• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 State chemist's report, 1916
 Citrus fruit analyses, 1916
 Miscellaneous analyses and examinations,...
 Expenditures chemical division,...
 Index






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00043
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00043
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    State chemist's report, 1916
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
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    Citrus fruit analyses, 1916
        Page 159
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    Miscellaneous analyses and examinations, 1916
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    Expenditures chemical division, 1916
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    Index
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Full Text







FLORIDA QUARTERLY

BULLETIN


January 1, 1917

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE.


REPORT OF THE CHEMICAL DIVISION.


R. E. ROSE
STATE CHEMIST.


Analyses of Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs, Foods and Drugs.
Rules and Regulations.


Entered January 31, 1903. at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.


These Bulletins Are Issued Free to Those Requesting Them.

T. J. Appleyard, State Printer.
Tallahassee, Fla.


NUMBER 1


VOLUME 27















STATE CHEMIST'S REPORT, 1916



Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1917.
To His Excellency,
Sidney J. Catts, Governor,
Tallahassee, Florida.
SmI:-I have the honor to submit the following report
of the Chemical Division of the Agricultural Department
of the State of Florida for the year ending December 31,
1916:

The report of the Commissioner of Agriculture, shows
the sale of inspection stamps covering 203,383.16 tons of
Commercial Fertilizers and Cotton Seed Meal-

Amounting to .................... ....... $50.845.79
And 137,578.80 tons of Commercial Feeding
Stuffs-
Amounting to .............................. .34,394.70

A total revenue of .............. ......... .85,240.49
paid into the State Treasury to the credit of the General
Revenue Fund. From which is to be deducted the total
expenses of the Chemical Division, incident to the execu-
tion of the Fertilizer, Feed Stuff, and Pure Food and
Drug Laws, including the expenses of the Immature
Citrus Fruit Law, total expense of the chemical division
being $21,095.62, showing a balance of .$64,144.87 paid
into the General Revenue Fund of the State. A summary
of these expenditures will be found on the succeeding
page. A detailed Financial Report will be found on the
last pages of this report.











FINANCIAL REPORT
Su mmary.

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF CHEMICAL
DIVISION, 1916.


Salary of the State Chemist. ................ .
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Fertilizers.....
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Food and Drugs.
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Stock Feed....
Salary three Food and Drug Ins]ectors .....
Salary Clerk Chemical Division ..............
Salary Janitor .............................
Traveling expenses three Food and Drug In-
spectors .................................
Samples and Incidentals, Pure Food Depart-
m ent ....................................
Chemicals, Apparatus and Incidentals, State
Laboratory ............................ .
Traveling Expenses State Chemist and Assist-
ants .....................................
Postage State Chemist ......................
Salaries of Citrus Fruit Inspectors ...........
Traveling Expenses Citrus Fruit Inspectors...


3,000.00
1,800.110
1,800.00
1,800.00
4,500.00
1,080.00
300.00

2,446.24

841.81

806.49

867.80
150.82
908.31
794.06


Total Expenses Chemical Division ......... .$21,095.62
To Credit General Revenue.................. 64,144.87

Gross Revenue ........................... 85,240.49

Appropriation, 1916 ........................ .$23,630.00
Expenses Chemical Division.................. 21,095.62

Unexpended Appropriation .................. $ 2,534.38











SUMMARY OF ANALYTICAL REPORT, 1916.

The following analyses were made during the year:

Official samples fertilizers ........................ 184
Special samples fertilizer (sent in by citizens)..... 225
Official samples feed stuff ...................... 242
Special samples feed stuff (sent in by citizens).... 43
Official food and drug samples ................... 26
Special food and drug samples (sent in by citizens). 8
Official samples citrus fruit ..................... 112
Special samples citrus fruit....................... 437
W ater sam ples ................................. 16
Miscellaneous samples (sent in by citizens)....... 139

Total number analyses. ..................... ..1.511

SPECIAL SAMPLES DRAWN BY PURCHASERS.

The Florida Law is peculiar in this respect, permitting
citizens, purchasers of lawful feeds and fertilizers that
are duly registered, under oath with the Coommissioner
of Agriculture, as evidenced by the guarantee tag and
stamp upon each package, to draw samples of the same,
according to Law, Rules and Regulations, to prevent the
submission of spurious samples, and obtain, without cost,
a certificate of analysis by the State Chemist. In case
of deficiency in the goods so purchased, the sample being
properly drawn, packed and transmitted, according to
Law and Regulations, the purchaser can, upon proof of
the fact, obtain a judgment for double the amount of the
price of the goods, while the dealer will be subject to the
penalties of the Law. This provision of the Law, how-
ever, does not apply to illegitimate goods sold by un-
registered, unlawful dealers or their agents; consumers
who purchase such unlawful goods having no recourse
under the law, for damages..











FERTILIZERS SUMMARY.

Frank T. Wilson, B. S., Analyst.

Official samples fertilizers .......................... 184
Special samples fertilizers........................ 225

Total analyses fertilizer department .......... 400!

The 85 samples of complete fertilizer drawn by the
State Chemists and Inspectors had the following average
composition and guarantee:
Available
Ammonia. Phos. Acjd. Potash.
Official analysis ......... 4.087 (O.927 .4'',
Guarantee ............... 3.787 ; -i', 3.284
Excess above guarantee... 0.307 0.527 0.12%

Average State value found, per ton.............. $45.88
Average State value guaranteed, per ton......... 44.29

EXCESS 0.20% ABOVE GUARANTEE.

We find complete fertilizers exceeding the guarantee
0.20% (twenty points), as follows:
In Ammonia .................... 50 samples, or 58.8%
In available Phosphoric Acid...... 48 samples, or 5(.5%
In Potash .......................36 samples, or 42.:- ',

DEFICIENCY 0.207 BELOW GUARANTEE.

We find complete fertilizers below guarantee 0.207
(twenty points) as follows:
In Ammonia ...................5 5 samples, or 5.9%
In Available Phosphoric Acid.....15 samples, or 17.7%
In Potash (KO) .............. . 5 samples, or 17.7%









7

SUMMARY COMMERCIAL STOCK FEED.

E. Peck Greene, B. S., Analyst.

The following analyses have been made during the year:
Official samples feed stuff........................ 242
Special samples feed stuff........................ 43

Total analyses Feed Department............... 285

The average composition of the official samples was as
follows:
Starch and
Protein. Sugar. Fats.
Official analysis ............. 14.01 54.63 3.11
Guaranteed analysis ......... 12.75 54.21 2.99!

Average Excess .......... 1.26 0.42 0.12

We find the official samples of feed stuffs exceeded the
guarantee 0.20% (twenty points), as follows:

In Protein ............... 177 samples, or ....72.54%
In Starch and Sugar....... 114 samples, or... .46.72%
In Fats ..................... 106 samples, or .... 40.57%

There was a deficiency of 0.20% (twenty points), as
follows:

In Protein ................ 30 samples, or .... 12.30'
In Starch and Sugar....... 99 samples, or .... 40.50%
In Fats .................. 70 samples, or .... 28.68%









8

FOOD AND DRUGS SUMMARY.

L. Heimburger, B. S., M. S., Analyst.
A. M. Henry, B. S., Analyst.

Official food and drug samples ............... 26

Special food and drug samples............... 87
W ater samples ............................ 16

Total food and drug samples............ 129

Official citrus fruit samples................. 112
,Special citrus fruit samples................ 437

Total citrus fruit samples ............... 549

Grand total food and drug samples ...... 678

CITRUS FRUIT SUMMARY.

Analyst- Mature. Immature. Total.
Berry, H. D. ........... 12 27 39
Elliott, H. H. ........... 133 41 174
Griffis, V. E. ........... 98 94 192
Henry, A. M. ........... 1 9 10
Knight, J. W. ............ 37 73 110
W ilson, F. T. ........... 18 6 24

Total ............... 299 250 549

Per cent. ...........54.46 45.54 100(










CITRUS FRUIT ATTACHMENTS.
GRAPEFRUIT.


Date Date
Attached Reported


Oct. 13, 1916 Oct. 16, 1916

Oct. 11, 1916 Oct. 16, 1916

Oct. 9, 1916 Oct. 13, 1916

Oct. 11, 1916 Oct. 13, 1916

Oct. 4, 1916 Oct. 11, 1916

Oct. 5, 1916 Oct. 10,1916

Oct. 13, 1916 Oct. 17, 1916

Oct. 14, 1916 Oct. 17, 1916

Oct. 19, 1916 Nov. 1, 1916


Owner or Agent


S. J. Sligh & Co., Orlando, Fla.

J. R. Wood, Palmetto, Fla.

L. McAnsey, Okeechobee, Fla.

Dr. P. Phillips, Orlando, Fla.

Dr. P. Phillips, Orlando, Fla.

Dr. P. Phillips, Orlando, Fla.

Dr. P. Phillips, Orlando, Fla.

J. D. Lamb & Co., Parrish, Fla.

SW. D. Horne, Homestead, Fla.
I


Inspector


H. D. Berry

I W. E. Griffis

H. H. Elliott

SH. H. Elliott

SH. H. Elliott

SH. D. Berry

[H. H. Elliott

i W. E. Griffis

SH. H. Elliott


No. Boxes
Attached


322

219

328

300

300

86

326

47

300


2,138


Total....


CITRUS FRUIT ATTACHMENTS.
GRAPEFRUIT.


-~-~--










10

SUMMARY OF ILLEGAL, ADULTERATED, MISBRANDED,
LIGHT WEIGHT FOODS, FERTILIZER, COTTON
SEED MEAL AND STOCK FEED REPORTED.

Amount
Cases Paclrages Amount
Article e s packages Attached
Reported Attached (in Lbs.)


Fertilizer ................. 25 485 97,000

Cotton Seed Meal.......... 9 330 33,000

Feed Stuff ................ 36 1,705 170,500

Foods (Flour) ............. 15 6,858 83,388
Citrus Fruit ...............
Citrus Fruit ............... 9 2,138
________________________________r











LIST OF THE CASES CERTIFIED BY THE COMMIS-
SIONER OF AGRICULTURE TO THE UNITED
STATES DISTRICT PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS
DURING THE YEAR 1916, FOR PROSECUTION IN
THE U. S. COURTS FOR VIOLATION OF THE
FLORIDA AND NATIONAL FOOD AND DRUGS
ACTS.


N. D.-April 12, A. A. Poindexter Medicine Company,
Birmingham, Ala., misbranded Poindexter Tonic.
N. D.-M-ay 8, Middle Tennessee Milling Co., Tullahoma,
Tenn., 46 24-lb. bags misbranded flour.
N. D.-May 10, Middle Tennessee Milling Co., Tullahoma,
Tenn., 168 12-lb. bags misbranded' flour.
N. D.-May 8, Middle Tennessee Milling Co., Tullahoma,
Tenn., 24 12-lb. bags misbranded flour.
N. D.-June 2, Middle Tennessee Milling Co., Tullahoma,
Tenn., 61 bags misbranded bran.
N. D.-June 16, Arlington Cotton Oil Co., Arlington,
Ga.. 146 bags misbranded Cotton Seed Meal.
S. D.-June 16, Dawson Bros., Mfg. Co., Atlanta, Ga.,
84 jars misbranded jams.
N. D.-June 27, Arlington Cotton Oil Co., Arlington,
Ga., 52 bags misbranded Cotton Seed Meal.
N. D.-June 30, John Wade & Sons Co., Memphis, Tenn.,
135 bags misbranded Alfalfa meal.
N. D.-June 30, Nelson Grain Co., Kansas City, Mo., 31
bags misbranded corn chops.
N. D.-June 30, Western Grain Co., Kansas City, Mo.,
346 bags misbranded corn chops.
S. D.-August 18, Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla.,
256 6-lb. bags misbranded flour.
S. D.-September 8, Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla..
78 6-lb. and 144 24-lb. bags misbranded flour.
S. D.-September 8, Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla.,
640 6-lb. and 320 12-lb. bags misbranded flour.











S. D.-September 8, Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla.,
1040 12-lb. and 560 24-lb. bags misbranded flour.
S. D.--September 8, Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla.,
160 12-lb. bags misbranded flour.
S. D.-September 21, Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla.,
1120 6-lb., 1040 12-lb. and 600 24-lb. bags mis-
branded flour.
S. D.-October 7, Mounfain City Mills Co., Chattanooga,
Tenn., 160 12-lb. bags misbranded flour.

NOTE: N. D.-Northern District, U. S. District Attor-
ney, Pensacola, Florida.
S. D.-Southern District, 1. S. District Attor-
ney, Jacksonville, Florida.

MISBRANDED, LIGHTWEIGHT FLOUR.

There were reported fifteen attachments of misbranded,
lightweight flour, totaling 6,858 packages-6-, 12-, and 24-
pound-amounting to 83,388 pounds. Of these attach-
ments, ten were referred to the U. S. District Attorneys
as provided by Section 2 of the Law, as violations of the
Interstate Comnerce Law. The result of these cases is
reported by the Commissioner of Agriculture, the evi-
dence only being furnished by the State Chemist; all
prosecutions under the Food and Drug, Fertilizer and
Feed Stuff Laws, being made under the authority and di-
rection of the Commissioner of Agriculture, the Attorney
General, the State's Attorneys and County Solicitors.
It is unnecessary to say that this practice of selling mis-
branded, lightweight foods is not only illegal, being con-
trary to both the National and State Laws, but is particu-
larly reprehensible when considered in connection with
the high price of all foods, and bears heavily on those who,
from necessity, purchase in small packages. It will be
noted that small packages of flour-6-, 12-, and 24-pound-
are those generally found shortweight.











MISBRANDED LIGHTWEIGHT FEED.

An unusual number of such infractions of the Law are
reported, largely consisting of the failure to properly reg-
ister the goods, or to place the proper guarantee and in-
spection stamp upon each package as required by Law.
Dealers and consumers should decline to purchase goods
not properly registered, and duly guaranteed under oath;
such goods are not only illegal, but their sale subjects
the dealer to the penalties of the law, while the purchaser,
having no guarantee, cannot recover, in any action for
damages, for deficiency either in the quality or quantity
of the goods.
We find that in many cases these lightweight and de-
ficient feeds are sold direct to the consumer by agents of
unregistered dealers, and not through Florida merchants
or dealers, hence it is difficult, if not impossible, to col-
lect for deficiencies in quantity or quality. Both the State
and National Laws require a truthful statement of the
net weight of all foods (for men or animals) printed on
the package. The failure to state "conspicuously, legibly,
and correctly the net contents of the package in terms of
weight, measure or numerical count" under the Laws,
both State and National, constitutes a misdemeanor, and
subjects the guilty party to the penalties of the Laws.

IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT.

A study of the report of the Inspectors for this season
indicates that there was considerable Fall and Winter
bloom of grapefruit, which matured in September and
October; that the main crop, beginning to move early in
November, did not show the same percentage of maturity
as did the first few cars of Fall and Winter bloom shipped
during September and October; that the same general
conditions applied to Oranges (excepting the early va-
rieties) and that at the close of the Inspection season,











November 5, the bulk of the average oranges and grape-
fruit in the State were still below the standard for ma-
turity and also deficient in color, as noted in the market
reports. Excepting the Fall and Winter bloom, the it-
rus crop for 1916 was some two to three weeks later than
usual; the usual February and March bloom being delayed
by unseasonable conditions until April and into May.

IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT ATTACHED.

There were two cars and seven lots of grapefruit in
packing houses, aggregating 2,138 boxes, attached by In-
spectors and duly reported to the proper authorities.
They were promptly replevined, as usual, and shipped.
This proceeding, as stated in previous reports, renders the
attempt to enforce the Law farcial. This law was enacted
in compliance with the demand of a very large majority
of the citrus growers of the State, as represented by the
Hortiuiultural Society and other organizations of citrus
growers. It is scrupulously observed by most of the grow-
ers and shippers of the State. There are but few violators
of the Law, as shown by the detailed report, sufficient,
however, to degrade tie market and destroy the reputation
of Florida citrus fruit.
It is unnecessary to say that a Law not strictly enforced
fails to accomplish its purpose and simply places a prem-
ium upon its violation. The Law should be strictly en-
forced by the prosecuting officers and the courts, or re-
pealed and the expense of inspection and obtaining the
evidence of its violation avoided. The constitutionality
of the Law has been upheld by both the State and
National Supreme Courts. It has been successfully ap-
plied to Porto Rican citrus fruit. The Florida standard
has been adopted and enforced by other States. The fail-
ure to enforce the Law in Florida, therefore, seriously re-
flects upon the integrity of her officers, her good faith,
and implied obligation to prevent the shipment of imma-











ture, deleterious or unwholesome food (fruit) products
into the other States of the Union.

REPLEVIN OF ADULTERATED, MISBRANDED
FOODS.

The unresisted replevin of illegal, adulterated, mis-
branded, lightweight or deleterious food stuffs, attached
by Inspectors and placed in the custody of the Sheriff of
the County, has made the attempt to enforce the law
farcial.
I would respectfully call your attention to this evident
miscarriage of justice and the necessity of having the
proper officer resist the replevin of such goods found to
be illegal.
In this connection, I am pleased to say, the position of
this Division of the Agricultural Department is sustained
by the Attorney General, who, in an opinion dated No-
vember 18, 1913, says:

"In view of this rule, and the great public im-
portance of the question, I would suggest that
the proper course for your Department (the
Agricultural Department) to pursue would be
to assume the statute valid until declared invali:i
by the highest court of the State."

In view of the fact that goods attached by Inspectors,
under Section 8 of Chapter 6541 the Pure Food and
Drugs Law and after analysis by the State Chemist,
showing them to be illegal, have been replevined. without
,resistance, and sold or shipped for consumption, I re-
ppectfully call your attention to this very important
matter, on which depends the proper enforcement of the
Pure Food Law of the State and the protection of our
citizens from adulterated, misbranded, immature, un-
wholesome or deleterious foods and drugs.











FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

New York, Baltimore and Chicago wholesale prices.
compared with prices at Florida seaports, in ton lots, for
cash, f. o. b. factory:
The usual quarterly current wholesale price list of fer-
tilizer materials is found under the proper heading, also
the price in ton lots of same materials at Florida seaports,
for cash, f. o. b. factory, on which the State or commercial
values are based.
Much has been said in reference to the high price of
fertilizers. This is true as applied to mixed fertilizers,
but excepting German Potash Salts there has been much
exaggeration as to the advance in fertilizer materials.
It will be noted that 16%' Acid Phosphate is now quoted
at $16.00 per ton or $1.00 per unit of 20 pounds of Phos-
phoric Acid, or 5 cents a pound at Florida seaports. The
same material is quoted in New York, wholesale, at
$12.00 per ton, 75 cents per unit or 3.75 cents a pound for
Phosphoric Acid.
In 1914 these quotations were $15.00 and $10.00, re-
spectively, or 93.75 cents per unit, or 4.0875 cents per
pound at Florida seaports, and 62.5 cents per unit, or
3.125 cents per pound in New York for available Phos-
phoric Acid; an increase of .3125 cents per pound, or
6 2-3% at Florida seaports, with .625 cents per pound or
20% increase at New York, in 1916.
The average value of all ammoniates (salts and or-
ganic) in 1914 at Florida ports was 171/2 cents a pound
($3.50 per unit). At New York the average was 14 cents
a pound, or $2.80 per unit for the same materials.
The quotations, December 31, 1916, average, at Florida
seaports, for ammonium salts, $3.90 per unit, or 19.5
cents per pound; for organic ammoniates, $5.20 per unit
or 26 cents per pound. The average of all ammoniates,
from all sources, being $4.55 per unit, or 22.75 cents per
pound, an increase of 30% over the 1914 prices.











The average price of Potash in New York from Jan-
uary 1 to August 1, 1914, was 83 cents per unit, 4.15
cents a pound for (K20) Potassium Oxide. At the same
time actual Potash (K,0) Potassium Oxide was quoted
in Florida ports at $1.10 per unit, or 5.5 cents a pound.
At present, January 1, 1917, New York prices are for
Muriates $7.42 per unit (K20) or 37.1 cents a pound; for
sulfate $6.36 per unit (K20) or 31.8 cents per pound,
double manure salt $4.05 per unit (K20) or 20.25 cents
per pound, manure salt and hard salt $2.50 per unit
(KO) or 12.5 cents per pound. The average price of all
potash salts per unit of 20 Ibs. (KO) Potassium Oxide
in New York December 31, 1916, being $5.08 or 25.4 cents
per pound; the only quotations for potash salts at Flor-
ida ports December 31, 1916, being $6.00 per unit or 30
cents per pound of (K20).
The increase in price in New York is 512%, from 4.15
cents to 25.4 cents per pound; at Florida ports 445%,
from 5.5 cents to 30 cents per pound for (K0O) Potassium
Oxide.
It will be noted that low grade sulfates and muriates,
20 to 35% (K,0) are now quoted in New York at $2.50
per unit, 12.5 cents a pound. The freight on fertilizer,
New York to Jacksonville by sea is $2.00 per ton, adding
but 1/2 cent per pound to the cost of the Potash in 20%
goods.
POTASH IN MIXED GOODS.

Averaging the price of numerous brands of mixed goods
by various manufacturers, deducting the cost of am-
moniates and available phosphates, we find the price of
potash in mixed goods $6.00 to $6.30 per unit or 30 to 31
cents per pound of KO. The fact that the supply of
muriates carrying 20 to 30% of KO0 has continually in-
creased and the price decreased to $2.50 per unit as com-
pared to high grade 50% muriate at $7.50 and H. G.
sulfate 43% at $6.50 per unit, should, and doubtless will,
2-Chem.











very materially reduce the cost of potash in fertilizers
particularly in cotton goods, where the low grade chlo-
rides, kainits and manure salts are preferred.
High grade potash salts are in demand by the muni-
tions factories, low grade chlorides, from kelp and kelp
ash, Salt Lake and other American sources are not avail-
able for munitions manufacturing until refined and puri-
fled at considerable cost, particularly in time.
The low grades, 20 to 30'/ (K.,O) are equally as valu-
able per pound of actual potash (K,0) as are the high
grade sulfates and nuriates for fertilizer, and much
cheaper, in fact the cotton growers get better results from
kainits and manure salts than from the high grade sul-
fates; while for general field crops, vegetables, cabbage,
tomatoes and potatoes, the lower grades, kainits, manure
salts and hard salts, are equally as valuable and in many
cases superior to the high grade salts.

HOME MIXING.

1 have never advocated home mixing on the average
farm. The farmer has many problems to solve and duties
to perform without the annoyance and vexation of
formulas and percentages of various fertilizer materials
to annoy and vex him; while in order to obtain the
advantage of ton prices of materials lie would neces-
sarily have to purchase much more material than re-
quired on the average farm. I, however, do now and al-
ways have advocated a community or co-operative mixing
plant, where a number of farmers can join their forces,
their cash and their credit, and purchase the necessary
materials and the necessary apparatus for accurate
weighing and mixing their goods, employ a skilled.
trained man to superintend the mixing, whose salary
when divided by t he number of tons should not "mate-
rially increase the cost per ion. A knowledge of mar-
kets and prices of percentages of various plant foods in












raw materials and the proper proportions in which to
mix them is necessary.
I am pleased to know that such co-operative organiza-
tions are securing satisfactory results and obtaining their
fertilizers at reasonable cost for cash, and avoiding the
"crop lien" and its many evils, particularly forced sales
on the depressed market that always occurs during the
harvest season.

FLORIDA FACTORIES.

All reputable Florida factories will make up carefully,
grind and mix any formula a grower may desire from
goods selected by himself in proportions as required and
hag the same for $1.() per ton for cash f. o. b1. factory.
This, 1 consider, next to the co-operative community
mixer under a skilled superintendent, the most satisfac-
or1y method.

CANE (CILTIRE ANI) SGAR MAKING.

A nllumberl of nlallyses of sugar cane taken from the
State Farm at Raiford, Fla., will be found under 1he
proper head. These analyses slow (as has been fre-
ilientlyv shown in former reports) that Florida sugar
caie is eIqual in quality to that produced anywhere: and
that with proper culture as large tonnage per acre can
be produced as in Louisiana. Texas or Cuba. Your atten-
tion is called to ihe special report on the advisanility of
establishing a sugar factory, to produce only standard
granulated sugar, on the State Farm. as made to the
Ihonird of State Insiitutions, November 2;.), 191i. Such a
factfory would noi only lie exceedingly profitable, Ibu
would l)e an object lesson, a practical demon situation.
Ihat tile soil and climate of Florida are pecnliarlyv adllted
1o the culture of sugar ocne and the manufacture of
suea'r. TB employin.g only modern apparatus. usin. : all











the economical devices now employed by the beet sugar
factories of the West and the modern cane sugar factories
of Louisiana and Cuba, the yield of pure, standard granu-
lated sugar (direct from the cane without the interme-
diate refining of raw sugar), can be doubled in quantity
and in value. The cost of manufacture can be reduced
one-third as compared to the present crude, inefficient
and wasteful methods employed in the manufacture of
crude syrup and raw sugar-methods that are still gener-
ally employed in Mexico and the Philippines-in which
one-half of the sugar content of the plant is wasted in the
crude, inefficient mills, while a large percentage is further
lost or destroyed by the wasteful evaporating apparatus,
while the resulting syrup or raw sugar, not to exceed 50%
of the available sugar in the cane, is necessarily sold at
one-half to two-thirds the price of standard granulated
sugar. The cost to manufacture this raw material, per
pound, is far greater than the cost to manufacture stand-
ard granulated sugar in a modern sugar factory. Cane
that will produce one hundred pounds of crude syrup or
raw sugar, using the present inferior apparatus, will
yield two hundred pounds of standard granulated sugar,
using modern apparatus, at less cost per pound to manu-
facture.
Sugar cane is successfully and economically lproduced;l
in all parts of Florida; by far the largest acreage in the
northern counties, as shown by the report of the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture. The crude apparatus' used, com-
pared to a modern sugar factory, is comparable to the
spinning-wheel and hand-loom of our grandmothers' to
the modern cotton spinning and cloth factory; the ox
cart to the railroad train.
With sugar cane of the quality grown, and the tonnage
obtained in Florida, a modern factory, with all the econ-
omical devices, triple mills (nine rolls and crusher),
bagasse burners, multiple evaporating apparatus, filters
and centrifugals, pure standard granulated sugar can be











produced in Florida for not to exceed three cents per
pound. The present price is 7.50 cents a pound, with the
probability of not selling for less than 6 cents per pound
for years to come; the demand is far greater than the
supply, the market universal. The material is stable, not
,subject to decay or deterioration, and can be, if neces-
sary, held for months. Pure sugar is as staple as cotton,
corn or wheat. Raw sugar and syrup are not staple;
they must be sold quickly to a refiner or a "smear house"
at the price fixed by the refiner.
A modern factory on the State Farm would not only
be a most profitable investment for the State, but a prac-
tical demonstration of the extreme profitableness of cane
culture and sugar manufacture in Florida.
It is unnecessary to say that the reclaimed lands of the
Stale, not only the Everglades, but the numerous drain-
age districts organized under the General Drainage Act,
some fifteen or more, of from 30,000 to 350,000 acres, re-
spectively, are eminently fitted for sugar culture, having
wonderfully fertile and productive soil, abundant rain-
fall and long-continued sunshine, the three principal fac-
tors necessary for successful production of sugar.
No State in the Union, not excepting Louisiana or
Texas, nor the Western beet sugar States, has superior
conditions for the profitable production of sugar than has
Florida, while the peninsular portion of the State, with
its wonderfully fertile soils, particularly the well drained
swamp lands, is the equal of Cuba for sugar production,
both as to soil and climate.

FLORIDA FERTILIZERS.

No State in the Union has more abundant fertilizing
material than has Florida. Few realize that the princi-
pal commercial fertilizer used by the world, to-wit: high-
grade Phosphate, is mined in Florida; that some 5,000,000











tons of high grade rock and pebble Phosphates are mined
annually; that fully three-fiftlis-3,000,0(10 tons-of this
material, is shipped to Europe for fertilizers, and 2,000,000
tons to Northern and Western States. Phosphates in
larger or smaller deposits, of varying grades from 8/i to
:'5'/ of Phosphoric Acid, are found in all parts of the
State, from the Chattahoochee to the St. .Johns; from the
Suwannee to the Caloosnhatchee.

There are vast deposits of "Soft Phosphate" and clays;
and enormous quantities of phosphatic matrix-thle waste
of thie high grade rock and pebble mines washers-
averaging ,S'/ Phosphoric Acid (17.50( Ihone Phosphate
of Lime) are discarded annually; a material in excellent
mechanical condition, to be had for the haIlihng, which
\when applied to soils containing the proper amount of
humus (vegetable matter) or when used with stable ma-
nure or soiling erops-cow peas, velvet beans or beggar
weed properly turned under-would add one of the most
necessary elements of fertility to the soil.

NIT(O)(EN (Ammonia).

Possibly no State ii tile Union has more fixed nitrogen.
readily made available, than lhs Florida. Thle muck soils
of the State, in various sized deposits, etending from the
extreme northern part of the State to the Keys-deposits
varying in size from a few acres to the millions of acres
found in tile Everglades, the valleys of the St. Johns,
Peace, Kissimmee, M3iakka and other rivers--the beds
varying in depth from one to fifteen feet, contain an aver-
age of three per cent of fixed nitrogen, as shown by ni-
mierous analyses byi tle Florida Experiment Station, thle
'. S. Bureau of (Chemistry and by tile State Laboratory-
nitrogen readily made available by proper drainage, and
the addition of a small proportion of Florida Phosphate.











FISH SCRAP.

No State has a more extended sea coast, with more
abundant possibilities for a profitable fishing industry
than Florida. Immense quantities of edible and inedible
fish are found on the Florida sea coasts, her inlets and
bays. As is well known, fish scrap is one of the most val-
uable sources of Nitrogen and available Phosphoric Acid.
* ranking second to none in the fertilizer market.

POTASH.

The clay lands of the State are far more abundant than
is generally supposed; few counties if any, do not possess
enormous beds of clay. In the northern counties it is
found on the surface, the "red clay hills" of North Florida
are noted. These clays all possess, as do most clays, ain
abundant supply of Potash, which is readily made avail-
able by proper culture, the "turning" in of leguminous
crops, thus adding humus, with its nitrogen, and releas-
ing, making available the Potash and Phosphate of the
soil.

LIVE STOCK.

Until very recently it was not generally known that
Florida was pre-eminently a cattle-producing State,
though for many years immense herds of native cattle
were grown and marketed from her vast prairies and flat
woods ranges; that many herds of from 1,00)0 to 51),0(00
head were owned by individuals, and that a few herds of
more than 100,000 head were owned by several individuals
or families. These cattle were grown upon the open range.
with little or no care and found a read market in Cuba.
Until 1880 these cattle were the principal source of fer-
tility or manure for the cotton and corn and truck fields
of the State. while the orange groves were practically all











fertilized at that time by "cow-penning" these herds on,
and in, the groves.
Recently the sale of vast tracts of wild lands, the fenc-
ing in and conservation of pastures, and the introduction
of better breeds has to a large extent revolutionized the
business. The planting of pastures and proper attention
to the breeding and care of the animals has largely in-
creased the size, quality and value of the cattle grown in
the State. The reclamation of vast areas of fertile soil,
formerly impassable swamps and morasses, now reclaimed
and covered with an enormous growth of nutritious
grasses-notably the "Maiden Cane" or "Paille Finne," a
grass that analyzes 10% Protein, 2.15% Fat, and 43.40%
Starch and Sugar, unequaled by any other grass, and only
equaled by the legumes in feeding value, as shown by the
V. S. Bureau of Chemistry, and this Laboratory-cover-
ing hundreds of thousands of acres on the various re-
claimed territories and now affording pasturage to many
thousand head of fat cattle. As the drainage and recla-
nation of the lowlands of the State progresses, now rap-
idly being accomplished, the increase of meadows and
pastures on our flat woods, aided by intelligent drainage
and the planting of suitable grasses and legumes, the
prospect for the State to soon become one of the largest
cattle producing States of the Union is exceedingly bright.
As an indication of this movement, the recent building
of a modern packing house in Jacksonville by the Armour
Packing Co., is notable. No American institution is bet-
ter informed as to the supply of cattle and hogs than is
Armour and Company, who make no investment without
carefully considering all the factors for success-in this
case a supply of cattle and hogs. This inevstment, the
erection of a modern packing house of large capacity, in-
dicates their belief in the development of a large livestock
industry in Florida in the near future.
A number of live stock companies have recently pur-
chased, cleared and fenced large areas of excellent pasture











lands, have planted pastures and meadows of native and
imported grasses and legumes-Bermuda, Natal, Rhodes
and Soudan, grasses; cow peas, velvet beans and beggar
weed, legumes; have erected large silos and corrals, in-
stalled dipping vats to eradicate the cattle tick, and have
introduced large numbers of pure-bred beef cattle-Short
Horns, Herefords, Polled Angus, etc. There are now in
the State numerous herds of pure-bred beef cattle the
equal of any, all produced in Florida pastures from Flor-
ida grasses and feeds.

DAIRY CATTLE.

No State produces a better grade of dairy cattle than
Florida pure-bred Jerseys, Alderneys, Holsteins and
other breeds. The rolling "red clay hills" of North Flor-
ida are noted for their excellent dairy stock, from whence
the dairy cattle of South Florida are practically all se-
cured; the growing of dairy stock being one of the prin-
cipal industries of these counties, though the industry is
rapidly expanding into southern counties. Florida pure-
bred dairy stock is now a recognized factor in the State's
agricultural development.

LIVE STOCK-MANURE.

PRODUCTIVE SOIL-FERTILE FARMS.

It is well known to practical farmers, as well as scien-
tific agriculturists, that where the dairy cow, the beef ani-
mal, the hog and the sheep are much in evidence, that the
soils are fertile and the farms productive. It is not gen-
erally known, however, that it was not the original fer-
tility of the soil that produced the cattle, hogs and sheep,
but that the growth of live stock produced the fertile soil;
that the manure pile and compost heap, aided by phos-
phates and potash, were the basis of the fertility of the











soil, the productiveness of the farm, and the wealth of the
community. This is particularly true of France, Belgium,
Denmark and Sweden, where the soil, which has supported
for centuries a dense population, produces far larger crops
per acre than do the virgin soils of America. There the
compost heap, reinforced with American phosphates, with
cotton seed meal, and other American concentrates fed
the cattle, is recognized as the basis of credit to the farm-
er: the producer of all wealth, the foundation, base or
"mud sill" on which the prosperity of nations is builded.

With the dairy cow, the beef animal, the hog and the
"golden hoofed" sheep, a naturally fertile and productive
soil, mild climate, abundant rainfall, well distributed and
continuous sunshine, aided by the spread of agricultural
knowledge through our schools and colleges, together
with the co-operative farm demonstration and home econ-
omnics, a system of practical agricultural education and
manual training fostered by the Nation and State through
the Smith-Lever Bill, the Hatch and Morrell Bills, to-
gether with the recent Farm Loan Act, in which the farm-
er is recognized as the principal factor in the Nation's
prosperity and welfare, and the soil and its products as
the basis of all credit, the prospects for the development
of Florida"s wonderful natural resources her mines,
forests, groves, fields and pastures; her waters, with their
immense undeveloped wealth; and particularly her boys
and girls, the future men and women of the Stale-are,
teed, bright.

THE STATE LABORATORY AND EO()LOGIC('AL
SURVEY BUILDING.

The present small building now occupied by the State
Laboratory and State Geological Survey is greatly con-
gested. Neither of these important scientific departments
l': s s:ficient working room to properperlyerform its func-











tions. The building would accommodate either one, but
not both of the departments.
I suggest that a scientific building, for the accommoila-
tion of the State Laboratory and its library; the Geo-
logical Survey, its library and museum; and the State
Engineer and Secretary of the Drainage (Commission,
properly designed for the purpose, would greatly facili-
tate the business of the State, relieve the congestion of
these offices, and also release much room in the Capitol
Iumilding now demanded by larger and increased public
business. Respectfully,
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist.








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER AND COTTON SEED MEAL SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


No. Name of Manufacturer



2343 Camilla Cotton Oil and Fertz. Co., Camilla, Ga.

2344 Camilla Cotton Oil and Fertz. Co., Camilla, Ga.

2353 Camilla Cotton Oil and Fertz. Co., Camilla, Ga.

2354 Lakeland Phosphate Co., Lakeland, Fla.

2360 V.-C. Chem. Co., Savannah, Ga.


2361 Planters''Cotton Oil Co., Dothan, Ala.


2362 A. A. Chem. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


Osceola Fertz. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Houston Guano Co., Dothan, Ala.


Date
Reported Reason for Report



No insepction stamps.

April 5,1916 Deficient in Ammonia.

April 5, 1916 Deficient in Ammonia.

April 3, 1916 I No analysis tags. Composite sample.

April 5, 1916 Deficient in Available and Insoluble
IPhos. Acid.


April 5, 1916


April 3,1916


April 6, 1916

April 11, 1916

April 11, 1916


Deficient in Ammonia. No inspec-
tion stamps or tags.

Deficient in Available and Insoluble
Phos. Acid.

Deficient in Ammonia and Potash.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.










Houston Gnano Co., Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Houston Guano Co., Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Grasselli Chem. Co., Dothan, Ala.

Houston Guano Co., Dothan, Ala.

Houston Guano Co., Dothan, Ala.

Houston Guano Co., Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.

Young, Sanders & Adams, Dothan, Ala.


April 11, 1916

April 11, 1916

April 11, 1916

April 11, 1916

April 13, 1916

April 13, 1916

April 13, 1916

April 13, 1916

April 13, 1916

April 13, 1916

April 18, 1916

April 18, 1916

April 18, 1916

April 18, 1916

April 18, 1916


No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspect. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags or inspec. stamps.

No analysis tags.

No analysis tags.

No analysis tags.


10

16

11

75

2

18

75

20

20

10

14

19

30

95

31


I


J









OFFICIAl. FERTILIZER AND COTTON SEED MEAL SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL-Continued.



Date C
Lab. Name of Manufacturer Reported Reason for Report
No. o -


2389 Cowetta Fertz. Co., Newman, Ga. April 18, 1916 No analysis tags or inspect. stamps. 12

2:;90 West Coast Fertz. Co., Tampa, Fla. May 25,1916 Deficient in Potash; an excess in
| Phos. Acid.

2:!l1 Gulf Feitz. Co., Tampa, Fla. May 25, 1916 Deficient in Potash; an excess in
Phos. Acid.

2:92 Wilson & Toomer Fertz. Co., Jacksonville, Flu. May 25, 1916 Deficient in Potash; an excess in
| Phos. Acid.

Total Number of Sacks Seized.... 550


~










OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLI,S REPORTED ILLEGAL.


Date
Reported Name of Manufacturer Reason for Report a



2198 [ Jan. 17, 1916 Sold by Peninsular Naval Stores Co., No analysis tags or inspection stamps. 5
Pensacola, Fla.

2199 Jan. 27, 916H Hattelett Co., Milwaukee, Wis. No analysis tags or inspection stamps. 14

2215 |Febl. 11. 9161 Mayo Commission Co., Richmond, Va. In. very poor condition; burnt and moldy.

2217 April 5, 1916 Stringfellow-Padgett Co., Jacksonville, Deficient in Protein, Starch and Sugar. -
Fla.

2226 I Feb. 23, 1916 Billed from John Wade & Sons, Memphis, Low-grade damaged grain, adulterated with
Tenn. chess, weed and screenings.

2229 I April 5. 1916 F. W. McKee, Atlanta, Ga. Deficient in Fat and Protein.

22331 April 5,1916 Superior Feed Co., Memphis, Tenn. Deficient in Protein and Nitrogen-Free Ex-
tract.

2235 Ap: il 5, 191; Superior Feed Co., Memphis, Tenn. Deficient in Protein and Nitrogen-Free Ex-
Itract.
""I Auril 5. 1016 Baljllrd & Ballard Co.. Louisville, Ky. Deficient in Fat and Protein.
-+









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL-Continued.


Date
Reported Name of Manufacturer Reason for Report ra

z Zr

2249 April 7, 1916 Milam-Morgan Co., New Orleans, La. Deficient in Nitrogen-Free Extract.

2259 April 5,1916 Superior Feed Co., Memphis, Tenn. Deficient in Nitrogen-Free Extract.

2264 April 7,1916 Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. Deficient in Fat and Nitrogen-Free Extract.

2276 May 1, 1916 Chipley Gin Co., Chipley, Fla. Not registered. Deficient in Protein. 22

2277 May 1, 1916 Chipley Gin Co., Chipley, Fla. Not registered. Deficient in Protein. 5

2283 May 6,1916 Chapin & Co., Hammond, Ind. No analysis tags or inspection stamps. 84

2284 May 31, 1916 Omaha Alfalfa Milling Co., Omaha, Neb. i Deficient in Protein and Starch and Sugar.

2286 May 31,1916 J. H. Wilkes & Co., Nashville, Tenn. Deficient in Protein and Starch and Sugar.

2290 May 19, 1916 Standard Feed Mills, Memphis, Tenn. No inspection stamp. Weight not given. 297

2296 June 8, 1916 Chipley Gin Co., Chipley, Fla. Deficient in Fat and Protein.

2300 May 31, 1916 Middle Tennessee Milling Co., Tulla- Short weight. No inspection stamps. 61
Soma, Tenn.











June 3, 1916 Arlington Cotton Oil Co., Arlington, Ga. Short weight.


June 28, 1916


June 28, 1916


Superior Feed Co., Memphis, Tenn. Deficient in Protein and Nitrogen-Free Ex-
tract.

Superior Feed Co., Memphis, Tenn. Deficient in Fat, Protein and Nitrogen-Free
Extract.

Sylvester Oil and Fertilizer Co., Sylves- Not registered. Deficient in Fat and Am-
ter Ga. monia.

Dewey Bros. Co., Blouchester, Ohio. Not registered. Deficient in Fat and Pro-
tein.

Arlington Cotton Oil Co., Arlington, Ga. Short weight. Deficient in Ammonia.

Milam-Morgan Co., New Orleans, La. Short weight.

\[ichinan Sugar Co.. Selewaing. Mich. No inspection stamps.

Standard Feed Mills, Memphis, Tenn. Not registered. No inspection stamps.

John Wade & Sons, Memphis, Tenn. Short weight.

Nelson Grain Co., Kansas City, Mo. Short weight.

Western Grain Co., Kansas City, Mo. Short weight.

Milam-Morgan Co., New Orleans, La. No analysis tags or inspection stamps.

Puckeye Cotton Oil Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. INo inspection stamps.


June


2310 June


2311 June

2316 June

2317 June

2318 June

2322 June

2C23 June

2324 June

2338 July

2363 Sept.


8, 1916


12, 1916


8, 1916

22, 1916

22, 1916

22, 1916

30. 1916

30, 1916

30, 1916

21. 1916

18. 1916


54


2S


52

96

20

40

135

31

346

49

15








OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL-Continued.

MZ
Date .
Reported Name of Manufacturer Reason for Report



2364 Sept. 18,1916 Tennessee Fiber Co., Memphis, Tenn. No inspection stamps. 5

2381 Oct. 10, 1916 Western Grain Co., Birmingham, Ala. [ No inspection stamps. 10

2387 Oct. 17, 1916 Madrid Cotton Oil Co., Madrid, Ala. No tags or inspection stamps. 13

2388 Oct. 17,1916 Liberty Mills, Nashville, Tenn. No inspection stamps. 18

2393 Oct. 31,1916 Buckeye Cotton Oil Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. No inspection stamps. 280

2403 Nov. 1, 1916 Baltimore Pearl Hominy Co., Baltimore, I No analysis tags or inspection stamps. 100
Md.
2405 Nov. 8, 1916 Larrowe Milling Co., Los Angeles, Cal. No inspection stamps. 44


Total Number of Sacks Seized .... 1970










OFFICIAL FLOUR SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


Name of Manufacturer


Date
Reported


1761 Waverly Milling Co., East St. Louis, Ill. Sept.


1762 Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla. | Sept.


1763 Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla. Sept.


1764 Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla. Sept.


1765 Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla. Sept.

1766 Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla. Sept.
I I

1769 Mountain City Mill Co., Chattanooga, Oct.
Tenn.

1 RS I Tennessee Mill Co., Estill Springs, Tenn. IFeb.


Reason for Attachment


5, 1916 Misbranded;
weight.

7, 1916 Misbranded;
weight.

7, 1916 I Misbranded;
weight.

7, 1916 I Misbranded;


7, 1916 I Misbranded;

20, 1916 Misbranded;



7, 1916 Misbranded;


1. 19161 M'sbranded;


adulterated;


adulterated;


adulterated;


light weight.


light weight.

light weight.



light weight.


light weight.


a M




light 18 -6-lb.


light 144 24-11).
78 6-lb.

light 1,040 12-lb.
560 24-lb. Ot

320 12-lb.
640 6-lb.

160 6-lb.

1,120 6-lb.
1,040 12 lb.
600 24-lb.

160 12-lb.


79 6-lb.










OFFICIAL FLOUR SAMPLES REPORTED ILLEGAL.


Name of Manufacturer
2z


1829 Tennessee Mill Co., Estill Springs, Tenn.

1.30 Middle Tennessee Milling Co., Tulla-
homa, Tenn.

1831 Middle Tennessee Milling Co., Tulla-
homa, Tenn.

1832 Acme-Evans Co., Indianapolis, Ind.

1833 Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla.

1834 Thomas Milling Co., Thomas, Okla.

1835 Mountain City Mill Co., Chattanooga,
STenn.


Reason for Attachment


April

April


May


May

Aug.

Aug.

IDec.


1916 Misbranded;

1916 i Misbranded;
1916 1 Misbranded;


light weight.

light weight.


6, 1916 I Misbranded; light weight.


1916 Misbranded; light

1916 Misbranded; light

1916 Misbranded; light

1916 I Misbranded; light


168 12-lb.

46 24-lb.


24 12-lb.


12-lb.

6-lb.

6-lb.

6-lb.


weight.

weight.

weight.

weight.











ANALYSIS MADE BY STATE LABORATORY.

Only such materials as are of public interest are
analyzed by the State Laboratory, such as are directed
by the Pure Food, the Fertilizer, and Stock Feed Laws.

There are no fees or charges of any kind made by the
State Laboratory.

The State Laboratory is not permitted to compete with
commercial laboratories.

No commercial work of any kind is accepted.

The State Laboratory does not analyze the materials
used by, nor the products of Fertilizer, Feed Stuffs, or
other factories, by which to guarantee their goods. Such
analyses are commercial problems.

The State Laboratory does not analyze samples for in-
dividual account wherein the public is not interested.
Such samples should be sent to a commercial laboratory.

ANALYSES IN CRIMINAL CASES.

The State Laboratory does not make post mortem ex-
aminations, nor furnish evidence in criminal cases (ex-
cept as provided by the Pure Food, Fertilizer, and Stock
Feed Laws). Such analyses and examinations are made
by specialists employed by the grand jury and prosecut-
ing attorney, the cost being taxed as other criminal costs,
by the court.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.


Tallahassee. Fla., January 1. 1916.










THE STATE OF FLORIDA,

Department of Agriculture.

January 1, 1916.



REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF SAMPLES OF COMMERCIAL
FEEDING STUFF TO THE COMMISSIONER OF
AGRICULTURE FOR ANALYSIS BY THE STATE
CHEMIST.

The following regulations for drawing, preparing and
sending samples of Commercial Fertilizer and Commer-
cial Stock Feed, under the authority given in Section .15
of Chapter 4150, Acts of 1901 (Chapter XXII General
Statutes), and Sec. 15, Chapter 5452. Acts of 1907, are
this day adopted.

OFFICIAL SAMPLES, drawn by State Chemist, As-
sistant State Chemist or Inspectors.

An approximately equal quantity (a pint or a pound,
approximately) shall be taken from each of ten original
packages of the same brand in the possession of any man-
ufacturer, dealer, or person, when the lot being sampled
contains ten or more packages of the same brand.

In case the lot contains less than ten packages of the
same brand, each package shall be sampled as directed.

PREPARATION OF SAMPLE.-The several samples, drawn
as above from each package, shall be carefully and thor-
oughly mixed. From this well-mixed lot drawn from each
package as above, a fair sample of not less than one










pound, in the case of fertilizers, and of not less than
one-half pound in the case of stock feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can approximately a quart can or
bottle.

The sample shall be delivered to the State Chemist, who
shall prepare the same for analysis (by properly grind-
ing, mixing and sifting the same). The State Chemist
shall retain one-half of this prepared sample for analysis;
the remainder shall be placed in a glass bottle, sealed,
and identified by the Laboratory number, and date, and
placed in the custody of the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture. These duplicate samples shall be retained for a
period of three months from the date of the certificate of
analysis. In case of appeal from analysis of the State
Chemist (within three months from the date of the cer-
tificate) the sample shall be retained indefinitely. until
the final disposition of the case.

SPECIAL SAMPLES.-Samples drawn and transmit-
ted by the purchaser under Sections 9 of both the Com-
mercial Fertilizer and the Commercial Stock Feed Laws.

The purchaser or owner of the material to be sampled,
when the lot or shipment contains ten or more original
packages, each bearing the Guarantee tag and stamp
required by law, of the same brand, shall take in the pres-
ence of two witnesses, an approximately equal quantity
from each of ten packages of the same brand (approxi-
mately a pint or a pound), after carefully and thoroughly
mixing these samples, a fair sample of the mixture, not
less than a pound in the case of commercial fertilizer and
not less than one-half pound in the case of commercial
-stock feed, shall be placed in a bottle or tin can, and
sealed in the presence of the witnesses.

On the sample thus drawn shall be written the name










and address of the purchaser, and the name of a disinter-
ested party, who shall transmit the package to the Com-
missioner of Agriculture by mail or express, properly
packed to prevent damage in transportation.

In case the lot or shipment contains less than ten
original packages of the same brand, each bearing the
Guarantee tag and stamp required by law, each package
shall be sampled as provided in the foregoing paragraph.
the samples mixed, and a fair sample of the lot, "one or
more packages," shall be drawn and transmitted as pro-
vided in the foregoing paragraphs.

The purchaser, or sender of the sample, shall also ad-
dress a letter to the Commissioner of Agriculture, advis-
ing him of the sending of the sample, stating the number
of original packages, each bearing the guaranteed analysis
and inspection stamp required by law, represented by the
sample. This letter must not be enclosed in the package.

The object of the sealed bottle or tin can is to prevent
the evaporation of the moisture from the sample-an
important determination.

SAMPLES IN PAPER OR WOODEN PACKAGES WILL NOT BE
ACCEPTED.

These regulations are adopted to secure fair samples
of sufficient size to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for three months from the date of
certificate of analysis.

The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser.

The propriety of the method of drawing and sending
samples as fixed by law is obvious.












The drawing and sending of special samples is in rare
cases in compliance with law. Samples are frequently
sent in paper boxes, badly packed, and frequently in very
small quantity (less than an ounce) ; frequently there
are no marks, numbers or other means of identification;
the postmark in many instances being absent.


The attention of those who desire to avail themselves
of this privilege is called to Sections 9 and 10 of the l;ws,
which are clear and explicit.


NOTE.-HEREAFTER STRICT COMPLIANCE WITH ABOVE
REGULATIONS WILL BE REQUIRED. THE SAMPLE MUST NOT
BE LESS THAN ONE POUND OF FERTILIZER OR ONE-HALF POUND
OF STOCK FEED, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, SEALED AND AD-
DRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTI RE. THE
PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS, AND THE NAME OF THE
SENDER, MUST ALSO BE ON THIS PACKAGE, THIS RI LEI APPLY-
ING TO SPECIAL SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS OR COMMERCIAL
FEEDING STUFF.


NOTE.-A one-pound baking powder tin can. properly
cleaned, filled with a fairly draw, well-mixed sample,
drawn as directed, is a proper sample. IT MUST BE SEALED
AND ADDRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE. AT
TALLAHASSEE. THE PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS. AND
THE NAME OF THE SENDER, MUST ALSO BE PLACED ON THE
PACKAGE.

IF MORE THAN ONE SAMPLE IS SENT REPRESENTING DIF-
FERENT BRANDS, THE SAMPLES MvST BE NUMBERED SO AS TO
IDENTIFY THEM. ALL THIS SHOULD BE DONE IN THE PRES-
ENCE OF THE WITNESSES, AND THE PACKAGE MAILED OR EX-
PRESSED BY A DISINTERESTED PERSON.

NOTE.-The tags off the sacks with the guaranteed
analyses and stamp, and names of manufacturers should










be retained by the purchaser, to compare with the certifi-
cate of analysis when received and NOT SENT TO THIS
OFFICE. THE DATE OF THE DRAWING AND SENDING OF THE
SAMPLE, AND NAMES OF WITNESSES, SHOULD ALSO BE RE-
TAINED BY THE PURCHASES; NOT SENT TO THIS OFFICE.

RAW PHOSPHATES. Ground raw phosphate rock-hard
or soft-contains phosphoric acid, more or less available.
'hence is classed a fertilizer when sold to consumers for
fertilizing purposes, under Section 11 of the law; and is
required to be guaranteed and stamped as required by
section 3; listed and guaranteed under oath, as required
by Section 5, and the inspection fee paid. previous to sale
as provided by Section 6.

LIME is not classed a fertilizer. It is not required to
be sold under guarantee, nor the inspection fee paid;
hence is not subject to free analysis by the State
Laboratory.

When sold under guarantee to growers, the State Lab-
oratory will analyze the same on receipt of proper infor-
mation as to the guarantee, and a sample drawn, trans-
mitted and certified to, as provided for drawing and send-
ing special samples of fertilizers.

OBJECT OF THE LAWS.

The object of the Fertilizer and Stock Feed Laws are:
First, to protect the consumer from fraud, false repre-
sentations by illegitimate dealers who have not complied
with the law, nor filed their guaranteed analysis under
oath, and who have not paid their inspection fee fixed
by law.

Second, to protect the lawful dealer who has fully com-
plied with the law, by filing his guarantee under oath,








43

and has paid his inspection fee, and who has placed upon
each bag or other package, a guarantee tag showing the
minimum percentage of valuable ingredients in the fer-
tilizer or feed stuff, as provided by the law.

These regulations supersede and revoke all previous
regulations governing the .drawing and transmitting of
samples of Commercial Fertilizer and Commercial Stock
Feed.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1916.










THE STATE OF FLORIDA,

Department of ALi ;ill ai .

RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE
ANALYSIS OF WATER, SOILS, COMMERCIAL
SAMPLES, AND SAMPLES INVOLVING CRIM-
INAL CASES.

WATER ANALYSIS.

The State Laboratory will analyze samples of water
from publicly-owned water supplies, municipal plants,
etc., owned and operated by the city or town, when ac-
companied by the certificate of the mayor, or other city
officer, that the water is furnished the public by the city
or town.

It will not analyze water for individuals or corpora-
tions selling water to the public, water companies, ice
companies, mineral springs, health resorts, etc., main-
tained for profit. Such samples should he sent to a com-
mercial laboratory.

The State Laboratory does not make bacteriological
examinations for disease germs. Such examinations are
made by the State Board of Health, at Jacksonville, Fla.,
which has entire charge of the public health.

We do not make a sanitary analysis. We determine
the total dissolved solids in the sample quantitatively,
and report them as parts per 1,000,000, naming the prin-
cipal ingredients in the order of their predominance
qualitatively. We find Calcium Carbonate (lime),
Sodium Chloride (salt), Magnesium Sulphate (epsom
salts), Silicia (sand), and Iron, is the general order of
their predominance, though on the coast, where the total













dissolved solids amounts to 5,000 or more parts per
1,000,000, Sodium Chloride (salt), is the predominant
substance.

From a knowledge of the chemical analysis of a water,
unaccompanied by any further information, no conclu-
sion as to the potability and healthfulness of the water
can be deduced.

Therefore, we require the following information to be
given in regard to the source of the water:

(1). The source of the water: spring, lake, river,
driven well, dug well, bored well, artesian well, or flow-
ing well; and also the depth of the water surface below
the top of the soil, and in cased wells, the depth of the
casing.

(2). The locality of the source of the water; town,
city or village; or the section, township and range.

No sample of water will be analyzed unless the name
and address of the sender is on the package for identi-
fication.

IIW require two gallonr of each sample of walter. in (
niic jug, stopped with a new cork, and 'sent by prepaid
c.press. We will not accept any sample of water for
analysis not in a new jug. Vessels previously used for
other purposes are never properly cleaned for sending
samples of water for analysis. Corks, once used for other
substances (molasses, vinegar, whiskey, kerosene, etc.).
are never properly cleaned.

NOTE.-We find the waters of the State -springs,
wells, driven wells and artesian wells -generally very
pure and wholesome, with but little mineral impurity,












and that such as is not harmful. Except in cases of
gross carelessness, in allowing surface water to contami-
nate the well or spring, the waters of the State are pure
and wholesome. The deep wells of the State are noted
for their purity and healthfulness.

SOIL ANALYSIS.

Frequently samples of soil are sent in for analysis with
a request to advise as to the best methods of fertilizing.
There is but little information to be derived from a soil
analysis that would be of benefit to farmers. So much
depends on tilth, drainage, culture and other physical
conditions, that an analysis made under laboratory con-
ditions is of little value.
A chemical analysis of soil may indicate a very fertile
soil, rich in plant food, while the facts are the soils are
not productive. This is instanced by the rich Sawgrass
muck lands and river bottoms of the State, that are
fertile ,chemically, but not productive until properly
drained; also, by the arid lands of the West, rich in the
elements of plant food, but not productive until irrigated.
Other soils, with less plant food, but on account of proper
physical conditions, culture and tilth, are exceedingly
productive.

The average of thousands of analyses of Florida soils
made by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
and the State Laboratory is as follows:

Nitrogen (per cent.) ................... 0.0413
Potash (per cent.) .................... 0.0091
Phosphoric Acid (per cent.)............ 0.1635

This is a fair average of all of the Norfolk and Ports-
mouth soil series of the State, which comprises by far the
greater portion of the State.












In this connection we quote from the report of the In-
diana Agricultural Experiment Station, Purdue Univer-
sity, Lafayette, Indiana, 1908, as follows:

"SOIL ANALYSIS OF LITTLE VALUE IN SHOWING FERTIL-
IZER REQUIREMENTS.-The Chemical Department is called
upon to answer hundreds of letters of inquiry in relation
to agricultural chemical problems from people all over
the State. In this connection it might be well to say that
there is a widespread idea that the chemist can analyze a
sample of soil and, without further knowledge of the con-
ditions, write out a prescription of a fertilizer which will
fill the needs of that particular soil.

"The Experiment Station does not analyze samples of
soil to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is no
chemical method know that will show reliably the avail-
ability of the plant food elements present in the soil, as
this is a variable factor, influenced by the kind of crop,
the type of soil, the climate and biological conditions;
hence, we do not recommend this method of testing soil.
"The method recommended by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot system, in which long,
narrow strips of the field to be tested are measured off
side by side. The crop is planted uniformly over each.
Different fertilizers are applied to the different plots,
every third or fourth one being left unfertilized. The
produce from these plots is harvested separately and
weighed. In this manner the farmer can tell what ferti-
lizer is best suited for his needs. As climatic conditions
may influence the yield with different fertilizers, it is
best to carry on such tests for more than one year before
drawing definite conclusions. There is positively no
easier or shorter method of testing the soil that we feel
safe in recommending.
"Soil can be greatly improved by an intelligent rotation
of crops, the conservation of stable manure, and the use












of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need
have no fear that the proper application of commercial
fertilizer will injure the land."

ANALYSIS OF FOODS AND DRUGS.

Samples of Foods and Drugs are drawn under special
regulations as provided by law.

Applications should be made to the Commissioner of
Agriculture or State Chemist for the necessary blanks,
instructions, etc., for drawing and transmitting samples
of foods and drugs, including drinks of all kinds.

FOOD AND DRUG SAMPLES NOT DRAWN AND TRANSMITTED
ACCORDING TO LAW WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS.

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the
respective Laws, including Rules and Regulations and
Standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissibner of Agriculture or
State Chemist. The Bulletins of the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station can be had by application to
the Director at Gainesville.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.


Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1916.












HOW TO LEGALLY DRAW, PACK AND TRANSMIT
SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS AND COMMER-
CIAL FEED STUFFS FOR ANALYSIS BY
THE STATE LABORATORY.

1. Only such samples as are drawn from original
packages, EACH BEARING THE GUARANTEE OF A LAWFUL
DEALER AND THE INSPECTION STAMP REQUIRED BY LAW, will
be analyzed by the State Laboratory.
2. If the lot or shipment be TEN or more packages, the
sample must be drawn from NOT LESS THAN TEN packages.
3. If the lot or shipment be LESS than TEN packages,
the sample shall be drawn from EACH package.
4. The sample shall be drawn in the presence of
TWO disinterested witnesses, and shall be SEALED IN THEIR
PRESENCE, and TRANSMITTED by a DISINTERESTED PARTY
(one of the witnesses) to the COM1MISSIONER OF
AGRICULTURE.
5. Not less than one pound of Fertilizer, or one-half
pound of Commercial Feed Stuff must be placed in a tin
can or a glass bottle and addressed and sent, prepaid, to
the Commissioner of Agriculture.
6. The purchaser (or sender) shall address a letter
to the Commissioner of Agriculture, stating:
1. The number of original packages represented by
the sample, and the number of packages sampled.
2. That each package had attached to it the guar-
antee tag and stamp required by law.
3. That the sample was drawn in the presence of two
or more witnesses.
4. THIS LETTER MUST NOT BE INCLOSED IN THE PACKAGE.
The tags OFF THE PACKAGES SAMPLED, with the guaran-
teed analysis and stamps must be RETAINED by the pur-
chaser, to compare with the certificate, and for future
evidence, if 'necessary, and BY NO MEANS SENT TO THIS
OFFICE.
4--Chem.









S50


The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
the sample.
We suggest a form of the letter of transmittal to the
Commissioner of Agriculture on this page.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Approved.
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1916.


FORM LETTER FOR TRANSMITTING FERTILIZER
AND FEED SAMPLES.


........................, Fla., ............, 191...
Hon. W. A. McRae,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:
I send you today by mail (or express) a sample of
. .................................... for analysis
(Indicate Fertilizer, Cotton Seed Meal, or Feed Stuff)
by the State Chemist.
This sample is taken from a lot of ......... package,,
each bearing the guarantee tag and stamp required by
Law, purchased from a Florida dealer.
This sample was drawn from ......... packages in
the presence of two witnesses, this day.
The guarantee tags and stamps off the ............
packages sampled are retained by the purchaser.
This sample is sent by me, one of the witnesses, for
Mr. ....................., the purchaser.
Yours truly,











STATE VALUATIONS.

(Based on commercial values, Dec. 31st, 1916)
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of 1917.
Available Phosphoric Acid.............. 5c a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. lc a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) 22.75c a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K,20)......... 30c a pound
If calculated by units---
Available Phosphoric Acid................. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. 20c per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen) 4.55 per unit
Potash ............................... 6.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent., in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid...6.22 per cent.x$1.00-$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.. .1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 4.55- 15.56
Potash ..................... 3.23 per cent.x 6.00- 19.38
Mixing and Bagging ................... ...... 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports.................. $42.96

Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid ..... 8 per cent.x$1.00-- 8.00
Ammonia ...................... 2 per cent.x 4.55-- 9.10
Potash .....................2 per cent.x 6.00-- 12.00
Mixing and Bagging ........................-- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports ................. $30.60
The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JANUARY 1. 1917.

"Under unsettled conditions, potash quotations are
wholly nominal."

AM MONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 17% Ammonia............... $ 70.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25% Ammonia........... 95.00
Dried Blood, 16% Ammonia .................... 78.00
Cyanamid, 20% Ammonia..................... 75.00

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% Sul-
phate, 48% K20O......................... Nominal
Low Grade Sulphate of Potash, 48% Sulphate,
26% KO ............................... Nominal
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% K,O0.......... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash,' imported, 15% Ammonia,
44% Potash K20 ........................ Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% Ammonia,
42% Potash KO ......................... Nominal
Kainit, Potash, 12% KO................... Nominal
Canada Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 4% KO
Potash ................................. Nom final

AMMONIA AND PHOSPH-ORIC ACID.

High Grade Tankage, 10/, Ammonia, 5% Phos-
phoric A cid ................................ 58.00
Tankage, 8% Ammonia, 10%/ Phosphoric Acid.... 50.00
Low Grade Tankage, 612% Ammonia, 12% Phos-
phoric A cid ................................ 46.00
Sheep Manure, 31/2% Ammonia, 1/% Potash..... 24.00
Imported Fish Guano, 11% Ammonia, 51/2%











Phosphoric Acid ........................... 50.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% Ammonia,
22% Phosphoric Acid ....................... 40.00
Raw Bone, 4% Ammonia, 229/ Phosphoric Acid. 42.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/2% Ammonia, 2%
Phosphoric Acid ........................... :35.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 71/2% Ammonia....... 40.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2% Ammonia........ 3:5.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16% Available
Phosphoric Acid ............................$ 16.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% Available Phosphoric Acid. 15.00
Bone Black, 17% Available Phosphoric Acid.... 25.00
MISCELLANEOUS.
High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 2% Am-
monia, 7% Potash .........................$ 55.00
High Grade Ground Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
21/2% Ammonia, 8% Potash ................ 60.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% Ammonia, 2% Potash... 32.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash .......................... .. ....... 34.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash ............. ... .................... 4. 00
Land Plaster, in sacks ....................... 12.00

The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.

NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
DECEMBER 31, 1916-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
AMi MONIATES.

Ammonia. Sulph., prompt .............. 4.30 @
Ammonia, Sulph., futures ............. 4.30 @











Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. c. Ammonia and
14 p. c. Bone Phosphate, f.o.b. de-
livered Balto...............per unit 4.50( & 10
wet, acidulated, 6 p. c. Ammonia, 3
p. c. Phosphoric Acid, delivered.... 4.25. & 10
Ground Fish Guano, imported, 10 and 11
p. c. Bone Phosphate, c. i. f. N. Y..
Balto. or Phila ............... ..... (1 -
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. f.,o..
Chicago ......................... :.871 & 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c., f.o.b. Chicago,
ground .......................... 3.75 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f.o.h. Chicago
ground .......................... 3.87- & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f.o.b. Chicago. 14
to 15 p. c., f.o.b. Chicago........... 3.70 & 10
Garbage, tankage, f.o.b. Chicago........ 15.00 @ -
Hoofmeal, f.o.b. Chicago....... per unit 4.00 ( -
Dried Blood, 12-13 p. c. Ammonia. f.o.b.
New York ....................... 4.05 @ -
Chicago .......................... 3.874 -
Nitrate of 'Soda, 95 p. c. spot, per 100 lbs. 3.12 @ 3.15
futures, 95 p. c............. ......... 3.12 @ 3.15


PHOSPHATES.

Acid Phosphate ............... per ton 10.50 @ 12.00
Bones, rough, hard............. per ton 22.50 @ 24.00
soft steamed unground.............. 21.50 @ 22.00
ground, steamed, 11/4 p. c. Ammonia
and 60 p. c. Bone Phosphate....... 20.00 @ 21.00
ditto, 3 and 50 p. c................ 23.50 @ 24.00
raw, ground, 4 p. c. Ammonia and
50 p. c. Bone Phosphate........... 28.50 @ 30.00
South Carolina Phosphate Rock, kiln
dried, f.o.b. Ashley River .......... 3.50 @ 3.75











Florida Land Pebble Phosphate Rock,
68 p. c., f.o.b. Tampa, Fla ..........
Florida High Grade Phosphate Hard
Rock, 77 p. c., f.o.b. Florida ports..
Tennessee Phosphate Rock, f.o.b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c....
per ton
75 p. c. guaranteed .................


68@ 72 p. c............


2.00 @

5.00 (a


5.00 @ 5.50
4.75 (i' 5.00


....... ... 4.25 W( 4.50


POTASHES.


Muriate of Potash, 80-85 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags ... pe. .r ton 450.00 (G
Muriate of Potash, min. 95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cenl., in bags. .per ton 375.00 a
Muriate of Potash, min. 98 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags........... N
Sulphate of Potash, 90-95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags ........ 275.00 (i
Double Manure Sall, 48-53 per cent.
basis 48 per cent., in bags....... 105.00 @
Manure Salt, min. 20 per cent., K.O,
in bulk ......................... 50.00 @
Hard Salt, min. 16 per cent., K,0,
in bulk ......................... 40.00 (~i
Kainit, min. 12.4 per cent., K2O, in
hulk ............................ 40.00 @


COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF
FOR 1917.


FEED S


460.00




nominal

300.00


60.00

50.00

50.00

TUFF.


For the season of 1917 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation January 1.
These values are based on the current prices of corn.
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the comr
mercial values, the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:










COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEED STUFFS FOR 1917.

Indian corn being the standard at $43.00 per ton.
($2.15 per sack of 100 Ibs., $1.20 per bu. 56 lbs.)
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.

Protein, 4.45c per pound ................... 8c per unit
Starch and Sugar, 2.05c per pound ....... 41c per unit
Fats, 4.6c per pound ..................... 92c per unit

EXAMPLE NO. 1.
CORN AND OATS, EQUAL PARTS-

Protein ....................... 11.15 x 89c, $ 9.92
Starch and Sugar................ 64.65 x 41c, 26.50
Fat ............................. 5.20 x 92c, 4.78

State value per tou ............................ 41.20

EXAMPLE NO. 2.
CORN-

Protein ........................ 10.50 x 89c, $ 9.34
Starch and Sugar. ............... 69.60 x 41c, 28.53
Fat ............................. 5.40 x 92c, 4.97

State value per ton. ................... ........ 42.84

STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
"season." They may, but seldom do, vary from the market











prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight advance
or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound a ton of goods similar to "Smith's
Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but accepted and
well-known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values," Jan. 1, 1917, are nominal.

SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only State in the Union that provides for
the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or pur-
chaser, UNDER PROPER RULES AND REGULATIONS FIXED BY
LAw-to be sent to the Commissioner of Agriculture for
analysis free of cost. Any citizen in the State who has
purchased fertilizers or feeds FOR 111S OWN USE MAY DRAW
A SAMPLE OF THE SAME, ACCORDING TO LAW, and have the
same analyzed by the State Chemist free of cost. In case
of adulteration or deficiency he can, on establishing the
fact, receive double the cost price demanded for the goods.
The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmitting "special samples."











This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.
Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of "food and drugs" will be sent
to any citizen requesting the same.
"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON
SUMMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS
MATERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE
OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FER-
TILIZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."












COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.
Pounds Per Hundred.
Total
Ammonia. Phosphoric I Potash.
Acid.
Nitrate of Soda.......... 17 to 191 ............ . ......
Sulphate of Ammonia ... 21 to 261............ ............
Dried Blood ............ 12 to 17 ............ .1 .. .. ....
Concentrated Tankage ... 12 to 15 1 to 4 ...........
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 91 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap ........ 6 to 111 3 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal ...... 7 to 101 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal ............ 13 to 171 1 to 2 1 to 2
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.
Pounds Per Hundred.
Available I
Ammonia. Phos. Acid. Insouble.

Florida Pebble Phosphate! ........... ............. 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate. ............ ............. 30 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 3
Ground Bone ........... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 1 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.
Pounds Per Hundred
Actual Am'onia Phos. I Lime
_____ Am'onia. A Lime.
Potash. Acid. i

Muriate of Potash...... 50 to 62 .. ...... I..... i .........
Sulphate of Potash..... |48 to 52 .. ... ..........
Carbonate of Potash.... 55 to 60 .................. .........
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ... ... ......
Dbl. Sul. of Pot. and Mag. 25 to 30 ......... ....... .........
K ainit ................. 12 to 13 ......... ........ .. .......
Sylvinit .............. 16 to 20 .......... .. ........
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to 30 ......... .7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8 ........1 to 2.........
Wood Ashes, leached.... 0 to 2 ......... 1 to 11i35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ........ 3 to 9 2 to 4 ......... 3
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.45 0.501 0.30 0.30
Horse Manure (fresh). 0.50 0.60 0.25 0.30
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.601 1.00 0.35 0.35
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.30 1.00 0.40 0.10
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 1.75 1.25 0.25
Mixed Stable Manure...! 0.50! 0.751 0.501 0.70








60

FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.
To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............. 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............ 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by ....... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by..... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K,0) by.. 2.33

For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K20).












AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS.


i

NAME OF FEED.
4-
C)
Irr
_____J


Maiden Cane Hay.....

Natal Grass Hay......

Para Grass Hay.......

Rhodes Grass Hay .....

Beggarweed Hay ......

Kudzu Vine Hay......

Cow Pea Hay.........

Velvet Bean Hay ......

Velvet Beans .........

Velvet Bean Hulls.....

Velvet Beans and Hulls.

Cow Peas ............

Soy Bean Meal........

Peanut Vine Meal.....

Cotton Seed ..........

Cottton Seed Hulls....


28.60

36.70

31.20

41.10

24.30

32.30

20.50

29.70

7.00

27.00

10.70

4.10

4.50

29.60

23.20

44.40


Bright Cott'n Seed Meal 9.40


.0





11.60 42.40

7.40 39.20

8.00 45.70

7.70 36.80

21.60 35.10!

15.90 33.001

13.00 45.901

14.70 41.00

21.00 53.10

7.50 44.60

9.40 50.60

20.80 55.70

48.40 27.50

9.90 38.40

18.40 24.70

4.00 36.601

39.70 28.60
1


cd
a4


2.60

1.80|

1.601

1.30

4.10

1.60

4.201

1.70i

5.40

1.60

4.50

1.40

6.40

6.301

19.90

2.00

7.801
1


4.20

5.00

6.20

6.60

4.00

6.80

7.50

5.70

3.60

4.30

3.50

3.20

4.40

6.60

3.50

2.60

5.80










AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF FLORIDA FEEDING
STUFFS-Continued.
-c

NAME OF FEED.



Dark Cotton Seed Meal. 20.00 22.90 37.101 5.50 5.00
Barley (grain) .......I 2.70) 12.40 69.80 1.80 2.40
Corn (grain) ......... 2.101 10.50 69.600 5.401 1.50
Corn Meal ........... 1.90 9.70 68.701 3.801 1.40
Honiiny Feed .......... 4.00 10.50 65.30 7.80 2.60
I I
Corn and Cob Meal .... .5.80 7.50' 70.80 3.10 1.20
I I I
Ground Corn Shucks ... 30.201 2.80 54.60 0.60 1.90
Ground Corn Cobs. .... 30.00 3.00 56.60 0.70 1.60
Oats (grain) ......... 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.00 3.00
Rice (grain) ......... 0.20 7.40 79.20 0.40 0.40
Rice Bran ........... .9.50 12.10 49.90 8.80 10.00
Wheat (grain) ....... 1.80 11.90 71.901 2.10 1.80
Wheat Bran .......... 9.000 15.40 53.90 4.00! 5.80
Wheat Middlings ..... 5.40 15.40 53.90 4.00 5.80
Wheat Mixed Feed.... 7.80 16.901 54.401 4.80 5.30
Wheat Ship Stuff....... 5.60 14.60 59.801 5.001 3.70
Dry Jap Sugar Cane... 26.20 2.30 2.30 .601 1.501 2.80










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.




Sample No. 1-Washed Pebbles
from solid rock deposit.......

Sample No. 2- Matrix washed
from No. 1, with sand settled
off ..........................

Sample No. 3-Soft Rock (run
m ine) .......................

.Samnle Nn 4-Snurfacp R.nk in


37901 .....


Phosphoric Acid

a


37911..... 3.50


22.70



30.30


3792 ..... 1.2.60127.


BY WHOM SENT.


24.40. .... ..... K. 0. Varn, Ft. Meade.



33.80 .......... K. O. Varn, Ft. Meade.


30.50 ... .... K. O. Varn, Ft. Meade.


first 2 to 4 feet.............3793..... 1.40'12.40 13.80 ..... K. Varn, Ft. Meade.

Ashes ......................... 3794 4.461 ..... 44.66 ....... .. 1.57 S. C. Newlin, Groveland.

Fertilizer ...................... 3795 10.67 7.60 0.65 8.251 2.65110.21 W. T. Bird, Blountstown.

Fertilizer ...................... 3796 4.02 7.93 0.62 8.551 2.30111.60 Blountstown Mfg. Co., Blountstown.


I


I









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Phosp


Fertilizer ...................... 3797 17.32 8.35
Fertilizer 8.35

Fertilizer No. 2A...............3798113.16 8.45

Hardwood Ashes ............... 3799 .........

Pine Ashes .................... 3800 .........

Hickory Ashes ................. 3801.........

Ashes ....................... 38021 ..... ...

A shes ........................ 3803 ..... ...

Ashes (from sawmill pit)....... 3804 ... .

Fertilizer ...................... 3805 14.34 5.50

Fertilizer No. 1................. 38061 5.87 5.75


horic Acid.



3 _*
0
C



0.30 8.65

0.95 9.40



. .. . . .





..... .....



0.30 5.80

1.55 7.30


0
a



3.701

2.57

...I











1.851

4.921


BY WHO., SENT.


I

0.701 P. M. Dempsey, Trilby.

2.80 C. R. Warren, Blountstown.

2.30] E. C. Stuart, Bartow.
0.84 A. L. McKay, Morriston.
0.81 A. L. McKay, Morriston.
0.821 A. L. McKay, Morriston.

1.62 R. W. Rhodes, Miami.

0.49 W. E. Hamner, Valrico.

5.46 R. H. Paul, Watertown.

5.071 J. T. Price, High Springs.

2.72 M. S. Mishler, Little River.









Fertilizer No. 2................. 138071 7.431 2.801 2.551 5.35| 7.671 4.00| M. S. Mishler, Little River.
Fertilizer ................... 3808 5.831 7.95 1.50 9.45 4.301 3.02 A. P. Buie and Coite W. Hie, Gaines
I I I I I I I ville.
SCrematory Ashes ............... 38091..... ...... ..... ..... 0.68 W J. Bailey, Tampa.
I I I 7 I I i
Fertilizer No. 149,177........... 138101 5.721 7.63 1.72, 9.35 3.90 3.15| Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.
1 5 0 I [I i 5
Fertilizer No. 149,178........... 3811| 5.60 6.651 1.651 8.30 4.45 3.211 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.
Fertilizer No. 149,179........... 3812 4.94 4.75 1.251 6.00 5.42 3.181 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.
Fertilizer No. 149,180........... .38131 5.4 5 .4I 7.55\ 1.65 5.45 3.42 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.
Fertilizer No. 149,181 .......... 3814 2.27 8.01 0.24 8.25 5.00 3.10 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.
Fertilizer No. 149,182........... 3815 4.52 6.07 1.35 7.42 4.32 3.14 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.
Fertilizer No. 1................. 3816 6.68 6.03 0.77 6.80 3.05 8.65 Harry L. Geiger, Miami.
Fertilizer No. 2................ 3817 10.06 6.30 2.20 8.50 5.10 4.63 Harry L. Geiger, Miami.
Fertilizer No. 3. ............... 3818 9.72 8.56 1.52 10.08 4.67 2.35 Harry L. Geiger, Miami.
Fertilizer No. 1................. 3819 8.70 6.80 1.10 7.90 4.83 4.57 Geo. V. Leonard, Hastings.
Fertilizer No. 2................. 3820 8.34 7.95 1.45 9.40 4.20 4.67 Geo. V. Leonard, Hastings.
Fertilizer No. 3 ................. 3821 7.19 7.33 2.32 9.65 5.20 4.24 Geo. V. Leonard, Hastings.
Fertilizer No. 4................. 138221 7.38 7.30 1.15| 8.45| 4.781 4.331Geo. V. Leonard, Hastings.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Phos


m

'3


Fertilizer No. 5................. 3823 6.501

Fertilizer No. 6................. 38241 7.371

Fertilizer ...................... 382-5 .
I I
Fertilizer ...................... J38261 8.921

Fertilizer ...................... 3827 7.04

Fertilizer ...................... 3828 6.73

Fertilizer ...................... 1382911.13

Hardwood Ashes ............... 383011.22

Cotton Seed Meal............... 13831 .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3832111.02


--~-----


phoric Acid.
___ .
S BY WHOM SENT.





1.35 8.30 4.60 5.00 Geo. V. Leonard, Hastings.

4.47 10.60 6.65 5.40 Geo. V. Leonard, Hastings.

1.50' 7.70 4.55 2.76 W. B. Bratham, Orange Lake.

3.50 9.10 3.98 5.20 R. E. Rose, Tallahassee.

0.30 6.60 4.10 4.97 L. H. Evans, Titusville.

5.02 9.85 4.00 3.04 J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

7.40 13.80 3.651 2.631R. E. Rooks, Center Hill.

............... 1.64 W. D. Horne, Homestead.

..... .... 7.80 .... T. H. Johnson, Ocala.

0.70 7.70i 3.53 4.83 Phil C. Peters, Winter Garden.









Fertilizer ...................... 13833 5.91 7.851 3.75 11.tiO 3.30

Fertilizer ........... .. .... ... 13834 10.33 7.051 2.25 9.30 4.90

Fertilizer ................. ..... 1383514.97 6.62 1.16 7.78 4.58
Fertilizer ...................... 836 6.43 5.88 1.371 7.25 4.35

Fertilizer ............ .......... 3837 16.79 4.73 1.92 6.65 2.20

Fertilizer ...................... 3838 4.53 6.15 2.55 8.70 4.25

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3839 5.37 6.25 1.60 7.85 4.10

Fertilizer No. 2................. 384011.39 6.43 1.87 8.30 3.32
I I 6
Cotton Seed Meal No. 3......... 3841 .... .. ... ..... ..... 6.85

Ashes ...... .................. 3842 1.93 ..... ..... ......
I I i
A she's ......................... 3843 ..... ..... .. ..... .....

Sea Weed Ashes ................ 3844 1.37 ........ .... ....

Fertilizer ...................... 1384511.20 6.65 0.85 7.50 4.95

Fertilizer ...................... 3846 9.37 7.1 0.80 7.90 5.10

"Vithumus" ................. 3847 2.08 0.10 4.15 4.25 ..

Loggerhead Sponge Compost.... 38481 4.96 0.45 0.151 0.00 5.50|


1.91 C. J. Crenshaw, DeLand.

5.011 Harry Wynns, Orange Home.

2.33 H. A. Perry, Pomona.

5.351 Eugene Shannahan, lona.

1.011 Max Shane, Ft. Lauderdale.

3.831 J. A. Leggett, Lakeland.

3.01 E. E. McLin, Ocala.

2.101 E. E. McLin, Ocala.

....|E. E. McLin, Ocala.

1.02 A. L. Wilson Co., Quincy.

1.02 J. W. Mahaffey, Quincy.

1.721 G. W. Bonds, Ft. Lauderdale.

5.14 B. B. Letchworth, Istachatta.

5.40 S. L. Knight, Istachatta.

0.151 A. H. Brown, Manavista.

0.991 Jefferson B. Browne, Key West.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Phosphoric Acid.




S> 0
E-4


BY WHOM SENT.


I I l I I
Cotton Seed Meal............... 3849 ... ...7.38 .....| A. S. Hodges, Orlando.

Fertilizer No. 1................. 38501 6.59 5.40 0.60 6.001 5.15 4.63| Gust Nyberg, Dania.

Fertilizer No. 2................. 13851 7.52 6.35 0.53 6.90i 4.30 4.561Gust Nyberg, Dania.

Fertilizer No. 3................. 3852 6.16 6.45 0.45 6.90 3.95 5.096 Gust Nyberg, Dania.

Fertilizer No. 1................. |3853- 6.41 7.85 2.85 10.70 4.80 2.991 E. H. Pringle, Leesburg.

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3854 8.88 7.20; 1.40 8.60 5.05 2.74 E. H. Pringle, Leesburg.

Arkansas Hardwood Ashes...... 3855 .......... ..... ...... 0.731 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

Floats ......................... 3856 . 2.70 27.80130.50 ..... ..... W D. Bradshaw, Palmetto.

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 3857 .... ..... ...... ..7.63. ... West Florida Grocery Co., Pensacola.
Fertilizer No. 1................385 1.07 6. 920 E. heler Co. Quiy.
Fertilizer No. 1..... ............. 38581 1.071 6.351 9.2011i5.55i ..... l.(051E. B. Shelter Co.. Quillcy.










Acid Phosphate No. 2........... 3859 ..... 17.60

Fertilizer No. 3................. 13860 5.73110.35

Fertilizer No. 4................. 3861 3.81 9.55

Fertilizer No. 5................. 3862 7.56 10.85

Cotton Seed Meal No. 6......... 3863 .... .....

Acid Phosphate No. 7........... 3864 ..... 18.10

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3865 5.37 7.70

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3866 5.37 7.90

Fertilizer No. 3................. 38671 5.98 7.78

Fertilizer ...................... 3868 5.21 9.70

Fertilizer ...................... 3869 3.78 8.35

Fertilizer ...................... 3870 4.43 9.90

Oak Ashes ..................... 3871 ..... ....

Hardwood Ashes No. 1 (from I
green wood) ................. 138721 ..... .....
Hardwood Ashes No. 2 (from
seasoned wood) .............. 13873 ..... ..
Pine W ood Ashes............... 387414.31..
Pine W ood Ashes.............. .13874114.311 ....


0.75 18.35 ..... ..... E.

1.35 11.70 2.50 1.24| E.

1.1510.70 3.07 1.641E.

0.45111.30 1.50 1.13 E.

. ..... 7.65 .....| E .

0.60 18.70 ..... IE.

2.45110.151 5.251 3.281R.

2.40110.30 5.601 3.23 R.

2.42 10.30 5.00 3.301R.

9.65 19.35 2.70 9.14 J.

2.95111.30 4.73 7.55 C.

0.10 10.001 4.65| 5.87 M

1 I I
.. .....|. ..... 1.12 R .


..... .. ..... 6.611 M .
I I
S.. . ...... 6.881 M.

; .. .. .. . . 2.021 E .


B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

B. Shelter Co., Quincy.

W. Clark, Homestead.

W. Clark, Homestead.

W. Clark, Homestead.

P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

L. Bugbee, Lilebridge.

. Q. Simmons. Naranja.

)y Landrum, Wade.


H. Luten, Quincy.

SH. Luten, Quincy.

H. Hayward, DeLand.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Phos



0- .
o ~


I I
Fertilizer No. 1 ................. 138751 3.87 6.10

Fertilizer No. 2................. 38761 3.50 5.95

Fertilizer No. 3................ 3877/ 7.781 7.05

Fertilizer ...................... 3878 ..... 7.43

Fertilizer ...................... 138791 3.13 8.65

Ashes ......................... 13880 19.62 .....

Coarse Ground Bone............ 3881 ..... 6.70

Steamed Bone ................. 3882 ..... 14.30

Fertilizer ...................... 3883 ..... 6.45

Blood and Bone ................ [3884 ..... 3.80


;phoric Acid.




1 0


2.60 8.70

2.5 8.50

2.70 9.75
I I
I 0.671 8.10

I 0.05| 8.70



17.00 23.70

7.90 22.20

1.25 7.70

3.40 7.20


BY WHOM SENT.


3.88 3.35 Chas. Lejone, Miami.

3.55 3.08 Chas. Lejone, Miami.

5.45 0.50 Chas. Lejone, Miami.

4.92 3.06 Walter J. Hector, Wiersdale.

4.40 5.061 O. K. Morgan, Goulds.

..... 2.72 E. O. Painter Co., Jacksonville.

5.50 ..... Fugazzi Bros., Clearwater.

5.85 .... G. D. Jackson, Eustis.

4.22! 1.97 Council Wooten, Palmetto.

10.25 ..... A. W. Harley, Winter Garden.


t


-









Ashes No. 1 .................... 13885115.871 .....I ..... .....
I I I I
Ashes ......................... 38861 .. .. ..... ..... ..
I I
Cotton Seed Meal.............. .38871 ..... ..... .|. 7.65

Cotton Seed Meal............... 3888 ..... ..... 7.72
K elp Ashes ................... .138891 1.17 ..... .... . .. .

Japan Lima Bean Meal......... 38901 ...... .. ... 1.02 4.20

Fertilizer ...................... .[38911..... 6.10 0.45 6.55 3.25

Guano ......................... 3892118.37 10.70 2.20 12.90 13.35

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 3893 ..... ......... .. 7.35

Natursown . . . . . . . . 3894 . . 2.00 30.60132.0 . . .

Fertilizer No. 1 .......... ... . 385 8.07 10.80 1.15 11 ..5 2.1C

Fertilizer No. 2................. 38961 8.5311.40 1.2012.;0 2.55

Fertilizer No. 3 ................ 138971 .28 13.33 0.32113.(i.5 1.15

Hardwood Ashes ............... 3898 ... .. ........... .....

Fertilizer ......... ...... .....3899 9.11 7.08 1.92 I.C0 5.2

Fertilizer ...................... 3900 5.28 6.70 1.20 7.0 4.1:


1.06 R. J. Knight, Safety Harbor.

0.45 J. R. Davis, Bartow.

..... C. C. Moseley, Gretna.

..... Palmer Sylvester, Hinson.

35.45 Mark Isaacs, Jacksonville.
1.69 V. M. Scott, Pence de Leon.

5.701 C. G. Phillips, Jacksonville.
2.701 C. M. Berry, Sanford.

.....T. W. Dorsey, Concord.
.A. C. Jordan. Punta Gordn.

1.O50 J. F. Thaggard, Jasper.

None J. F. Thaggard, Jasper.

.. J. F. Thaggard. Jasper.

1.371 Ed. V. Lundberg, Winter Haven.
) 5.05 W. G. Ross. Fruitland Park.

, 1..S, ('ounil W"ioti. Sneads Island.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


Phosp

NAME, OR BRAND.

a;


Grapefruit Seed ............... 3901 0.50 .

Fertilizer ...................... :3902 4.87 7.201

Fertilizer ...................... 3903 10.30 7.60

Guano ........................ 3904 8.33 10.30

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3905 3.44 9.72

Fertilizer No. 2 (Acid Phos.) . . 3906 4.96118.28

Guano ......................... 3907 13.7S 7.95

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3908 9.151 8.73

Fertilizer No. 2 (Acid Phos.) ... 3909 12.45 16.50
~~IFertilizer No. 3........ 3910 .
Fertilizer No. 3................ 139101 S.s8;1 8.0;01


horic Acid.

SS BY WHOM SENT.





I I I I
.... 0.72 :.:21 0.5!] Fla. Fruit Products Co., Haines Ciiy.

1.051 ,.25] 4.25i 4.82 ). N. Thompson, Sneads islaid.

0.45 .05u 5.15i. 1.89 H. A. Crippen. Bushnell.

1.10 11.40 2.15 1.52 L. Adans, Glendale.

0.7810.50| 2.(8 0.4(i J. F. Cook, Galliver.

1.42]1!1.701 ..... ..... J. F. Cook, Galliver.

0.55 S.50 2.0 ....G. E. Keimp. Havana.

0.07 !.40 4.10 0.88 J. J. Ramsey. Altla.

0.60117.10 ..... .... J. J. Ramsey, Altha.

0.i62 .25| 2..2: 1.00 J. J. Ramsey. Altha.










Fertilizer No. 4................ 3911

Fertilizer No. 5................. 3912

Fertilizer No. (................. 3913

C. H. Ashes.................... .3914

Cottonseed Meal ............... 3915

Fertilizer ..................... 1.391

Fertilizer No. 1 .................. 3917

Fertilizer No. 2.......... . .... 3918

Fertilizer No. 3................. 3919

Fertilizer ..................... 3920

Sheep Manure ................. 3921

Ashes . . . . . . . . . . 3922

Fertilizer ...................... 3923

Bone Meal .................... 3924

1 ertilizer ..................... 3925


9.20 9.83 0.37 10.201 2.08 0.98 J. . Ramsey, Altha.

3.56 9.33 1.0710.40 2.(3 0.48 J. J. Ramsey, Altha.

6.18 8.58' 0.52 !.10 2.35 0.90 J. J. Ramsey, Altha.

..... .. .. ... . 1.31 H. S. Riggins, Winter Haven.

S. ... .... . .. 7.981 .... Shelfer & Ellinor Co., Havana.

..... 8.08 1.32 111.0 05.23 Nonel W. M. Igou. Eustis.

7.72 9.65 1.15 10.0I 5.151 ..... i Thos. J. Peters, Peters.

6.78 9.50 1.10 10.( 0 5.00 ..... Thos. J. Peters, Peters.

6.91 9.50 1.15 10.5 5.25 ..... Thos. J. Peters, Peters.

7.7310.25 1.20 11.45| 2.10 1.57 L. Adams, Glendale.

8.40 2.15 0.35 2.50 2.251 0.38 H. H. Elliott, Miami.

..... . .. .. . .. 1.701 A. L. Chandler. Homestead.

.... 8.65 0.501 !.15 2.(;3 1.31 Mrs. M. J. Edenfleld. Grand Ridge.

..... 6.15 16.7522.10 4.88 ..... C. B. Morrow, Crescent City.

4.41 9.20 0.601 93.0| 3.20 None R. P. Borwick, Havana.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.

a a
P s
C5 c ~


Cottonseed Meal ............. 3926 ... .. .... .. 7.40

Wood Ashes ................... 13927.. .............. ...

Fertilizer ...................... 392812.29 9.85 0.55110.40 2.10

Cottonseed Meal ............... 3929 ............. ..... 7.25

Acid Phosphate No. 1........... 3930 .... .13.(0 0.55 14.15 . ..

Acid Phosphate No. 2 ........... 3931 ..... 12.85 0.70[13.55 .....

Guano ........................ 3932 8.87 8.48 1.8210.30 2.45

Bone Meal ..................... 3933 ..... 9.85 12.20 22.05 5. 55

Fish Scrap No. 123...... 3934 ....... .. .. .1 0 1 8.05

Fertilizer "Sample A"........... 39351 4.751 S.351 0.251 S.C:0[ 4.40


BY WHOM SENT.


..... T. B. Jones, Havana.

2.30 C. W. Mangus. Homestead.

1.98 Henderson-Matthews Turpentine Co..
DeFuniak Springs.
..... P. C. McRae, Concord.

.. H. W. Metcalf. Jacksonville.

..... H. W. Metcalf. Jacksonville.

2.01 C. C. Eiland, Sr., Baker.

..... Nocatee Fruit Co., Nocatee.

..... E. E. Saunders & Co., Pensacola.

4.13 J. P. Cowlurn, Crescent City.


NAME, OR BRAND.


42
0









Fertilizer ...................... 3936 9.37 10.40 0.35 10.75' 4.80 5.11 DeSoto Fruit Co.. Nocatee.

Cottonseed Meal ............... 3937 .. .. ..... .. 7.87 ..... W. Walsh, Havana.

Incinerator Ashes .............. 3938 ..... .... ..... 2.75 ..... 0.i9 E. A. Catheart, Miami.

Charred Seaweed .............. .3939 ..... .. ..... .. .. .... 1.X5 W. A. Parrish, Dania.
.... r1.05! W. Iar Luarrish, Dania.
Fertilizer ...................... 3940 0.23 6.43 0.17, 7.10 :.3S 8.10 Harry Louis Geiger, Miami.

Dried Grapefruit Pulp.......... .3941 .... .. ...... .. ,0 1.05 1.0 Fn. Fruit Products Co., Haines City.

Ashes ......................... 3942 ..... ..... ......... ..... 0.92 D. L. Collins, Lucerne Park, Fla.

Fertilizer ...................... 394310.81 6.88 1.00 7.88 5.12 4.881 M. M. Smook, Floral City, Fla.

Fertilizer ...................... 3944 8.72 6.45 2.30 8.75i 4.60, 2.20 J. M. W illis, W illiston, Fla.

Ashes ......................... 945 19.12 ... .. ......... 0.95 E. 0. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jackson-
Sville, Fla.
Fertilizer ......................3946 5.07 10.10 2.50112.60 4.95 .... J. E. Barnes, Sydney, Fla.

Fertilizer ...................... 3947 4.67 8.85 2.85 11.70 4.40 ..... G. D. Moore, Hawthorne, Fla.

Soy Bean Meal................. 3948 .......... .... 1.30 9.46 1.97 A. G. Liles, Terra Ceia, Fla.

Fertilizer .................. .!3949 7.62 6.48 0.521 7.001 .08 5.00 J. M. Scott, Fort Green, Fla.
I I I 1 1 i
Phoslime ...................... 3950 .. ........... 22.20..........| P. A. McMillan, Eau Gallie, Fla.

Fertilizer ...................... 39511 6.62112.15 1.05113.20 5.61..... H. A. Perry, Pomona, Fla.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ...................... 39521

Soft Phosphate ................ 3953

Phosphate Washings ........... 3954

Fertilizer ...................... 3955

Fertilizer No. 1................. 13956:

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3957

Cave Earth .................... |39581

Phosphate Rock ................ 3959 .

Sulphate of Potash ............. .3960

Fertilizer No. 1 (Raw Phosphate) 3961


Phosphoric Acid.



> o
> W


12.15 0.90 13.05 3.47

..... 116.65 ...

1.92 8.08 10.00 .....

7.58 0.97 8.55 6.15

5.70 1.25 6.95 5.62

5.45 1.651 7.101 5.35

9.48 4.17 13.65 0.62

... . . 27.50 ...



. ..... 22.05 .....


BY WHOM SENT.


..... W. S. Moore, Hawthorne, Fla.

..... Gus A. Morton, Williston, Fla.

... G. M. Ellis, Fort White, Fla.

2.521 H. L. Geiger, Miami, Fla.

5.24 R. P. McAdams, Larkins, Fla.

3.161 R: P. McAdams, Larkins, Fla.

.....Lloyd S. Tenny, Miami, Fla.

.... G. A. Dashier, McAlpin, Fla.

47.71 A. M. Garrison, Bradentown, Fla.

.....I. I. Moody, Bunnell, Fla.









Fertilizer No. 2 (Raw Phosphate) |39621 ..... I ... . ... . 28.95 ... . . .

Guano No. 1 (Light) ............ |3963 15.56 16.60 5.80|24.40 0.83 .....
Guano No. 2 (Dark)............ 3964 11.48 4.501 7.50112.001 1.65 0.27
1I1 1
Red Mangrove Ashes............ 3965 10.45 .................... 0.56
Hardwood Ashes ............... 13966 .. . .. .. . .... 0.92
Guano ......................... 3967 21.62 6.70 4.70 11.40 3.45 0.41
Fertilizer No. 1 ................. 3968 4.87 7.53 5.72 13.25 3.85 0.42

Fertilizer No. 2................. |3969 8.08 8.90 1.10i10.00 5.70 0.19

Potash Salt (Carbonate) ........ ... 3970 16.30 .......... ... .. . ..52.72
Fertilizer ......................3971 3.45 ..... .. ... .. 1.18 8.78

Sheep Manure ................. 3972 3.37 .. ... 0.40 3.80 0.47
Fertilizer ..................... 397310.02 2.05 1.10 3.15 6.57 2.57
Cotton Seed M eal .............. 3974 .... ... ...... .... 7.45 .....
Fertilizer ...................... 3975 9.22 5.43 2.82 8.251 5.22 1.98

Ground Bone .................. 139761 ..... 6.00 17.50 23.50|. .........
~IFertilier ...... .39 8.78 .70 3.40 3.40 4.62
Fertilizer ......................39771 8.78| 6.70 3.40[10.10| 3.40 4.62


1 I. Moody, Bunnell, Fla.

SB. F. Dupont, Ojus, Fla.
| B. F. Dupont, Ojus, Fla.
| Jose Geno Piodela, Key West, Fla.
SA. Rumble, Winter Haven, Fla.
M. M. Benness, Miami, Fla.

SU. A. Lightsey, Bartow, Fla.
U. A. Lightsey, Bartow, Fla.

I B. K. Phipps, Tallahassee, Fla.
B. K. Phipps, Tallahassee, Fla.
SE. D. Donne, Tampa, Fla.
* M. S. Mishler, Miami, Fla.
J. L. Hoeflich, Eldred, Fla.
Carroll Dunscombe, Stuart, Fla.

I Fugazzi Bros., Clearwater, Fla.
F. R. nerst, St. Petersbrg, la.
-) F. R. Singleburst, St. Petersburg, Fla.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid

NAME, OR BRAND. o 6 ." BY WHOM SENT.




Ashes . .. 3.601 J. A. Barnes, Y uincy, Fla.


Hardwood Ashes ............... 3980 .... .... ..... ... . ... 8.39 Hickson & Bledsoe, Sanford, Fla.
Fertilizer (acid phosphate)..... 39086 8.141(1.15] 1.00| 17.1,j .......... |Thos. J. McNamara, Hilliard, Flh.
Phosphate RIock . . . . . . .. 3087| . . . ..... : .2 .. . J. C. Montford. Tallahassee. Fla.
~~ ~ ~E- .1









Ashes ...... ................... ... .......... .......... 1.5 JIIA.. Elliott. Miami. Fla.
Ashes No. .... ................ ...399 .3. ... ... .... ..... 2.(;|Manatee Fruit Co.. Palmetto.Fla.
II II
Ashes No. 1 2.. ............... 398 ..... ..... ... .. .......... 3.40|Manatee Fruit Co.. Palmetto, Fla.
Ashes No. 2 ................... '3990....'. I '".I 3.401Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto, Fla.
Tobacco Dust . . . . . . .. 3991 .... .... . . . 2.401 6.151T. J. Hankins, Sanford, Fla.

Cotton Seed Meal.......... .... 3992 ... .. . .C. Bell, Sanford, Fla.







Fertilizer ..................... ...,:3 :15.151 5.201 1.401 i;.;0t 4.52 2.9 3|L. I Zi"lllli erman.l Sanford, Fla.
Fertilizer ..................... 13!)!)411.141 (.33 2.671 .00 4.05 4-.11 Myers Citrus (rowers Ass'n,
I I I I Fort Myers, Fla.
Castor Pomace ................ 39!)51 ... .. ... ... I ..... 5.Ss ..... Joe C'amlero.i Sanford, Fla.
Tobacco Dust .............. .... ..... . ..... 2.83 .7. Joe ( eron, Sanford. Fla
II. (G. Blood and Bone.......... .!3!)7 S.4,( 2.7 3.15 5.9011.071 ..... .e Cmeroln. Sainford. Fla.
11. (. Blood and Bone ...... ... 3!S 712,8 4.75 0.00 10.75 10.08 . . L. Bruiley. Sanford, Fla.
Mixed Fertilizer .............. 3!!) 9.38 ;. 1.501 8.30 4.) 3.8 1. Buchana. Sanford, Fla.
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 400.... ..... 7.50 .. . IJ. T.McC(lelland. Snford, Fla.
Castor Pomace ..... .......... .I0 1 .. ... . .. . .... . (i ..35 . W. .A. Ilaynor. Sanlford. Fla.
Ashes ........ ............... 002 ..... ... I. .. ..... Allen. Iampton. Fla.
eo I I I
Nitrate of Potash and Soda..... 4003 ..... ......... 113.10113.90 2.70|Ed Putnam, Sanford, Fla.
Ground Tobacco Stems.......... 4004 .. .. ........... 16.0 6.50 ..... S. Hand, Sanford, Fla.
Ground Tobacco Stems......... 4005 .... .......... 9.051 9.53 ..... Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford, Fla.
Tobacco Dust.............. .. 4006 .... .I. .
Tobacco Dust .................. .4006.................... 2.38 7.12 Mrs. J. S. Moore, Sanford, Fla.
I I I I.......I 2.3












I'uuphuric Acid.
O0
NAME, OR BRAND. BHY WHOM SENT.
l 0 4n
tZ 0 8 o
A E

Ground Drid Fiddlers....... 4007 .... ..... ....... 6.37 W S. Hand, Sanford, Fla.

Compost ....................... 4008 4.02 1.25 0.45 ..... 2.45 7.lz C. J. Merriwether, Sanford, Fla.

Phosphate Rock ............... 4009 ..... ......... .. 2.40 6.:;,S L. A. BIumley, Sanford, Fla.

Mixed Fertilizer ............... 4010 7.3 4.6 1.30 .... 17.33 13.05J. \V. Bel, Monroe, Fla.

Mixed Fertilizer .............. 4011 10.37 5.00 2.50 ..... 2.45| 6.93 E. O. Painter Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.

Peruvian Guano ............... 401215.92110.10 3.00 ..... 2.30 6.40!E. 0. Painter Co., Jacksonville. Fla.

Blood and Bone ................ 401: 8.61 9.10 7.80 . .. 2.62 6.71 C. Bell, Sanford, Fla.

Blood and Bone ............... 4014| 6.281 4.351 4.70 2.30 6.20 ... IW. S. Smith, Palmetto, Fla.

Tobacco Dust .................. 4015' ..... .... ...... 1.70| 1.85| 0.23 J. W Oliver, Kissimmee, Fla.

Tobacco Dust .................. 14016 .......... ..... 37.00 ..... ..... W V. Knott, Tallahassee, Fla.


SPE('IAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES. 1!l1i-Continued.










Tobacco Dust .................. 40171 ..... ... .. 5.90| 5.07 1.80OJ. D. Hood, Sanford, la.

Tobacco Dust .................. 4018 .............. 7.50 4.20 3.091G. W Spencer, Sanford, Fla.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspectors Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1901.
Deficiencies Greater Than 0.20% Are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Armour Irish Potato Special....


Largo Fruit and Vine.........


Ideal Vegetable Manure........


Seminole Tree Grower...........


Mape's Vegetable Manure.......


o
,U,6
mC :Z


2308 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 7.28

2309 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 8.88

2310 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 17.41

2311 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 8.48

2312 Guaranteed 12.001
Found..... 12.071
1


Phosphoric Acid.


W 3 C




5.50 1.00 6.501 3.501
5.38 0.52 5.90 3.35

6.00 1.00 7.00 3.00
5.98 0.34 6.32[ 3.23

6.00 1.00 7.00 4.00
6.59 1.70 8.29 4.25

6.00 .. ... 4.00
7.50 2.7210.22 4.05

6.00 2.00 8.001 5.00
5.031 5.32 10.351 4.83
I |


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


8.50|Armour Fertilizer Works,
8.12 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
8.09 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
7.23 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
8.57 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

4.001Mapes Formula & Peruvian
5.40 Guano Co., New York,
I N. Y.








Simon Pure Rose Special ....... 2313 Guaranteed! 8.001 4.50 1.75 6.25 5.50 5.501E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
S ound..... 12.90 5.83 1.32 7.15 5.30 7.93 Jacksonville, Fla.

Simon Pure Special No. 2..... 12314 Guaranteedl 8.001 6.00 1.00 7.001 5.001 6.001E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
Found..... 7.441 6.73 0.92 7.65 5.65! 6.53 Jacksonville, Fla.

Simon Pure No. 1.............. 2315Guaranteedl 8.00 6.00 1.00 7.00 4.00112.00E. O. Painter Fertz. Co..
S Found..... 4.71 6.44 0.11 6.55 4.80 11.58 Jacksonville, Fla.

Armour's Cucumber Special.... 2316 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 1.00 9.00 5.00 7.00Armour Fertilizer Works,
Found..... 9.78! 7.681 0.85 8.531 5.15 6.531 Jacksonville, Fla.

Armour Vegetable .............2317 Guarantee 10.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 4.00 6.00Armour Fertilizer Works,
Found..... 11.12! 6.79 0.65 7.44 3.90 5.551 Jacksonville, Fla.

Bean Special .................. 2318Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 7.001 3.00 4.00 Amer. Agri. Chemical Co.,
IFound..... 10.55 6.82 0.77 7.591 3.45 4.611 Jacksonville, Fla.

High Grade Cuke and Lettuce 2319 Guaranteed 10.00 4.00 1.00 5.00! 6.00 5.00 Amer. Agri. Chemical Co.,
Special ......................I Found .... 13.25 4.68 1.32 6 00 5.65 5.991 Jacksonville, Fla.
Ideal Fruit and Vine Manure.... 2320 Guaranteed| 8.001 6.00 ........ 3.00 10.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
F Iound.....i 7.311 7.20 2.401 9.601 3.70 9.951 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
I 1 1 1 I I I
Original Ideal Fertilizer........ 2321|Guaranteed 8.00] 5.001 1.00 6.001 4.00! 6.00|Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
S IFound..... 11.77 5.251 4.80110.05! 3.931 8.01! Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
I 1.00 I I 5. 1 I
Wilson & Toomer's Special Mix- 12322 Guaranteed 8.001 6.00 1.001 7.00 5.001 5.00]Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
ture No. 1...................I Found..... 10.52! 7.13| 3.12110.251 4.901 5.551 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
I I I I T I
Gulf Sea Fowl Guano.......... 2323IGuaranteedl10.00! 6.00 1.00 7.001 5.00! 5.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
| Found..... 110.17! 6.781 8.42115.201 4.90! 5.081 Tampa, Fla.










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. E .


SI I

Favorite Vegetable ............ 2324 Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 2.00 9.00 4.00
Found..... 10.161 7.18 2.77 9.95 4.25
Cotton Seed Meal .............. 2325 Guaranteed ... ........... 2.50 7.50
Found ..... .......... ..... . 7.50 .
Unleached Hardwood Ashes..... 2326 Guaranteedl ......... .....
IF ound ..... I ..... ..... ..... ..... .... .
Lettuce Special ................ 2327 Guaranteed 10.00 5.00 1.00 6.00 6.501
Found ....10.14 5.89 5.0110.90 6.75
Green Band Lucky Trucker No. 2 23281Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 .......... 3.00
IFound..... 7.24 9.10 0.75 9.80, 3.55

Special Vegetable No. 1........ 2329|Guaranteed 8.001 5.00 5.00 10.00 4.00
Found ..... 7.47 5.00 7.1012.10 4.85
Extra Fruit and Vine........... 2330 Guaranteed 10.001 8.00 1.00 9.001 3.00
S iFound..... 7.441 5.801 5.40 11.20 3.55


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.
IS
0


3.00 Independent Fertilizer Co.,
2.871 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Talla-
.... hassee, Fla.

1.50 West Coast Fertilizer Co.,
2.061 Tampa, Fla.

3.001The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
3.241 Tampa, Fla.

3.00 The Coe-Mortimer Co.,
2.931 Charleston, S. C.

2.00 West Coast Fertilizer Co.,
2.06 Tampa, Fla.

3.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
3.20 Tampa, Fla.








Green Band Bean Special No. 2.123311Guaranteed 10.001 6.001 4.00110.00 3.001 2.00The Coe-Mortimer Co.,
S Found ..... 6.46 6.481 2.07 8.55 3.75 2.091 Charleston, S. C.
Special Vegetable Trucker......|2332 Guaranteed 8.00 5.00 5.00 10.00 4.50 2.00 The West Coast Fertz. Co.,
Found..... 7.75 6.48 7.1213.60 4.63 1.88 Tampa, Fla.
1I I l
Gulf Orange Tree Grower...... 2333 Guaranteed 8.001 6.00 1.00; 7.00 5.001 3.00The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
S Found..... 8.90 7.50 4.0011.50 5.53 3.121 Tampa, Fla.
Green Band Tomato Special.... 2334Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 .... ... 4.00 3.00The Coe-Mortimer Co.,
Found..... 5.59 5.42 3.58 900 4.35 2.971 Charleston, S. C.
o n I 5
Fertilizer No. 393............... 23351Guaranteed 10.001 9.00 1.00 10.00| 3.00 3.00Armour Fertilizer Works,
Found..... 8.01 9.05 1.50 10.551 3.351 2.871 Jacksonville, Fla.
Cherokee Grower .............. 2336 Guaranteed 12.001 9.00 ..... ... 4.00 ..... Wilson & Toomer Fertz. C
I Found..... 9.78 9.05 2.2011.251 4.60 ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla. C
Florideal Fruit Manure......... 2337 Guaranteed 12.00 8.00..... ..... 3.00 2.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
S Found..... 7.56 8.23 4.12 12.35 2.85 1.94 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Early Bird Special Vegetable 12338Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 7.001 4.00 3.0010sceola Fertz. Co., Jack-
Manure ..................... Found..... .62 5.95 0.75 6.701 4.05 3.10 sonville, Fla.
Vegetable No. 3................ 2339Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 1.00 8.001 4.00 3.00Armour Fertilizer Works,
S IFound..... 5.661 7.45 1.101 8.55 3.95 3.251 Jacksonville, Fla.
Tankage (Blood and Bone).... l2340IGuaranteedl ...... . .. 15.00 6.501 ..... Armour Fertilizer Works,
I Found ..... .... .....|16.95 6.751 ..... I Jacksonville, Fla.

Bone Flour ................... 2341lGuaranteed10.00112.0013.00j25.001 3.001 ..... Armour Fertilizer Works,
I Found..... 3.341 8.60116.30|24.90 3.771..... Jacksonville, Fla.









OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSIS, 1916-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND BY WHOM and WHERE
a o 05 : "a MANUFACTURED.
a P. = 0
2 <.Bi gE,


Cherokee Special Mixture...... 2342 Guaranteed 12.00 8.00 ...... ....
Found..... 9.76 7.70 2.50 10.20
Standard Grade Cotton Seed 2343 Guaranteed ...... .... ... ..
M eal ........................ Found .. ... ..... .... ... .
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2344 Guaranteed ......... ...
Found..... ..... ..... ..... ....
Ideal Cotton Fertilizer ........ 2345 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 ..... .....
Found..... 13.63 8.50 3.50 12.00
Blood, Bone and Potash No. 3.... .2346(Guaranteed|10.001 8.00 1.00 9.00
S Found..... 5.77 7.95 1.50 9.45
American Standard Guano...... 2347 Guaranteed 10.00] 8.00 2.00 10.00I
Found..... 10.15; 8.15 1.40] 9.55|
S uI I 1 I
Ideal Vegetable Grower ........ 2348 Guaranteed 12.00 7.00 ..... ..... .
IFound..... 10.21] 8.65 1.80110.45|


5.00 ..... Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
5.00 ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

7.55 ..... Camilla Cotton Oil & Fer-
7.60 ..... tilizer Co., Camilla, Ga.
7.50 1.50 Camilla Cotton Oil & Fer-
6.93 ..... tilizer Co., Camilla, Ga.

2.00 2.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
2.75 1.94 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
5.00 3.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
4.92 3.18 Jacksonville, Fla.
2.00 2.00 Amer. Agri. Chemical Co.,
2.15 1.91 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00| 1.001Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
3.60, 1.251 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.











Irish Potato Special............ 2349 Guaranteed 10.00, 7.00 1.00 8.001 4.001 3.0Amer. Agri. Chemical Co.,
Found..... 7.28 6.75 2.15 8.90 4.15 3.011 Jacksonville, Fla.

Special Mixture ............... 2350 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 1.00 9.00 4.00 5.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
Found..... 5.38 7.70 1.00 8.70 4.20 4.71 Jacksonville, Fla.

Medium Grade Cotton Seed Meal 2351 Guaranteed ..... .......... 2.00 7.50 1.00 Richland Cotton Oil Co.,
Found..... . ..... .. ... ....... 7.75 ..... Richland, Ga.

Premium High Grade Acid Phos- 2352 Guaranteed 14.00116.00 1.50 17.50 ..... ..... Virginia-Carolina Chemical
phate .......................I Found ..... .....|17.90 0.40 18.30 ..... ..... Co., Savannah, Ga.

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2353 Guaranteed .. ....... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Camilla Cotton Oil & Fer-
SFound..... ..... ..... ... ...... 4.88 ..... tilizer Co., Camilla, Ga.

"Natursown" .........3.001..... ..... 33.00 .....I ..... Lakeland Phosphate Co.,
Found .......... 1.50 27.90 29.40 ........... Lakeland, Fla.

Early Bird Watermelon Manure. 2355 Guaranteed 12.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 5.001 5.00 Osceola Fertz. Co., Jack-
Found..... 6.98 7.10 0.80 7.901 5.10 4.88 sonville, Fla.

Combination ................... 2356 Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 2.00 2.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
Found..... 04 7.15 0.85 8.00 2.20 1.81 Jacksonville, Fla.

Standard Grade Cotton Seed 2357 Guaranteed .......... ..... 2.00 7.50 1.00ITaylor Commission Co.,
Meal ........................ I Found.. . .. .. ..... 7.25 ..... Atlanta, Ga.
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2358Guaranteed .... .......... 2.50 7.50 1.50Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
I Found..... .. .......... ..... 7.351..... Jacksonville, Fla.







OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.

6 J


*a I~ H3


Shelfer's High Grade Acid Phos- 2359 Guaranteed 10.00 10.00 1.00 11.00.....
phate and Potash............. Found..... 6.4810.35 1.25 10.60 ....

Shelfar's Cumberland Guano.... 2360 Guaranteed 10.00 9.00 1.00 10.00 2.00!
Found..... 5.281 7.90 0.45 8.35 2.351
1 1
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2361 Guaranteed ............. 2.00 7.501
Found..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 6.37

Special Mixture ............... 2362 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 6.00 12.00 4.00
Found.....6.93 5.68 4.12 9.801 3.90

Vegetable No. 2................ 2363Guaranteed 10.00' 7.00 1.00 8.00 4.00
1 Found..... 6.161 7.35 1.45 8.80 3.85
1 I I 1
Special Mixture ............... 2364 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 6.00 12.00| 3.00
I Found..... 3.92' 5.801 6.60112.401 3.251
Early Bird Special Young Tree 23651Guaranteed 10.001 5.00| 1.001 6.001 5.001
Manure ..................... [Found..... 5.01 5,80 0.;5 (.35. 4.70[


NAME, OR BRAND.


0,
4)..
Lu0 0


0 BY WHOM AND
' WHERE
MANUFACTURED.

0


4.00 Virginia-Carolina Chemical
3.90 Co., Savannah, Ga.

1.00 Virginia-Carolina Chemical
1.64 Co., Savannah, Ga.

1.501Planters Cotton Oil Co..
..... Dothan, Ala.

3.00 Amer. Agri. Chemical Co.,
3.05 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
2.27 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 Amer. Agri. Chemical Co.,
2.95 Jacksonville, Fla.
3.00[Osceola Fertz. Co., Jack-
2.671 sonville. Fla.


00
wo







Feldspar ...................... 12366 Guaranteed ..... .... ..... ..... I .....| 10.00|Lakeland Phosphate Co.,
I Found..... .... ..... ...... 0.031 Lakeland, Fla.
Early Bd S............................12.00 J.
Early Bird Special Watermelon.. 23(7 Guaracd 12.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 5.00 3.00 Osceola Fertz. Co., Jack-
Manure ..................... |Found.... 7.42 S.25 0.851 9.101 5.051 3.001 sonville, Fla.
Bradley Florida Vegetable...... 2368 Guaranteed 10.001 6.00 1.00.0000 4.00 3.00 Amer. Agri. Chemical Co.,
Found..... 6.71 6.70 2.951 9.65 3.951 3.35i Jacksonville, Fla.
Early Bird Young Tree Manure. 2369 Guaranteedl10.00] 5.00 1.00 6.00 5.00! 5.00O sceola Fertz. Co., Jack-
I Found..... 4.42! 5.30 0.50 5.80I 5.27! 4.951 sonville, Fla.
Lazaretto's Early Trucker...... 2370 Guaranteed 8.00 7.00 2.00 9.00! 5.00| 5.00|Amer. Agli. Chemical Co.,
S Found..... S.28 7.70 2.00 9.701 5.05[ 5.43| Jacksonville, Fla.
Extra High Grade Acid Phos- 2731 Guaranteed ............... ................ Young, Sanders & Adams,
phate ....................... Found..... . 13.65 0.15 13.80 ..... ..... Dothan, Ala.
16% Acid ...................... 2372 Guaranteed .... .. ..... .... ..... ... Houston Guano Co.,
Found..... ..... 13.45 0.25 13.70 ..... ..... Dothan, Ala.
16% Acid ...................... .2373 Guaranteed ........ ...... ..... ..... Houston Guano Co.,
Found....... 11.60 0.15111.75 ..... .... I Dothan, Ala.

Extra High Grade Acid Phos- 2374jGuaranteed ..... ... ..... I..... ..... IYoung, Sanders & Adams,
phate .......................I 1 Found ..... .... 12.80 0.10 12.90 ... ..... Dothan, Ala.
16% Acid ......... .......... .2375 Guaranteed . ... .... .. ..... ..... Houston Guano Co.,
I Found ..... .... 16.05/ 0.25116.30 ..... .....I Dothan, Ala.
Extra High Grade 2376 Guaranteed1 .......... .. .... I ..... I ..... [Young, Sanders & Adams,
Acid Phosphate .............. [Found ..... .....14.60 0.10114.701 ..... I ..... I Dothan, Ala.










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSIS, 1916-Continued,

Phosphoric Acid.
SBY WHOM AND
NAME, OR BRAND. WHERE
? 5 5 = MANUFACTURED
'0 o 0 *
,-1 .~ 0s


16% Acid ..................... 2377 Guaranteed ... . .... . .
Found..... ..... 14.68 0.47

Vithumus ................ 2378 Guaranteed ..... ....
IFound.....a 1.67 0.45 4.60

12-2-0 Fertilizer ................ 123791Gua -nte-d ..... ..........
S Found..... 7.12110.30 0.25
12-2-0 Fertilizer ................ [2380|Guara:m tee ........ ....... .
I Found..... 6.40] 9.55 0.25

12 2-0 Fertilizer ................ 2381 i 'uarant' edi ..... ..........
IFound..... 9.06) 8.80 0.25

Grasselli's High Grade Blood and|2382 Guaranteed ..... ..........
Meal Mixture ............... IF und..... i 8.53 11.10 1.10

Banner Special Formula ....... 2383 Guaranteed ..... ..... ..
I (Found ..... 10.42113.48 0.27


..... ..... Houston Guano Co.,
..... ..... Dothan, Ala.

.. .. ... .R. W. Gamble,
Trace TraceI Norfolk, Va.

... ...... Young, Sanders & Adams,
1.25 ..... Dothan, Ala.
/
.... ..... Young, Sanders & Adams,
1.63 ..... Dothan, Ala.

......... Young, Sanders & Adams,
1.65 ..... Dothan, Ala.

..... ..... The Grasselli Chemical
2.10| 1.21, Co., Dothan, Ala.

.... ..... IHouston Guano Co.,
0.80 .....| Dothan, Ala.


I - -- I










Banner Special Formula ........ 2384 Guaranteed ..... ..... ..... ...... ..... G ..... nHouston Guano Co.,
I Found..... 11.781 12.50 0.20112.70 0.90SNone Dothan, Ala.
jI i j
Banner Special Formula........ 2385 Guaranteed ..... ..... .......... ..... ..... Houston Guano Co.,
Found..... 12.62 14.45 0.75 15.20 1.00 ..... Dothan, Ala.

No Name .................... 2386 Guaranteed ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... Young, Sanders & Adams,
Found.... 8.93 11.40 0.45 11.85 1.65 None Dothan, Ala.

No Name ...................... 2387 Guaranteed ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... Young, Sanders & Adams,
Found..... 11.62 14.10 0.40 14.50 None None Dothan, Ala.

No Name .................... 2388 Guaranteed ..... ..... ..... ....... ...... Young, Sanders & Adams,
Found..... 10.28 11.65 0.65 12.30 1.80 None Dothan, Ala.

Cowetta Acid and Aimour 2389 Guaranteed..... ..... ..... ..... ......... Cowetta Fert. Co.,
Compound ................... Found..... 12.21 13.98 0.77 14.75 1.78 None Newnan, Ga.
Special Grower No. 1............. 2390 Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 4.00 10.00 4.00 2.00 West Coast Fert. Co.,
Found..... 5.87 7.23 9.8717.10 4.10 0 97 Tampa, Fla.

Gulf Melon Special ............. 2391 Guaranteed 10.00] 6.00 1.00 7.00 5.00 2.001The Gulf Fert. Co.,
Found..... 6.02 15.60 7.30 8.30 5.80 1 75 Tampa, Fla.

Ideal Vegetable Grower ........ 2392 Guaranteed 12.00 7.00 .... ..... 4.00] 1.00]Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
Found..... 10.73 8.65 2.3511.00 3 44 1.29 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Alkideal Fruit and Vine........ 2393 Guaranteed 12.001 6.00 4.00 10.00 3.001 0.50]Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
IFound..... 18.51] 6.55 3.65 10.20 4.301 1.08] Co., Jacksonville, Fla.








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1910-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. a





Gulf Special Fruiter ........... 2394 Guaranteed! 8. 8.008.00 1.00 9.00
S IFound..... 6.76 10.00 1.80 11.80

Special Mixture ................2395 Guaranteed 10.00 9.00 2.00 11.001
ound..... 5.78 8.90 3.3012.20

Excelsior Citrus Grower ........ 2396 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 4.00 10.00
Found..... 7.48 7.74 9.5117.25

Ideal Corn & Cane Grower..... 2397 Guaranteed 12.00 7.00 ..... .....
Found ..... 8.70 7.38 3.3210.70

Special Mixture ............... 2398 Guaranteed 10.00 10.00 2.00 12.00
Found..... 6.73 9.68 5.02 14.70

Excelsior Truck Grower........ 2399 Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 4.00 11.00
S Found..... 5.72 7.95 10.10 18.05

Seminole Citrus Special ........ 2400 Guaranteed 12.00 10.00 ..........
I Found..... 9.98 11.35| 8.45!19.801


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


C
0


4.00 2.00The Gulf Fert. Co.,
4.50 2.361 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 ..... The American Agr. Chem. .
5.07 ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla. I'

4.00 ..... The Gulf Fert. Co.,
4.25 .... Tampa, Fla.

3.00 ..... Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
3.57 ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 ..... The American Agr. Chem.
4.15'..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 ...... The Gulf Fert. Co.,
5.201 ..... Tampa, Fla.

3.00 ..... Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
2.95 .....I Co,. Jacksonville, Fla.










Goulding's 14% Acid Phosphate.. 2401 Guaranteed 16.00 14.00i 0.5014.50
Found... ..... 15.30 0.2015.50
1 0I115.50
Phosphate Floats .............. 2402 Guaranteed ..... .... ..... .....
SFound..........1 4.0 28.75 32.75
Irish Potato Formula........... 2403 Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 1.00 8.00
Found..... 8.91 6.78 2.62 9.40
Non-Potash Vegetable Special... 2404 Guaranteed 5.00 6.00 3.00 9.00
Found..... 7.48 6.70 3.85 10.55
Vegetable & Truck Special..... 2405 Guaranteedl10.00 7.00 2.00 9.00
I Found..... 7.56 6.58 2.77 9.35
Strawberry Special ............ 2406 Guaranteed 5.00 6.00 1.75 7.75
Found..... 14.77 7.43 0.97 8.40
Trucker 3% Special ........... 12407 Guaranteed ....... .....6.00
Found..... 15.42 6.15 0.65 6.80
Lettuce Special ................ 2408 Guaranteed 10.001 5.00 .... .....
I Found..... 13.34 5.43 0.72 6.15
Fruit & Vine 3% Special ....... 2409 Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
SFound..... 12.51 7.75 0.65 8.401
Bean Special .................. 2410 Guaranteed 10.00 5.00 2.00 7.00
1 Found..... 12.13 6.35 0.95 7.30


..... ..... The American Agr. Chem.
..... ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla

..... ..... Liveoak Limestone Co.,
..... ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 ..... Independent Fert. Co.,
4.75 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

4.50 ..... E. Painter Fertz. Co.,
4.55 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 ..... Independent Fertz. Co.,
4.90 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
4.67 4 10 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 3.00E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
5.87 3.26 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 3.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
5.50 4.31 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 3.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
3.92 3.32 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 3.00|E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
5.62 4.22 Jacksonville, Fla.









OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Vegetable 3% Special .......... 241


Melon & Cantaloupe Special.... 1241


All Mineral Citrus Formula..... 241


Special Tree Grower ........... 241


Superphosphate ............... 241


Special Mixture ................ 1241


310% Special ........... ...... 241


0 BY WHOM AND
SIWHERE
S MANUFACTURED.
S K



4.00 3.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
4.70 3.32 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 ..... Independent Fertz. Co., a
5.40 ..... Jacksonville, Fla. i-

4.00 ..... Independent Fertz. Co.
4.30 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 ..... Independent Fertz. Co.,
5.40 ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

..... ..... Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
..... ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 2.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
2.05 1 521 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 0.50E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
3.401 1.01 Jacksonville, Fla.








Fruit & Vine Special........... 2418 Guaranteed1 8.001 6.00 1.00 7.00 3.00
Found..... 12.711 7.20 2.8010.00 2.92
Strawberry Special ............ 2419 Guaranteed 5.00 6.00 1.75 7.75 4.00
Found..... 9.631 6.35 1.45 7.80 5.10
Muckland Trucker Special...... 2420 Guaranteed ..... 0.50 ......... 3.00
Found ..... 19.981 0.85 0.15 1.00 3.25
Florida Soft Phosphate........ 2421 Guaranteed .................. .....
Found.... ... 2.80 19.40 22.20....
Medium Grade Cotton Seed Meal 2422 Guaranteed ... ..... ..... 2.00 7.50
Found .. .. ..... . .... 7.05
Medium Grade Cotton Seed Meal 2423 Guaranteed ...... ........ 2.00 7.50
I Found .. I . .. ..... ..... 7.16
Cotton Seed Meal ........... .. 2424GuaranteedI ..... .. 2.50 7.50
1 Found ..... .. ... ... .... .... 6.87
Castor Pomace ................2425 Guaranteed ..... .... ... 200 5.50
1 Found. .... ........ ....... 6.25

Goat Manure ................... 242 Guaranteed............. 1.50
I Found... .............. ..... 2.50
Duplex Basic Phosphate A. A... 2427Guaranteed ....... .......... 18.00 .
| Found. ... i 4.20 14.1018.30


Foud.. 40 1


2.001E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
2.381 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
3.17 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
1.80 Jacksonville, Fla.

..... Florida Soft Phosphate &
..... Lime Co., Citra, Fla.

1.50.Donaldsonville Oil Mills,
.....I Donaldsonville, Ga.

1.00 The Richland Cotton Oil
..... I Co., Richland, Ga. CA

1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
...1.. Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 E. O. Painter Fertz, Co.,
..... Jacksonville, Fla.

2.25E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
2.06 Jacksonville, Fla.

.... Tenn. Coal, Iron & Rail-
..... road Co., Ensley, Ala.


I











OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


High Grade Acid Phosphate..... 2428


High Grade Acid Phosphate..... 2429


16% H. G. Acid Phosphate...... 2430


High Grade Superphosphate..... 2431


Special Mixture ................ 2432


Cherokee Special Mixture ....... 2433


Dixie Truck Grower............ 2434


Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found.....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaran teed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


-


Phosphoric Acid.

BY WHOM AND
9o < WHERE
5 MANUFACTURED.




..... 16.00 ..... ..... .......... E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co.,
..... 17.72 0.43 18.15 ......... Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 14.00 2.00 16.00 .......... Virginia-Carolina Chem.
..... 14.33 0.87 15.20 .......... Co., Montgomery, Ala.

12.00 16.00 2.00 18.00 .......... Gulf Chemical Co.,
17.30 0.80 16.00 ..... ..... Marianna, Fla.

12.00 16.00 ..... ........... ..... Wilson & Tomer Fertz.
..... 17.10 1.50 1S.0 ..... ...... Co., JacksDnville, Fla.

10.0010.00 2.00112.00 4.00 ..... Amer. Agricultural Chem.
5.88 9.70 3.3013.05 4.80 ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 8.00 ..... .... 5..00 ..... Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
9.06 8.35] 1.75110.10 5.171..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 9.00 1.00110.00 4.00 ..... Va.-Carolina Chemical Co.,
3.42 9.501 1.8511.35 4.20 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.










Vegetable No. 1............... 2435 Guaranteed 8.00 7.00[ 1.00 8..001 4.001 ..... Standard Ferlz. Co.,
Found .... 813 7.251 4.0511.301 5.25 ..... Gainesville Fla.

Dexle's Aiunioniated Dissolved 243( Guaranteed 10.00 12.00 2.00114.001 2.00[ .... .Gulf Cl'emical Co.,
Bone .................Found....... 6.28 13.70 0.70114.40 2.121...... Marianua, Fla.
Fruit & Vine 3% Special........ 2437iGuaranteed 8.00 (.001 1.00 7.00 3.00 3.00 E. O. Painted Fertz. Co.,
Found .... 11.60 7.35 0.45 7.80 3.(00 3.291 Jacksonville, Fla.

Vegetalle Special ............... 243SIGuaranteed 5.00 5.00 3.00 8.00 4.001 3.001E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
Found .... 10.96J 7.0 3.i2110..70 4.781 2.15| Jacksonvil Fla.

V-(C Gem Meal Mixture No. 2 .... 2439iGuaranteed 10.00 10.00 2.00 12.001 2.001 1.00]Va.-Carolina Chemical Co.,
Found .... 8.95 9.70 1.0510.751 2.201 1.251 Montgomery, Ala.
I I I I I
recentet (uanno No. 1.......... 2440G Uaranterd 10..00 10.00 2.00112.00 1.00 1.001Na.-Carolina Chemical Co..
S Found ... 10.93 !.'80 1.50111.30 2..00 1.011 Montgomery. Ala.

(ouldilng's High Grade Guano 2441IGuarantee 16.00 10.00 0.010.501 2.001 2.00lAmer. Agricultural Chem.
Found .. .. 13.37 10.13, 0.87111.001 2.231 1.801 Co., Pensacola, Fla.
I II I I I I
Mutual Fertz. Co's. Blood & Bone 2442 Guaranteed 14.00 !.00 1.00.00 001 2.00 1.00[Mutual Fertz. Co.,
Found .... 9.81 8.65 0.401 9.051 2.10 1.281 Savannah, Ga.

Ideal Cotton Fertilizer.......... 2443Guaranteed 10.00 8.001........2.00 2.00Wilson & Tcomer Fertz.
IFound ... 12.41 6 80 2.85|10.(i5 3.001 3.401 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
I I I I I I
(oinlding's Gemi Guano. ......... 24441Guarauteed 16.00 s.00 0.50 8.501 2.001 2.00|.Amer. Agricultural Chem.
S |Found ... 11.78 7.72 2.101 9.82 2.551 2.011 Co., Pensacola, Fla.









OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Z,~

anna
-il a


ri
0


Cotton Special ................ 2445 Guaranteed 10.00
Found .... 6.73

Special Mixture ............... 2446 Guarantced 8.00
Fund .... 9.43

Young Tree or Nursery 3% 2447 Guaranteed 5.00
Special ....................... Found .. .. 15.72

Sweet Potato 3% Special.........2448 Guaranteed .....
Found .... 9.53

Goat Manure .................. 12449 Guaranteed ..
Found ... .....

Fruit & Vine 3% Special........ 2450 Guaranteed 8.00
S Found .... 8.26

Guano Mixture .................12451 Guaran teed ...
I Found .... 891


Phosphoric Acid.
SBY WHOM AND
WHERE
. MANUFACTURED.


I
(i.00 1.001 7.001 2.001 2.00 Va.-Carolina (hem. Co.,
6.501 1.05 7.55 2.201 1.73 Gainesville, Fla.

7.00 .00 .00 4.00 3.00jStandard Fertz Co.,
(;.90 3.1010..00 3 40 2.141 Gainesville. Fla.
I I
5.00 3.00.0000! 4.00 3.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
5.63 1.271 6.90! 4.45 3.32! Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 .......... 4.00 3.00 E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
5.28! 1.32 6.60 4..72 3.75 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.00 ..... ..... 1.75 3.00 Independent Fertz. Co.,
0.95 0.05 1.00 2.10 2.871 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.001 1.00 7.00 3.00 3.001E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
7.751 0.50 8.25 3.37 3.071 Jacksonville, Fla.

....... 8.00 3.75 1.001Independent Fertz. Co.,
2.281 5.47 7.75 3.80 0 441 Jacksonville, Fla.









Vegetable 8% Special........... 2452 Guaraa teed 5.00 5..001 3.001 S.00O 4.001 3.0011 . Painter Fertz. Co.,
Found .... 11.43 5.801U 2.U0 7.85 4.801 3..067 Jacksonville, Fla.
I I I I iI I
Sugar Cane 3% Special......... 12453 Guaranteed ..... 8.00..... ..... 3.001 3.001E. O. Painter Fertz. Co.,
Found .... 6.46 8.901 2.4511.35 3.651 2.80 Jacksonville, Fla.

Bone Phosphate of Lime ........ 2454 Guaranteed .. . ...... 20 .... ... Leland Phosphate Co.,
Found .... .... ... . .. ..20 95 . Croom, Fla.

"Natursown" Floats Raw Phos-12455 Guaranteed 3.0 ..... ..... 33.00 ..... ..... ILakeland Phosphate Co.,
phate ........................ I Fond ..... ... ..... ..... 31 .90 ...... .. Lakeland, Pla.
e I I I
Unleached Ashes ................ .24(i0 Gua anteed .. ......... .... ..... ...10.00 Gulf Fertz. Co.,
Found ......... .. .... ........ 9.291 Tampa, Flt.
I I I I I
Unleached Ashes ............... 124(l Guaianteed ..... ........ ..... I 5.00 Gulf Fertz. Co.,
IFound .... ............. .......... 4.621 Tampa, Fla.

Unleached Hardwood Ashes ..... 2462 Guaranteed ......... ..... ..... ..... 1.50 West Coast Fertz. Co.,
S Found ........ ... ... ......... . 1.651 Tampa, Fla.

Special Mixture ................ 2403 Guaranteed 8.00 7.00 8.00 10.001 3.001 1.00 West Coast Fertz. Co.
Found .... 8.93 6.95 3.55110.50 4.15 0.60 Tampa, Fla.
I I I I I I
Special Mixture ................. 2464 Guaranteed ..... .001 1.001 9.00 3.001..... Gulf Fertz. CD.,
Fourd .... 8.40 7.681 1.12 8.80 3.35 ..... Tampa, Fla.
I I I I
Canada Hardwood Ashes ........ 2465 Gua'anteed ..... ... .. . . .... ...... Independent Fertz. Co.,
I Found ........ ........... ...... .. 1600 Jacksonville, Fla.
_____________ I ____ _____________________









OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES. 1916-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND 3 3





Exeelsior Cane & Corn .......... 124G0 Guaranteed 10.00
I Found .... 9.22
Nursery Fertilizer ............. 24(7 Guaranteed 8.00
Found .... 10..G1
Low Grade Blood & Bone ........ 1240S Guarnnteed 5.00
Found ..... 0.88
Special Mixi ure ............... 24001Guartnteed 8.00
IFounc .... 8.58
High Grade Blood and Bone .... 2470 Guaranteed 8.00
[Found. ...
Medium Grade Cotton Seed Meal!2471 Guaranteed .....
Found.........
Cotton Seed Meal............... 2472Guaranteed ...
Found..... .....


Phosphoric Acid.




/ a
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BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED


S.00 2.00110.00 3.50 ..... Gulf Fertz. Co.,
S.10 1.90110.00 4.04 ..... Tampa, Fla.

0.00 4.0010.00 5.0 ..... West Coast Fertz. Co.,
5.701 4.80 10.50 4.9 ..... Tampa, Fla.

. . ... 12.001 (;.50r ... O. Painter Fertz. Co.
-.3!: s.s7113.s0 .35 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

.5.(lK 7.012.00.00 00 ..... |West Coast Fert;;. Co.,
;.lsl .5.72 11.!0 3.80] ...... Tampa, Fla.

..... .. 7.u0 10.00| ... . E. O. Painter Fertilizer
..... . 10.00 10.101 ..... Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 ..... ..... 7.50. The Richland Cotton Oil
7.48.... Co., Richland, Ga.

..... ..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Union Seed & Fertilizer
..... ... ..... 1 7.72|. .... Co., Atlanta, Ga.




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