• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 County map of state of Florida
 Part I
 Part II. Crop acreages and...
 Part III. Rules and regulations,...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00044
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00044
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
    County map of state of Florida
        Page 2
    Part I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Sheep growing on the farm and range in Florida
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
        Erosion of soils
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Rice growing in Florida
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
        Insects destructive to tomatoes
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Notes on cabbage growing
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Why Florida is behind
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
    Part II. Crop acreages and conditions
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Divisions of the state by counties
            Page 45
            Page 46
        Department of agriculture
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
    Part III. Rules and regulations, fertilizers, feeding stuffs, and foods and drugs
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Department of agriculture - Division of chemistry
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
Full Text






Volume 27 Number 2



FLORIDA

QUARTERLY


BULLETIN
OF THE

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT


APRIL 1, 1917.


W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE
TALLAHASSEE, FLA.

Part 1-Sheep Growing on the Farm and Range in Florida.
Erosion of Soils. Rice Growing in Florida. In-
sects Destructice to Tomatoes. Notes on Cabbage
Growing. Why Florida is Behind.
Part 2-Crop Acreages and Conditions.
Part 3-Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs and Foods and Drugs.

iEntred January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.
THESE BULLETINS ARE ISSUED fREE TO THOSE REQUESTING THEM


T. J. APPLEYARD, STATE PRINTER
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA






























COUNTY
MAP OF

STATEoF LO RIDA
SHOWING SUBDIVISIONS


Y WT
KEY WEST



















PART I.

Sheep Growing on the Farm and Range in Flor-
ida.
Erosion of Soils.
Rice Growing in Florida.
Insects Destructive to Tomatoes
Notes on Cabbage Growing.
Why Florida is Behind.














SHEEP GROWING ON THE FARM AND
RANGE IN FLORIDA.

By H. S. Elliott,
Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture.
From the earliest historical period the sheep has been
the companion of the Indo-Chaldaic man. It finds men-
tion in the oldest Sanscrit, Chaldaic and Egyptian
records. Historians and poets speak of the timidity,
harmlessness and usefulness of the sheep and of their
products. Astronomers placed Aries at the head of the
constellations, and reckon attitude and longitude from
the Ram. Eliminate all allusions to sheep from the
Bible, and much of its poetic beauty will be gone.

ORIGIN OF SHEEP.

So long has the sheep been under the control of man
that the spot where the race started is lost to the anti-
quarian. Before the days of Abraham, shepherds from
the valley of the Euphrates had made a descent upon
Egypt and established a dynasty that lasted 500 years,
until the Egyptians drove them and their flocks from the
land; and we read that when Jacob and his sons went
there with their flocks they were compelled to settle in
Goshen, because their occupation as shepherds was "an
abomination to the Egyptians." We are thus able to
trace the sheep to the worn plains and mountains of
Persia, Arabia, Turkey and Greece, later to both shores
of the Mediterranean, and finally to Northern Europe
and America.
The fine wool of the eastern sheep furnished the staple
for the purple and scarlet clothing of kings and princes,
and to those sheep, through Greece and Rome, may be
traced the sheep of Spain. When the Tartar tribes from











the mountains of Asia ravaged western Asia and the
Slavo-Germanic barbarians burned, destroyed and killed
the Greeks and Latins, the shepherds fell and their sheep
supplied food to warriors; only the Moors of Western
Spain could stop their inroads, and there the fine wooled
sheep were spared, near the sea, and from thence re-
ceived their name, marino.
Thus we have traced the variety of sheep from before
the days of the Hebrew patriarchs, to the present; living
in a climate where grows the vine, fig and orange,
we conclude there is nothing in such climate injurious
to their health of body, or fineness of fleece.

FLORIDA WILL YIELD THE GRABS.

Sheep are both grazers and browsers and live upon
grass and the leaves of certain herbs and bushes. No
State can grow a greater amount of nutritious plants,
suitable for the food of sheep, than Florida.
In no portion of the State do snows cover the vegetation,
nor are frosts sufficiently severe to freeze the soil or kill
many varieties of the most nutritious grasses. Most of
these grow constantly, even best when in other States
the pastures are frost bound. Rains sufficient for good
vegetable growths fall at all seasons and places, and in
one-half of the State vegetation is perpetual. Perennial
and annual grasses and nutritious herbs grow every-
where except in the densest shades and in deep waters.
The lands at present adapted to sheep pastures wil1
supply more food to the acreage than will the best nat-
ural pasture of any State or Territory west of the Missis-
sippi, though they are considered the greatest cattle
ranges of America. Unlike them, the water is good and
abundant at all seasons and locations. Such, in brief,
is Florida in its natural state.
Among the varieties of range lands adapted to the
growing of sheep, five classes may be considered:












First. Are the dry lands covered with pines, and
black and willow-leafed oak as undergrowth, free from
palmettoes or water plants. These lands are fairly
stocked with perennial wire grasses and a few annuals.
These have been burned over as often as every second
year. This land could be cheaply converted into the best
of sheep-walks by clearing it of all dead wood, roots,
scrubby bushes, and removing the pine leaves if they
covered the surface, and give it a good harrowing to
encourage the growth of the seeds of both perennial and
annual grasses. The smut-grass delights in this soil,
and can be easily enduced to grow on it. This grass is
one of the most nutritious of grasses, and remains green
and grows during the coldest months in the most north-
ern counties. The Bermuda, another perennial grass,
spreading by runners and very nutritious, grows well.
To these will be added as volunteers, on account of the
annual harrowing, the crabgrasses, and, with a little
pains, the Japan clover. The pine trees need not be
removed.
Second. The wetter flat woods pine lands produce
some dwarf palmettoes, a few gall and other bushes,
wire-grass, lyme grass, wild oats and others. The soil
contains considerable vegetable matter, and clearing and
harrowing greatly increase the growth of the native
grasses. These grasses will increase rapidly, and green
and nutritious with the smut, and Bermuda may be
added and form a compact and evergreen turf on which
sheep will feed. In all the southern portions of the State
the Para grass will thrive on this soil when properly pre-
pared. Sheep on these soils should be penned at night on
the dry, high land.
Third. The same scrubs are usually covered by the
scrub pines of no value, a schubby growth of oaks and
other bushes, with clumps of scrub palmettoes. The soil
is white and sandy, nearly destitute of vegetable matter,












and little grass is found on them. If these were cleared
of the brush, etc., and planted to leguminous crops, cov-
ered with oak leaves and grass and made into sheep pens,
they would become productive as gardens. Good water
may generally be found near these scrubs.
Fourth. The low flat prairie lands, frequently covered
with water, can be made to produce more grass than
any other, are at times too wet for sheep. The lyme and
other coarse grasses grow on these lands in large quan-
tities, affording feed for cattle as well as for sheep.
When drained of the surface water, as they can be easily,
these lands would produce heavy crops of Bermuda, smut,
and carpet grasses, and many others of high value for
sheep.
Fifth. The hammocks remain to be considered; these
lands are fairly dry and densely covered with broad-
leafed trees, such as oaks, hickories, etc. In their native
condition these produce very little grass. The cost of
clearing is too great for profitable pasturage. Moreover,
these are the lands usually selected for cropping in
cotton and corn and may be omitted in estimates for
pasture lands.

FLORIDA SHEEP ARE HEALTHY.

As early as 1830 Scotch settlements were made in West
Florida and sheep were brought with them. These have
been fed on the dry pine lands, almost without care, and
from them have sprung all the sheep now here. The
warmness of the climate permits the lambs to be dropped
at any season of the year; therefore the rams need not
be separated from the ewes; and seldom does twelve
months pass frob birth to birth, more often only nine
months. Loss from cold storms is at the lowest percent-
age; and the ewes rear more lambs each year than their
own number, unless prevented by dogs.
A renewal of interest in the raising of live stock gen-












rally also suggests the growing possibilities of profitable
sheep raising. The present price of wool being directly
responsible for a sudden and apparently earnest interest
in a revival of the sheep growing industry.
Instability in wool values explain in large part the
increases and decreases in numbers of farm sheep during
the past 30 to 50 years, so that at present many former
raisers of commercial sheep who breed altogether for
wool are giving more attention to mutton, and most of
the new flocks being established are of some of the mutton
breeds. A system of sheep farming that is to be con-
tinuously successful cannot ignore either wool or mut-
ton. In many cases the two products will be worthy of
equal consideration; in others, either one may be empha-
sized according to the peculiarities of local conditions,
management and marketing. All purpose breeds are
apparently what is needed.
A decision to raise sheep chiefly for mutton purposes
leaves much still to be considered in making a choice of
type and breed. The choice of a breed is not the most
important question. Any breed is far superior to no
breed. Once established, there must be advance in the
character and usually in the size of the flock. Such ad-
vance can not be made unless the same breed and type
is adhered to in securing rams. The female of mixed
breeding, no matter how good individually, is an uncer--
tain quantity when used as a breeder. There are enough
highly improved breeds to allow a choice of one Ihat will
have special fitness for almost any combination of real
needs. IIn this article it is aimed to discuss the breeds
in a way that will enable those who are not familiar with
them to know which ones are likely to meet the require-
ments. All the Ibeeds mentioned in this article have
their good qualities and advantages.
Some of the breeds differ very strikingly in appearance.
Differences in size, color and covering of face and legs,












wnile quickly noticed, are not the main points which
determine whether a breed is likely to prove satisfactory
upon rough pasture land, for winter lambing, or any
of the points that must be taken into account when
starting into sheep raising. The breeds differ very widely
in their special points of usefulness for various sections
and systems of management. The differences are mainly
a result of breeding for special qualities needed by the
farmers in the localities in which and for which the
breeds are formed.
In starting into sheep raising the most important thing
is to decide what plan can be best followed. The avail-
able feed and care and the selling outlets will determine
this. If pasturage is sparse, feed expensive, and market-
ing arrangements poor, wool will need to be the first
consideration. If there is a good market for winter lambs
and the feed and care that can be given are such as are
needed, then the ability of the ewes to get in lamb in
the spring and the mutton qualities are the important
things to look for in tie breeding stock. If it is de
sired to have lambs come early and to feed them to be
sold before the time stomach worms become troublesome,
the choice would not fall upon the same breed that would
fit in if there was a better chance to keep the lambs to
clean pastures, and they were expected to take care of
themselves more largely through their first summer.
By keeping a moderate size fllock of sheep the farmer
can provide with meat for the table, sell a few lambs for
mutton, and secure additional revenues through the sale
of wool. For those who have no sheep, let us consider
just how to get started in the business with a small out-
lay of capital and how to handle the flock after obtain-
ing it.
Your first ewes can be native ewes, purchased from
nearby sheep owners. Go into a flock and pick out
vigorous ewes with compact bodies. Get young, healthy











ewes. If you must buy old ones, do not take those ha-
ing spread, broken or worn off teeth. Such ewes cannot
eat well and will make no money as breeders for their
purchasers.
Do not use anything but good rams of a mutton breed
upon your ewes. A Southdown, Shropshire, Hampshir~
Dorset Horn or Cotswold ram will prove most desirable.
He should be about two years of age, healthy and carry
a plenty of mutton. Such a ram will cost, delivered
from $15 to $25, and can be bought by a half dozen
farmers clubbed together. He will breed from forty to
sixty ewes.
Sheep do not require closed buildings for protection
from cold, as their fleece affords protection if kept dry.
A low shed, built on dry ground and opening to the
south, is sufficient. Such a shed need cost but very little,
as scraps of lumber about the farm can be utilized in
building it.
Place your flocks within a dog-proof fenced inclosure
at night, as dogs often attack and destroy sheep. A
fence that will turn a dog must be at least fifty inches
high, have a barbed wire stretched flat to the surface of
the ground at its bottom, and three barbed wires seven
inches apart stretched at its top. The space between the
barbed wires can be filled in with old boards, poles, or
any other fence-building material, provided it is so built
as to keep the dog from crawling through.
Ticks and lice may infect sheep. Guard against this by
dipping once each year in dips sold for this purpose. A
rain barrel or tub can be used to hold the dip. Pick the
sheep us bodily and work it around gradually in the dip
until all parts are submerged and drenched to the skin.
Keep salt before the flock at all times. Sheep require a
great deal of salt, and it is essential for them.
Give the sheep access to all harvested and vacated
fields, but do not depend entirely upon such forages











The ideal way is to provide lots of forages of such size
as will pasture the flocks for only two-week periods dur-
ing warm weather. By changing the pasturing ground
of lambs every two weeks there is little danger of loss
from stomach worms, as clean pastures do not infect
sheep. Rape, cow-peas, oats, vetch, crimson clover,
velvet beans and soy beans should constitute the prin-
cipal forages used. During the fall and winter perma-
nent pastures can be used. Even regular fields of winter
wheat and barley can be pastured without injury to them.
When pasture is not available, feed hay or fodder to
the flock. The sheep should receive as much cow pea hay
or velvet beans as they will eat; also feed silage. Keep
up the appetites of the ewes by adding small quantities
of rape, collards, chopped cabbage, or roots along with
they hay. Do not feed sugar beets and mangel-wurzels
to your rams or weathers.
Begin feeding the ewes a little grain, about two weeks
before lambing, and gradually increase the amount to
one-half pound daily at that time. After lambing, slowly
increase the amount to one and a half or two pounds
daily, and continue this ration during the suckling period.
Ewes need not be fed grain when dry if good pasture is
provided.
Give the ram just enough grain to keep him in good
condition. The amount fed should be increased during
the breeding season.
Teach the lambs to eat grain as soon as possible after
birth, and continually feed them what they will eat up
clean, until ready for the market. Feed them twice daily,
keeping them .separated from the ewes.
Th following grain ration, generally available on the
farm, is suitable for sheep: Corn, three parts by weight;
cotton seed meal, one part by weight.













AMOUNT OF FEED PER 100 POUNDS OF LIVE
WEIGHT, FOR FATTENING SHEEP.

Ration No. 1.
2 pounds corn.
pounds cottonseed meal.
1 pounds prairie hay.
Ration No. 2.
1 pound black strap molasses.
2 pound cottonseed meal.
3 pounds cottonseed hulls.

FOR GROWING SHEEP.

Suggested Ration.
A pound corn.
i pound cottonseed meal.
A pound wheat bran.
2 pounds prairie hay.
2 pounds silage or roots.
Growing sheep to be kept in condition should have
about two pounds of silage or roots, or similar food, in
their ration.
If cottonseed hulls and meal cannot be bought in the
local markets any cottonseed oil mill or broker can supply
these products. The meal is generally marketed in sacks
of 100 pounds. The usual carload consists of 300 to 400
of these sacks. The hulls can be bought in 100-pound
bales or sacks, or can be bought cheaper loose in bulk.
A carload varies from twelve to twenty tons. If desired,
these products may be shipped in the same car by putting
the sacked meal on top of the loose hulls.
Probably August and September are the best months
for mating, as this will bring your lambs in January and
February. Do not leave the ram with the ewes contin-
ually, but take the ewes to him for a few minutes each
morning. Allow only one service to a ewe during each











period of heat, but be certain that the ewe gets in lamb
before dropping breeding operation.
Watch the ewes carefully during the lambing season,
but do not interfere with them unless necessary. After
lambs are born, see that they are properly dried and
suckled. Frequently ewes disown their lambs unless
forced to nurse them.
Give the ewe little if any grain ration for two or three
days after lambing. At the expiration of this time it can
be gradually given her until the full ration is reached.
In small flocks the fleece can be most economically re-
moved by using hand shears. After the sheep is shorn
remove all tags and Lurs from the fleece, carefully roll it
up inside out and tie neatly with cotton or paper string.
If only a few fleeces are had they can be placed in clean
gunny sacks and sold to local dealers. If there is a
woolen mill in your vicinity perhaps it will make-your
wool into cloth for you.

AS TO BREEDS.

The following breeds of sheep, as elsewhere stated, are
generally considered to be the best adapted to Florida
conditions. They are the breeds that have been used suc-
cessfully in all parts of this State for many years and
have proven to be the best.
The descriptions following are for the purpose of show-
ing the principal characteristics of each breed, so that
parties interested can make an intelligent choice of the
breed best adapted to their special locality and needs.
The climate of Florida is quite as good for sheep pro-
duction as the plains of Persia, Asia Minor and messo-
potania or Australia. The greatest drawback is the dog.
and it is inconceivable that the people of a progressive
State will longer submit to the present conditions.

THE SOUTHDOWN.

The Southdown is probably the oldest breed of sheep











in existence. They have been commented upon for cen-
turies by prominent agricultural writers, and there is a
distinct record more than two hundred years old that
refers to this breed and cites an incident where several
flocks were entirely destroyed by a disease resembling
smallpox.
The breed originated in the low range of hills in south-
eastern England, known as the South Downs, which ex-
tends through the counties of Kent, Sussex, Hampshire
and Dorsetshire.
They progenitors of the Southdowns were known as
the Sussex sheep, and they were small, ill-shaped, horned
sheep, having dark faces and lacking quality. Their
fleeces were light but of good quality, and they had ex-
ceptional development of the leg of mutton.
The modern development of the Southdown has un-
doubtedly been effected entirely through selection. It is
said that attempts were made to introduce new blood,
but these have been unsuccessful. Almost a century and
a half of careful selection has improved the carcass, espe-
cially in development of the fore quarters, neck and rump.
Greater refinement has been attained and the horns have
been eliminated.
The distribution of the Southdown is practically un-i
versal. They can be found in many parts of England
outside of their native shires, and exportations have been
made to almost every civilized country. The Southdown
has been widely used in the development of the other
medium-wool breeds of sheep, and there are very few, if
any, of these that do not owe, either directly or indirectly,
some part of their improvement to Southdown blood.
The first reliable record we have of Southdowns in this
country is that of Dr. Rose's flock, in Senica County, N.
Y. In 1803 these sheep were reported as doing well. In
all probability importations were made many years pre-
vious, and they have taken place almost continuously
since that date.











The Southdown is the mutton sheep par excellence.
There is no better combination of quality and beauty in
the bovine world; hence their name, the "gentleman's
sheep." This breed is remarkable in having a large num-
ber of wealthy admirers and breeders whose flocks have
been of more than ordinary excellence, though even now,
as a rule, the best specimens are imported from their na-
tive hills. The lawns of quite a number of famous coun-
try estates are kept closely cropped by these bovine aristo-
crats and they are also used upon the parks in some of
the large cities.
They have attained their greatest popularity in the
South. In the spring-lamb region of Tennessee, Kentucky
and Virginia, Southdown rams are used almost exclu-
sively. This country has few other sections where one
breed has been adopted for a standard over so wide a
range of territory. Other breeds have been tried here
and in some cases have produced larger lambs, but they
lacked quality and condition and have not succeeded in
supplanting the Southdown to any appreciable extent.
The lambs of the latter attain a weight of 60 to 90 pounds
when from three to four months old, and are ready for
market the latter part of May, during June and early
July. Gains of from one pound lo one and one-fourth
pounds per day per lamb are reported for short periods
during the best growing seasons. The early lamb is the
object sought after.
The Southdown is the smallest of the mutton breeds.
They are, however, remarkably compact; their deceptive
weights causing them to be called "the big little sheep."
Mature rams in breeding condition should weigh from 170
to 190 ounds and ewes from 125 to 130 pounds.
The wool of the Southdown is of good quality, but the
fleeces are not as heavy as might be desired. The ewes'
fleeces should weigh from six to eight pounds and the
rams from ten to twelve pounds. The government flock
at the Morgan Horse Farm, Middlebury, Vt., has aver-











aged approximately seven pounds in weight of fleece dur-
ing recent years, one of the breeding rams producing
more than twelve pounds of wool. This wool graded very
largely three-eighths and one-half blood combing, but in
many flocks in this country clothing wool would predomi
nate because of the shortness of fiber.
The breed is noted for its early maturity and its easy
keeping qualities. Southdowns thrive upon pasture that
would be entirely insufficient for the larger breeds. They
are undeniable a short pasture sheep. In fecundity they
are fair, but not equal to the best.

THE SHROPSHIRE.

Although little more than half a century old, the Shrop-
shire is today the most popular breed of medium-wool
sheep. They attracted little attention prior to 1848, when
they first received the name they now bear.
The profitable combination of wool and mutton the
Shropshire represents has caused it to be known as the
"farmers sheep," and it has been especially popular in the
farming section of America. However, this breed has not
only found a home under these conditions, but it has
been used extensively in the West for crossing upon range
ewes. Because of its wide range of adaptability and con-
sequent popularity, it is doubtful whether there is a State
in the Union that does not possess flocks of this breed.
The Shropshire is also prominent in the show ring, as at
tested by the large classes exhibited. They usually over
top any other breed in respect to numbers, and there have
been instances where they outnumbered all other breeds
combined. It is a source of considerable satisfaction to
American Shropshire breeders to know that their best
sheep are not surpassed in excellence by any imported.
This is also a tribute to the breed, as it indicates that the
Shropshire does not deteriorate when removed from its
native home, but maintains its type and soon becomes ac-
climatized. The winnings at the International Live
2 I-11.












Stock Exposition indicate to some extent the prominence
of the breed.
At present the Shropshire is an early maturing breed
of pronounced fecundity. They are medium sized, rams
weighing from 175 to 250 pounds and ewes from 140 to
180 pounds. Their wool is of good quality and weight,
fleeces ranging from eight to fifteen pounds. One of the
best ewe flocks in this country, comprising over 200 head,
produced 10.31 pounds per head, which is a very good
average. From data secured from leading Shropshire
breeders, an average of eight to nine pounds is considered
very satisfactory. Most Shropshire fleeces grade three-
eighths blood combing or clothing.

THE HAMPSHIRE.

The native home of the Hampshire sheep is in the coun-
try of the same name, which is located in South England,
bordering upon the English Channel.
The Hampshire of today is the result of the amalgama-
tion of two native types, into which had been introduced
the blood of one or more improved breeds. These two
types were known a sthe "Wiltshire and the Berkshire
Knots."
The Wiltshire sheep were native of North Devon,
Somersetshire, Buckinghamshire, and Berkshire. They
were the largest fine-wool sheep of Britain. They were
white-faced, horned, slow-maturing sheep of inferior mut-
ton qualities. They undoubtedly had been in existence
for centuries, for it is said that the old Roman woolen
mills at Winchester were supplied with the wool from
these sheep. They were also known as "crooks" because
of the peculiar shape of their horns.
No breed of sheep will give more satisfactory returns
than the Hampshire, if accorded good care and given
plenty of feed. Neither will any other breed deteriorate
more rapidly, if these are denied. They are unable to
rustle for themselves to the extent of some other breeds,












consequently they do not thirve upon broken or scanty
pasture. They are especially adapted to an intensive sys-
tem of farming, such as hurdling upon green forage
crops, rape, turnips, etc.
Hampshire rams are used quite widely upon the range
for crossing upon ewes of other breeds for the produc-
tion of marker lambs. The Hampshire lambs are large;
they grow rapidly and attain their greatest perfection
while comparatively young-the reason for their wide
popularity. In the East the rams are frequently used for
siring "hot-house" lambs.
The Hampshire is unexcelled in early maturity, the
rams commonly being used for breeding purposes when
from seven to nine months old. The fecundity of this
breed is very creditable, though some of the others sur-
pass it slightly in this respect.
The principal criticism of the Hampshire is that they
require the best of attention or they soon become
"weedy." They require an abundance of food and are not
satisfactory where pastures are short or broken.

THE DORSET HORN.

The Dorset Horn, like the Southdown, is an extremely
old breed that has been developed largely through selec-
tion. For several centuries there had existed in the coun-
try of Dorset in Southern England a type of sheep that
were coarse, small, and light of carcass, especially in
fore quarters, but with broad, deep loins. They had dark
noses and both sexes were horned. In somerset were a
larger, lankier type, producing longer wool and noted for
their large lambs. They had white faces and pink noses.
These types were probably the ancestors of the Dorset
Horn.
There is considerable variation in the size of American
Dorsets, but rams in breeding condition should weigh
from 200 to 225 pounds; ewes from 150 to 175 pounds.
Their fleeces lack somewhat in weight, but are of excel











lent quality. The fiber is very white, and discolorations
are practically unknown. Ewes produce from six to
seven pounds and rams from eight to ten pounds of wool.
Twenty-five samples of Dorset fleece were graded upon
the Philadelphia market for the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture, fifteen pounds of which were three-
eighths blood combing and the other ten quarter combing
wools.
The Dorsets are probably the most fertile of all the
mutton breeds of sheep, ewes frequently producing twins
and triplets, and occasionally quadruplets. The ewes
will breed either in the spring or fall, and it is claimed
that they will produce two crops of lambs per year, but
it is unlikely that this can be successfully accomplished,
as breeders of prominence condemn the practice as being
injurious to the ewes. The ewes are excellent mothers and
usually have ample milk for their lambs, whether they be
singles, twins or triplets. In the United States a large
percentage of the ewes lamb in the fall, many breeders
having the entire crop dropped at this time. In their na-
tive shire the ewes were formerly used for dairy pur-
poses.
The breed matures early, the lambs growing rapidly
and exhibiting a bloom that they often do not retain
during the weather stage.
Dorset ewes are very highly regarded for the produc-
tion of "hot-house" lambs, and the grades are considered
even better for this purpose than the purebreds. The
East, with its large cities and consequent favorable
market facilities, is especially adapted to the production
of this product, which explains the distribution of the
breed in this section.
THE COTSWOLD.

For several centuries certain sheep of Gloucestershire
and parts of Hereford and Worcester, England have
borne the name of Cotswolds. Some authors claim that









21

they derived their name from the region and others claim
that the hills derived their name from the sheep. The
derivation of the word is from "cote," a sheep shelter,
and "wold," a stretch of upland. It seems that in the
early days the Cotswold was a fine wool-breed, greatly
famed for the quality of the wool. Later the sheep that
bore the name were a large, coarse wool-breed, of great
vigor and constitution. These latter sheep were un-
doubtedly the stock from which the present Cotswold
breed has been developed, but whether the fine-wooled
sheep spoken of were more remote ancestors is a question
that has not been satisfactorily answered. There are
stories that the sheep of this region furnished wool for
the Romans 2,000 years ago, but there is probably no
more similarity between the modern Cotswolds and
these sheep than between the oldest modern breeds and
th ancient types from which they sprung.














EROSION OF SOILS.

In this connection we wish to bring to the farmer's at-
tention a condition that is growing serious in the more
rolling lands of the State, and is wasting at a high rate
the fertility of these lands. We mean soil erosion.
Soil washing by heavy rains is a cause of the loss of
soil fertility on rolling upland farms. The amount of
this loss is difficult to determine accurately. But it is
reasonably certain that as much as four or five per cent.
of the real fertile soil may be lost during one year on
even a gently sloping field if the surface is left bare of
vegetation. This means that the continuous cultivation
for a long period of time may result in the loss of prac-
tically all the fertile soil on even gently rolling land,
unless some methods are adopted to prevent it. On hill
lands the loss is necessarily much more rapid.
The element lost in this way is one of the most valu-
able that exists-nitrogen. This element in the soil is
contained in the organic or vegetable matter. Nitrogen
is made available for the use of plants by the decay of
organic matter. It is considered that about two per cent
of the total amount present becomes available each year.
It is this two per cent. which may be removed by the
crops, by leaching, and in the form of gas, by evapora-
tion. As the availability of the other elements of plant
food in the soil is closely associated with the decay of
organic matter, it is certain that the washing away of
that part of the soil richest in organic matter results in
a lack of all the really valuable plant food. In addition
to the loss of plant food, the poorer physical condition
of the soil resulting from the removal of organic matter
and the inconvenience caused by the necessity for ditches
in the fields are to be considered.
The sort of farm work that causes excessive erosion is












continuous cultivation without crop rotation, shallow
plowing, running furrows down the hills, leaving the
land bare of vegetation in winter, neglect of control of
the gullies and the exhaustion of organic matter.
The best way to control erosion is by systematic rota-
tion of crops, containing fewer cultivated crops, and
more hay and pasture crops by the gradual deepening of
the soil, by occasional deep plowing, the use of barn-
yard and green manures, winter cover crops such as rye,
oats and wheat, and prompt control of gullies and
ditches.
Cultivate the level lands and plant the hillsides to
pasture grasses for permanent pastures, and thus reclaim
the worn-out hill lands.
As lands increase in value, reclamation becomes profit-
able. Steep, badly washed hillsides may be also set to
forest trees. Small ditches may be filled with litter and
soil and seeded down to grass. Large ditches may be
filled by obstructing with brush and coarse litter staked
and weighted down, by planting willows, or placing some
form of obstruction in the gullies, which will in time aid
in filling them and gradually restore these soils to use-
ful fields. Our people must realize that neglect in this
matter means positive ruin to the land itself. They must
also realize that the soil is the one most valuable natural
resource of any country. From this source, directly or
indirectly, we derive all that we have, use or subsist
upon. In fact, the soil may justly be considered the bea-
rock of civilization itself. Thus considered it becomes as
necessary to existence as the air we breathe, or ihe water
we drink. Then the case of the soil and the prevention
of its destruction is one of the most impor!;ni features
connected with farm management. It is a vital -ni.j,, I
to continued prosperity and the maintenance of farm
land values. No owner of lands can afford i ignore its
importance.














RICE GROWING IN FLORIDA.
BY H. S. ELLIOT.
(Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture.)

Rice growing in Florida has long been a profitable in-
dustry in a small way, and it forms one of the principal
articles of food of a large majority of the people of this
State as well as other countries of the world. It is the
principal article of food of more than half of the people
of the world, which number practically 1,600,000,000
of people.
A combination of rice and legumes, such as cow peas,
soy beans, etc., produces a much cheaper, and at the same
time, a more complete food ration than any other com-
bination produces. It is superior to wheat and meat,
and, of course, the acreage on which it can be produced
is much less than either of the above mentioned.
Rice is an annual plant and belongs, of course, to the
large family of grasses. There are a great many varieties
of cultivated rice and they differ in length of time of
maturing as well as in character, yield and quality. There
is also a difference in the size, shape and color of the
grain, but the relative proportion of food constituents is
practically the same. The principal varieties of rice used
in America, are known as the golden yellow and the white
rice, the latter having been originally introduced into
this country as early as 1600. This has a cream colored
husk, and it somewhat resembles the rice known as
Chinese rice. The soils best adapted to rice culture are
the medium loam soils, either the sandy loam or clay
loam, but it should in either case contain some clay. In
this, of course, there must be considerable humus which
adds to the fertility and enables the soil to produce a
good quality of rice. The alluvial soils along 1he rivers
and in the wet places where drainage can be controlled,











are probably the best soils for the production of rice even
of the upland varieties. The best rice lands are under-
laid with a clay sub-soil, or some semni-impervious soil,
something like hard pan. This is because these soils re-
tain moisture. Light sandy soils are not so well adapted
to rice growing because of their dryness. They do not
possess the mechanical condition above referred to which
enables them to retain moisture. Sometimes on light,
sandy soils, where there is a stiff clay sub-soil near the
surface, these lands produce well, but it requires, as will
be noticed, some compact soil underneath the sand to
make it capable of producing rice profitably. However,
this quality of land is not best adapted to upland rice
culture. In moist lands, of which there are great areas
in Florida, rice grows well and yields well. These kinds
of lands are in most cases easily drained, and in many
instances can be irrigated from convenient streams and
sometimes lakes. Irrigation is a good thing to have, of
course, whether it is necessary to use it often or not, but
in case of drought the irrigation will either save or add
immensely to the crop yield. Water in these cases can
be controlled or saved through reservoirs or artificial
lakes, and when the water for such purposes is needed
it becomes a very valuable asset to a rice-growing dis-
trict or farm.
In general, the lands which are or may be devoted to
rice growing without irrigation, are so varied in charac-
ter and location that we will not undertake to describe
any particular locality. It may be said, however, that
rice can be grown on any soils adapted to the successful
growing of corn, cotton or sugar cane, if the climatic
conditions are favorable. This, of course, includes the
proper drainage of the soil. We refer to drainage to a
considerable extent because perfect drainage is one of
the most important considerations in rice production,
and because upon it depends the proper condition of the
soil for planting. Thorough cultivation is as beneficial to











rice as it is to any other cultivated crop, and complete
and rapid drainage at the time the rice is ready for har-
vest permits of lhe crop being harvested under the best
conditions, and, of course, reduces the expense.
Cultivation.-The best method of cultivation of up-
land rice when planted in the drill, as it should be, is
with a five-tooth cultivator that can be expanded or con-
tracted 1o the desired width, so as to suit the width of
rows between the drills. The depth to plow can also be
regulated by changing the slant of the plow or tooth.
With this implement properly managed, the fields can
readily be kept clean of weeds or .grass. It is bes; not
to plow deeper than one to two or at most lirec inches.
In planting rice great care must be taken in the selec-
tion of the seed. It is indispensable to the successful
growing of a good quality of rice that it should be free
from what is known as red rice, grass and weeds. It
should be uniform in quality and size of kernel. The
uniformity in the size of the kernel is more essential to
rice growing than to any of the other cereals. This is
necessary because of the polishing process.
In planting rice the drill should be used because it dis-
tributes the quantity more equally per acre and saves in
quantity of seed, besides the depth of planting will be
uniform and the stand, of course, will be more uniform.
A roller should follow the drill which packs slightly ihe
dirt over the seed and prevents birds from picking it up.
Sowinm Broadcast.-This method should not be prac-
ticed with upland rice because the seed cannot be placed
with any degree of uniformity, and because it cannot be
cultivated as upland rice should be, this method prevents
plowing or any sort of cultiv-ation except hand weeding
or flooding, and is therefore tedious, and if flooded, ex-
pensive.
Rice can be planted from about the middle of March
to the first of June in Florida, but from the middle of
March to the middle of May is the best time. In plant-











ing, the best varieties for Florida would probably be the
Carolina upland rice, the Honduras rice, or Japanese
rice, but the Honduras and Carolina upland rice will
probably succeed best and produce larger yields in this
State.
The drill should be from 30 to 36 inches apart, and
the rice should be planted thinly in the drill about a
peck to a peck and a half per acre would be sufficient for
seeding purposes. In the growing of rice too much im-
portance cannot be given to thoroughly pulverizing the
soil, and putting it in a good condition to about the same
depth that corn or oats soil is put. Then it should be
leveled with a smoothing harrow and given as smooth a
surface as possible. This will get rid of the lumps and
will conserve the moisture while the crop is growing, and
it also enables the grower to maintain the soil in a better
condition for harvesting.
The yield of rice varies with condition of soil, climate
and method of cultivation, just as with other grains.
The commercial standard weight of rough rice is 15
pounds to the bushel. The product is usually put up in
sacks or barrels of 162 pounds each, but a barrel is a
definite quantity of 162 pounds, the sack is not always
definite in quantity, and usually varies from 150 to 200
pounds. A good average yield of upland rice is from 8
to 12 barrels per acre. The latest statistics show the rice
crop of the United States in 1916 at 40,702,000 bushels,
as against 28,947,000 bushels in 1915, and in this enor-
mous increase in production, prices have held their own
with a slight upward tendency, notwithstanding the fact
that there is a greater demand for rice than can be
supplied.
It would be a good idea for those interested in rice
culture, individuals as well as organizations, to encour-
age the use of rice as food, and it is possible that if it
was known generally to consumers the high food value
of rice, the demand for it would be greatly enlarged. Rice











31

contains more nutritive matter than wheat or any other
grain. Nearly four times as much as potatoes and al-
most double that of the best beef. It is an ideal food for
the invalid, and is equal to any other cereal or meat as
a muscle former for those who are engaged in heavy
manual labor, especially when combined with legumes
such as cow peas, soy beans, etc.
This department desires to encourage and strongly
advocates the increased planting of rice in Florida as
one of the most profitable and one of the best food-pro-
ducing grains adapted to successful culture in this State.
It is particularly advisable to grow rice at this time be-
cause it is a crop that demands less fertillizing and less
expensive manure to cultivate than almost any other,
especially of the cereals.














INSECTS DESTRUCTIVE TO TOMATOES.
This insect is the most serious pest of the tomato. It
is the same species that is so frequently found in the
ears of corn (particularly sweet corn), which is indeed
its favorite food. It is then known as the "corn-ear
worm." It also attacks green peas, beans and other
plants, and is particularly destructive to cotton, being
then known as the boll worm.
Life History.-There are three or more broods in Flor-
ida. The insect usually spends the winter in the pupa
stage; but occasionally an adult moth hibernates. The
female of the first brood, after mating, deposits her eggs
on a variety of plants, preferably on corn; but if corn is
not to be had, she will choose tomatoes, and occasionally
other plants, such as peas, beans, squashes and tobacco.
On the corn, the larvae first eat the leaves, which they
riddle with holes. When the ears begin to form, the
worms mostly abandon the leaves for these. The silk is
first largely consumed, and then the ear is entered ani
the soft grain eaten. Three or four worms are often
found in a single ear; although in this case the largest
worms will frequently eat the smaller ones. As the ker-
nels of the corn become hard, they are not so much rel
ished, and then the caterpillars attack cotton eagerly,
eating into the young and tender bolls.
On the tomato, which is troubled mostly in early spring,
the eggs are laid on the leaves. The young larvae feed
on the leaves for a day or so, but soon migrate to the
stems, into which they bore. They are prone to wan-
der, however; and the young tomatoes, as soon as they
are set, are attacked by the caterpillars, which entirely
desert the stems. Here, as on other food plants, they
bore into the fruit, and mine out the inside. As the hole
by which they enter is often quite small, their depreda-
3-Bull.











tions are not very conspicuous. Here again their restless
habits come into play, for, instead of confining themselves
to one fruit until it is consumed, they will desert the
first to attack a fresh one, which in turn is eaten enough
to be spoiled and then deserted for another. In this man-
ner a single caterpillar may spoil two or three tomatoes
per day, and thus so much more damage than would be
represented by the amount of food actually consumed.
Prevention the Best Remedy.-Because most of the lar-
val life is spent inside of the tomato, corn-ear or cotton
boll, it is practically useless to try to control this pest
by means of arsenate or other poisons, or by contact in-
secticides, except in the early part of the season while
the insects are still exposed and feeding on the leaves. It
th larvae are very common at this time, the vines may
be sprayed with paris green, or, which is better, with
lead arsenate, or the newer insecticide, zinc arsenate, as
there is less danger of burning the foliage with these.
During most of the life history of the tomato worm
we must fall back upon cultural methods for protection.
This is usually the most effective way to fight the insect.
The great preference of this insect for corn suggests one
method of fighting it; that is, to use corn, preferably
sweet corn, as a catch crop. Wherever the season will
allow, it is recommended that for every twenty-five rows
or so of tomatoes, there be planted two rows of sweet
corn. The date for planting the corn should be chosen
so that it will be in silk at the time the tomatoes are be-
coming of sufficient size to be attractive to worms. The
moths will lay most of their eggs upon the corn in prefer-
ence to the tomatoes. If the larvae attack the corn in
large numbers when it is only knee high (at which time
they are known as "bud worms"), they can readily be
poisoned by dusting a little dry lead arstnate or zinc
arsenate into the bud.
The corn should be cut and fed to stock before the larvae
become full grown and enter the ground to pupate, or











before the corn hardens and is deserted by the cater-
pillar. Otherwise, like all catch crops, it will be a source
of danger to the tomatoes, rather than a protection. All
wormy fruit should be picked and removed from the
field, and so disposed of as to destroy the larvae. Hogs,
and also chickens, will eat a limited amount of these
wormy t'.matoes, especially if they do not have access to
other green food. Where the acreage of tomatoes is
la re, the most practical method of disposing of these
n or"uy fruits is to bury them. They should be covered
with at least a foot of well packed soil (or more, if it is
very sandy), to insure that the larvae or the moths will
not be able to make their way to the surface. The prac-
tice of dumping the wormy and cull fruits beside the
packing house or along the roadway cannot be too se-
verely censured. If a wormy tomato is thrown down in
the field, the caterpillar will soon attack another tomato,
or, if full grown, will enter the ground to pupate. It will
be better not to pick the tomato at all than to throw it
on the ground in the patch. Wormy tomatoes can per-
haps best be sorted out at the packing house. If these
caterpillars are destroyed it will greatly reduce the num-
ber in succeeding generations.
It is not too much to say that for every worm the
grower destroys early in the season he will save a crate
of tomatoes later on. Each moth will lay as many as
500 eggs, and there is a generation every 30 days under
the most favorable weather conditions.
At the close of the picking season, the vines with in-
fested fruit should be burned or plowed under as soon
as possible. This is very important, as a means of com-
bining not only this insect, but other insects and fungus
diseases as well. Growers sometimes object to burning
old plants, on the ground that they are destroying so
much fertilizer which would be returned to the soil by
the rotting of the plants. While it is true that some of









36

the nitrogen would be destroyed, the loss is infinitesimal
in comparison with that resulting from the injuries
caused by the insects and fungi if they are allowed to
live over.
Birds, especially the bluejay and mocking bird, feed
large numbers of tomato worms to their young. These
birds, and also wasps, should be protected by the grower.
The above solutions are made as follows:
1. Paris Green, 1 pound; water 50 gallons.
2. Lead Arsenate, 11/2 pounds; water, 50 gallons.
3. Zinc Arsenate, 1 pound; powdered lime, 1 pound;
water, 50 gallons. If mixed in powdered form, and
dropped or blown over plants is good.
Use either formula desired as a spray. No. 3 as a pow.
der also, if desired.














NOTES ON CABBAGE GROWING.

As to the best varieties, the Jersey and Charleston
Wakefield are the best of the pointed head cabbages and
seem to be the favorites with many Florida truckers. If
you prefer the flat head varieties, any of the following
will make fine shippers: The Early Flat Dutch, Early
Summer, Succession, Surehead, Large Flat Dutch and
the large Late Drumhead.
When the plants are ready to set, they should be put
out immediately, as a stunted plant is sure to make a
poor crop. The field where you are going to set the
plants should be in the best condition possible. It should
be plowed several times, then harrowed. If you wish to
broadcast the fertilizer, it should be applied before you
harrow it; but I would advise putting the fertilizer undee
the row where you set the plants. To do this, lay the
field off in furrows the width you wish the rows; some
prefer them two and a half feet apart, while others prefer
the three-foot rows. Apply the fertilizer in these fur-
rows, using about 1,000 pounds to the acre. Of course,
you could make a crop with less, but it does not pay to be
stingy with fertilizer, as cabbages are rank feeders. I
prefer to put 1,000 pounds in the furrows and then drill
an equal quantity to them after they start to grow. The
following makes a fine fertilizer for cabbages: Ammo-
nia, from 4 to 5 per cent; available phosphoric acide, 6 to
8 per cent; and potash, 8 to 10 per cent. I always like
to have plenty of potash in the fertilizer for this crop.
Apply it about two weeks before you are ready to set the
plants. If you will do this and give them all work and
water they require, the chances are you will be smiling
when you figure up the profits on the crop.
In setting the plants, it is well to get them down fairly
deep in the ground. I set them up to the first leaves. The












best tool for this purpose is a plasterer's small pointing
trowel or a round stick or dibbler. Pack the dirt well
around the roots and water the plants immediately after
setting, pouring it at the side of the plant and not on it.
The distance to set the plants depends upon the variety
of the cabbage you are planting, the early and small
varieties only requiring about eighteen inches between
the plants.
Start working the plants as soon as they take root,
and do not stop until the heads are about formed. Ship
the cabbages as soon as the heads are fully grown, as
you may lose the crop by leaving it in the field after it
matures.
If the crops do not grow fast enough to suit you or
start to turn yellow at any stage of their growth, give
them an application of nitrate of soda, about 150 or 200
pounds to the acre, drilling it in the row about six inches
from the plant, being careful not to get it on them, as it
burns.
Ship the cabbages in barrels, or, better still, barrel
cabbage crates. You can get these from any Florida
crate manufacturer.
The only insect that will be apt to bother this vege-
table is the green cabbage worm or looper, and a solu-
tion of arsenate of lead sprayed on the plants will fix
them, using about one and a half pounds of arsenate of
lead to 50 gallons of water.














WHY FLORIDA IS BEHIND.
BY W. A. MCRAE.
(Commissioner of Agriculture.)
A very little thing, but formidable by reason of num-
bers and rapacity, has retarded the development and
growth in Florida of the great industries of dairying and
stock raising-industries which in other states have been
the source of great wealth. This little thing is the cattle
tick. There are seven other ticks in the United States
that closely resemble the cattle fever tick.
One particular form of tick does not infect any other
than cattle, horses and mules, and tick resemblance has
been a leading obstacle to the effort to get rid of it. The
other ticks infest other forms of animals. Horses and
mules sweat and for this reason this tick cannot as a
rule maintain itself on them as on non-sweating cattle.
All of the various kinds of ticks are liable to get on to
bovines and equines, but only one is dangerous, and that
one is the cause of a fever which if not fatal, debilitates
and stunts the growth of the unfortunate animal. Unfor-
tunates, because the helpless cow or steer suffer endur-
ing physical pain, irritation and itching, which in a
human being would be intolerable. It is unfortunate.
too, because it diminishes the income of owners. The
meat of tick-infested cattle is poor, the hides are full
of minute holes and the milk is poorer in quality and
smaller in quantity. The only known way of getting rid
of the tick is to dip the cattle in an arsenical solution.
By dipping and isolation in many sections of the
South, the tick has already been eradicated. It must be
gotten rid of in Florida-a state with more infested ter-
ritory, in proportion to area, than any other in the South.
Cattle from infested sections cannot be shipped into tick
free territory except under severe restrictions. There











are other reasons why we should eradicate the tick, but
those given are ample.
Congress has already expended over $600,000 in the
South in a campaign to eradicate it, in addition to large
expenditures by the states, counties and individuals.
Farmers' Bulletin No. 569, of the U. S. Department of
Agriculture, gives the following description of the com-
mon animal ticks, and tells why opposition to united
efforts to eradicate it has been fostered:
"A very prolific cause for argument aaginst the rela-
tion of ticks to Texas fever, or tick fever, has been the
confusion which exists with reference to the various
species of ticks observed on cattle. Some stockmen have
claimed that ticks will not cause tick fever, because their
experience has not been with the Texas-fever ticks, but
with the species of ticks which are harmless so far as
their ability to transmit Texas fever is concerned.
"A similar experience with these harmless ticks upon
woodland far removed from cattle and confusing them
with cattle ticks have led others to claim that it would
be impossible to eradicate the latter from infested pas-
tures. However, their life histories are not parallel,
since the cattle ticks demand the blood of cattle or
equines in order to mature, while the ear, dog, lone star
and other ticks do not. Thus, if the fever ticks cat be
separated from these animals for a definite period, they
will die from lack of a host.
"There are eight species of ticks which have been found
on cattle in this country. They all show the same suc-
cessive stages of development, namely, eggs, larve or
seed ticks, nymps, and adult male and female ticks. Much
stress cannot be laid upon the color of these various
ticks, as it changes considerably with age.
"Texas-fever, or Cattle Tick.-This tick may be readily
distinguished from the other seven ticks by the small
head. The four pairs of legs on mature ticks are brown,
moderately long, and very slender. The body is oblong











oval in shape, and the color varies from a dull yellow to
an olive brown.
"Castor-Bean Tick.-The body of this tick resembles
in shape that of an egg plant, and it takes its name from
its similarity to the bean of the castor oil plant. Two
stout and well developed feelers may be see- extending
outward on each side of tie head. This tick hais been col-
Icted from cattle, goats, horses, deer, dogs, cats, foxes,
rabbits, birds and man.
"Net Tick.-The body of the adult female is oblong
oval, five-eighths inch long, and of a deep brown or slate
color. It has four pairs of legs of moderate length. Be-
sides the grooves that are located like those in the cattle
tick, there is a marginal groove extending around the
body just inside the border. The net tick has been found
on man, cattle, horses, sheep and deer.
"American Dog Tick.-This tick resembles the net tick
so closely that a hand lens must be used to distinguish
between them. However, it can be readily known from
the Texas-fever tick by the fact that the so-called head
parts are longer and broader. This tick has been found
on man, cattle, dogs, horses, rabbits and panthers, and
has been collected in woods and on uncultivated lands
in many sections of the country, especially in eastern
United States. It is also known as the wood tick.
"Lone Star Tick.-The body of this tick is oblong oval
and of a yellowish gray or brown color. The reddish-
brown area at the front of the tick is composed of the
head and head shield. The latter extends backward a
short distance to form a triangle, in the apex of which is
a white or metallic yellow spot, from which it derives its
name 'Lone Star.' The mature female may reach one-
half inch in length and has four pairs of long, thin legs.
This tick has been found on cattle, dogs, horses, sheep,
goats, hogs and man.
"Ear Tick.-The shape of this tick is similar to that
of the body of a violin. It is nearly twice as long as









42

broad, rounded at both ends, and slightly constricted in
the middle. Found in the ears of cattle, horses and other
animals.
"Chicken Tick.-In shape and appearance this tick is
like an enlarged red bug. The head is so completely
covered by the body that it cannot be seen from the back.
Seldom found on cattle, but frequently on chickens, tur-
keys and other birds in the South.
"European Dog Tick.-The feelers are longer and
more prominent than in the cattle tick, but not so long
as in the castor-bean tick. This tick has been collected
from dogs, cattle, sheep, foxes, rabbits, squirrels, gophers,
cats, birds, man and other hosts in eastern United
States."

















PART II.

Crop Acreages and Conditions.













DIVISIONS OF THE STATE BY COUNTIES.

Following are the subdivisions of the State, and the
counties contained in each:


Western Division.
Bay,
Calhoun,
Escambia,
Holmes,
Jackson,
Okaloosa,
Santa Rosa,
Walton,
Washington-9.


Northeastern Division.
Alachua,
Baker,
Bradford,
Clay,
Columbia,
Duval,
Nassau,
Putnam,
St. Johns,
Suwannee-lO.


Broward,
Dade,
DeSoto,
Lee,


Northern Division.
Franklin,
Gadsden,
Hamilton,
Jefferson,
Lafayette,
Leon,
Liberty,
Madison,
Taylor,
Wakulla-10.

Central Division.
Brevard,
Citrus,
Hernando,
Hillsborough,
Lake,
Levy,
Marion,
Orange,
Osceola,
Pasco,
Pinellas,
Polk,
Seminole,
Sumter,
Volusia-15.


Southern Division.
Manatee,
Monroe,
Palm Beach,
St. Lucie-8.














DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
W. A. McRAE, Commissioner. H. S. ELLIOT, Chief Clerk.


CONDENSED NOTES OF CORRESPONDENTS.

BY DIviSIoNs.
NORTUERN DIVISION.-The climatic conditions existing
in this division differ greatly from those of last year,' in
that there have prevailed the most equable atmospheric
conditions that this section of the State has known for
many years. In fact, except for the cold the first part of
February, which did no special damage in this section of
the State, this has been one of the best growing seasons
of any spring for perhaps twenty years. The condition
of the crops shows this to be the case. The cotton and
the corn show a better condition than has been seen, as
above stated, for many years, in this section of the State.
The bulk of the cotton crop planted is smaller than usual.
This, of course, is ascribed to the ravages of the boll
weevil, but the corn crop is perhaps the largest, and
with no setback, will undoubtedly produce the largest
crop in the history of the State. With the prevailing
favorable conditions the largely increased acreage in
corn, it is quite possible that the people of this district
at least may look forward to a crop fully 50 per cent
greater than that of 1916. This same condition applies
to all the food crops to a greater or less degree. Crops
such as sugar cane, sweet potatoes, field peas, peanuts,
velvet beans and rice are planted more largely and are
in better condition at this season of the year than they
have been know nto be for many years, if ever. Live
stock is also in good condition, pastures are good and if
no unfavorable climatic conditions arise, Florida will
produce all that is necessary for her own support and a











large surplus for commercial purposes, and this state-
ment applies as well to the garden products as to field
products.
WESTERN DIVISION.-In this division practically the
same conditions exist as to crops, climate, etc., as in the
first named division. The acreage of cotton is practically
the same as last year in this division, but most of those
who are growing cotton are growing smaller areas than
in years past. Only about 60 per cent of the usual acre-
age planted prior to last year is planted to cotton in
this district this year. This, of course, like the first men-
tioned district, is caused by the ravages of the boll weevil,
under which conditions farmers are finding out that there
is more money to be made in live stock growing and in
standard crop production than there was in cotton, es-
pecially under the conditions that exist. In this district
corn has been made to take the place very largely of cot-
ton and it is possible that corn, as well as other foo-J
crops enumerate and referred to in the above district,
will be grown on a larger scale than in the first named
district. This is very noticeable in sweet potatoes and
peanuts. The acreage planted to peanuts in this district
is, practically, 50 per cent greater than has ever been
before, and also 50 per cent greater than has before been
planted to sweet potatoes. The same conditions exist in
connection with the growing of a great many vegetables.
noticeably Irish potatoes, cabbage, also melons. As to
live stock, it is improving all the time, both cattle and
hogs are being graded up and rapidly increased in num-
ber. Pastures are good and there will be no shortage
either of crop or meat supplies in this section.
NORTUEASTERN DIVISION.-In this section of the State.
where Sea Island cotton is the principal cotton grown,
the acreage is larger than in the foregoing sections and
will, of course, produce more, the boll weevil not having
yet made any inroads on the cotton except in one or two
]sola901el points. The probability is, however, that it will











he on hand the latter part of the cotton growing season,
and by next year will have full sway. In this division.
as in the other, the food, feed and forage crops are shown
to be on a much larger scale than have ever been planted
before in this section of the State. Not only has the
acreage been very greatly increased in the principal food
and feed crops, but the crops are in ideal condition and,
as said of the other divisions of the State, if no unfore-
seen accident occurs this division will also produce the
largest feed crops in its history. There are also in this
division large areas planted to vegetables that are yield
ing unusually large crops, such as Irish potatoes, etc.
this latter crop being the most profitable of its kind ever
grown in this State.
IENTRAIJ DIVISION.-In this division both the vegetable
and standard crops are produced in large quantities and
the same conditions as to acreage and prospective yield of
crops exist as in those above mentioned. While the gen-
eral farming counties of this section are producing un
usually large crops, though they are few in number, the
other counties of this district will produce equally as
large and remunerative crops of vegetables for commer-
cial use. Even in this district the acreage planted to corn
is remarkably large, and with the favorable climatic con-
ditions that have existed since the planting of these crops,
it is fair to assume that the yield will be proportionately
great. The crops of cane, sweet potatoes, field peas, pea-
nuts, velvet beans, etc., are of greater acreage and in bet-
ter condition than they have been in this district for sev-
eral years.
SOUTHERN DIVISION.-In this division, which is chiefly
given up to fruit and vegetable production, the crops are
ususually large, considering the cold which affected them
the first of February. While they may be a little late,
they are unusually good in quality and also in quantity.
The principal food, feed and forage crops in this district
are unsurpassed in any other section of the State. Per-
4-Bull.











haps more lands have been planted to such crops as rice,
sweet potatoes, field peas, velvet beans, etc., than ever
before in this section, while the acreage and condition of
such crops as cabbage, Irish potatoes, tomatoes and oth-
ers of like kind and character have actually broken the
record of all past time. This shows better than anything
else what the possibilities of Florida are under the polit
ical conditions that exist. It shows that when every
person puts his whole heart and soul into the business of
producing the necessities of life for himself and others,
there is practically no limit to the accomplishment of
the end desired. With all of this information at hand
we feel justified in saying and maintaining that Florida
in 1917 will produce the greatest crops of all kinds Ihat
it has ever made in its entire history. It is fair to as
snme that the corn crop. on which so much depends, will
reach perhaps 13,000,000 bushels if nothing happens be
fore the period of its maturity. It is also noticeable Ihat
more lands are being devoted to rice culture, which is one
of the most valuable cereals that can be produced in the
South and one of the most valuable for edible purposes
grown in any country. Florida, with ease could produce
many millions of bushels of rice every year and be mil-
lions of dollars better off for doing so. If this State will
make the production of live stock, food, feed and forage
crops its specialty it will excel any State east of the Mis-
sissippi river in wealth and achievement before the next
ten years expire. If there ever was a time for industrial
development and opportunity in Florida it is the present.












51

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION OF CROPS BY PERCENT-
OAGE, PLANTED AND BEING PLANTED, AND CONDITION OF
FRUIT TREES, FOR THE QUARTER ENDING MA RCH 31. 1917,
AN COMPARED WITH SAME PERIOD FOR 1916.


COUNTIES. Upland I Sea Island I Corn.
I Cotton. Cotton. I
Northern Division. Acreage. | Acreage. I Acreage.
Franklin .................. ......... . 100
Gadsden ......................... 70 10 110
Hamilton ........................I 20 s80 1 115
Jefferson .................... .... 70 40 | 120
Lafayette .......... ... ........ . 50 115
L eon ............................ 75 . 135
Madison ................ ............ 90 85 110
T aylor ........................... . 115
W akulla ......................... i0 0. 110
I)iv. Average per cent............ 63 '0 114
Western Division.
Calhoun ... ... .................. .. 0 3 1 2 5
Escam bia ........................ 60o .. 12
IH olm es ............ .................. 40 12
( kaloosa ........................ 7.. 1 15
Santa Rosa ...................... 75 125
W alton .................. ......... 60 .. 12
W ashinglon ..... .... ..............I 0) . 25
DIlv. Average per cent......... ......... l 59) 3 1 24
North'astern Division.
Alachna ............................. 10 100 100 1 0
B aker ........................... .. 100 00
Bradford ....................... .. 100 110
Clay ..........100 1.50.
Colum bia ........................ 00 1 80
N assau .......................... .. 100 125
St. Johns ....................... .. 1 10
Suwannee .................. ..... . 90 120
Iliv. Avera;ge per cont .............. 1 100 97 12(i
Central Division.~
B rovard .......................... .. .. 1i0
IIernando ........................ I .. .. 110
IIillsborough ..................... .. 125
Lake ............................. .. 200 125
Levy ............................ .... 1 0 100 125
Marion ............................ 110 110 115
O range ........................... 130
O sce ola .......................... .. 1 0
asco ........................... 100
Pinellas ..................... ..... I 120
P olk ............................ I 145
Seminole ............. ..... ........ .. I 100
Volusia .............. .......... 11.
Pir \ rr.,rcL -'ir c*ent .............. 13:0 125 11

B row ard .... .......... ....... . -
Dade .............. ......... ..I .. 12.5
DeSoto ............................. .. .. 130
L ee ............................. I .. I 100
M anatee .......................... .. I 100
Palm Beach ..................... .. .125
St. Lucie ........................I I 150. .
Div. Average per cent............... .. 1 .1
State Average per cent............. 88 1 77 120















REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


Northern Di
Franklin
Gadsden ..
Hamilton
Jefferson
Lafayette
Leon ...
Madison ..
Taylor ...
Wakulla .


COUNTIES. Oats. BugarCane. Broom Corn

vision. Acrege. Acreage. Acreage.
. . .. .. .. .. .. . ... .. 5 0 I
......... ..............| 00 110
....................... 80 110
................. I 85 110
... .............. \ 80 115 |
.. 85 120
.......................| 100 110
1010 110
........... I 80 100
....................... 50 110


Div. Average per cent............... 7812- I
IWestcr Division.
Calhoun .........................] 85 110
Escambia ......................... 100 125 100
H olm es .......................... 100 110
Okaloosa ........................ 100 | 00
Santa Rosa ........................ 95 115
W alton .......................... S 85 110 I
W ashington ...................... 150 110
Div. Average per cent .............. 102 I 110 I 1010
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ............................ 8 1 0 ..
Baker ........................... 75 115 .
Bradford ........................ 100 110
Clay ...... ...................... 100 100
Columbia ............... ........ 80 110
Nassau ........................ .... 80 110 10(0
St. Johns ........................ 105
Suwannee ........................ 60 900
Div. Average per cent.............. 81 105 11 oo
Central Dirision.
Brevard ......................... .. n 75
Hernando ........................ 75 110
Hillsborough ..................... 1(0
L ake ............................ 90 .
Levy ............................. 50 75
M arion .......................... 100 105
Orange .......................... 100 | 100
O sceola .......................... 100
Pasco ........................... 80 .
Pinellas ......................... .. | 110
Polk ............................ 90 150
Seminole ........................... 100 |
V olusia .......................... .. 100 |
Div. Average per cent .............. 58 101 1
Southern Division.
Brow ard .......................... I .. .
Dade ............................ 100 100 |
DeSoto .......................... lI 100 125
Lee .............................| 200 100
M anatr e ......................... .. 100
Palm Beach ...................... .. 125
St. L ucie ........................
Div. Average per cent.............. | 1~1 1114
State Average per cent.............. 95 110 I100












53


REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

Tobacco Tobacco
COUNTIES. Open Under IRye.
| Field | Shade
Northern Division. Acreage. Acreage. Acreage.
F franklin ........................I
Gadsden ......................... 11. 1035 1 10
H am ilton ........................
Jefferson ........................ .. t100
Lafayette ........................ .
Leon ............................ 100 100
M adison ......................... 100 100
T aylor .......................... ..
W akulla ...... ........ ....... 2
Div. Average per cent .............. 1f05 102 7
Western Division.
Calhoun .........................I . 100
Escambia ........................ SO 100 100 f)
HI olm es ..........................I .. .
Okaloosa ........................ .. 100
Santa Rosa ...................... .. 100
W alton .......................... ..
W ashington ...................... I | 100
Div. Average per cent .............. 80 100 100
Northeastern Division.
Alachua ...................... ... I 50
B aker ............... ........... .. 50
B radford ........................ .. .
Clay ..... ........... .......... .. 100
Colum bia ........................ .. .
Nassau ........................ 00
St. Johns ........................ .
Suwannee ........ ............ ... .. 6
Div. Average per cent .............. O70
Central Divisio.n
Brevard ........................... ..
Hernando ........................ .. ..
H illsborough ..................... .. .
L ake .......................... I .60
L evy ............................
M arion ...........................
O range ..........................
O seeola ..........................I
P asco ...........................I ..100
P inellas ......................... ..
Polk ............................ .
Sem inole ........................I .
V olusia ..........................
Div. Avernge ner cent .............. I 100 60
Southern Division.
Broward ........................ . ..
D ade ............................ I .. .
D eSoto .......................... ...

Mandate ............................. 100
Manatee .........................1.... 1oo
Palm Beach ..................... .
St. Lucie ........................ I ..
Div. Average per cent ............. .. 100
State Average per cent............. 93 I 101 82












54


REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. Rice. Sweet Field Peas
Potatoes.
Northern Division. Acreage. Acreage. I Acreage.
Franklin ......................... . 100 1)00
Gadsden ......................... 110 125 125
Hamilton ........................... 100 120 200
Jefferson ........................ 100 125 150
Lafavyclte .. .................... 125 125
Leon .................. ......... . 115 150 1 -0
M adison ......................... 100 1140
Taylor ... .................... 110 100
W akulla 1......................... .O 110 1040
Div. Average per cent .............. 105 1114 1 0
i eastern, Dirisioa.
Callioun ........................... 125 100
Escam bia ........................ I 110 150 150
H olm es ....... .. ........ .. ........ .. 115 110
Okaloosa ......................... .. 1 110 110
Santa Iosa ...................... . 1 110 115 114
W alton .......... .................. 1040 120 115
W ashington ................. ........ 100 110 1 100
Div. Average per cent. ............. 100 121 114
Noritheas7tern1 Iiirisiot.
Alellua ........................ .. .. 110 110
Baker ........ ..................I 110 110 110
Bradford ........................ 1 110 100
Clay ....................... 100 125 110
Colum bia ....... ................ 101)0 15- 120
Nassau .............................. 150 125 125
St. Johns .................... ....... 110 115 110
Suwannee ..........................1 50 1(t) 104
Div. Average per cent.............. 103 11S 1111
Central Dit vision.
Brevard .. .........................I 40 1 75 10
Hlernando ..................... .. . .. 115 I 110
Hillshorough ..................... .. 100 115 110
L akR .............................. .. 7 70
L evy .............................. .. 110 10
M arion .......................... 1(00 110 1 10
OraInge ........................... I . 100 110
Osctola ........................... 100 201 140)
'aseo ............ .............. . . 90 80
Pinellas ......... ................ 100 115 110
P olk ............................ 135 123)
Sem inole .................... .. ... .. 100 100
Volusia .... .... .................... 110 100
Div. Average per cent .............. 88 11 100)
ou1tlher) in Dil'ision.
Broward ......................... . 100 I 100
D ade ........................... 12'5 125
DeSoto ......................... .. 200 300 200
Lee ......... .................... 200 200 100O
M anatee .......................... 150 125 115
Palm Beach ........... ............. .. 1550 125
St. Lucie ........................I I 110 I 10
Div. Average per cent.............. 183 1 1 24
State Average per cent............. l 115 125 I 116













55


REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. Peanuts. | Cassava. Velvet
I [ Beans.
Northern Division. | Acreage. Acreage. | Acreage.
Franklin .........................I 100 I 0100
Gadsden .. ......................... 1501 125
IIam illon ......................... 200 200
Jefferson ........................... 150 150
Lafayelte ........................ 12 .125
Leon ............................ 150 | 140
M adison .... ....................... 115 100
Taylor . ..................... 115 110
W akulla ........................ 110 |o110
liv. Average per cent .............. 135 .. I 1:30
Iv esicri Division.
Catllounln ......................... 130 1 10
Eseamlina ........................ 200 1 l) 200
llolm cs .......................... 150 . 125
O kaloosa ........................ 115 .. 11 0
Santa Rosa .................. ..... 12. .. 110
Walton ............................. 125 .. 11
W ashington ........... ....... 200 | 1 10
l)iv. Average per cent .............. I 14!) 101 1-li
AVrthcastern Dnirision.
A lachua .........................I 150 ..
B aker ...........................[ 12 | .. 130
Bradford ................... ......... 125 120
Clay .............................. 12 100 12I
Colum bia ..... ................ | 150 i 130
N assau .......................... 1 1 0 I 10 1 :0
St. Johns ... ............. .... ...... I 11 111) 120
Suwannee ........................I 120) 5 I 115
IDiv. Average per cent .............. i 132 I SS I
Central Diviston.
B revard ........................ ... .. ..
lHernando .......................... 120 .. 110
Ilillsborough ...................... 100 .. 115
Lake .............................. .. 0( 1(0 ,M
L evy ............................. 12 15(0
M arion ........................... 11 120
O range ......................... .. I. 110
O sceola ............ ............. 100( 15-0
Pasco ................. .......... 0 90
P inellas ............. .......... ... 1 . 115
P olk .......................... . 135
Seminole .. ................... 100 . 110
Volusia .. ......................... 12 I 120
Div. Average per cent.............. 102 0S 1 I:
bounthern Division.
Broward ......................... 100 . 100
D ade ............................ 100 1 10
DeSoto ............ ............... 200
Lee ......... ..................... 1))00 100 2011
M anatee . .......... ............ .. . 1 0 125
Palm Beach ................. ...... .. .. 10 l 12
St. L ucie .. .... .................. .. .. 125
Div. Average per cent .............. 10t0 1)00) 141
State Average per cent ............. 124 T 92 I 120












56

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. Cabbage. Irish Potatoes.

Northern Divsion. Acreage. Condition. A creage. | Condition.
Franklin .............. 100 100 100 1(10
Gadsden ............... 100 100 110 100
Hamilton ........... 105 1110 70 100
Jefferson .............. 100 00 | 11 ) 100
Lafayette ............. .
Leon .................| 110 100o 123 | 1()0
M adison .............. 100 .
T aylor ................ .
W akulla ............. .
Div. Average oer cent... 1 03 8 0: l 100
WIestera Diviision.
Calhoun . ............ 100 100 200 IT0
Escambia .............. 110 100 200 I 100
IIolmes ...... ......... . 110 100 | 1'23 I0
Okaloosa ............ i
Santa Rosa ............ i 100 ( 0 I 110 !5
W alton ...............
Washington ........... 100 00 530 100o
Div. Average per tent... 104 !)(1 137 !9l
Northeastern Dirision.
Alacuua .............. .. . 75 | 100
Baker ................. .. 150 I 100
Bradford ............. ... I
Clay ............... .. . 100 loo
Columbia ............. .. 100 100
Nassau ............... 100 00 110 100
St. Johns ................ .. 110 120
Suwannee ............. I .... ..
Div. Av 'rr lp nor cent... 100 I 00 1( I l:
Ceat)rol W ni ll
brevardl ............... 1 110 2 100
Hernando .. ........ ... .. I .. 75 |
Hillsborough ... ...... .. . 100 | 01
Lake ................. 70 7;i I S 0
Levy .................. 40 I tl 3o | 1 11
M arion ................ 105 00 | 11. 1100
Orange ................. 120 i 130 I 1400
Osceola ...............I 150 100 2.1 1oo
Pasco ................ .. 60 O| i SO |
Pinellas ............... .. .. .. I 1 12 i 00
Polk .................. .. 125 100
Seminole ............... 110 100 110 | 100
Volusia .............. 100 t(1) 12.3 I 104
Div Aver."o nr cent. . 95 17 I 111 I 01
$ hi 4.in 4,,'i 4nr1 f i____________________


Browar ............... I l
D ade .................... 1 0
DeSoto ................ '.. 00
Lee ..................I 300
M anatee .............. 100
Palm Beach ........... 100
St. Lucie .............. I 100
Div. Average per cent...| 1o
State Average per cent. 11


I I.. f4 hl
123 100
1 25 lo)
250 1 11(
S :100 7
125 90
| 120 1 (10
S 1:1 I oo

I 1253 i 198















REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


North
Frank
Gadsd
Hamil
Jeffers
Lafay
Leon
Madis.
Taylor
Wakul
riv A


COUNTIES. Tomatoes. Cucumbers.

ern Division. I Acreage. Condition. Acreage. Condition.
lin .............. -100 100 90 0
en .............. I 100 i 100 100 100
ton .. ........... I 70 100
ion .............. 1 100 100100 100
tte ......... .
.a'n '" .. . I. | 140 | 100 100 100
on .. . .. . .. .. I I
. . . . . . . . .
la . . . . . . . I .
vern er cent |I 102 1 100 98 I O


Western Divisioi.
Caliioun .......... .. . 100 90 100 900
Escambia .. . .. . 100 1100 00 I 100
Holmes ...... .. . .
Okaloosa ............. I ..
Santa Rosa ............ 100 90 100 I 00
W alton ...............I I
Washington ........... 100 00
Div. Aveorng npr cent.... I 100 I 93 100 I :
N orfhe(a- le rns Iirision.
Alanciua ............... 100 100 1 7 75
Baker .................. .. ..
Bradford .............. ..
Clay ................. 100 100 100 100
Columbia .............. .. I
Nassau ................ 100 00 100 I
St. Johns ............I 105 110 100 110
Suwannrce ..... .......... .
Div. Averner nor cent... 101 1 100 !) 4 I 04
('77n1rl iriNi0on.
BrevNard ............... 50 T 75 50 75
IIernando .............. .. 7 80 ..
HIillsborough ........ 100 90 .
Lake ..................I .5 90 | 00
Levy .................I 00 I O 100) 95
Marion ............... 100 9 10 105 100
Orange ...............I 1 0 10 1 00 100
Osceola ............... 150 1 1100
Pasco ................ .. 60 70
Pinellas .............. 110 100
Polk .................. 1:0 100 120 | 10(l
Seminole ............. 100 100 100 | 100
Volusia ............... 100 100 100 I 0
Div. Average nor cent... 99 9n5 :
Htthern Division.
Broward .............. 110 100 .
Dade ................. 100 100 |
DeSoto ............... 200 I 100 200 110)
Lee .................. Ti 00 I 50 | sl
Manatee .............. 110 100 100 100
Palm Beach ........... 125 i 100 115 1oo
St. Lucie ............. .5 I 100 100 I
Div. Average per cent... 115 94 I 113 4
State Averagne pr cent. 103 1 I 1))00 I
















REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES.


English Peae.


Northern Division.__ Acreage. I Conall
Franklin ........ . 100 100
Gadsd(en . .... ... .. ... 1001 lo0
lamnillon ............. ....
Jefferson ........ .... ....
Lafayette .............
Leon ................. 10U 100
lM adison .............. .
Taylor ................ .
W akulla .... .......... .
Div. Average per rcent... 100 I 100
WI C lf iti LtDi S,181 t.
Cal n ul ln ......... . ... | 1U 1 )
Escamlbia ............ 1)00 101)
Hl olmes ............... I
Okaloosa .............. .
Sanl a l .io ........... .. .
Waltin ...............
W ashington ........... .. |
Div. Average per nllt ... 10( 100
Auo timt ,lU81l' iJl U_ llur itl.
Alacnua ............. 30 75
Baker ............ ... ..
Bradord ..............I .
Clay ..... ..... ..........
Coluillia ............... .
Nass.au ............... 100 T1
St. Jolns ............. 100 1)()o
Suwannce ........... ..
Div. Average per vent... I 8 | 3
C01ttrul Dil'isioli.
Brevard.. .............. ..
lIernando ............. .. i .
Ilillsborough .......... .
L ake ................. ..
L evy ................. .
Marion ............... 100 0. 0
Orange .............. 1100 100
Usceola ............... 10U) 100
Pasi o ................. 80 70
i inellas .............. ....
P olk ................ .
Seminole ........... 100 11 U
Volusia ............... 100) 100
)iv. Aveiaae per cint... !97 03
OUt ll0 i51b D JIS)Um1.
Broward .............. | .
Dade ................... 100 100U
DeSoto ............... | 100 100
Lee ..................I 100 x1)
M anatee ..............
Palm Beach .......... .
St. Lucie ... ......... . 0 | 90
Div. Average per cent ...| 98 03
State Average per c(nt..| 06 I 04


ieans.

ion. Acreage. I Condition.

1)1) i i00
100 11)(1
I o0 lio
100 l1i)


I -o loo
100 100



200 101)

I 1 I il
1 Io 1111
1O0 l10

S 100 1i 1)
I 1 Ii 1U


100 100




I(0 1
t6 :',

;,


110 ;


100
1001

111

100
1100
111)
90



150
71)
1 Ioo


125
105
loi



125

S 200)
200
llO
115

140
110
1 111
uri)


S 100




I m)
1100







100
| A)

S 10
| 10
I ou
S ult
I 10
9 10I








19
I 1UI
S 111)



100


I ,












59

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. Lettuce. Egg Plants.

Northern Division. Acreage. Condition. I Acreage. | Condition.
Franklin ............. ... [ 0 T5 75 .,
Gadsden ............... 100 100
H am ilton ............. .. .
Jefferson .............. .
Lafayette .............
Leon ................. 100 1100 100 14 0
Madison ............... 100 100
T i lor ............... ..
W akulla .............. I .. ..
Div. Avern p0 er cent...I !9M 9)4 1 S s
I cslt'ern Division.
('alio n ............... .. .. 100 i 10o
Escamnbia ............. 100 100 100 I 100
H olm es ............... .. ..
O Kaloosa .............. ...
Santa Iosa ............ ..
W allon ............... ...
Washington ......... .. .. I
Iliv. Average ler cent...t 10(1 100 1(0) 10((
A orfhi sfi tcrn IDirisio n.
Alacchlua ............. 1 75 7 ..
B aker ................ ..
Bradford .....
Clay .... ............. 100 00 .
Columblia. . .
Nassau ............... 100 ')0 | 1010 i S
St. Johlns . ........ ... 10. 5 100 1053 100
Suwannee ............. I
Div. Average per cent... .3 ) 80 I 10:i 9'!
(Cenrl l Division.
Brev ril r ................ 10)( 100 ..
IIernando ............ 100 100
Iillslorough .......... 1 (00 100
Lake ................. 60 7i7 75 73
Levy ............. .... . 25
Marion ............... 110 100 100 l95
Orange .............. 120 50 100 100
Osceola ................ . .. 100 100
Pasco ................ ......
P inellas ............... .
Polk .................. 1 00 100
Seminole .......... . .8 7I 00 I 1 00
Volusia .............. ... 10( 100 100 100
Div. Average per cent... 1 7 989 1 84 |I
southlcr( Division.
Broward ......... . . 10 1 (0 120 (100
Dade ................ 100 100 125 100
D eSoto ............... . . .
Lee .................. 100 1 00 I 100 .,
Manatre .............. 100 100 100 1()
Palm Beach ......... .. 110 00 100 !)0
St. Lucie ............... .. 100 )0
Div. Average per cent... 102 08 108 128
State Average per cent.. 9)8 I 04 I 97 100















REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. I Celery. Beets.

Northern Division. Acreage. Condon Ac e Condition.
Franklin .............. 50 25 100 I 100
Gadsden .............. .. . 100 100
Hamilton .......
Jefferson .............. .. 100 100
Lafayette ..............
Leon .................. 110 100
Madison .............. .. 80 SO
Taylor ................
W akulla ..............I
Div. Average per cent... 50 25 I !) 98
Western Division.
Calhoun .............. I
Escambia ............. .. 100 I 010
H olm es ............... .
Okaloosa .............. .
Santa Rosa ............ .
W alton .............. ..
W ashington ........... I -0
Div. Average per cent... I . .. 100 100
Northeastern Diriion.
Alachua .............. .. I .
B aker ................I .. ..
Bradford ........... .. .. .
Clay .................. ....
Columbia .............
Nassau ........... . . 100 .5 100 I 1
St. Johns ............. 105 100 110 100
Suwannee ............. .. I I
Div. Averane nor cent...I 103 I 9: 10)5 I ll
central Division,.
Brevard .............. 75 1 80 100 I 1)
H ernando ............. . .. I
Hillsborough .......... .
Lake ................ .. .. 75 75
Levy .............. .
Marion .............. . 100 100 I 100 o
Orange ............... 100 100 100 100
Osceola ............... 100 100 85 0
P asco ................ .....
P inellas ............... .....
P olk .................
Seminole ............ .. 105 100 10) 10)
Volusia ...............I 100 100 100 1
Div. Average per cent... 97 97 .94 .I
SOluthern Dif'rision.
Broward .............. 100 100 1)0 I )0
Dade ................. 100 100 100 1011
DeSoto .............. 100 100
Lee .................. 100 I 90 100) |
Manatee ............. 100 100
Palm Beach ........ 100 0
St. Lucie .............. .
Div. Average per cent... I 100 I 07 101) f"7
State Average per cent.. I 88 78 I 99 I 07












61

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. Watermelons. Canta

Northern Division. I Acreage. I Condition. Acreage.
Franklin .. ............ 100 | 100 100
Gadsden ............ .. 110 90 115
Hamilton ............ 110 100 110
Jefferson ............... 110 90 100
Lafayette ........ ... 110 100
Leon ................... 115 0 110
Madison .............. 100 100 100
Taylor .............. 110 100 I
W akulla ............ .. 110 100 .
Div. Acreage per cent... I loS I 97 10(


loupes.

I Condition.
100
I 95
100
100

| w
100


!1N


Western Divisiotn.
Calhoun .............. 100 9 0 100 1 '0
Escambia ............. 150 010 150 100
Holmes ............... 110 100
Okaloosa .............. 110 90
Santa Rosa ........... 110 90 100 !0
W alton ............... 100 100
Washington ........... I 200 100 100 0
Driv. Average n"r cent... I 140 h96 11:; .
A it rICeauaicI n UJtiisiofn.
Alacliuaa ......... .... i100 75 100 i5
Baker ................. 100 100 100 100
Bradford ............... 100 100
Clay ............. . 110 100 100 !)0
Columbia ............ 100 90
Nassau ..... .......... 12.5 0 100 8,
St. Johns . . ......... 110 100 105 100
Suwannee .............115 100 11 10
Div. Average per cent... 108 904 10 :i 9i"
Central Diriiion.
bie\arau ................. 100 I 00
IIernando . ........ . 100 90
Hillsborough .. . ... . ..
Lake ................. 8 .5 90 85 't0
Levy ............. .. 50 75 30 75
Marion ... ............. 110 100 100 100
Orange ............ .. 120 100 100 10t0
Osceola ............ ISO 100 150 100
Pasco ................. .. 0 60 60 80
Pinellas .. . . . . 100 90 90 9
Polk ................. 125 100
Seminole .............. 110 100 100 100
Volusia ................ 150 100 30 10to
Div. Average per cent... 110 91 83 9:
,soithlern Dirisii.,i.
Broward .............. I
Dade ................. 100 100 1 0 100
DeSoto ............... 250 100
Lee .................. 200 60 100 i0
Manatee ............ .. 100 100 75 t90
Palm Beach .......... . 100 90 I .
St. Lucie .............I 85 95
Div. Average per cent... 139 109 I 92 | 53
State Avernae per cent..( 119 I 97 9 I 92












62

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES.

Northern Division.
Franklin .............
Gadsden .............
Hamilton ............
Jefferson .............
Lafayette ............
Loon ................
M adison .............
Taylor ...............
W akulla .............
Div. Average oer cent.


Strawberries. Orange Lemon
[ a|e Trees. Trees.
I Acreage. I Condition. Condition. I Condition.
.| .. .. I o I 50
. . I . . I


S 100 I 1 I 40
. 1 . I . . I
. | . . .
I . i . i .

. 1 100 I 100 I 4. .


Wl'cstern Division.
l'al lioun .............I .. 5. .
Escambia ............ I 100 100 .
I olm es ............... I ..
Okaloosa ............. I
Santa Rosa ............ I
W alton ............... ....
W ashington ........... I ... .
I)lv. Average per (ent. .. 101) 100 510
Noth',tl tcrntCI Diri'ioen.
Alachna ............... (i0 75 4 40
Baker ................. 100 10 40
Bradford ............... .
C lay ................... .. 1 0 5 1
Colum bia ............. .
Nassau ...............I l150 100 ..
St. Johns .......... . 110 00 1 l0 |
Suwannee .............. 100 00 I
Div. Averanie oer cent... 104 1 81 45 I 5(
central l )Diriion.
Hrevard .............. . 0 50 I iT .
Hernando ............. .. I 00
11llshorough ..........I 125; 00 s 15
Lake .................. 5 00 | 70 10
Levy ................. i60
Marion ...............I 100 1 00 25 20
Orange ............... 100 100 so | i )
Osceola .............. 200 100 100 100
Pasco ................ 90 80 70
Pinellas ............. . 50 1
Polk ................. 200 ) 100 900
Sem inole .............. . I 75
Volusia ............... 100 900 40
Div. Average nor cent... 129 I 89 69 :i:
,outhernT Dlrision.


Browara ............. . I . 1 0 so
Dade ................. I 140 100 100 PO
DeSoto .............. I . . 8.5 60
Lee ..................I 100 00 | 00 50
M anatee ..............I .. I 00
Palm Beach ........... 100 100 n 70
St. Lucie ............ 100 100 100 60
Div. Average per cent... 1110 98 I 94 677
State Average per cent..l 109 9I 4 I 61 I 50











63


REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.
I | Grape
COUNTIES. I Lime ItanIn,.
STrees. Trees.
Northern Division. I Condition. Condition Condio.
Franklin ......................... I 5.0 I 5
G adsden .......................... .
H am ilton ........................
Jefferson ......................... I
L afayel te ........................ I
L eon ............................ I 40
M adison ......................... -
T aylor ..........................
W akulla .........................
I)iv. Averal e i1er ceant .............. .. 45 I i0


it western i nvisioln.
C alhou .................... ....... 0 .
E scam bia ......................
Ilolm es ..........................
O kaloosa ......................... I
Santa IRosa .. ........... . . .
W alton ........................
W ashington ................ ..
I)iv. Average p r nt ............. 40
u\ortlft icern iiriision.
A lachua ......................... 40
B aker ...........................
Bradford ...............
C lay ............................ 50
C o l i . . . . . . . . . . . .
N assau ........................
St. Johns ........................
Suw annee ............... I ........
D)lv. Average per cent .............. I. 43
Central Dii.rsioAn.
B revard ......................... 50
llernando ........................ 55
IIllsborough ..................... 15 80 I
L ake ............................ 10 | S0 7
L evy ............................ I
M arion ..........................I 25
Orange ................... ......... I 0 00
Osceola ........................ .. 100 100 0
Pasco .............. . ......... so
P inellas ................. ........ 1 80
P olk ............................ ..0
Sem inole ........................ 75
V olusia .......................... .3
Div. Average per cent............... 38 67 I 45
Southern Division.
Broward ......................... 100 I 100 75
Dade ............................ 120 100 80
D0eSoto 75
IeSoto ......................... CI 75. 0 .
Lee .............................. O 585 40
M anatee ......................... I 9
Palm Beach ...................... 70 5 I 40
St. Lucie ........................ I 0 100 25
Div. Average per cent ................ [ 7 [ 3 I 52
State Average per cent............. 57 58 1 40











64

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.


COUNTIES. I Pineapples. Mangoes. I Guaros.
CConditi.I I I
Northern Division. I Condition. | Conditlon. Condition
Franklin .........................
Gadsden ..............
IIam illon ........................ ..
Jefferson ......................... ..
Lafayette .................. ..... ..
Leon ............................ .
M adison ......................... ..
Taylor ........................... ...
Wakulla ........................I .
Div. Average per cent ...... ....... . 50
I etcrSa Dirision.
anaho un ............................
E scalt bia ........................ .
IIolm (s .......................... ..
Okaloosa ........................ .
lanta Rosa ......................
Walton .......................... .
W ashington ....................... .
[Div. Average per cent .............. I ""_
Noiirthc(tsfcrn Divisinn.a__
Alaenua .......................... .

Bradford .......................... .
Clay .............................. .
Columbia ......... ..... .......... .
N assau ......................... I
St. Johns ........................ I
Suwannee .............................. I I
)iv. Average per cement ............. .
Central Division.
B revard .........................I ..
Ilernando ........................ .
Hillsborough ....... ............ .. 30
Lake ............................ .. .. 25
L evy ............................ .
M arion .......................... . I
O range ...................... .... ..
O sceola .......................... 30
P asco ...........................
P inellas ......................
P olk ............................ 95
Sem inole ......................... .
Volusia ...................... ..... ... I . 20
Div. Average per cent .............. 63 5..
,southern Division.
Broward .................... ..... 100 70
Dade ...... ...................... 100 s80 7
D eSoto .......................... I ..
Lee ...................... ........ .. 85 7 70
M anatee .......................... I .
Palm Beach ................ ...... ..
St. Lucie .......................... 20
Div. Average per cent ............... 78. 7S 14
State Average per cent.............. 71 1 78 46












(i5

REPORT OF ACREAGE AND CONDITION-Continued.

| Avacado
COUNTIES. Pears. Peaches. Pears.
Northern Division. Condition. Condition. Condition.
Franklin ......................... . 75 100
Gadsden ...................... .
H am ilton ........................
Jefferson ......................... 50 40
Lafayette ........... ............. 50 30
Leon ...................... . .. 50 25
Madison ..................... .... . 50 100
T aylor .......................... I ..
W akulla .... .................. .50 25
Div. Average per cent.............. . 54 53
IWestern Division.
Calhoun ......................... . .. 50 40
Escambia ........................ I 100 60
Holmes ................. ............. 50 30
Okaloosa ........................ 40 35
Santa Rosa ...................... I I 60 40
W alton ......................... ..... 80 40
W ashington ...................... I 1 100 100
Div. Average per cent .............. i"_i 69 48
Northeastern Division.
Alachua .................... ...... 25 75
Baker ......................... .. I .. .
Bradford ........................ .
Clay ............................ .. 100
Colum bia ........................ I 50
Nassau ........................... .50 60
St. Johns ........................ 85
6uwannee ........................ I .. I ..
Div. Average per cent............... .. I 62 68
Central Division.
Brevard ......................... .50
Hlernando ........................ I ..
IIillsborough .....................
Lake ............................. 70
L evy ............................I .. 1 o 0
Levy 50 50
M arion ............... .. ......... 75 100
Orange ............................. .. 0 00
Osceola .......................... .. 00 100
P asco ........................... I 6. 0 60
P inellas ...........................
P olk ....................... ......
Seminole .......................... .

Div. Average per cent............... 1 68 73
Nouthlern Division.
Broward .......................... 75 . I
D ade ............................ 80
D eSoto ..........................I
L ee .............................| 75
M anatee ......................... .. .
Palm Beach ...................... ..
St. L ucle ........................ .
Div. Average per cent.............. 77 --
State Average per cent ............. 77 1 03 I 01


5-Bull.



















PART III.

Rules and Regulations.
Fertilizers, Feeding Stuffs, and Foods and Drugs.














HOW TO LEGALLY DRAW, PACK AND TRANSMIT
SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS AND COMMER-
CIAL FEED STUFFS FOR ANALYSIS BY
THE STATE LABORATORY.

1. Only such samples as are drawn from original
packages, EACH BEARING THE GUARANTEE OF A LAWFUL
DEALER AND THE INSPECTION STAMP REQUIRED RY LAW, will
be analyzed by the State Laboratory.
2. If the lot or shipment be TEN or more packages, the
sample must be drawn from NOT LESS THAN TEN packages.
3. If the lot or shipment be LESS THAN TEN packages,
the sample shall be drawn from EACH package.
4. The sample shall be drawn in the presence of TWO
disinterested witnesses, and .shall be SEALED IN THEIR
PRESENCE, and TRANSMITTED by a DISINTERESTED PARTY
(one of the witnesses) to the COMMISSIONER OF AGRI-
CULTURE.
5. Not less than one pound of Fertilizer, or one-half
pound of Commercial Feed Stuff must be placed in a tin
can or a glass bottle and addressed and sent, prepaid, to
the Commissioner of Agriculture.
6. The purchaser (or sender) shall address a letter
to the Commissioner of Agriculture, stating:
1. The number of original packages represented by
the sample, and the number of packages sampled.
2. That each package had attached to it the guar-
antee tag and stamp required by law.
3. That the sample was drawn in the presence of two
or more witnesses.
4. THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE INCLOSED IN THE PACKAGE.
The tags OFF THE PACKAGES SAMPLED, with the guaran-
teed analysis and stamps must be RETAINED by the pur-
chaser, to compare with the certificate, and for future











evidence, it necessary, and BY NO MEANS SENT TO THIS
OFFICE.
The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
the sample.
We suggest a form of the letter of transmittal to the
Commissioner of Agriculture on this page.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Approved.
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1916.

FORM LETTER FOR TRANSMITTING FERTILIZER
AND FEED SAMPLES.

...................... F la., ............ 191 ...
Hon. W. A. McRae,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:
I send you today by mail (or express) a sample of
.................................... for analysis
(Indicate Fertilizer, Cotton Seed Meal, or Feed Stuff)
by the State Chemist.
This sample is taken from a lot of ........ packages,
each bearing the guarantee tag and stamp required by
Law, purchased from a Florida dealer.
This sample was drawn from ........... packages in
the presence of two witnesses, this day.
The guarantee tags and stamps off the ..............
packages sampled are retained by the purchaser.
This sample is sent by me, one of the witnesses, for
Mr. .........................., the purchaser
Yours truly,











STATE VALUATIONS.

(Based on commercial values, Dec. 31st, 1916.)
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of 1917.
Available Phosphoric Acid............. 5c a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............ Ic a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) 22.75c a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K,O)........ 30c a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid............. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid ............. 20c per unit
Ammonie (or its equivalent in nitrogen). 4.55 per unit
Potash .............................. 6.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent., in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid... 6.11 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid. ..1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 4.55- 15.56
Potash ................... 3.23 per cent.x 6.00- 19.38
Mixing and Bagging .........................- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports................. 12'.'
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:

Available Phosphoric Acid.....8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.00
Ammonia ................... .2 per cent.x 4.55- 9.10
Potash ......................2 per cent.x 6.00- 12.00
Mixing and Bagging..........................- 1.50


Commercial value at sea ports.................. $30.60
The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
APRIL 1, 1917.

"Under unsettled conditions, potash quotations are
wholly nominal."

AMMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 19% Ammonia ............. $ 85.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25% Ammonia........ 120.00
Dried Blood, 17% Ammonia ................ 94.00
Cyanamid, 21% Ammonia .................. 82.00

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% Sul-
phate, 48% KO ........................ Nominal
Low Grade Sulphate of Potash, 53% Sulphate,
29% K20 ................... ........... .188.00
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% KI(O.......... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 17% Ammonia,
14% Potash KO ....................... 167.00
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% Ammonia,
12% Potash K2O ........................ Nominal
Kainit, Potash, 12% K,O .................. Nominal
Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 3% K20 Potash... 19.00

AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Tankage, 10% Ammonia, 5%
Phosphoric Acid ........................ 62.00
Tankage, 7% Ammonie, 15% Phosphoric Acid. 50.00
Low Grade Tankage, 61/% Ammonie, 15%
Phosphoric Acid ........................ 46.00
Sheep Manure, 3% Ammonia ................ 28.00
Imported Fish Guano, 11% Ammonia, 51/2%
Phosphoric Acid ......................... 45.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% Am-
monia, 24% Phosphoric Acid.............. 42.00











Raw Bone, 41/2% Ammonia, 22% Phosphoric
A cid ................................... 44.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/2% Ammonia, 1%
Potash ................................. 36.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 71/2 Ammonia..... 42.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2 Ammonia....... 35.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16% Available
Phosphoric Acid ........................ 17.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% Available Phosphoric
A cid .................................... 16.00
Bone Black, 16% Available Phosphoric Acid. 25.00

MISCELLANEOUS.

High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 21/ Am-
monia, 8% Potash ....................... 58.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% Ammonia, 2% Potash 30.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% Ammonia,
4% Potash ............................. 34.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% Ammonia,
4% Potash ............................. 34.00
Land Plaster, in sacks ..................... 12.00

The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing
and bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50
per ton in excess of above prices.

NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
APRIL 1, 1917-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

AMMONIATES.

Ammonia, sulph, prompt.......per cwt., 5.25 @ -
futures ........................... 5.25 @ -
Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. ammonia and
14 p. c. bone phosphate, f. o. b. deliv-
ered Balto. .................per unit., 4.50 & 10











wet, acidulated, 6 p. c. ammonia, 3
p. c. phosphoric acid, delivered..
Ground fish guano, imported, 10 and 11
p. c. bone phosphate, c. i. f. N.
Y., Balto. or Phila..............
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. f. o. b. Chi-
cago ...............................
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c. f. o. b. Chicago,
ground .............................
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago,
ground .................. .........
Tankage, concentrated, f. o. b. Chicago,
14 to 15 p. c., f. o. b. Chicago ..........
Garbage, tankage, f. o. b. Chicago......
Hoofmeal, f. o. b. Chicago...... per unit,
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. ammonia, f. o. b.
New York .......................
Chicago ..........................
Nitrate of soda, 95 p. c., spot.per 100 lbs.
futures, 95 p. c....................


PHOSPHATES.


Acid phosphate ................per ton,
Bones, rough, hard ................... .
soft steamed unground ...........
ground, steamed, 11/4 p. c. ammonia
and 60 p. c. bone phosphate. .....
ditto, 3 and 50 p. c................
raw, ground, 4 p. c. ammonia and
50 p. c. bone phosphate..........
South Carolina 'phosphate rock, kiln
dried, f. o. b. Ashley River...........
Florida land pebble phosphate rock, 68
p. c., f. o. b. Tampa, Fla..............
Florida high grade phosphate hard rock,
77 p. c., f. o. b. Florida port..........


11.50
26.00
21.50


12.00
27.00
22.00


23.00 @ 23.50
26.00 @ 27.00

32.00 @ 35.50


3.50 @

2.00 @


5.00 @ 5.25


4.25 &



.. @

4.25 &

4.10 &

4.25 &


4.15
15.00
4.00











Tennessee phosphate rock, f. o. b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic 78@80 p. c. per ton, 5.00 @ 5.50
75 p. c. guaranteed................ 4.75 @ 5.00
68@ 72 p. c ........................ 4.25 @ 4.50
POTASHES.

Muriate of potash, 80@85 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags ...........per ton 425.00 @ 450.00
Muriate of potash, min. 98 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags. .................. Nominal
Sulphate of potash, 90@95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags ........... 275.00 @ 300.00
Double manure salt, 48@53 per cent.,
basis 48 per cent., in bags............105.00 @ -
Manure salt, min. 20 per cent., K,O, in
bulk ............................... 50.00 @ 60.00
Hardsalt, min. 16 per cent., KO, in bulk 40.00 @ 50.00
Kainit, min. 12.4 per cent., K,O, in bulk. 4l.00 @ 50.00

COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED STUFF
FOR 1917.

For the season of 1917 the following "State values"
are fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation, January 1.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing Ihe com-
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:
Indian corn being the standard at $43.00 per ton.
(.2.15 per sack of 100 lbs., $1.20 per bu. 56 lbs.)
To find tle commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.

Protein, 4.45c per pound................. 89c per unit
Starch and Sugar, 2.05c per pound ....... 41c per unit
Fats, 4.6c per pound ............... . 92c per unit











EXAMPLE NO. 1.

CORN AND OATS, EQUAL PARTS-

Protein .......................... 11.15 x 89c, $ 9.92
Starch and Sugar ................ 64.65 x 41c, 26.50
Fat ............................ 5.20 x 92c, 4.78

State value per ton .... ........................$41.20

EXAMPLE NO. 2.

CORN-
Protein .......................... 10.30 x 89c, $ 9.34
Starch and Sugar ................ 69.60 x 41c, 28.53
Fat .............................. 5.40 x 92c, 4.97

State value per ton............................ $42.84

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
"season." They may, but seldom do, vary from the
market prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight
advance or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question can-
not be answered categorically. By analysis, the am-
monia, available phosphoric acid and potash may be de-











termined and the inquirer informed what the cost of the
necessary material to compound a ton of goods similar
to "Smith's Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but
accepted and well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values," Jan. 1, 1917, are nominal.

SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only State in the Union that provides
for the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or pur-
chaser, UNDER PROPER RULES AND REGULATIONS FIXED BY
LAW-to be sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture for
analysis free of cost. Any citizen in the State who has
purchased fertilizers or feeds FOR HIS OWN USE MAY DRAW
A SAMPLE OF THE SAME, ACCORDING TO LAW, and have the
same analyzed by the State Chemist free of cost. In
case of adulteration or deficiency he can, on establishing
the fact, receive double the cost demanded for the goods.
The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmitting "special samples."
This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.
Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent io
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of "food and drugs" will be ;ent
to any citizen requesting the same.









78

"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS
MATERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE
OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FER-
TILIZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."














COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.
Total
Ammonia. Phosphoric Potash.
Acid.
Nitrate of Soda.......... 17 to 19 .......... .............
Sulphate of Ammonia... 21 to 26 .......................
Dried Blood ............ 12 to 17 ............ ............
Concentrated Tankage.. 12 to 15 1 to 4 ............
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ............
Dried Fish Scrap........ 6 to 11 3 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal....... 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13 to 17 1 to 2 1 to 2

PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.
SAvailable
Ammonia. Phos. Acid. Insoluble.

Florida Pebble Phosphate ............ ............ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate ........... ............ 30 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 3
Ground Bone ........... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 1 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3

POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Actual Amonia. Phos.
Potash. Acid. Lime.
Muriate of Potash...... 50 to 62 ................. ......
Sulphate of Potash. ..48 to 52 .................
Carbonate of Potash.... 55 to 60...... .........
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ..................
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag. 25 to 30 .....................
Kainit ................. 12 to 13 ...... .....
Sylvinit .............. 16 to 20 ...........................
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8 ......... 1 to 2 .........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 ......... 1 to 11 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ........ 3 to 9 2 to 4 ........ 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.50 0.30 0.30
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.50 0.60 0.25 0.30
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.60 1.00 0.35 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.50 0.75 0.50 0.70











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-

Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by....... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by..... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K,0) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (KO), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.20
per cent. actual potash (K0O).









81

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.



NAME OF FEED. .
I 0


Maiden Cane Hay..... 28.60 11.60 42.40 2.60 4.20

Natal Grass Hay...... 36.70 7.40 39.20 1.80 5.00

Para Grass Hay ....... 31.20 8.00 45.70 1.601 6.20

Rhodes Grass Hay ... 41.10 7.70 36.80 1.30 6.60

Beggarweed Hay ...... 24.301 21.60 35.101 4.101 4.00

Kudzu Vine Hay...... 32.30 15.90 33.00 1.60 6.80

Cow Pea Hay......... 20.50 13.00 45.90 4.201 7.50

Velvet Bean Hay...... 29.70 14.70 41.00 1.70 5.70

Velvet Beans ......... 7.00 21.00 53.10 5.40 3.60

Velvet Bean Hulls .... 27.00 7.50 44.60 1.60 4.30

Velvet Beans and Hulls. 10.70 9.40 50.60 4.50 3.50

Cow Peas ............ 4.10 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.20

Soy Bean Meal ........ 4.50 48.40 27.50 6.40 4.40

Peanut Vine Meal..... 29.60 9.90 38.40 6.30 6.60

Cotton Seed .......... 23.20 18.40 24.70 19.90 3.50

Cottton Seed Hulls.... 44.40 4.00 36.60 2.00 2.60

Bright Cott'n Seed Meal 9.401 39.70 28.60 7.801 5.80
S1__________ I


6-Bull.












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS-Continued.



NAME OF FEED.



Dark Cotton Seed Meal. 20.00 22.90 37.10 5.50 5.00

Barley (grain) ....... 2.70 12.40 69.80 1.80 2.40

Corn (grain) ......... 2.10 10.50 69.60 5.40 1.50

Corn Meal ........... 1.90 9.70 68.70 3.80 1.40

Hominy Feed ......... 4.00 10.50 65.30 7.80 2.60

Corn and Cob Meal.... 5.80 7.50 70.80 3.10 1.20

Ground Corn Shucks... 30.20 2.80 54.60 0.60 1.90

Ground Corn Cobs..... 30.00 3.00 56.60 0.70 1.60

Oats (grain) ......... 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.00 3.00

Rice (grain) ......... 0.20 7.40 79.20 0.40 0.40

Rice Bran ........... 9.50 12.10 49.90 8.80 10.00

Wheat (grain) ....... 1.80 11.90 71.90 2.10 1.80

Wheat Bran .......... 9.00 15.40 53.90 4.00 5.80

Wheat Middlings ..... 5.40 15.40 53.90 4.00 5.80

Wheat Mixed Feed.... 7.80 16.90 54.40 4.80 5.30

Wheat Ship Stuff....... 5.60 14.60 59.80 5.00 3.70

Dry Jap Sugar Cane... 26.20 2.30 62.60 1.50 2.80









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.

Phosphoric Acid
0
NAME, OR BRAND. S FOR WHOM SENT.
za ds w
0 I I
gz a S E < f

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4019 11.02| 6.151 2.95 9.101 3.80 2.08 W. S. Thornton, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4020 6.72 4.48' 5.02 9.50 5.20 2.66 John Bolly, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4021 11.731 5.30 3.30 8.60 4.031 4.42 G. F. Smith, Sanford.

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 4022 10.661 4.851 3.30 8.15 4.20 2.80 G. F. Smith, Sanford.

Blood and Bone ................ 402311.28 3.uo1 5.15 8.801 8.901 ..... G. F. Smith, Sanford.
Mixed Fertilizer .............. .|40241 6.94[ 4.78 5'42 10.20 4.10 2.18 W. R. Pell, Sanford.

Blood and Bone ................ 4025 5.87 3.301 4.70 8.00 9.80.....W. R. Pell, Sanford.

Blood and Bone ................ 4026 7.121 4.05 4.45 8.50 9.55 ..... Dr. T. A. Neal, Sanford.

Dried Blood .................. 4027 ..... ...... ..... ..... 15.00 ..... Dr. T. A. Neal, Sanford.








Dried Blood ................... 4028 .....]..... .
Dried Blood ................... 4031 ..... ...

Dried Blood ................... 4032 ........ .

Pulverized Tobacco Stems...... 4033 ..... ......
Tankage ...................... 4034110.08 3.40
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4035 11.91i 7.45
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4036 9.58 3.88

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4037 9.78 6.13

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4038 10.82 4.901
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 40391 9.371 5.251
SF I
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4040 10.141 5.650
Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4041 12.79 4.601

Sheep Manure ................. 4042 12.831 2.12

Tankage ...................... 4043 9.371 ..051
Tankage ...................... 14044 9.771 5.551
Tankage ...................... 40451 9.231 4.951


.... ..... 14.78 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.
I I
.... ..... 14.78 ..... R. B. Monroe, Sanford.
.... ..... 13.91 ..... G. F. Smith, Sanford,

..... 2.60 7.99 John Meisch, Sanford.
5.20 8.60 9.351..... John Meisch, Sanford.
2.351 9.80 4.48 2.21 John Meisch, Sanford.
1.02 4.90 10.40 1.43 Roy F. Symes, Sanford.

2.77 8.90 3.70 2.011 Joe Meisch, Sanford.

0.701 5.60 4.95 3.031 T. W. Bryden, Sanford.
0.451 5.70 4.80 2.76 A. H. Moses, Sanford.
0.90 6.55 5.05! 2.78 Harry Wolff, Sanford.

2.451 7.05 4.301 3.00 T. F. Adams, Sanford.
0.18 2.30 2.65 1.56 Joe Meisch, Sanford.

3.551 7.60110.80 .... Joe Meisch, Sanford.
5.00 10.55 9.30 ..... T. W. Bryden, Sanford.

3.80! 8.75110.501..... A. H. Moses, Sanford.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES. 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. 2 -a FOR WHOM SENT.


140 I 1

Tankage ......................4046 8.761 4.53 4.221 8.75 10.45 .... Henry Nickel, Sanford.
Blood and Bone .............. 4047 6.48' 4.201 5.00 9.20 9.50 ..... Carl Carlson, Sanford.

I I
Dried Blood ................... 4048 ..... .......... .. .. 16.20 .. ... Roy F. Sym es, Sanford.
Acid Phosphate ................ 40491 .... 15.881 2.62118.50 ..... ..... E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.
Pebble Phosphate (from Arcadia) 4050 .......... ..... 28.15 .. .... 1.Pelot, Tallahassee.
Fertilizer ...................... 4051110.28! 5.48 2.72 8.20 5.35 2.17 John Parrish, Parrish.
Dried Blood (No. 2)............ 4052 ..... .... ..... ... 15.201 .... B. E. Squires, Sanford.
I I I I
Tobacco Dust (No. 1).......... 4053[............. ..... 2.551 7.401 Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.
Blood and Bone (No. 2)........ 40541 ..... 4.051 5.25 9.3010.15 ..... Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.
Tankage ...4055 3.08 5.82 8.90 9.40 A. T. Rossetter & Son, Sanora.
Tankage ..................... 140551 ... 3.081 5.821 8.90! 9.401 ..... IA. T. Rossetter & Son, Sanfora.









Blood and Bone (No. 1)........ 4056 .... 6.35

Blood and Bone (No. 2)........ 4057..... 4.65

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 3)........ 40581 9.871 5.301

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4059 9.721 4.081

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4060 9.581 4.98S

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)......... 4061110.06 4.801

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)......... 4062 10.78 6.38

Mixed Fertilizer ............... '4063] 5.78 6.00

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 406410.33 5.48i

Fertilizer ...................... 4065112.10 10.58

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 40661 8.531 4.901

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4067 9.56 9.95

Goat Manure .................. 4068118.67] 1.45]

Ground Tankage (No. 2)........ 4069 ..... 4.25,


9.60 15.95i 6.80 .....

4.351 9.00110.301 .

2.75 8.05o 3.75 3.16

3.271 7.351 3.90 3.58

2.621 7.601 3.751 3.59

2.75 7.55 4.05 3.86

2.32 8.70 4.051 2.07

6.75 12.75 4.001 ....

2.72 8.20 4.25 3.40

1.82 12.40 5.32 .....

3.15| 8.05 3.67] 5.43

3.05113.00] 4.00 3.17

0.20 1.651 2.051 3.43


4.75 3.00 10.15 .....


L. A.

L. A.

L. A.

SB. E.

T. L.

R. 0.

R. O.

iR. L.

IT. J.

H. A.

G. W.

SG. W.


Brumley, Sanford.

Brumley, Sanford.

Brumley, Sanford.

Squires, Sanford.

Mead, Sanford.

Meriwether, Sanford.

Meriwether, Sanford.

Garrison, Sanford.

Miller, Sanford.

Perry, Pomona.

Spencer, Sanford.


Spencer, Sanford.


Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford.

SJ. E. Pace, Sanford.


Tobacco Dust .................. 4070..... .......... ... 2.45 6.89 R. O. Meriwether, Sanford.

Ground Tankage .......... 4071..... 3.10] 3.25 6.35 10.75 ..... Irving Post, Sanford.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. FOR WHOM SENT.

'd Z
4 A Eo


Blood and Bone (No. 3)........

Blood and Bone (No. 2)........

Nitrate of Soda (No. 1).........

Nitrate of Soda (No. 1).........

Fertilizer (Bone Meal) .........

Palmetto Ashes ................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Mixed Fertilizer ..............

Mixed Fertilizer .............


4072 .....

4073 .....

4074 .....|

4075 .....

4076 .....

4077 .....

4078111.871

40801 6.551

4081 8.901

4082110.861


I I
4.10 7.2011.30 9.20 ....G. W. Spencer, Sanford.
I I 7 .3
4.33 7.32 11.65 10.50 ..... Ed Putnam, Sanford.

..... ..... ... ..118.50..... J. E. Pace, Sanford.
I I
. .... .. ....... 18.65 ..... Ed Putnam, Sanford.

7.50116.05123.55 3.05 ..... Nocatee Fruit Co., Nocatee.
I I
.... ....... ... ..| 3.27 E. B. Savage, Ocala.

6.90 3.75110.651 4.27 0.631 C. A. Peunifay, Grand Island.

7.431 2.42 9.851 4.40 0.901 H. P. Peterson, West Tocoi.

7.181 2.9710.15 3.75 2.16 Mrs. G. S. Moore, Sanford.

6.031 1.271 7.301 3.901 2.96 C. M, Stowe, Sanford,









Mixed Fertilizer ...............4083 10.13 7.231

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4084 8.55| 5.13

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4085 8.621 o.301

Blood and Bone (No. 2)........ 40861 9.011 5.00
I
Blood and Bone (No. 1)........ 4087 8.28 1.95

Blood and Bone (No. 2)........ 4088 4.5712.15

Tankage (No. 2) .............. 4089 7.721 1.681

Tankage ...................... 4090 3.771 3.72

Ground Tankage ............... 4091 7.861 4.40

Blood and Bone ............... 4092 7.651 3.551

Blood and Bone ............... 40931 6.481 6.03

Ground Tankage ............... 4094 8.98! 6.20

Blood and Bone (No. 1)........ 4095 7.761 5.05!

Tobacco Dust (No. 3) .......... 4096 .. .. ..

Tobacco Dust (No. 1) ......... 4097. .. .... I

Cotton Seed Meal .............. 4098 ..... ...


1.871 9.101 3.53 1.80 Rex Packard, Sanford.

3.77| 8.901 4.05 3.04 M. Fleischer, Sanford.
4.15 9.45 4.00 2.06 A. K. Powers, Sanford.

5.30110.301 9.90 ..... Joseph Camerson, Sanford.

3.351 5.30110.30 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.

6.25118.40 6.85 ..... L. A. Brumley. Sanford.

1.121 2.801 9.85 ..... H. H. Chappel, Sanford.

5.38 9.10 10.50 ..... L. S. Robb, Sanford.
3.95 8.3510.20 .... Carl Carlson, Sanford.

3.301 6.85 9.50 .... FR. B. Monroe, Sanford.

6.37 12.40 7.20 ..... C. B. Bell, Sanford.

4.10 10.30 9.60 ..... Rex Packard, Sanford.

3.151 8.20 9.40 ..... A. K. Powers, Sanford.

.... ..... 1.701 5.36! Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

.... .... 1.151 4.39 Fish & Fish, Sanford.

... I 7.85 ..... Fish & Fish, Sanford.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid

NAME, OR BRAND. .' r FOR WHOM SENT.



I I I
Nitrate of Soda (No. 4)........ 4099.............. ....19.10..... Joseph Cameron, Sanford.
Dried Blood (No. 1) ............ 4100 ..... .... .....17.25 ...Joseph Cameron, Sanford.
Dried Blood (No. 1)............ 141011..... ..... ... I...... i 16.70 . H. H. Chappel, Sanford.
I I 7 ..... I h, Sanford.
Dried Blood (No. 2) ........... .4102 .... .. ..... 17.20 . . Fish & Fish, Sanford.
Fertilizer ..................... 4103 4.671 8.601 0.351 S.95j 3.30] 4.35 J. H. W endler, Bulow.
Fertilizer ...................... 4104 9.431 8.901 2.70 11.60 4.15 1.93 J. J. Hall, Green Cove Springs.
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 4105| 8.391..... ..... ..... 1 6.281 ..... J. B. W illiams, Citra.
I I I I I I
Fertilizer (Raw Phosphate)..... 14106! 0.54! 1.91129.69131.601 ..... ..... S. J. Forny Duval, Live Oak.
I I I I ] I
Fertilizer ...................... 41071 9.54] 7.80 0.801 8.601 4.171 ..... 0. H. Brinson, Live Oak.
Fertilizer ...................... 4108112.311 7.651 1.851 9.501 4.26] 2.23 W A. W eisensale. Sarasota.









Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


...................... 4109[ 6.401
I
(N o. 1) .............. 141101 8.241
I I i
(No. 2) .............. .4111| 4.32|

(N o. 1) .............. 41121 7.75|
(No. 2, C. S. M.) ..... 4113! 8.171


Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Mixed Fertilizer

Tankage (No. 1)

Blood and Bone


(No. 1)........ 4114110.18

(No. 2)........ 4115 10.62

(No. 3)........ 41161 9.451

............... 4117 7.121
1 i I
............... 14118 7.86]

............... 4119 8.231

(No. 1) ........ 14120i 8.63

(No. 1)........ .412111.651

(No. 2)........ 4122110.351

............... 14123] 5 .851

(No. 3) ........ 14124 7.06


8.711 2.37111.081 4.501 1.601 J. P. Whitehurst, Gainesville.

8.53 0.72 9.25 5.371..... J. A. Ross, Live Oak.

8.231 0.971 9.20 4.021..... J. A. Ross, Live Oak.

8.28j 2.72111.00 4.671 1.39 T. M. Waldron, Palatka.
i I I I
6.93] 0.22] 7.151 4.251 1.261 T. M. Waldron, Palatka.

5.551 4.75 10.30 3.701 1.83 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

5.20 3.50 8.70] 4.10| 2.88 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.
I I I
4.85' 1.351 6.201 4.851 0.88 G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

6.401 3.30 9.70 3.481 1.951W. B. Miller, Sanford.
I I I
6.451 2.25| 8.70] 4.43 4.30 G. F. Smith, Sanford.

6.651 7.25113.901 5.101 2.59 A. T. Rossetter & Son, Sanford.

4.301 3.801 8.10 4.101 3.01 A. H. Stone, Sanford.
I I I I
5.381 5.22 10.601 4.051 1.87 B. L. Squires, Sanford.

5.50 0.85] 6.35| 4.95| 3.281 W. A. Fitts, Jr., Sanford.

3.90 5.651 9.551 9.70 .... W. A. Fitts, Jr., Sanford.
.201 5.51 I Cameron, Sanford.
4.20! 5.551 : ,10. "0!.... I Joseph Cameron, Sanford.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. FOR WHOM SENT.

0 :: a1 M
-0 "6 Cd dC
Cd 0 0


Tankage (No. 4) ............... 4125

Acid Phosphate ................ 4126

Nitrate of Soda (No. 2)......... 4127

Dried Blood (No. 1)............ 4128

Dried Blood (No. 2)............ 4129

Dried Blood (No. 2)............ 4130

Complete Fertilizer ............ 4131

Commercial Fertilizer (No. 1)... 4132

Commercial Fertilizer (No. 2)... 4133

Fertilizer ...... ..... ......... 4134


4.53 3.70

..... 19.62

. . . ) . . .


5.051 8.75

0.43120.05


10.801 .....


18.90

17.05


G. C. Chamberlain, Sanford.

Ed Putnam, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.

Joseph Cameron, Sanford.


..... ..... ..... ...... 15.44 ..... L. B. Squires, Sanford.

.. .... .....| ..... ... 15.18 ..... A. H. Stone, Sanford.

5.151 8.301 1.75 10.05 4.68 1.45 W. G. Whitehurst, Raleigh.
I I I 1
3.09 7.881 3.47111.35 3.30 2.53 J. P. Allen, Lithia.
I I I
7.381 8.18! 1.621 9.801 3.601 2.28 J. P. Allen, Lithia.
6.00 ............... ..... 43.85 uelta Sumatree Co., Hava
6.001 ..... I ..... I ..... 1 ..... 143.851 Vuelta Sumatree Co., Hava


na.









Cotton Seed Meal .............. 141351..... ..... 1.

Fertilizer ...................... 4136 4.081 5.951

Fertilizer ................ ... 4137 5.231 7.00


I I
Fertilizer ...................... 14138111.76| 5.931

Fertilizer ................... ... 4139 8.731 9.601

Fertilizer (No. 190448) .......... 41401 3.24 3.901

Fertilizer (No. 190449).......... 14141 4.22! 4.781
Fertilizer (No. 190450) .. 414 4.56 6.54
Fertilizer (No. 190451) .......... 41421 4.583 6.530

Fertilizer (No. 190451)..........4143 4.83] 6.30]

Fertilizer (No. 190452) .......... 4144 5.78 7.33
I 1
Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 141451 9.231 5.75

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 2)........ 4146 12.27| 4.58

Mixed Fertilizer ............... .4147110.681 5.901

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 141481 5.05 7.351

Mixed Fertilizer (No. 1)........ 4149 8.431 5.90

Goat Manure (No. 3)........... 4150115.161 1.05]


.... . 7.38 ..... J. & O. Altschul Tobac

8.90114.85 4.02 5.42 J. B. Stetson Estate,

1.40 8.40 5.85 1.99 R. E. Van Nest, Hern

1.42 7.35] 4.30 3.27 J. H. Herlong, Princet

1.80111.40 2.87 1.76 S. S. Mobley, Live Oal

0.95 4.85 3.57 4.04 Armour Fertz. Works,

0.67] 5.45[ 5.37 5.82 Armour Fertz. Works,

1.36 7.90 2.95 3.77] Armour *Fertz. Works,

1.05] 7.35] 3.561 5.241 Armour Fertz. Works,

1.421 8.751 4.501 5.35 Armour Fertz. Works,

3.901 9.65[ 4.381 2.361 John Pezold, Sanford.

3.721 8.301 4.08] 2.80] John Pezold, Sanford.

2.701 8.601 4.25 2.86 T. E. Wainwright, San

1.231 8.68 4.751 1.171 A. E. Sjoblom, Sanford

6.45 12.35, 6.13 ..... R. B. Monroe, Sanford.

0.30] 1.35| 1.75| 3.33 R. B. Monroe, Sanford.


co Co., Quinc

DeLand.

ando.

on.

k.

Jacksonville.

Jacksonville.

Jacksonville.

Jacksonville.

Jacksonville.




ford.


y.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. .0 I FOR WHOM SENT.

C d EQ 0
S I I

Blood and Bone (No. 1)........|41511 9.381 2.601 2.55 5.151 9.881 ..... C. Bell, Sanford.
Blood and Bone (No. 1)........ 4152 6.701 3.15 7.20110.351 9.50 ...... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.
SI I I I
Acid Phosphate (No. 2)......... 4153 ..... 17.321 0.28117.601... ...... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.
Blood and Bone ................ 4154 6.43 2.551 7.251 9.80110.30 ..... E. E. Brady, Sanford.
Ground Phosphate (No. 2)...... 4155 .... 0.90 31.20 32.10i ..... I ..... R. B. Monroe, Sanford.
Tobacco Dust (No. 2)........... 41561 ..... .......... ..... 2.95 7.59 C. Bell, Sanford.
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 4157 ..... ..... .. ..... 7.72 ..... L. A. Brumley, Sanford.
I I I
Fertilizer ...................... 4158 4.481 8.001 2.20110.20 2.83 2.36 D. P. Nobles, Live Oak.
Fertilizer ...................... 4159 7.3812.831 1.77114.601 2.43 ..... J. C. Smith, DeFuniak Springs.
C o I I I I I
Cotton Seed Meal ............. 141601.....|..... I..... .....I 6.98|..... J. M. Freeman, Havana.







Fertilizer ...................... 14161 7.37112.201 2.05114.251 4.381 ..... T. J. Adkison, Glendale.
fertilizer ...................... 4162 8.52 12.55 1.65 14.20 2.40 . . L. Adams, Glendale.
I |_ II










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1917. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspectors Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1901.
Deficiencies Greater Than 0.20% Are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND.




Phosphoric Acid.


c" (
>S ,3 -


I I I
Daybreak Tennessee Brown 2492 Guaranteed ...... ... ..... 29.75 .....
Phosphate Rock ............. Found..... 1.18 3.80]25.80 29.60.


Daybreak Tennessee Brown 2493 Guaranteed ..... ... I ..... 129.75 .....
Phosphate Rock ............ Found..... 1.71 3'.00124.80127.80 ..
I I

Guano ........................ 24941Guaranteedl ..... ..... ..... I ... .....
I Found ..... 6.421 9.83 1.17111.00 .....
I I I I ...
Thomasville Acid Phosphate.. .. 2495 Guaranteed .... | ..... ..... ..... ..
| Found..... ..... 1]6.13 1.87118.001 .....


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


..... Federal Chemical Co., Inc.,
Columbia, Tenn.; Louis-
ville, Ky.

.. Federal Chemical Co., Inc.,
.... Columbia, Tenn.; Louis-
ville, Ky.

..... Thomasville Fertilizer Co.,
.... Thomasville, Ga.

... ..Thomasville Fertilizer Co.,
..... Thomasville, Ga.


'~''








Cotton Seed Meal .............. .2499 Guaranteed. ........ ..... ....... 7.50 ..... Empire Cotton 'Oil Co.,
Found..... ........... ..... .... 6.80 ..... Blakely, Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal ............. .2500 Guaranteed .. .... .... 7.50 ..... Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
SFound..... ..... ....... 7.33..... Blakely, Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2501 Guaranteed ..... .. ....... 7.50 ..... Empire Cotton 'Oil Co.,
I Found..... .... ... ... .... 6.451..... Bainbridge, Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal ............. 2502 Guaranteed ..... ............... 7.501 ..... Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
IFound..... ..... ..... .. ..... 6.85 ..... Bainbridge, Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 25031Guaranteed ..... ....... .. ... 7.50..... Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
I Found......... ..... .......... 6.851 ..... I Bainbridge, Ga.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES. 1937. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 24. 1905.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Cotton

Rolled


Seed M eal .................

O ats .......................


Cotton Seed Meal .................

Sweet Potato Silage ...............

Cotton Seed Meal .................

Dairy Feed ........................

Cotton Seed Meal .................

Corn in Shucks and Velvet Beans..


| atL BY WHOM SENT.
0 e C. .Z b


379 ...... 39.40 ...... .......M E. Clark, Greensooro, Fla.

380 13.17! 12.11 56.15 5.05 4.10 Consolidated Gro. Co., Pensacola. ,
I Fla.


3811 .. .. .

3821 1.481

383 ......

384 10.92'

3851 ...... I

3861 16.20


31.41. ...... ......... .The A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy, Fla.

1.821 39.41 0.66 1.85 John M. Scott, Gainesville, Fla.

33.47T ............. ...... Ila C. Howell, Pensacola, Fla.

15.57 53.02 3.47 4.42|E. E. McLin, Ocala, Fla.

36.82 ............. .. F. H. Snyder, Quincy, Fla.

12.95 52.45 2.92 4.80 Leon Storage and Seed Co., Tallla-
S hassee, Fla.
I l I








Cotton Seed Meal .............. 87 . . . 39.91 ..... .... . . G. Roberts, Frostproof, 'la.
Cotton Seed Meal ................. 3881 ...... 33.99 .. ...... ...... S. A. Galloway, Jamieson, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal .................. 3891...... 40.-12[ ... I...... ...... Palmer Sylvester, Hinson, Fla.
I I I
Cotton Seed Meal . . . . . . . . 390 . . 37.24 . .. 3.2 ...... . . . J. T. DeLacy, Havana, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal .......... 3911 ...... 39.651 ... .... .. I... ... . . Daniell, Havana, Fla.
I I I I










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1917. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspectors Under Sections 1, 2 and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1905.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BAND. NAME AND ADDRESS OF
NAME, OR BR D. MANUFACTURER.


Clover Leaf Fancy Brown Shorts 2432 Guaranteedl
F ound.....

Valu Horse and Mule Feed.... 2433 Guaranteed
I Found.....

Cream of Alabama Dairy Feed. 2434 Guaranteed
S Found.....
I I
Purina Feed with Molasses.... 2435 Guaranteedl
[Found.....
I I I
Peck's Mule Feed with Molasses 2436 Guaranteet
I Found.....

Peerless Alfalmo Horse Feed.. 2437 .Guaranteed
I Found..... I


6.00 15.00
4.50 14.74

18.00 9.00
19.13 9.52

11.501 15.08
14.221 14.321

11.70 9.30
11.85 11.14|

12.00 9.00!
13.881 9.731

12.001 10.00
11.56] 10.741


56.00
57.69

50.00
47.84

52.13
53.01

59.20
56.411

55.00
55.08

55.00
59.22


4.00 ...... Akin-Erskine Milling Co.,
2.90 9.821 Evansville, Ind.

1.50 ...... Golden Grain Milling Co.,
2.27 6.651 East St. Louis, Ill.

3.94 ...... McGowin- Bennett Milling
1.70 4.45 Co., Georgiana, Ala.

1.70 ...... Purina Mills, St. Louis. Mo.
1.93 5.871

1.501 ..... Ralston Purina Co., St.
1.601 7.06 Louis, Mo.
I i
2.001...... Omaha Alfalfa Milling Co.,
1.851 5.271 Omaha, Neb.


0 ~5~


< 3 a
<5




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