512|Guaranteed 36.05 ...... ........... IFlorida .Cotton Oil Co.,
SFound..... 34.25 ...... |...... ...... Jacksonville, Fla.









Cotton Seed Meal............. 25131Guaranteedl
|Found..... |
Milco Feed ................... 2514Guaranteed 22.00
Found..... 16.101
I I
Velvet Bean Feed Meal........ 2515 Guaranteed 14.00
Found..... 10.70
Velvet Bean Feed Meal........ 2510Guaranteed 14.00
Found..... 12.12!
Old Reliable Horse and Mule 2517 Guaranteed 16.00!
Feed ...................... Found..... 17.40

Aunt Patsy's Poultry Feed.... .2518 Guaranteed 11.00]
Found..... 9.771

Suwanee Horse and Mule Feed. 2519 Guaranteed 13.00'
Found..... 14.009
"Peerless" Molasses Feed ..... 2520 Guaranteed 12.00
S Found..... 11.57
Southern Mule Feed.......... 2521 Guaranteed 17.00]
Found..... 20.701
"Quality" Molasses Feed...... 2522 Guaranteed 11.00
I Found..... 8.741
1 1 1 i


36.05 ...... I...... ...... [Planters Oil Co., Albany, Ga.
34.50 ..................
[I
20.001 30.00] 5.00|..... Empire Cotton Oil Co., At-
27.(4 :3(i.791 5.S01 5.751 lanta, Ga.

17.25 55.001 4.25 ..... IMcGawin -Bennett Milling
18.211 52.721 4.57] 3.901 Co., Georgiana, Ala.

17.251 55.00] 4.25] ...... McGawin-Bennett Milling
17.761 51.71] 4.07] 4.521 Co., Georgiana, Ala.

9.001 50.001 1.50 ..... Snow & Bryan, Tampa, Fla.
8.071 52.141 2.25| 6.18|

15.751 50.00] 3.50] ..... .Aunt Patsy Poultry Feed
20.841 48.72[ 3.151 6.901 Co., Memphis, Tenn.

9.001 50.001 1.50] ..... IMilam-Morgan Co., New Or-
9.171 56.CC 3.201 9.31| leans, La.

9.00. 55.001 2.001...... Peerless Milling & Feed Co.,
10.85| 53.621 2.251 8.731 Cairo, Ill.

9.00! 45.00] 2.501...... Jurina Mills, Branch, St.
10.70' 45.78 4.061 5.971 Louis, Mo.

10.501 59.00] 2.50 ...... Peerless Milling & Feed Co.,
10.531 59.561 1.811 7.18] Cairo, Ill.
I


cl~ ` ----~









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.


NAMEOR BRAND NAME AND ADDRESS OF
0 4 MANUFACTURER.
M W, v4 48
22 <3 6 d4. U1 0e4

Peacock" Hen Feed. ......... 2523 Guaranteed 4.00 10.00 64.00 3.00 ...... IMilam-Morgan Co., New Or-
Found..... 2.92 10.84 69.40! 3.521 1.701 leans, La.

4dluh Cow Feed.............. 2524 Guaranteed 15.00 10.00 67.00 3.801 ...... Adluh Milling Co., Colum-
Found ..... 15.60 20.711 40.821 6.101 7.271 bia, S. C.

Velvet Bean Feed Meal........ 225 Guaranteed 14.00 17.25 55.001 4.25 ...... |McGawin-Bennett Milling
Found..... 12.02, 17.29 51.121 4.221 4.951 Co., Georgiana, Ala.
I I I I
Schumacher Poultry Feed..... 2526 Guaranteed 10.00 17.501 52.001 4.00 ...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
Found..... 6.12 20.71 53.931 4.15 4.571 cago, Ill.

Sunshine Scratch Feed........ 2527 Guaranteed! 4.001 10.00 70.00 3.001...... J. H. Wilkes & Co.. Nash-
S Found..... 2.50[ 10.71 67.62 3.001 4.421 ville, Tenn.

Royal Hen Feed.............. 12528 Guaranteed! 5.001 10.001 65.001 3.00 ...... John Wade & Sons, Mem-
IFound..... 4.821 16.23' 59.131 3.021 3125! phis, Tenn.
I I I I
Animo Ox Feed, Dry.......... 12529 Guaranteed! 27.001 10.001 46.001 2.00 ...... IThe Buckeye Cotton Oil
I Found..... 24.901 13.431 45.721 3.101 3.60! Co., Memphis, Tenn.
I I I I I
Peters' Alfal-Fat ............. 125301Guaranteed 26.00! 10.001 46.00! 0.501 ...... |M. C. Peters Mill Co., Oma-
Found..... 23.041 14.321 39.251 0.921 8.781 ha, Neb.









Nutro Sweet Feed............. 12531|Guaranteed
I 1Found ....
Buck Eye Molasses Feed...... 25321 Guaranteed
S Found....
Lucky Horse and Mule Feed... 2533 Guaranteed
Found.....

International Dan Patch Spe- 2534 Guaranteed
cial Horse Feed............ Found.....

King Cotton Horse and Mule 2535 Guaranteed
Feed ......................I Found.....

Big Mule Molasses Feed Mix- 2536 Guaranteed
ture ....................... I Found.....
I I
Producer Dairy Feed..........12537 Guaranteed
I Found.....
International Arrow Horse 12538 Guaranteed
Feed ...................... Found.....

Stafolife Horse and Mule Feed. 25391Guaranteedl
S IFound.....

"Bronco" Horse and Mule Feed25401 Guaranteed
S Found.....
I 1.


15..001
15.291

12.001
16.47

15.00
16.701
1

12.501
13.10|

15.001
14.11]
1
15.001
14.131

13.00
14.45

15.001
11.471

12.001
13.851

15.001
14.691


9.001
9.17!

9 00
10.381

9.501
9.361

9.001
9.861

9.00
11.041

10.001
13.391

20.001
19.821

9.001
10.001

9.00
9.38

10.001
10.201


55.001 2.501 ...... National Oats Co., St. Louis,
57.221 2.151 5.57 Mo.

50 001 .2.001..._..Geo. B. Matthews & Sons,
45.471 4.75 7.581 New Orleans, La.

54.001 2.25 ...... Marco Mills, Pine Bluff, Ark.
54.481 3.641 4.751

55.00 2.25 ...... International Sugar Feed
54.471 1.821 6.521 Co., Memphis, Tenn.
I I 1
50.001 1.50 ..... Alfocorn Milling Co., East
53.131 2.42 7.701 St. Louis, Ill.

50.001 2.o0 ......The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
51.341 2.001 8.99[ cago, Ill.
I I
50.001 5.001......IThe Savannah Milling Co..
48.311 2.92 5.751 Savannah, Ga.

65.001 1.75J.....International Sugar Feed
53.58 2.361 8.10 Co., Memphis, Tenn.

55.00[ 3.00 ...... John E. Koerner & Co., New
51.401 3.271 9.121 Orleans, La.
I 1 1
50.001 1.501 ..... Grain Belt Mills Co., St.
52.651 1.861 8.061 Joseph, Mo.
I I I


I I









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


w
'
<0d


Stayrite Feed ................ 2541IGuaranteedl
Found.....
S I I
Sunshine Dairy Feed......... 25421Guaranteed
Found.....

Sho-Me Horse and Mule Feed. 25431Guaranteed
S Found.....
I I
"Eureka" Dairy Feed......... 25441Guaranteed
Found.....

Excello Horse Feed............ 2545 Guaranteed
I Found.....

Green Cross Horse Mixed Feed 2546 Guaranteed
Found.....

Victor Feed .................. 2547 Guaranteed
Found.....
I I
"Mo-Egg" Chicken Feed ...... 2548 Guaranteed
I Found.....


15.55 13.751 52.32
16.00 10.00] 54.00

15.001 15.001 45.001
11.921 18.361 46.881

17.00 9.001 45.00
14.90 11.14( 53.63

I I I
15.00 16.00 50.00o
16.38 16.08; 44.951

15.00 10.00 58.411
14.70 11.62 54.52

12.00 10.00 62.00?
14.20 9.80 54.37

12.00 8.00 62.00
'2.90 10.31 70.27

4.001 8.00 60.001
8.72 12.37 60.781


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.
CCI'
I I

3.301...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
2.691 5.361 cago, Ill.
I I
3.001...... J. H. Wilkes & Co., Nash-
2.381 8.061 ville, Tenn.

2.00 ...... Excello Feed Milling Co.,
1.931 7.08] St. Joseph, Mo.

4.001...... Milam-Morgan Co., New Or-
3.621 8.621 leans, La.

3.00 ...... Excello Feed Milling Co.,
2.93 5.601 St. Joseph, Mo.
I I
2.501...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
2.791 7.201 cago, Ill.
I I
3.00 ...... The Quaker Oats Co.. Chi-
2:051 3.851 cago, Ill.
I I
2.50 ...... Milam-Morgan Co., New Or-
3.25? 3.081 leans, La.










Second Class Cotton Seed Meal 2549 GuaranteedI
S |Found.....

Milk Made Dairy Feed........ 2550 Guaranteed[
IFound.....

Milco Feed .................. 2551[Guaranteed[
S Found.....

Ceralfa Stock Feed ........... 2552 Guaranteed.
[Found.....
I I
Hot Shot Scratch Feed....... 2553 Guaranteed
I Found.....
I I I
Victor Horse and Mule Feed... 2554 Guaranteed
[Found.....
I II
Early Bird Scratch Grains.... 2555 GuaranteedI
I Found.....

Reliable Horse and Mule Feed. 25561Guaranteed[
[Found.....

East Coast Sweet Feed....... 25571Guaranteed[
[ Found.....

Kay Horse and Mule Feed.... 2558 Guaranteed[
I Found.....
I [ I


14.00|
17.351

12.501
16.251

22.001
23.501

11.501
11.77[
I
5.001
4.471

9.001
5.971

5.001
3.621

15.00
15.201

12.001
13.471

15.00|
17.711
I


36.00| 30.001
86.151 u8.581

24.001 48.00[
25.27 36.48

20.001 30.001
21.50 37.63

13.00 55.00|
13.84 54.921

.co0 ,:.0o0
10.53| 64.701

10.00 60.00o
12.81 61.851

10.00 60.001
11.18 66.381

10.001 52.001
12.601 54.511

9.00o 57.001
9.28[ 56.29

9.001 50.00o
14.041 47.071
I I


6.00[...... [Empire Cotton Oil Co., At-
5.601 5.15[ lanta, Ga.

5.001...... International Sugar Feed
6.82| 7.58[ Co., Memphis, Tenn.

5.00[...... Empire Cotton Oil Co., At-
5.651 3.551 lanta, Ga.

3.50[...... Edgar-Morgan Co., Mem-
3.00[ 5.951 phis, Tenn.

2.501.... Just Mills, Nashville, Tenn.
3.051 3.501

4.00 ...... Tne Sa-. nnah Milling Co.,
4.401 3.801 Savannah. Ga.

2.50 ...... The Quaker Oats Co, Chi-
3.321 3.50[ cago, Ill.

3.00 ...... Excello Feed Milling Co.,
2.501 4.721 St. Joseph, Mo.

1.50 .......Consolidated Grocery Co.,
2.30[ 6.421 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.50 ...... Kornfalfa Feed Milling Co.,
2.001 7.54[ Kansas City, Mo.
I I


I I ~I








OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES,


NAME, OR BRAND. | | 0 |

___________iA__r_
I I I
Novo Stock Feed............. 25591Guaranteed1 17.001 10.00 50.00
Found..... 19.921 12.65 46.731
I I I
Green Harvest Horse Feed.... 12560 Guaranteed1 12.00| 10.00[ 62.001
Found..... 12.361 10.88 56.171
I I I II
Animo Ox Feed............... 125611GuaranteedI 25.00| 10.001 48.001
S Found.....| 23.52 10.90 49.08
Excello Dairy Feed............ 25621Guaranteed ...... 18.00 45.00]
Found.....| 11.621 18.97 48.341
Broncho Molasses Feed....... 2563 Guaranteedl 16.001 9.00 55.001
S IFound.....I 17.301 13.38 46.59
Cavalry Molasses Feed....... 2564 Guaranteed| 16.001 9.00 55.00
S IFound.....[ 13.891 12.83 51.041
Red Cow Dairy Feed.......... I2565Guaranteed| 10.001 15.001......
S Found..... 13.301 14.921 55.23
Lucky Horse and Mule Feed.. 12566 Guaranteedl 15.001 9.501 54.00
1 Found..... 13.171 8.971 56.761


1917-Continued.


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.
ca .n


1.501...... G. E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
1.381 7.061 phis, Tenn.
2.501...... The Quaker Oats Co., Chi-
1 901 5.911 cago, Ill.
I I
2.001..T... The Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
1.861 3.931 Memphis, Tenn.

3.501...... Excello Feed Milling Co.,
3.44) 7.181 St. Joseph, Mo.
1 I
1.50 ...... National Milling Co., Macon,
1.371 7.671 Ga.
1.501 ...... National Milling Co., Macon,
1.89[ 6.981 Ga.
5.001...... Merchant Mills, Montgom-
2.901 4.651 ery, Ala.
2.251...... Marco Mills, Pine Bluff,
1.901 5.031 Ark.








Valdo Horse and Mule Feed... 25671Guaranteedl 17.001 10.00 55.001 3.001...... South Georgia Milling Co.,
S Found..... 14.661 10.64 56.65! 2.541 5.541 Valdosta, Ga.
Stafolife Horse and Mule Feed 2568|Guaranteed| 12.00 9.00| 55.00 3.00..... John E. Koerner & Co. ..ew
S Found..... 18.501 9.38 51.251 1.631 7.221 Orleans, La.
M-M "Better" Horse and Mule 2569IGuaranteed 12.00 8.001 50.00 2.00 ...... Milam-Morgan Co., New Or-
Feed .......... ...........I IFound..... 15.83 10.001 54.411 2.391 8.311 leans, La.
S I I I I I I
Horse Life Feed.............. 2570 Guaranteed| 12.001 10.00 56.001 2.001...... Cunningham Commission
I Found..... 13.531 10.121 51.07( 2.161 9.391 Co., Little Rock, Ark.
I I I I I
Rice Shorts .................. 25711Guaranteed! 10.001 10.001 50.00 10.001...... The Adler Export Co., Ndw
IFound..... 10.971 15.251 45.69 10.971 10.971 Orleans, La.
I I I I
Second Class Cotton Seed Meal 2572 Guaranteed ...... 36.00 ...... ..... ....... Camilla Cotton Oil and Fert.
|Found..... 11.37 35.98 31.71! 7.05 6.12! Co., Camilla, Ga.
II I
Cotton Seed Meal............. 2573Guaranteed ...... 36.05 ...... ...... ...... Ashburn Oil Mill., Ashburn,
S Found..... 10.82! 36.861 31.97! 5.51! 5.50! Ga.
Red Mill Molasses Feed....... 25741Guaranteed| 16.001 9.00! 55.001 1.50 ...... National Milling Co., Macon,
I Found..... 16.64! 11.26! 51.50! 2.421 6.55! Ga.
Pawnee Sweet Feed........... 2575 Guaranteed| 19.00! 10.00 50.001 2.0, ...... National Oats Co., St.Louis,
S Found.....( 14.17 10.44 55.031 2.51! 6.43| Mo.
Shur Nuff Horse and Mule 12576 Guaranteed 15.001 10.001 55.001 2.00 ...... The Superior Feed Co.,
Feed ...................... I Found..... 20.831 10.12 45.62! 2.591 8.131 Memphis, Tenn.
Bully Mule Feed.............. 2577 Guaranteed1 20.00] 9.00] 45.001 3.00 [...... Just Mills, Nashville, Tenn.
I Found..... 23.75! 9.401 46.511 4.281 7.44|










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FOOD AND DRUG SECTION.
E. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1917. A. M. HENRY Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 12, Act Approved June 5, 1911.
MISCELLANEOUS.


No. I NAME, OR LABEL. RESULTS. ] BY WHOM SENT. REMI

1672 Barma, 10 fluid ounces, Val.[ Iupree & Ausley, Citra Legal.
Blatz Browing Co., Mil- Alcohol .............. Trac
waukee. Wis.

G73 Barma, 10 fluid ounces, Val. Alcohol ...............Trace (Crenshaw Bros. Prod- Legal.
Blatz Brewing Co., Mil-|Extract (%).......... 4.45 uce Co., Tampa.
waukee, Wis.

1674 Tanhauser, 12 fluid ounces, Alcohol .............Trace Crenshaw Bros. Prod- Illegil. Mist
The Royal Brewing Co., Extract (%) .......... 5.531 uce Co., Tampa. Measure.
Kansas City. Mo. Short measure (%) .... 4.00

1076 Tanhauser, 12 fluid ounces,! It. C. Shepherd. Tampa Legal.
The Royal Brev-ing Co., Alcohol ..............Trac
Kansas City, Mo.

1087 Tanhauser, 12 fluid ounces, Alcohol ..............Trace H. H. Haws, Talla- Legal.
The R'oyva Brewing Co., Extract (%3.......... 5.9 hassee.
Kansas City, Mo.

1175 Reifs Special, 12 fluid Alcohol (% by volume). G.41| A. J. White, Tampa. Legal.
ounces, Alcohol less than iExtract (%) ......... 4.S9) |


ARKS.


iranded. Fhort









1/2%, The Purity Extract
S& Tonic Co., Chattanooga.
Tenn.

(1177 Mecca, 10 fluid ounces, Jack- Alcohol ..............Trace Jacksonville Bre wing Legal.
sonville Bre w i n g Co., Extract (%) ........... 6.75 Co., Jacksonville.
Jacksonville, Fla.

1078 Bone Dry, 12 fluid ounces, [Alcohol ..............Trace The Florida Brewing Legal.
The Florida Brewing Co., |Extract (%) ......... 6.25 Co., Tampa.
Tampa, Fla.

1079 Bevo. 10 fluid ounces, An- Alcohol .............. Trace R. T. Butler, Kissim- Legal.
heuser-Busch Brewing As- Extract (%)......... 6.54 mee.
sociation, St. Louis, Mo.
I -00
1682 Whi t e Ribbon, 12 fluid Alohol ........ ....... Trace F. W. Pine, Miami. Legal.
ounces, Consumers Bever- Extract (%) ........ 3.57
age Co., New Orleans, La.

1084 Cotton-Top, 12 fluid ounces, Alcohol ............... Trace A. J. White, Tampa. Legal.
The Jung Bottling Works, Extract (%) .......... 4.92
Cincinnati, Ohio.

1089 Quizz, 12 fluid ounces, The Alcohol ...............Trace The Lewis Bear Co., Legal.
Wiedemann Quizz Co., Extract (%) .......... 5.76 Pensacola.
Newport, Ky.

185ITennessee Cider (No. 1). lAlcohol (% by volume). 8.00 G. S. Gregory, Quincy. Illegal. Misbranded. No state-
i| ment of alcohol content.
10806Apple Base Cider (No. 2). Alcohol (% by volume). 7.80 G. S. Gregory, Quincy. Illegal. Misbranded. No state-
Sment of alcohol content.









SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSIS. 1917-Continued.
MISCELLANEOUS

NAME OR LABEL. RESULTS. BY WHOM SENT. REMARKS.


Butter


Butter


Butter
I


Fat (%)....... 8.15 J. C. Moore, Tallahas-
see.

Fat (%)....... 4.00 Mrs. John Maige, Tal-
lahassee.

Fat (%).......12.00 Holmes Drug Co., Tal-
lahassee.


1681 Milk.


1683 Milk,


1680 Cream.


.... .. . .. .. . .. ... .. .. .. I




..........................


------ n









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FOOD AND DRUG SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSES, 1917. A. M. HENRY, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Sec. 12, Act Approved June 5, 1911.
MISCELLANEOUS.


No. LABEL. RESULTS.

2082 Hytone, 12 fluid ounces, National Alcohol (% by volume)......... 2.15
Bottling Works, New Orleans,
La.

2086 Lemon Soda. Artificial flavor Contents (liquid ounces)........ 7.33
and color. Pep-to-lac Bottling
Co., Ozark, Ala.


Van Camp's Pork and Beans.I
Prepared with tomato sauce,
1 lb. 5 oz. The Van Camp
Packing Co., Indianapolis, Ind.

Libby's Pork and Beans, with
Tomato Sauce, 1 lb. 1 oz. Libby,
McNeill & Libby, Chicago, Ill.

Yacht Club Baked Beans, in To-
mato Sauce, with Pork. 1 lb.
5 oz. Tildesley & Co., Chicago,
Ill.


REMARKS.

Illegal. Misbranded. No statement of
alcohol content.


Illegal. Misbranded. No statement of
net contents.


Contents ................... 1 lb. 5 oz.j Legal.




Contents....................1 Ib 1 oz. Legal



Contents........... ........ 1lb. 5 oz.1 Legal.









SPECIAL FOOT ANALYSIS, 1917-Continued.
MISCELLANEOUS

o. I LABEL. RESULTS. REMARKS.

20o l\Wagner's Pork and Beans, withI Contents '..................... 14 oz.j Legal.
Tomato Sauce. 14 ounces.
Martin Wagner Co., Baltimore,I
Md.

2056 Blue Grass Queen Flour. 12 lbs.l Net weight (lb.) ............... .11.101 Illegal. Misbranded. Sh.nrt weight.
Queen City Milling Co., Lex-1 \Veight short (%)............ 7.501
ington, Ky.

20,i7|0riole Flour. 12 lbs. Plattei Net weight (lb.) ................10.95 Illegal. Misb-anded. Short weight.
Valley Milling -Co.. Gothen-| Weight short (%)............ 8.75
burg, Neb.

2072 Melody High Patent Pure Soft Net weight (lb.)................ 5.56 Ilegal. Misbranded. fhort weight.
Winter Wheat Bleached Flour. \VWeight short (%) ............ 7.33
i lbs. The Portland Flourilng
Mills Co., Oregon-Wash.

2087 M e 1 o d y High Patent Pure Net weight (lb.) ................ 23.30! Illegal. Misbranded. SI ort weight.
SSoft Winter Wheat American[ Weight short (%)............ 2.501
Bleached Flour. 24 Ils. The Moisture (%) .................10.921
I'ortland Flouring Mills Co.,
| Oregon-Wash. I










20U741Climax Highest Patent Flour. 12 Net weight (lb.) ............... 10.82 Tllegal. Misbranded. Short weight.
lbs. Shawnee Milling Co.. Weight short (%)........... 9.83
Shawnee, Okla.
2071' California Apricots. Prepared Net weight (lb.) .............. 0.92 Illegal. Misbranded. Short weight.
Switch sulphur dioxide, 1 lb.] Weight short (%)........... 8.00)
Griffin & Skelly Co., Sai Fraun-i
cisco, Calif. 1
20S5 Ice. Madison Power Plant, Mad- Total dissolved solids (parts per ]Passed.
ison, Fla. m million) ....................... 171
ron oxide (parts per million) .... 28

20,)! Terrapin Brand Pineapple Chunks. Cans recently vented and soldered. Illegal. Misbranded. Consists in
S! oz. Schall Packing Co., Bal- Contents partially decomposed. of a decomposed vegetable substa
timore, Md.

207) Alligator Brand Pure Louisiana Contents....................1 lb. 9 oz. Passed.
Molasses. Contains sulphur di-
oxide, 1 lb. 9 oz. New'Orleans
Coffee Co., New Orleans, La.

20:: S Medium French Peas. Colored Contents ('ounces) ............ 15.101Illegal. Adulterated. Added poiso
with sulfate of copper. Societe Copper sulfate .............. Present deleterious substance. Misbran
Bordelaise de Conserve & Pro- No statement of net contents.
Suits Alimentaires, Bordeax,
[ France.

20 0ii Medium Peas 1. 141% ounces, lCopper sulfate .............. Present Illegal. Adulterated. Added poiso
colored with sulfate of cop.I deleterious substance.
I per. Mandron Brand, Wespe-|
Slaer, Belgium.


part
m e.


nous
ded.




no011









SPECIAL FOOD ANALYSIS, 1917-Continued.
MISCELLANEO US-Continued.


NAME OR LABEL.


Medium Peas 1. 14%
colored with sulfate
per. Mandron Brand,
laer, Belgium.


ounces, I
of cop-1
Westpe-I
I


2084 Medium Peas 1. 14% ounces,
colored with sulfate of cop-
per. Mandron Brand, Wespe-
laer, Belgium.

2088 Petits Pois Fins. Galo Beau-
mont, Calahorra, Spain.



2073 Invincible Brand Speghetti. 13

Sleans, La.

2075 Tomatoes. 1 lb. 3 oz. Wm. Mur-
phy, Glendale, Fla.


RESULTS.


Copper sulfate


........ ..... .Present


Copper sulfate .............. Present


REMARKS.

Illegal. Adulterated. Added poisonous
deleterious substance.



Illegal. Adulterated. Added poisonous
deleterious substance.


Copper sulfate (parts per million 196 Illegal. Adulterated. Added poisonous
Contents (ounces) ............. 7.671 deleterious substance. Consists in
Cans swollen and contents decom- part of a decomposed vegetable sub-
posed. stance. Misbranded. No statement of
net contents.
Net weight (lb.) ................ 11.15 Illegal. Misbranded. Short weight.


Weight short (%) ............ 14.23


Contents................. 1 lb. 4 oz.
Immersion Refractometer Reading at
200 C ....................... 40.35


Legal.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FOOD AND I)DRTG SECTION.
A. M. HENRY, Asst. Chemist. OFFICIAL DRUG ANALYSES, 1917. R. E. Rose, State Chemist.
Samples Taken by I.spectors Under Section 12, Act Approved June 5, 1911
MISCELLANEOUS


No. LABEL. .3 -
[a .-^ -

20(2 Granger Cough Syrup. Alcohol S. 00 0.14 7.00 .... ....... Pass
717%. Granger Medicine Co.,
Chattanooga, Tenn.

2063 Cough Cure. Dr. C. I. Shop, S2.79 0.5 .... .... ....... ....... Pass,
Racine, Wis.

2064 Otto's Cure. Alcohol 1%, chloro- 7!).4 0.5 1.00 .... Present Present Pass(
form 3 minims, morphine 1-10]
grain. S. C. Wells & Co., Le-l
Roy, N. Y.

20651Meritol Compound Syrup of Wild 70.07 0.4. | 0.10 .... Present ....... Pass
ICherry Bark, etc. Alcohol 6%,
Chloroform 4 minims. Ameri-I
can Drug & Press Asso.. De-I
Scorah, Iowa.

2066Pliney Woods Cough & Lungj 7.81 0.3....... ....... Passi










OFFICIAL FOOD ANALYSIS, 1917-Continued.
MISCELLANEOUS-Continued.


No. LABEL.


Cure. R. P. Menard, Macon,|
Ga.

2067 Dr. A. Boschee's German Syrup. 80.29 0.12
Alcohol 1.75%, morphine 0.24
grain. G. G. Green, Wood-
bury, N. J.

2076 Eckman's Alterative. Eckman 5.90 4.00
Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa.

2077 Dr. Brown's New Consumption 80.11 1.27
Remedy. Magnolia Remedy
Co., St. Augustine, Fla.

2078 Wintersmith's Chill Tonic. Al- 42.98 0.30
cohol 19.5%. Arthur Peter &
Co., Louisville, Ky.

2079 Nyal's Tonic. Alcohol, 18%. New 14.18 1.51
York & London Drug Co., New
York, N. Y.


0


1.70


Present


19.56



14.18


Passed




Passed


Passed



Passed



Passed


I










2080 Liver. Kidney & Nerve Toner.I
SAlcohol 20%. Paxson Medicinel
I Co., Valdosta, Ga. I


20S1


Colic & Diarrhoea Remedy. Al-
colhol 48%, ether 19 minims,
chloroform 1.99 grains. Cham-
lierlain Medicine Co., bes
Moines, Ia.


24.84



0.29


10.32



42.92


Present


....... Passed



Present Iassed


I I I I




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