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 State chemist's report, 1915
 Miscellaneous analyses and examinations,...
 Expenditures chemical division,...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
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 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    State chemist's report, 1915
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    Miscellaneous analyses and examinations, 1915
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    Expenditures chemical division, 1915
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Full Text




VOLUME 26 NUMBER 1


FLORIDA QUARTERLY

BULLETIN


January 1, 1916

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

W. McRAE
COMMISSIC < OF AGRICULTURE.


REPORT OF T g. CHEMICAL DIVISION.



R. ROSE
STATE CHEMIST.


Analyses of Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs, Food and Drugs.
Rules and Regulations.


Entered January 81, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-clas
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.


These Bulletins Are Issued Free to Those Requesting Them.

T. J. APPLEYARD, STATE PRINTER
TALLAHASSBE, FLORIDA












STATE CHEMIST'S REPORT, 1915



Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1916.
To His Excellency,
Park Trammell, Governor,
Tallahassee, Florida.

Sir:-I have the honor to submit the following report
of the Chemical Division of the Agricultural Department
of the State of Florida for the year ending December 31,
1915:
The report of the State Treasurer, shows the sale of
inspection stamps covering 189,594.00 tons of Commercial
Fertilizers and Cotton Seed Meal-
Amounting to.............................. $47,398.50
And 131,655.48 tons of Commercial Feeding
Stuffs-
Amounting to.............................. $32,913.87

A total revenue of.........................$80,312.37
paid into the State Treasury to the credit of the General
Revenue Fund. From which is to be deducted the total
expenses of the Chemical Division, incident to the execu-
tion of the Fertilizer, Feed Stuff, and Pure Food and
Drug Laws, including the expenses of the Immature
Citrus Fruit Law, $1,687.12; the total expense of the chem-
ical division being $20,524.07, showing a balance of
$59,788.30 paid into the General Revenue Fund of the
State. A summary of these expenditures will be found
on the succeeding page. A detailed Financial Report will
be found on the last pages of this report.


15 7











FINANCIAL REPORT



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF CHEMICAL
DIVISION, 1915.

Salary of the State Chemist................. 3,000.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Fertilizers..... 1,800.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Food and Drugs. 1,800.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Stock Feed.... 1,800.00
Salary three Food and Drug Inspectors...... 4,500.00
Salary Clerk Chemical Division.............. 990.00
Salary Janitor ........ .......... ......... 150.00
Traveling expenses three Food and Drug In-
spectors .................................. 2,071.14
Samples and Incidentals, Pure Food Depart-
ment .................................... 723.08
Chemicals, Apparatus and Incidentals, State
Laboratory .............................. 872.00
Traveling Expenses State Chemist and Assist-
ants .................................... 948.81
Postage State Chemist ..................... 181.92
Salaries of Citrus Fruit Inspectors........... 946.12
Traveling Expenses Citrus Fruit Inspectors... 741.00

Tota' Expenses Chemical Division.......... .$20,524.07
To Credit General Revenue ................. 59,788.30

Gross Revenue ............................. 80,312.37

Appropriation, 1915 ........................ 22,615.00
Expenses Chemical Division................. 20,524.07

Unexpended Appropriation .................. .. 2,090.93











Summary of Analytical Report, 1915-(12 pt. Blk Head)

The following analyses were made during the year:

Official samples fertilizers ....................... 113
Special samples fertilizer (sent in by citizens)..... 309
Official samples feed stuff ...................... 297
Special samples feed stuff (sent in by citizens).... 33
Official food and drug samples ................... 29
Special food and drug samples (sent in by citizens). 17
Official samples citrus fruit ...................... 3.04
W ater samples ................................ 25
Miscellaneous samples (sent in by citizens)....... 146

Total number analyses. ................... .. 1,273

It will be noted that the Miscellaneous and "Special
Samples" of fertilizer, feeds, foods and drugs, sent in by
citizens of the State, has materially increased, showing
an increased demand on the part of the citizen for spe-
cific information on these subjects, of such vital import-
ance-economical and otherwise.

The Florida Law is peculiar in this respect, permitting
the submission of such samples by the citizen, only re-
quiring that the sample shall be properly drawn, duly
authenticated, and properly transmitted, in order to pre-
vent the submission of spurous or fake samples, as pro-
vded by law and regulations.











FERTILIZERS.
Frank T. Wilson, B. S., Analyst.

Official samples fertilizer ........................ 113
Special samples fertilizers ....................... 309

Total analyses fertilizer department.......... 422

The 88 samples of complete fertilizer drawn by the
State Chemists and Inspectors had the following average
composition and guarantee:
Available
Ammonia. Phos. Acid. Potash.
Official analysis ......... 4.30% 6.67% 6.43%
Guarantee ................. 3.92% 6.25% 6.14%
Excess above guarantee... 0.38% 0.44% 0.29%

Average State value found, per ton.............. $76.66
Average State value guaranteed, per ton......... 72.88

Note-The above "State values" are nominal and com-
parative only, owing to the high prices of potash ,and
sulfuric acid.

EXCESS 0.20% ABOVE GUARANTEE.
We find complete fertilizers exceeding the guarantee
0.20% (twenty points), as follows:
In Ammonia ...................63 samples, or 71.6%
In Available Phosphoric Acid.....53 samples, or 62.5%
In Potash ......................45 samples, or 51.1%'

DEFICIENCY 0.20% BELOW GUARANTEE.
We find complete fertilizers below guarantee 0.20%
(twenty points) as follows:
In Ammonia ...................2 samples, or.... 2.3%
In Available Phosphoric Acid.....19 samples, or 21.6%
In Potash '(KIO) ................ 15 samples, or 17.0%















COMMERCIAL STOCK FEED.

E. Peck Greene, B. S., Analyst.

The following analyses have been made during the year:
Official samples feed stuff ........................ 297
Special samples feed stuff......................... 33

Total analyses Feed Department.............. 330

The average composition of the official samples was as
follows:
Starch and
Protein. Sugar. Fats.
Official analysis ............ 14.18 54.23 3.39
Guaranteed analysis ........ 12.15 54.87 3.18

Average Excess ......... 2.03 0.76 0.21

We find the official samples of feed stuffs exceeded the
guarantee 0.20% (twenty points), as follows:
In Protein .................233 samples, or.... 79.52o
In Starch and Sugar. .......153 samples, or.... 52.21%
In Fats ..................133 samples, or....45.39%

There was a deficiency of 0.20% (twenty points), as
follows:
In Protein ................. 20 samples, or.... 6.82%
In Starch and Sugar........103 samples, or....35.15%
In Fats ................... 75 samples, or.... 25.60%











FOODS AND DRUGS.
L. Heimburger, B. S., M. S., Analyst..


Official food and drug samples .................. 29
Special food and drug samples.................... 17
Official citrus fruit samples...................... 304
Water samples ................................. 25

Total food and drug samples.................. 375

Immature citrus fruit samples reported............. 228
Mature citrus fruit samples reported............... 76

Total citrus fruit samples.................... 304

IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT.

Samples officially analyzed, and reported by chemists
and inspectors:


Analyst.
R. E. Rose.............
L. Heimberger...........
Frank T. Wilson.........
J. H. Lancaster..........
Lancaster and Wilson....
H. D. Berry............
W. J. Edwards...........
Marcus Endel............
J. W. Knight............
C B. McKinnon..........
N. 0. Penny.............

Total ................


Below Above
Standard. Standard.
4 2
13 2
43 14
23 3
16 2
40 12
13 16
14 5
S 19 5
S 14 6
29 9

S 228 76


The above figures represent only samples for which eer-
tificates were given to the growers who desired certificates.


Total.
6
15
57
26
18
52
29
19
24
20
38

304











Many "tests" were made unofficially by Chemists and In-
spectors for information only, of which no official record
was made.
The notice of the adoption of the "national standard"
(recommended by the "National Association of Food Offi-
cials") on September 23rd was received September 25th.
Rules, regulations and instructions were put into effect
October 1, 1915. The inspection season, under the present
standard, therefore prevailed from October 1st to Novem-
ber 5, 1915-some thirty-five days-during which time
three cars and 250 boxes of immature citrus fruit were
attached by the State authorities and placed in the cus-
tody of the sheriffs.

Nineteen cars of immature citrus fruit were reported
to the national authorities under Section 2 of the Food
and Drugs Law, of which fifteen cars were found imma-
ture by the U. S. Bureau of Chemistry, five of which were
libeled by order of U. S. District Attorneys. These cases
are still pending.

The three cars and 250 boxes attached and placed in
the custody of the sheriffs of the county, as provided by
law, were promptly replevined by the shippers, and for-
warded to destination, no effort being made to prosecute
the shippers or to preevnt the shipment of the immature
fruit--"unwholesome and deleterious food stuff."

I again call attention to this evident miscarriage of
the law. The neglect "to prosecute all persons violating
the provisions of this act as soon as he receives the evi-
dence transmitted by the Commissioner of Agriculture,"
as provided by Section 2 of the "Pure Food and Drugs
Law," and the failure to enforce Section 7 of the Law.

The "Immature Citrus Fruit Law," and the legality of
the standards, have been decided constitutional by the
Supreme Court of Florida, in the case of Sligh vs. Kirk-











wood (65 Fla. 123), confirmed by the United States Su-
preme Court (237 U. S. 52), and further defined by the
U. S. Supreme Court in the case of Wisconsin vs. Mc-
Dermott, April 7, 1913 (228 U. S. 115).
I quote from my report for 1913, as follows:

Replevin of Immature Fruit.

"The replevin of illegal, adulterated, misbranded and
deleterious food stuffs, attached by Inspectors and placed
in the custody of the Sheriff of the County, has in the
case of citrus fruit, made the attempt to enforce the law
farcical.
"I would respectfully call your attention to this evident
miscarriage of justice, and the necessity of having the
proper officer resist the replevin of such goods found to
be illegal, and under the law unfit for consumption.
"In this connection, I am pleased to say, the position of
this Division of the Agricultural Department is sustained
by the Attorney General, who, in an opinion dated No-
vember 18, says:

'In view of this rule and the great public im-
portance of the question, I would suggest that
the proper course for your Department (the
Agricultural Department) to pursue would be
to assume the statute valid until declared invalid
by the highest court of the State.'

"In view of the fact that goods attached by Inspectors,
under Section 8 of Chapter 6541-the Pure Food and
Drugs Law-and after analysis by the State Chemist,
showing them to be illegal, immature and unwholesome,
as defined in Chapter 6236, and Chapter 6515, Laws of
Florida, have been replevined, without resistance, and
sold or shipped for consumption, I respectfully call your











attention to this very important matter, on which depends
the proper enforcement of the Pure Food Law of the
State and the protection of our citizens from adulterated,
misbranded, immature, unwholesome or deleterious foods
and drugs."

RAW PHOSPHATES.

"Floats," Ground, Hard Phosphate Rock.

The use of "floats," finely ground Florida hard phos-
phate rock, Florida pebble phosphate; also Tennessee hard
phosphate rock, has attracted considerable attention in
recent years. They have been experimented with to a con-
siderable extent on the soils of the "corn belt" of the cen-
tral Western states, particularly Illinois, Ohio, and ad-
jacent states. The conclusions drawn from these experi-
ments are by no means concordant, nor conclusive.
The universal application of finely ground raw, hard
phosphate rock is not recommended on all classes of soil
by any of the authorities consulted. The experiments con-
ducted by the Agricultural Experiment Stations of Massa-
chusetts, Maryland, Rhode Island and Florida, all prac-
tically agree that raw phosphates are beneficial and eco-
nomical only on soils well supplied with humus (vegetable
matter).
While Dr. Cyril G. Hopkins earnestly advocates the use
of raw phosphates on Illinois soils, he does not recommend
it under all conditions. Especially does he call attention
to the fact that raw phosphate is not the best and most
economical source of phosphoric acid for a soil deficient in
humus.
The following comparisons of the average chemical
analysis of Illinois soils from "Illinois Soil Report No. 9,
1915," and the average analysis of Florida soils is made to
show the difference in the composition of the "glacial











loams" of the "corn belt," and the "silicious sedimentary
poils" of the "coastal plain"-the "cotton belt"-and simi-
lar soils of Florida:

From Soil Report No. 9, Illinois (Hopkins). Average
of 21 samples taken from Table No. 2, page 5.

Two million lbs. surface soil, one acre about 6 2-3
inches surface soil.

Oraganic Carbon ......228,679 lbs. (64.34 tons)-6.43 %
Total Nitrogen ...... 9,134 lbs. ( 4.57 tons)-0.457%
Total Phosphoric Acid

(P20,,) ........... 2,553 lbs. ( 1.28 tons)-0.128%
Potash (K20) ....... 34,501 lbs. (17.25 tons)-1.725%




Average of typical Florida soils. Analyses made by
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station and the State
Laboratory.

Three million lbs. surface soil, one acre about 7 inches
surface soil.

Organic Carbon ...... 17,346 lbs. (8.67 tons)-0.5882%
Total Nitrogen ....... 1,239 lbs. (0.62 tons)-0.0413%
Total Phosphoric Acid

(PsO) ............ 4,095 lbs. (2.45 tons)-0.1635%
Potash (KIO) ....... 273 lbs. (0.14 tons)-0.0091%



For the purpose of comparing the valuable soil con-
stituents, I have compared the weight in tons per acre,
of each constituent, 6% to 7 inches deep:











Illinois Soil. Florida Soil. (Ratio)
Tons. Tons.
Organic Carbon ...... 64.34 8.67 7 to 1
Nitrogen ............. 4.57 0.62 7.3 to 1
Total Phosphoric Acid
(P2,O ) ............ 1.28 2.45 1 to 1.9
Potash (K20) ........ 17.25 0.14 123 to 1



(Assuming organic carbon as being largely derived from
vegetable matter.) In other words, average Illinois soils
have seven times more humus, or vegetable matter, seven
and one-third times more nitrogen and one hundred and
twenty-three times more potash than average Florida soils.
While average Florida soils have one and nine-tenths times
more phosphates than Illinois, and similar "corn belt"
soils. Showing a vastly greater supply of vegetable mat-
ter (and consequently greater supply of nitrogen) and
potash in the "corn belt" soils, which are also very defi-
cient in phosphates. While average Florida soils have one
and nine-tenths times the phosphate, or two and one-half
tons per acre, of total phosphoric acide, equal to eight
tons of average raw phosphate.
The beneficial effect of finely ground raw phosphates on
Illinois soils so well supplied with. humus confirms the
general conclusion that raw rock phosphate is economical
on such soils.
It is well known that the sandy soils of the coastal
plain-the "cotton and orange belt"-are deficient in veg-
etable matter; that the clean culture of the cotton field,
the neglect of rotation, the burning off of all "trash" has
reduced the humus content to such a degree that the
growth of bacteria is greatly reduced, hence the applica-
tion of soluble phosphates (acid phosphate) has become
general-a purely economical practice, taught by experi-
ence.











The average of a number of samples of floats, from hard
rock, made by this laboratory, show 30% total phosphoric
acid (PO,), with 2% available, using the "official Neutral
Ammonium Citrate Method," or 40 pounds in a ton, of the
total phosphoric acid being available. Two hundred and
fifty pounds of 16% available acid phosphate yield the
same number of pounds of available phosphoric acid con-
tained in a ton of 2000 pounds of floats, or one-eighth the
weight; at present prices the acid phosphate would cost
$2.00 (at $16.00 per ton.)

Soft Phosphates.

There are extensive deposits of "soft phosphate of Lime
and Alumina (clay)" well distributed over the State,
found in varying quantities, in Madison, Lafayette, Alau-
chua, Levy, Marion, Sumter, Citrus, Hernando, Pasco,
Hillsboro, Polk and Manatee Counties. This material
has not been exploited commercially, the preference being
given by manufacturers to hard rock and pebble phosphate.

The analysis of this material varies greatly on account
of the clay, sand, and Carbonate of Lime, more or less in-
timately mixed with the phosphate. It is generally very
soft and readily reduced to an impalpable powder. It is
found in large deposits in a number of locations, notably
in Marion, Alauchua, Sumter, Hernando, Pasco, Citrus
and Polk Counties.

Some twenty years ago this material was exploited and
advertised to a considerable extent. Its use has never be-
come general. Recently it has been again called to the
attention of the public by several companies who have ad-
vertised it by circular and in the press; citing numerous
experiments in which excellent results have been obtained.
Particularly the results of the Illinois Station (where
floats were used), and the Massachusetts, Rhode Island
and Maryland Stations, are quoted.











The careful reading of these reports emphasizes the con-
clusions drawn from the experiments with floats-that on
certain soils, well filled with humus, these floats and soft
phosphates are a valuable and economical application. On
soils well filled with vegetable matter, abundantly sup-
plied with stable manure, and in good tilth, and in proper
condition for material action, well supplied with moisture
and heat.
Well drained, low hammocks, flat woods, swamps, and
saw grasses, in good physical and bacteriological condi-
tion, and on higher lands, well supplied with humus
(vegetable matter), and stable manure, with abundant
bacteria, and in good physical condition raw phosphates
have been found economical.
Also that on high, sandy soils, deficient in humus, arid
and dry, in which bacterial action is necessarily not ac-
tive, the use of these raw phosphates are not found to be
economical, but are practically useless.
Agricultural writers generally agree that the addition
of these finely divided raw phosphates, and particularly
the soft phosphates (containing the same percentage of
phosphorus) added to a compost of stable manure, kept
in proper physical condition, will, on account of bacterial
action, become available to a degree, depending largely
on the care and attention given to the compost heap. That
on well drained flat woods, saw grasses well drained, soils
in good physical condition generally, their application is
economical. At the same time their application, even in
large amounts (four times the quantity used of super-
phosphates-so-called acid phosphate), do not produce
economical results on dry sandy soils.
A
We find the average of a number of characteristic sam-
ples of soft phosphate as follows:
Total phosphoric acid-25.37%; available phosphoric
acid-2.50%, or 50 lbs. available in a ton of 2000 pounds.











The composition of these samples varies greatly from
8.75% to 33.80% total phosphoric acid, and from 1.40% to
5.38% available phosphoric acid.
This variation is not surprising, as the material, from
its nature, is not susceptible of being washed, as are the
pebbles and hard rocks, hence the percentage of insoluble
matter (sand and clay) was in some samples excessive. It
will be noted that the total and available phosphoric acid
in hard rock, "float," and soft phosphate, varies but
slightly.

RAW PHOSPHATES SUBJECT TO GUARANTEE

AND PAYMENT OF INSPECTION FEE.

The following opinion of the Attorney General confirm-
ing the position of the Chemical Division of the Agricul-
tural Department, that raw phosphates, when sold to
consumers, must have the guarantee tag and inspection
stamp placed on each package, as provided by law:

Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 14, 1916.

Honorable W. A. McRae,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Honorable R. E. Rose,
State Chemist,
Tallahassee, Fla.

Gentlemen:

I have yours of January 6th, submitting the following
for my opinion: A
."This department respectfully requests your official
opinion as to the sale of hard or soft phosphate to con-
sumers by manufacturers or dealers, without the guaran-
teed analysis and inspection stamp required by Sec. 3,











Chapter 4983, Acts of 1901 (Sec. 1264, General Statutes,
as amended by Chapter 5660, Acts of 1907). Also Sec. 5,
of the law (Sec. 1270, General Statutes). Also Sec. 11,
of the law (Sec. 1273, General Statutes).

"We attach the circular advertisement of manufactur-
ers, offering the material to the public, who have not reg-
istered their guaranteed analysis nor paid their inspec-
tion fee required by law.

"We would be pleased to have your opinion on the fol-
lowing points:

"Are raw phosphates, hard or soft phosphates, wnen
sold to consumers, classed as fertilizers, containing as
they do, phosphoric acid, as defined in Sec. 11, and are
they liable to the guarantee as provided in Sec. 2, regis-
tered, as provided in Sec. 5, and subject to the inspection
fee, provided in Sec. 2 and Sec. 6?

"This department has ruled that these materials, when
sold to consumers, are properly classed as commercial
fertilizer and subject to guarantee and payment of in-
spection fee as provided by law."

In reply I beg to advise that the subject matter of your
inquiry is fully covered in Sections 1267, 1268 and 1273
of the General Statutes, which read as follows:

"1267. To file name of principal agent with Commis-
sioner of Agriculture. Any manufacturer or importer of
or agent for the sale of commercial fertilizers, previous to
offering the same for sale in this State, shall file with the
Commissioner of Agriculture annually a paper giving the
name of his principal agent or agents in the State of
Florida, also the name and guaranteed analysis, under
oath, of the fertilizer or fertilizers offered for sale by
him."

"1268. Fee to be paid by the manufacturer. Every
manufacturer, importer, agent or seller of any commercial
2-Chem.










fertilizer, cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems,
tobacco dust or tobacco meal, shall pay to the State Treas-
urer a fee of twenty-five cents for each and every ton
offered for sale in this State: Provided, That when the
manufacturer or importer shall have paid the fees herein
required for any person acting as agent or seller for any
manufacturer or importer, such agent or seller shall not
be required to pay the fee named in this section."

"1273. Meaning of 'commercial fertilizer.' The term
'commercial fertilizer' as used in this chapter, shall be
taken to mean all substances containing nitrogen, potash
or phosphoric acid; also cotton seed meal, castor pomace,
tobacco meal, sold, offered or exposed for sale and ordi-
narily used for manural purposes, excepting barn yard or
stable manure and crude cotton seed."

In view of the law as above quoted, I am of the opinion
that cotton seed meal, castor pomace, tobacco stems, to-
bacco dust, tobacco meal, hard phosphate, soft phosphate,
or any other substance containing nitrogen, potash or
phosphoric acid, sold, offered or exposed for sale to the
consumer to be used as fertilizer would be embraced with-
in the meaning of the term "commercial fertilizer" as
defined in section 1273, as above quoted, and would sub-
ject to registry and to the inspection fee as provided in
Sections 1267 and 1268, herein referred to.

Very respectfully,

(Signed) T. F. WEST,


Attorney General.










Raw Phosphates-Conclusions.

First-That there is little, if any, difference in the
availability of floats and soft phosphate.
Second-That immediate results are obtained from the
available phosphate contained, about 2%, or forty pounds,
in a ton of 2000 pounds.

Third-That the insoluble phosphate is slowly available
in soils well supplied with vegetable matter (and possi-
bly potash), aided by stable manure to induce bacterial
action.

Fourth-That on dry sandy soils deficient in humus,
in which bacterial decomposition is not active, floats and
soft phosphates are not economical and of little, if any,
benefit. That on such soils, 250 pounds of 16% available
acid phosphate will produce results equal or superior to
2000 pounds of raw phosphate.
Fifth-That the vast deposits of soft phosphate of lime
and alumina (clay) in Florida justifies a careful study of
the material by the experiment stations of the cotton
States, and particularly of the Florida Experiment Sta-
tion, and the practical demonstration under field condi-
tions of the most economical methods of its application to
the ordinary sandy soils, and particularly to the drained
muck soils of the State.

Demonstration Suggestions.

I would respectfully suggest to the State authorities
that a Demonstration Farm, under the scientific direc-
tion of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, and
the practical direction of a capable and scientifically
trained demonstrator, established on the Prison Farm at
Raiford, would be of great practical value, where the
scientific discoveries of the Experiment Station can be











practically demonstrated in field practice, where all the
field conditions may be carefully and accurately noted-
soil, drainage, tilth, season, rainfall, temperature, crops,
dates of planting, fertilizing, culture and results.
Such a demonstration farm would be of enormous eco-
nomic value to the State, and a practical demonstration
of the best methods to apply to the various field crops of
the State-cane, corn, rice, tobacco, cotton and live stock.
The conditions afforded by this farm, some 2,000 acres,
under State control, are ideal for a scientific and practical
demonstration of the best and most economical methods
of preparing the soil, fertilizing and cultivating those
crops which are best adapted to the State, and become an
object lesson to the practical farmers of the State-nol
an experimental farm, with small plots, but a demonstra-
tion farm, to practically apply under field conditions, the
scientific truths discovered by the Experiment Station.
Raw Phosphate on Muck Soils.
In this connection, I would suggest that the vast areas
of muck soils, soils largely composed of vegetable matter,
in the Everglades, the upper St. Johns, the Oklawaha,
Kissimmee, Peace River and Manatee valleys, in fact, in
every county in the State, and particularly in the numer-
ous drainage districts now organized, offer a field for
scientific study and practical demonstration, where all
the facts and conditions shall be carefully noted by com-
petent observers, and correct conclusions drawn, a field
which appears to offer an outlet to these vast deposits of
soft phosphates and phosphatic clays, the waste of phos-
phate washers, phosphatic matrix, now being lost to the
fields of this and other States, which should be conserved.
Lime-Ground Limestone.
There are vast deposits of first-class limestone in all
parts of the State. There is no county in the State in
which limestone is not found, upon or near the surface.











The limestones of the State are generally very pure,
showing 95 to 98% of Carbonate of Lime, when free of
sand and clay (soil). These are practically the only im-
purities found in the limestones of Florida.
Lime is not a fertilizer, but is found valuable on prac-
tically ninety per cent of the soils of the State, to correct
acidity and to provide an alkaline base to assist bacterial
action, decompose vegetable matter, and thus free the
unavailable plant foods locked up in the soil.
It adds no fertilizing elements to the soil, but by its
action, indirectly releases the inert or unavailable plant
foods in the soil, particularly when there is an abundant
supply of humus (vegetable matter).
The old adage that "lime makes rich fathers and poor
sons" is true. The use of lime without adding stable
manure, vegetable matter and other fertilizers certainly
tends in time to reduce the fertility or productiveness of
a soil.



HARDWOOD AND PALMETTO ASHES.

The present scarcity, and high price, of German potash
salts and the universal demand for potash by the farmer,
particularly in the cotton belt, and in Florida, has lead
to universal activity in the search for a supply of potash
to meet this demand.
The United States Geological Survey, and numerous in-
dividuals have spent much time and labor in the search,
with some hopes of success, though up to the present time
no economic source of supply has been discovered.

Potassium is one of the most universally distributed
elements, found in all soils in greater or lesser amounts,
particularly in rocks of Feldspathic origin, in granites











and numerous other minerals, and in clays, resulting
from their decomposition. Sandy soils are notably de-
ficient in potash, while clays are generally well supplied
with potash-mostly, however, insoluble and unavailable.
By proper culture, the growth of legumes, and applica-
tion of lime, this insoluble potash is rendered available
to plants.

HARDWOOD ASHES.

Numerous newspaper articles have recently appeared
in Florida, based on the analysis of ashes from "Palmet-
to roots," made from perfectly clean roots burned in a
crucible under laboratory conditions.

All hardwood ashes, burned under such conditions,
show a larger potash content. Such analyses, however,
are by no means a proper criterion by which to estimate
the potash content of commercial ashes.

Many analyses of Canada and other hardwood ashes
.have been made by the State Laboratory, samples of com-
mercial ashes from the furnaces of wood burning plants,
and from the waste ash heaps of immense quantities of
ashes formerly burned to make "pearl ash," in the Cana-
dian forests. A material now seldom used, as "Caustic
Soda," so-called "caustic potash" or "concentrated lye"
or "Ball potash," which contains no potash whatever, on
account of the low cost of its manufacture from salt
(sodium chloride), caustic soda has replaced "pearl ash"
(Potash) in the manufacture of soaps, formerly made ex-
clusively from potash, derived from wood ashes. It is
hardly necessary to say that the Canadian ash heaps allud-
ed to have been leached and their potash removed, and that
by far the greater part of the "Canada hardwood ashes"
have little potash in them. Their potash content is from
0.50% to 4.0%, averaging about 1.50%.











PALMETTO ROOT ASHES.

Recently, on account evidently of the numerous articles
in the press, on the subject, quoting the analysis of pal-
metto roots perfectly cleaned and free of sand, burned
under laboratory conditions, from small samples of excel-
lent roots, numerous letters of inquiry, and samples of
palmetto ashes, have been received by the State Labora-
tory, together with samples of various wood ashes, evi-
dently burned under ordinary conditions, in heaps in the
field, in ordinary furnaces, stoves, etc., frequently showing
by their condition they had not been protected from the
weather.

Potash is one of the most soluble salts, more so than
common salt; any exposure to dampness, fog, or rain,
will rapidly leach out all the potash, not only from the
ashes, but also from the roots.

Numerous analyses of wood ashes show as follows.
Commercial samples:











HARDWOOD ASHES.


No. Kind.


Potasi


3437
3474
3489
3494
3496
3528
3567
3568
3592
3612
3613
3690
3691
3695
3712
3720
3724
3737
3730
3736


*Minimum per cent.
tMaximum per cent.


Canadian H. W. Ashes 2.72
Ashes .............. 1.47
Cypress ashes ....... 0.61
Hardwood ashes ... 2.93
Ashes ............... 0.43
Cypress ashes ........ 0.36
Ashes ............... 0.90
Ashes ............... 0.48
Hardwood ashes ..... 3.22
Hardwood ashes ..... 1.61
Hardwood ashes ..... 1.27
Ashes No. 1.......... 3.37
Ashes ............... 3.29
Hardwood ashes ..... 0.86
Ashes ............... t4.37
Ashes ............... 3.42
Ashes ............... 0.26
Ashes ............... 1.81
Ashes No. 2.......... 0.96
Ashes ............... *0.28

Average ......... 1.73


h. Sand.
32.73
27.99
19.27
*3.75
78.15
18.20
28.26
t83.98
71.55
23.00
22.20
8.02
9.00
46.16
39.77
20.66
5.11
22.11
74.15
23.20

32.86


Carbonate
of Lime.
63.64
70.50
78.22
t93.32
21.42
80.84
70.84
*15.54
25.23
75.39
76.53
88.61
87.71
34.78
55.86
76.00
94.63
76.08
25.00
76.52

64.33









25

PALMETTO ASHES.

Carbonate
No. Kind. Potash. Sand. of Lime.
3525 Saw Palmetto ashes.. 0.49 96.39 3.12
3593 Palmetto Root ashes.. 0.24 94.20 5.56
3616 Palmetto ashes ...... 1.07 ....
3705 Palmetto ashes ...... 0.25 96.30 2.90
3721 Palmetto ashes ...... 1.44
3728 Palmetto Root ashes.. 4.04 81.00 15.00
3729 Palmetto ashes ...... 2.33 77.20 20.47
1111 Palmetto ashes ...... 0.57 ...
1258 Palmetto ashes ...... 5.73
2016 Palmetto ashes ...... 2.35
2065 Palmetto ashes ...... 3.35
2197 Palmetto ashes ...... 0.51

Average. ........ 1.86 89.20 9.41

Sample No. 3728 (the best complete analysis) shows
4.04% of potash (K0O) ; 15% of carbonate of lime, and
81% of sand. As a ton of dry roots will yield not to ex-
ceed 5% of ashes, or 100 pounds of ashes, it would re-
quire 20 tons of dry roots to make a ton of ashes. This
ton of ashes would yield 4.04% of potash (if all the roots
ran as high in potash as the sample sent) which would
give 80.80 pounds of potash in a ton of ashes, made from
20 tons of dry roots.

Potash is not now on the market. The last quotations
we had were $400.00 per ton for 50%sulphate of potash,
or 40 cents a pound for potash (KO), or $8.00 per unit of
20 pounds. Hence the ton of ashes with 2% potash (K20)
would be worth $16.16 f.o.b. Florida seaports. Hence the
digging, drying and burning of 20 tons of dry roots would
yield at the present prices $16.16 for the ton of ashes,
derived from the 20 tons of dry roots. These ashes would











contain 81% of sand, or 1620 pounds in the ton, also 15%
or 300 pounds of lime carbonate (totaling 2000.8 pounds).

You will note the average of 12 samples of Palmetto
ashes show 1.86% potash (K20), 5 samples show 89.20%
sand. The highest potash was 5.73% No. 1258, the lowest
0.24'% No. 3593.

We have discussed this fully to correct the false im-
pression so generally prevalent that palmetto roots,
burned under ordinary conditions, were particularly val-
uable as a source of potash, which is by no means a fact.

We find that as a rule, all ashes are greatly over-rated
as to their potash content. The average analysis of hun-
dreds of commercial samples of potash made by this and
other laboratories, show as follows: 1 to 5% of potash.
Twenty samples of wood ashes analyzed in recent years
average 1.73% potash, 32.86% sand, and 64.33% carbon-
ate of lime.

Hardwood ashes have been largely used in Florida with
good results. In the opinion of the writer, their greatest
value was in the lime content. However, ashes sell at
from $15.00 to $20.00 per ton, while lime carbonate can
be purchased in car lots at $1.75 per ton and sand can
be had for the hauling.

LEACHED ASHES.

Caution: Leached Ashes from Unlawful Shippers, Not
Guaranteed, Shipped Into the State by Irresponsible
Shippers.

The State is flooded at present with leached ashes from
various States and from Canada, sold without guarantee
by irresponsible parties. Such ashes are not subject to
free analysis by the State Laboratory. They seldom con-











tain more than 2% potash more frequently, less
than 1%.

Florida growers should consider the fact that the de-
mand for potash is acute, not only in Florida but through-
out the nation, and that there is a great demand for un-
leached ashes at remunerative prices locally. That it is
not probable that unleached ashes will be shipped into
Florida from other States where the demand is equally
as acute as it is in Florida.

It is the duty of all sheriffs to attach and sell at public
sale all packages of ashes, or other commercial fertilizer
offered for sale in Florida that do not bear the guarantee
of a reliable registered dealer, and the inspection stamp,
on each package.

SO-CALLED "BALL-POTASH."

Caustic Soda, So-called "Ball-Potash," "Concentrated
Lye," "Canned Potash."

We have received numerous letters asking if the ordi-
nary "ball-potash," "canned potash," or "concentrated
lye," could not be used as a substitute for potash (K20)
in fertilizers.

This material is not potash; has no potash in it what-
ever. It is simply caustic soda which, on account of its
cheapness, has entirely replaced caustic potash (Potas-
sium Hydrate) in the manufacture of soap.

It has no fertilizing value whatever. There is no sub-
stitute for potash in fertilizers. Careful culture, deep
plowing, rotation of crops, the planting of legumes, the
use of phosphates and ammoniates, with a liberal applica-
tion of ground limestone to aid in releasing, thus mak-
ing available the insoluble potash in the soil, is the best










practical method of securing the necessary potash, until
the German potash salts can be obtained, or some other
source of potash developed.
There is no doubt that potash has been extravagantly
used during recent years. It has been practically dem-
onstrated that equally as fine crops have been produced
with a 3% potash as were formerly grown with a 10%
formula.
Florida truckers have doubtless been extravagant in
the use of potash, and other high grade commercial fertili-
zers. Equally as good results could and doubtless will be
obtained by the use of composts, the growth of legumes,
rotations, and the intelligent application of ammoniates,
phosphates, and ground limestone, to aid in releasing the
latent potash naturally in the soil.

THE STATE LABORATORY AND GEOLOGICAL
SURVEY BUILDING.

The present small building now occupied by the State
Laboratory and State Geological Survey is greatly con-
gested. Neither of these important scientific departments
have sufficient working room to properly perform its func-
tions. The building would accommodate either one, but
not both of the departments.
I suggest that a scientific building, for the accommoda-
tion of the State Laboratory and its library, the Geologi-
cal Survey, its library and museum, and the State En-
gineer and Secretary of the Drainage Commission, prop-
erly designed for the purpose, would greatly facilitate the
business of the State, relieve the congestion of these offi-
cers, and also release much room in the Capitol building
now demanded by larger and increased public business.

Respectfully,
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.











ANALYSES MADE BY STATE LABORATORY.

Only such materials as are of public interest are
analyzed by the State Laboratory, such as are directed
by the Pure Food, the Fertilizer, and Stock Feed Law.

There are no fees or charges of any kind made by the
State Laboratory.

The State Laboratory is not permitted to compete with
commercial laboratories.

No commercial work of any kind is accepted.

The State Laboratory does not analyze the materials
used by, nor the products of Fertilizer, Feed Stuffs, or
other factories, by which to guarantee their goods. Such
analyses are commercial problems.

The State Laboratory does not analyze samples for in-
dividual account wherein the public is not interested.
Such samples should be sent to a commercial laboratory.

ANALYSES IN CRIMINAL CASES.

The State Laboratory does not make post mortem ex-
aminations, nor furnish evidence in criminal cases (ex-
cept as provided by the Pure Food, Fertilizer, and Stock
Feed Laws). Such analyses and examinations are made
by specialists employed by the grand jury and prosecut-
ing attorney, the cost being taxed as other criminal costs,
by the court.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
Tallahassee. Fla., January 1. 1916.











THE STATE OF FLORIDA,

Department of Agriculture.

January 1, 1916.



REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND
FORWARDING OF SAMPLES OF COMMERCIAL
FERTILIZERS AND FEEDING STUFF TO THE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE FOR ANALY-
SIS BY THE STATE CHEMIST.

The following regulations for drawing, preparing and
sending samples of Commercial Fertilizer and Cominer-
cial Stock Feed, under the authority given in Section 15
of Chapter 4150, Acts of 1901 (Chapter XXII General
Statutes), and Sec. 15, Chapter 5452, Acts of 1907, are this
day adopted.

OFFICIAL SAMPLES, drawn by State Chemist, As-
sistant State Chemist or Inspectors.

An approximately equal quantity (a pint or a pound,
approximately) shall be taken from each of ten original
packages of the same brand in the possession of any man-
ufacturer, dealer, or person, when the lot being sampled
contains ten or more packages of the same brand.


In case the lot contains less than ten packages of the
same brand, each package shall be sampled as directed.

PREPARATION OF SAMPLE.-The several samples, drawn
as above from each package, shall be carefully and thor-
oughly mixed. From this well-mixed lot drawn from each
package as above, a fair sample of not less than one










pound, in the case of fertilizers, and of not less than
one-half pound in the case of stock feed, shall be placed
in a bottle or tin can approximately a quart can or
bottle.

The sample shall be delivered to the State Chemist, who
shall prepare the same for analysis (by properly grind-
ing, mixing and sifting the same). The State Chemist
shall retain one-half of this prepared sample for analysis;
the remainder shall be placed in a glass bottle, sealed,
and identified by the Laboratory number, and date, and
placed in the custody of the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture. These duplicate samples shall be retained for a
period of three months from the date of the certificate of
analysis. In case of appeal from analysis of the State
Chemist (within three months from the date of the cer-
tificate) the sample shall be retained indefinitely, until
the final disposition of the case.

SPECIAL SAMPLES.-Samples drawn and transmit-
ted by the purchaser under Sections 9 of both the Com-
mercial Fertilizer and the Commercial Stock Feed Laws.

The purchaser or owner of the material to be sampled,
when the lot or shipment contains ten or more original
packages, each bearing the Guarantee tag and stamp
required by law, of the same brand, shall take in the pres-
ence of two witnesses, an approximately equal quantity
from each of ten packages of the same brand (approxi-
mately a pint or a pound), after carefully and thoroughly
mixing these samples, a fair sample of the mixture, not
less than a pound in the case of commercial fertilizer and.
not less than one-half pound in the case of commercial
stock feed, shall be placed in a bottle or tin can, and
sealed in the presence of the witnesses.

,On the sample thus drawn shall be written the name
and address of the purchaser, and the name of a disinter-
ested party, who shall transmit the package to the Com-











missioner of Agriculture by mail or express, properly
packed to prevent damage in transportation.

In case the lot or shipment contains less than ten
original packages of the same brand, each bearing the
Guarantee tag and stamp required by law, each package
shall be sampled as provided in the foregoing paragraph,
the samples mixed, and a fair sample of the lot, "one or
more packages," shall be drawn and transmitted as pro-
vided in the foregoing paragraphs.
The purchaser, or sender of the sample, shall also ad-
dress a letter to the Commissioner of Agriculture. advis-
ing him of the sending of the.sample, stating the number
of original packages, each bearing the guaranteed analysis
and inspection stamp required by law, represented by the
sample. This letter must not be enclosed in the package.

The object of the sealed bottle or tin can is to prevent
the evaporation of the moisture from the sample an
important determination.

SAMPLES IN PAPER OR WOODEN PACKAGES WILL NOT BB
ACCEPTED.

These regulations are adopted to secure fair samples
of sufficient size to allow the preservation of a duplicate
sample in case of protest or appeal. This duplicate sam-
ple will be preserved for three months from the date of
certificate of analysis.

The State Chemist is not the proper officer to receive
special samples from the purchaser.

The propriety of the method of drawing and sending
samples as fixed by law is obvious.

The drawing and sending of special samples is in rare
cases in compliance with law. Samples are frequently












sent in paper boxes, badly packed, and frequently in very
small quantity (less than an ounce); frequently there
are no marks, numbers or other means of identification;
the postmark in many instances being absent.

The attention of those who desire to avail themselves
of this privilege is called to Sections 9 and 10 of the laws,
which are clear and explicit.

NOTE.-HEREAFTER STRICT COMPLIANCE WITH ABOVE
REGULATIONS WILL BE REQUIRED. THE SAMPLE MUST NOT
BE LESS THAN ONE POUND OF FERTILIZER OR ONE-HALF POUND
OF STOCK FEED, IN A TIN CAN OR BOTTLE, SEALED AND AD-
DRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE. THE
PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS, AND THE NAME OF THE
SENDER, MUST ALSO BE ON THIS PACKAGE, THIS RULE APPLY-
ING TO SPECIAL SAMPLES OF FERTILIZERS OR COMMERCIAL
FEEDING STUFF.


NOTE.-A one-pound baking powder tin can, properly
cleaned, filled with a fairly drawn, well-mixed sample,
drawn as directed, is a proper sample. IT MUST BE SEALED
AND ADDRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE, AT
TALLAHASSEE. THE PURCHASER'S NAME AND ADDRESS, AND
THE NAME OF THE SENDER, MUST ALSO BE PLACED ON THE
PACKAGE.


IF MORE THAN ONE SAMPLE IS SENT REPRESENTING DIF-
ERENT BRANDS, THE SAMPLES MUST BE NUMBERED SO AS TO
IDENTIFY THEM. ALL THIS SHOULD BE DONE IN THE PRES-
ENCE OF THE WITNESSES, AND THE PACKAGE MAILED OR EX-
PRESSED BY A DISINTERESTED PERSON.

NOTE.-The tags off the sacks with the guaranteed
analyses and stamp, and names of manufacturers should
be retained by the purchaser, to compare with the certifi-
cate of analysis when received and NOT SENT TO THIS
3-Chem.











OFFICE. THE DATE OF THE DRAWING AND SENDING OF THE
SAMPLE, AND NAMES OF WITNESSES, SHOULD ALSO BE RE-
TAINED BY THE PURCHASER; NOT SENT TO THIS OFFICE.

RAW PHOSPHATES. Ground raw phosphate rock-hard
or soft-contains phosphoric acid, more or less available,
hence is classed a fertilizer when sold to consumers for
fertilizing purposes, under Section 11 of the law; and is
required to be guaranteed and stamped as required by
section 3; listed and guaranteed under oath, as required
by Section 5, and the inspection fee paid previous to sale
as provided by Section 6.

LIME is not classed a fertilizer. It is not required to
be sold under guarantee, nor the inspection fee paid;
hence is not subject to free analysis by the State
Laboratory.

When sold under guarantee to growers, the State Lab-
oratory will analyze the same on receipt of proper infor-
mation as to the guarantee, and a sample drawn, trans-
mitted and certified to, as provided for drawing and send-
ing special samples of fertilizers.

OBJECT OF THE LAWS.

The object of the Fertiilzer and Stock Feed Laws are:
First, to protect the consumer from fraud, false repre-
sentations by illegitimate dealers who have not complied
with the law, nor filed their guaranteed analysis under
oath, and who have not paid their inspection tax fixed
by law.

Second, to protect the lawful dealer who has fully com-
plied with the law, by filing his guarantee under oath,
and has paid his inspection fee, and who has placed upon
each bag or other package, a guarantee tag showing the









35

minimum percentage of valuable ingredients in the fer-
tilizer or feed stuff, as provided by the law.

These regulations supersede and revoke all previous
regulations governing the drawing and transmitting of
samples of Commercial Fertilizer and Commercial Stock
Feed.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1916.










THE STATE OF FLORIDA,

Department of Agriculture.


RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE
ANALYSIS OF WATER, SOILS, COMMERCIAL
SAMPLES, AND SAMPLES INVOLVING CRIM-
INAL CASES.

WATER ANALYSIS.

The State Laboratory will analyze samples of water
from publicly-owned water supplies, municipal plants,
etc., owned and operated by the city or town, when ac-
companied by the certificate of the mayor, or other city
officer, that the water is furnished the public by the city
or town.

It will not analyze water for individuals or corpora-
tions selling water to the public, water companies, ice
companies, mineral springs, health resorts, etc., main-
tained for profit. Such samples should be sent to a com-
mercial laboratory.

The State Laboratory does not make bacteriological
examinations for disease germs. Such examinations are
made by the State Board of Health, at Jacksonville, Fla.,
which has entire charge of the public health.

We do not make a sanitary analysis. We determine
the total dissolved solids in the sample quantitatively.
and report them as parts per 1,000,000, naming the prin-
cipal ingredients in the order of their predominance
qualitatively. We find Calcium Carbonate (lime),
Sodium Chloride (salt), Magnesium Sulphate (epsom
salts), Silicia (sand), and Iron, is the general order of










their predominance, though on the coast, where the total

dissolved solids amounts to 5,000 or more parts per
1,000,000, Sodium Chloride (salt), is the predominant
substance.

From a knowledge of the chemical analysis of a water,
unaccompanied by any further information, no conclu-
sion as to the potability and healthfulness of the water
can be deduced.

Therefore, we require the following information to be
given in regard to the source of the water:

(1). The source of the water: spring, lake, river,
driven well, dug well, bored well, artesian well, or flow-
ing well; and also the depth of the water surface below
the top of the soil, and in cased wells, the depth of the.
casing.

(2). The locality of the source of the water; town,
city or village; or the section, township and range.

No sample of water will be analyzed unless the name
and address of the sender is on the package for indenti-
fication.

We require two gallons of each sample of water, in a
new jug, stopped with a new cork, and sent by prepaid
express. We will not accept any sample of water for
analysis not in a new jug.. Vessels previously used for
other purposes are never properly cleaned for sending
samples of water for analysis. Corks, once used for other
substances (molasses, vinegar, whiskey, kerosene, etc.),
are never properly cleaned.

NOTE.-We find the waters of the State-springs,











wells, driven wells and artesian wells generally very
pure and wholesome, with but little mineral impurity,
and that such as are not harmful. Except in cases of
gross carelessness, in allowing surface water to contami-
nate the well or spring, the waters of the State are pure
and wholesome. The deep wells of the State are noted
for their purity and healthfulness.

SOIL ANALYSIS.
Frequently samples of soil are sent in for analysis with
a request to advise as to the best methods of fertilizing.
There is but little information to be derived from a soil
analysis that would be of benefit to farmers. So much
depends on tilth, drainage, culture and other physical
conditions, that an analysis made under laboratory con-
ditions is of little value.
A chemical analysis of soil may indicate a very fertile
soil, rich in plant food, while the facts are the soils are
not productive. This is instanced by the rich Sawgrass
muck lands and river bottoms of the State, that are
fertile chemically, but not productive until properly
drained; also, by the arid lands of the West, rich in the
elements of plant food, but not productive until irri-
gated. Other soils, with less plant food, but on account
of proper physical conditions, culture and tilth, are ex-
ceedingly productive.
The average of thousands of analyses of Florida soils
made by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
and the State Laboratory is as follows:

Nitrogen (per cent.) .................. 0.0413
Potash (per cent.) .................... 0.0091
Phosphoric Acid (per cent.)........... 0.1635

This is a fair average of all of the Norfolk and Ports-
mouth soil series of the State, which comprises by far
the greater portion of the State.










In this connection we quote from the report of the In-
diana Agricultural Experiment Station, Purdue Univer-
sity, Lafayette, Indiana, 1908, as follows:

"SOIL ANALYSIS OF LITTLE VALUE IN SHOWING FERTIL-
IZER REQUIREMENTS.-The Chemical Department is called
upon to answer hundreds of letters of inquiry in relation
to agricultural chemical problems from people all over
the State. In this connection it might be, well to say that
there is a widespread idea that the chemist can analyze a
sample of soil and, without further knowledge of the con-
ditions, write out a prescription of a fertilizer which will
fill the needs of that particular soil.

"The Experiment Station does not analyze samples of
soil to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is no
chemical method known that will show reliably the avail-
ability of the plant food elements present in the soil, as
this is a variable factor, influenced by the kind of crop,
the type of soil, the climate and biological conditions;
hence, we do not recommend this method of testing soil.

"The method recommended by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot system, in which long,
narrow strips of the field to be tested are measured off
side by side. The crop is planted uniformly over each.
Different fertilizers are applied to the different plots,
every third or fourth one being left unfertilized. The
produce from these plots is harvested separately and
weighed. In this manner the farmer can tell what ferti-
lizer is best suited for his needs. As climatic conditions
may influence the yield with different fertilizers, it is
best to carry on such tests for more than one year before
drawing definite conclusions. There is positively no
easier or shorter method of testing the soil that we feel
safe in recommending.

"Soil can be greatly improved by an intelligent rotation










of crops, the conservation of stable manure, and the use
of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need
have no fear that the proper application of commercial
fertilizer will injure the land."

ANALYSIS OF FOODS AND DRUGS.

Samples of Foods and Drugs are drawn under special
regulations as provided by law.

Applications should be made to the Commissioner of
Agriculture or State Chemist for the necessary blanks,
instructions, etc., for drawing and transmitting samples
of foods and drugs, including drinks of all kinds.

FOOD AND DRUG SAMPLES NOT DRAWN AND TRANSMITTED
ACCORDING TO LAW WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS.

COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain, free of charge, the
respective Laws, including Rules and Regulations and
Standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissioner of Agriculture or
State Chemist. The Bulletins of the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station can be had by application to
the Director at Gainesville.
R. E. RosE,
State Chemist.
Approved:
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1916.











STATE VALUATIONS.

(Based on commercial values, Dec. 31, 1915.)
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash for the Season of 1916.

Available Phosphoric Acid............... 6c a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............... Ic a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen)... 191c a pound
Potash (as actual potash, K2O).......... 40c a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid.............. $1.20 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............... 20c per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen).. 3.90 per cent
Potash .............................. 8.00 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent., in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take for
example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid...6.22 per cent.x$1.20-$ 7.46
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid... 1.50 per cent.x .20- .30
Ammonia .................. 3.42 per cent.x 3.90- 13.34
Potash .......................3.23 per cent.x 8.00- 25.89
Mixing and Bagging .........................- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports................... $48.49
Or as a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid..... 8 per cent.x$1.20-$ 9.60
Ammonia .................... 2 per cent.x 3.90- 7.80
Potash ......................2 per cent.x 8.00- 16.00
Mixing and Bagging...........................- 1.50

Commercial value at seaports................... $34.90
The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.










MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-
ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEAPORTS,
JANUARY 1, 1916.

"Under unsettled conditions, potash quotations are
wholly nominal."

AMMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 17% Ammonia ................ $ 68.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 251/ Ammonia........... 82.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25% Ammonia............ 82.00
Dried Blood, 16% Ammonia.................... 69.50
Cyanamid, 18% Ammonia..................... 60.00

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 90% Sul-
phate, 48% K2O ......................... Nominal
Low Grade Sulphate of Potash, 48% Sulphate,
26% K20 ................................. Nominal
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% KO ........... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 15% Ammonia,
44% Potash K20 ....................... Nominal
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% Ammonia,
42% Potash K20........................ Nominal
Kainit, Potash, 12% K0 .................... Nominal
Canada Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 4% K.O
Potash ................................... Nominal

AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Water Soluble Tankage, 14% Ammonia ......... $ 65.00
High Grade Tankage, 10% Ammonia, 10% Phos-
phoric Acid ............................... 49.00
Tankage, 8% Ammonia, 18% Phosphoric Acid.... 46.00











Low Grade Tankage, 6%% Ammonia, 12% Phos-
phoric Acid ................................ 40.00
Sheep Manure, ground, 5% Ammonia........... 35.00
Imported Fish Guano, 11% Ammonia, 51/2%
Phosphoric Acid ........................... 50.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% Ammonia,
22% Phosphoric Acid ...................... 35.00
Raw Bone, 4% Ammonia, 22% Phosphoric Acid. 38.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/% Ammonia, 2%
Phosphoric Acid .......................... 28.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 71/2% Ammonia........ 40.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2% Ammonia......... 35.00

PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16% Available
Phosphoric Acid ..........................$ 18.00
Acid. Phosphate, 14% Available Phosphoric Acid. 16.00
Bone Black, 17% Available Phosphoric Acid..... 25.00

MISCELLANEOUS.

High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 2% Am-
monia, 7% Potash.........................$ 55.00
High Grade Ground Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
21/2% Ammonia, 8% Potash................. 60.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% Ammonia, 2% Potash... 32.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash .................................... 34.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% Ammonia, 4%
Potash .............. ..................... 30.00
Land Plaster, in sacks....................... 12.00

The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.











NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT
DECEMBER 31, 1915-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

"Under unsettled conditions, quotations are wholly
nominal."

AMMONIATES.

Ammonia, Sulph., prompt............. 4.00 @ -
futures ........................... 4.00 @ -
Fish Scrap, dried, 11 p. c. Ammonia and
14 p. c. Bone Phosphate, f.o.b. fish
works ....................per unit 3.75 & 10
wet, accidulated, 6 p.c. Ammonia, 3 p.c.
Phosphoric Acid, delivered......... Nominal
Ground Fish Guano, imported, 10 and 11
p. c. Ammonia and 15-17 p. c. Bone
Phosphate, c.i.f. N. Y, Baltimore or
Philadelphia ..................... @ -
Tankage, 11 p. c. and 15 p. c. f.o.b. Chi-
cago ............................ 3.20 & 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p. c. f.o.b. Chicago,
ground .......................... 3.20 & 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p. c., f.o.b. Chicago,
ground .......................... 3.20 & 10
Tankage, concentrated, f.o.b. Chicago, 14
to 15 p. c., f.o.b. Chicago........... 3.10 & 10
Garbage, tankage, f.o.b. Chicago........ 9.00 @ -
Sheep Manure, concentrated, f.o.b. Chi-
cago .....................per ton, 13.00 @ -
Hoofmeal, f.o.b. Chicago...... .per unit, 2.60 @ 2.70
Dried blood, 12-13 p. c. Ammonia, f.o.b.
New York ....................... 3.40 @ -
Chicago ......................... 3.25 @ -
Nitrate of Soda, 95 p. c. spot, per 100 Ibs. 3.25 @ -
futures, 95 p. c................... 3.20 @ -











PHOSPHATES.


Acid Phosphate ...............per unit .80 @ 85
Bones, rough, hard............per ton, 22.50 @ 24.00
soft steamed unground.............. 21.50 @ 22.00
ground, steamed, 11/4 p.c. Ammonia
and 60 p.c. Bone Phosphate........ 20.00 @ 21.00
ditto, 3 and 50 p.c .................. 23.50 @ 24.00
raw, ground, 4 p.c. Ammonia and 50
p.c. Bone Phosphate............... 28.50 @ 30.00
South Carolina Phosphate Rock, kiln


dried, f.o.b. Ashley River...........
Florida Land Pebble Phosphate Rock, 68
p. c., f.o.b. Port Tampa, Fla........
Florida high-grade Phosphate Hard Rock,
77 p. c., f.o.b. Florida ports........
Tennessee Phosphate Rock, f.o.b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p.c., per
ton ..............................
75 p.c. guaranteed ..................
68@72 p.c. ........................


3.50 @ 3.75

2.75 @ 3.00

5.00 @ 5.25


5.00
4.75
4.25


5.50
5.00
4.50


POTASHES.


.Muriate of Potash, 80-85 p. c., basis 80
p. c., in bags......................555.00 @600.00
Muriate of Potash, min. 95 p. c., basis 80
p. c., in bags...................... Nominal
Muriate of Potash, min. 98 p. c., basis 80
p. c., in bags...................... Nominal
Sulphate of Potash, 90-95 p. c., basis 80
p. c., in bags .....................440.00 @ -
Double Manure Salt, 48-53 p. c., basis 48
p. c., in bags.....................105.00 @ -
Manure Salt, min. 20 p. c., KO, in bulk.. 60.00 @ -
Hardsalt., min. 16 p. c., K2O, in bulk.... 40.00 @ 50.00
Kainit, min. 12.4 p. c., K2O, in bulk...... 40.00 @ 50.00











COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED STUFF,
FOR 1916.

For the season of 1916 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation January 1.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEED STUFFS FOR 1916.

Indian corn being the standard @ $35.00 per ton.
($1.75 per sack of 100 lbs., 98c per bu. 56 lbs.)
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.
Protein, 4.8c per pound................... 96c per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1.55c per pound.......... 31c per unit
Fats, 3.5c per pound...................... 70c per unit

EXAMPLE NO. 1.

CORN AND OATS, EQUAL PARTS-

Protein .........................11.15 x 96c, $10.71.
Starch and Sugar................ 64.65 x 31c, 20.04
Fat ............................ 5.20 x 70c, 3.64

State value per ton..........................$34.49

EXAMPLE No. 2.

Protein ......... ...................10.50 x 96c, $10.08
Starch and Sugar................. 69.60 x 31c, 21.57
Fat ............................ 5.40 x 70c, 3.78

State value per ton ......................... $35.43











STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
"season." They may, but seldom do, vary from the market
prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight advance
or decline.

They are compiled from price lists and commercial re-
ports by reputable dealers and journals.

The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton ?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound to a ton of goods similar to
"Smith's Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but ac-
cepted and well-known materials of the best quality.

State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for in cash ton lots
at Florida seaports.

These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values" January 1, 1916, are nominal.

SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florida is the only State in the Union that provides for
the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or pnu-











chaser, under proper rules and regulations fixed by law-
to be sent to the State Laboratory for analysis free of
cost. Any citizen in the State who has purchased fertil-
izers or feeds for his own use may draw a sample of the
same, according to law, and have the same analyzed by
the State Chemist free of cost. And in case of adultera-
tion or deficiency he can, on establishing the fact, receive
double the cost price demanded for the goods.

The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmitting "special samples."

This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.

Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of "food and drugs" will be sent
to any citizen requesting the same.

"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS
MATERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE
OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FER-
TILIZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE."












COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Ammonia. Phosphoric Po
Acid. Potash.
Nitrate of Soda.......... 17 to 19 ............ ...........
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 24 .......................
Dried Blood ............ 12 to 17 ....................
Concentrated Tankage... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ............
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap........ 8 to 11 6 to 8 ............
Cotton Seed Meal........ 7 to 10 2 to 3 i to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13. to 17 1i to 2 1j to 2
PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

Pounds Per Hundred.

Ammonia. Available Insoluble.
SPhos. Acid.
Florida Pebble Phosphate ....................... 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate. ................. ..... 33 to 35
Florida Super Phosphate. ............ 14 to 45 1 to 3
Ground Bone ........... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3
POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.


Pounds Per Hundred.
Actual Am'onia. Phos.
Potash. Acid.


Lime.


Muriate of Potash......4
Sulphate of Potash.....48 to
Carbonate of Potash.... 55 to
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to
D'ble Sul.of Pot.and Mag. 26 to
Kainit ............... 12 to
Sylvinit ................ 16 to
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to
Wood Ashes, leached.... 1 to
Tobacco Stems ...... 5 to
Cow Manure (fresh).... 1
Horse Manure (fresh)..! (
Sheep Manure (fresh)..l 0
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0
Hen Dung (fresh)...... C
Mixed Stable Manure...1 0


50 .......... .............. ...
52 ......... ......... ....

44 112 to 16 ................
30 ......... .... ... .....
121 ......... .......... ......
20 ......... ........ ........
30 ..... .... 7 to 9 1 10
8 ......... 1 to 2 .........
2 ......... 1 to 1 135 to 40
8 2 to 4 ......... 31
).4010 to 0.411 0.16 0.31
).5310 to 0.601 0.28 0.31
.67[ 1.001 0.19 0.33
).601 0.551 0.191 0.08
.851 2.071 1.541 0.24
1.631 0.76! 0.261 0.70


4-Chem.










FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-

Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by.............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............. 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by....... 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by. 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by. 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by. 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by. 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.541
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681'
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K20) by.. 2.33
For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of soda
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (K20), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (K2O).








51

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS.


NAME OF FEED.



Bright Cot'n Seed Meal

Dark Cotton Seed Meal
Linseed Meal, old pro-
cess ...............
Linseed Meal, new pro-
cess ...............

Wheat Bran .........

Wheat Middlings .....

Mixed Feed (Wheat)..

Ship Stuff (Wheat)...

Corn (grain) ........

Corn Meal ...........

Corn Cobs ...........

Corn and Cob Meal....

Hominy Feed ........

Corn and Oats, equal
parts .............. I

Barley (grain) .......

Maiden Cane .........


Q m
0 Cd ;


9.35 39.70 28.60

20.00 22.90 37.10

7.50 35.70 36.00

8.40 36.10 36.70

9.00 15.40 53.90

5.40 15.40 59.40

7.80 16.90 54.40

5.60 14.60 59.80

2.101 10.50 69.60

1.90 9.70 68.70

30.10 2.40 54.901

6.60 8.50 64.80

4.05 10.50 65.30


5.80? 11.15 64.651

2.701 12.40 69.80?

30.601 10.101 43.401


7.80

5.50

7.201

3.60

4.00

4.10

4.80

5.001

5.40

3.801

0.501

3.501

7.851


5.201

1.801

2.151


5.80

5.00

5.30

5.2(

5.80

3.20

5.30

3.70

1.50

1.40

1.40

1.50

2.55


2.25

2.40

3.65


~9m4








52

AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS- (Continued).



NAME OF FEED. -



Oats (grain) ......... 9.50 11.80 59.70 5.00 3.00
Rice (grain) .......... 0.20 7.401 79.20 0.401 0.40
Rice Bran ........... 9.50 12.10 49.90 8.80 10.00
Rice Hulls ........... 35.701 3.60 38.60 0.701 13.20
Wheat (grain) ....... 1.80 11.90 71.901 2.101 1.80
Dry Jap Sugar Cane.. 26.22 2.28 62.55 1.55 55 2.77
1 I 1 1
Cow Pea ............. 4.101 20.801 55.701 1.401 3.20
I I
Cow Pea Hay......... 20.10! 16.601 42.201 2.20j 7.50
Velvet Bean Hulls .... 27.021 7.461 44.56! 1.57 4.32
Velvet Beans and Hulls 9.20 19.70 51.30 4.50 3.30
Velvet Bean Hay..... 29.70 14.70 41.001 1.70 5.70
Beggarweed Hay ..... 24.701 21.701 30.20] 2.301 10.90
Japanese Kudzu Hay.. 32.14] 17.43] 30.201 1.671 6.87
Cotton Seed (whole).. 23.20! 18.401 24.70! 19.901 3.50
Cotton Seed Hulls..... 44.401 4.00] 36.60! 2.00! 2.60
I I I I .
Para Grass ......... I 31.20! 8.00| 45.75! 1.55! 6.20









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Sampes Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ........ ..... .......

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Oak Ashes ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer .....................


Phosphoric Acid.


C 0
7> o
4 Cd
5 E 1


3481 ..... 10.73 1.12

3482 ..... 10.87 1.15

3483 7.64 8.95 3.40

3484 11.26 6.99 1.71

3485 7.68 5.73 2.37

3486 ..... ..... .....

3487 9.31 5.63 0.62

3488[ 6.84 7.851 3.15


11.001 3.351


BY WHOM SENT.




5.25 E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

4.66 N. H. Shaw, Quincy.

9.32 Baskin & Baskin, Tampa.

-5.59 Jas. McKay, Boynton.

5.89 H. W. Culbreath, Palmetto.

5.02 E. A. Davenport, Belleview.

5.88 Hardee & McFarland, Dania.

9.850C. H. Brcwn, Kathleen.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND. BY WHOM SENT.
C s e 0
=_ Z 8 ; W __
iCd a 0


Cypress Ashes.................. 3489 .... .... ..0.74

Fertilizer ...................... 3490 11.45 6.08 1.97 8.05

Fertilizer ...................... 3491 5.06 4.70 0.40 5.10

Fertilizer ...................... 3492 5.14 9.41 5.47 14.88

Fertilizer ...................... 3493 7.58 8.651 0.45 9.10

Hardwood Ashes........................... ..... .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3495 7.41 7.43 0.45 7.88

A shes .......................... 3496 . .. ... ..... .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3497 6.97 5.33 2.47 7.80

Fertilizer ......................3498 8.48 7.25 1.75 9.00


0.61 P. H. Rolfs, Ganesville.

5.46 D. K. Turner, Lakeland.

5.60 J. E. McGraw, Lakeland.

5.651H. S. Riggins, Winter Haven.

9.861H. A. Perry, Pomona.

2.93 C. M. Slaughter, Eustis.

8.37 J. W. Case, Hastings.

0.43 W. J. Berry, Pensacola.

8 51 J. E. McDuffie, East Palatka.

5.40 J. E. McDuffie, East Palatka.









Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Potato Sp'

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Hardwood


12.38

9.44


(No. 2967) ............ 3499

...................... 3500

...................... 3501

ecial. ................ 3502

No. 1................ 3503

No. 2................ 3504

.............. : ...... 3505

No. 1................ 3506

No. 2............... 3507

(116197).............. 3508

(116198)............ .. 3509

(116199) .............. 3510

(116200).............. 3511

(116201).............. 3512

...................... 3513

Ashes............... 3514


5.031 1.851 6.88

8.90 1.30 10.20

6.80 0.70 7.50

7.03 0.27 7.30

6.41 1.44 7.85

7.22 0.70 7.92

7.30 1.70 9.00

5.30 0.75 6.05

5.95 0.60 6.55

6.58 0.80 7.38

8.30 0.48 8.78

6.36 1.05 7.41

5.68 1.121 6.80

7.60 1.04 8.64

6.25 7.20113.45

..... ..... .. ...


5.15 W. T. Fields, Clearwater.

2.46 E. C. Croft, Olustee.

4.40 0. M. Jacobie, Tallahassee.

5.83 Seminole Fruit Co., Ft. Pierce.

5.05 S. A. McDonald, Plant City.

3.95 S. A. McDonald, Plant City.

7.80 J. L. Crowley. Wauchula.

4.68 Norman N. Crapo, Zolfo.

5.43 Norman N. Crapo, Zolfo.

L0.46 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

12.58 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

6.45 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

5.66 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

6.54 Armour Fertz. Works, Jacksonville.

7.12 C. W. Morrow, Crescent City.

0.451R. P. Johnson, Orlando.


6.19

5.50

4.58

4.46

5.51

6.16








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915.-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. BY WHOM SENT.

I I 0
ce 0 0!^ ^ !


Cotton Seed Meal............... 3515 .. . ..... ..... .... 7.10

Fertilizer ...................... 3516 6.55 6.30 10.9017.20 4.60

Fertilizer ...................... 3517 10.45 4.97 1.05 6.02 2.18

Distiller's Grain................. 3518 11.38 ... ... .. 0.58 5.55

Nitrate of Soda................. 3519 5.78 ..... ...... ..... 17.89

Special Mixture............... 3520 4.06 2.85 0.45 3.30 5.05

Fertilizer No. 2................ 3521 7.16 7.35 1.55 8.90 5.15

Fertilizer ...................... 3522 ..... 5.98 1.32 7.30 4.45

A shes .......................... 523 ..... ..... ..... .. .. ... ...

Tankage ..................... 3524 ..... 3.83 4.47 8.30 8.04
I I


IT. C. Smith, Madison.

! A. S. Alford, St. Petersburg.

4 Frank I. Pillsbury, Palma Sola.

I L. B. Thompson, Pensacola.

D. W. Swicord, Coleman.

SD. W. Swicord, Coleman.

LIE. C. Thornhill, Wauchula.

3 R. C. Fusell, Coleman.

) E. O. Painter Fertz. Co., Jacksonville.

. F. E. Dennis, Gainesville.
I








Saw Palmetto Ashes...........

Fertilizer .....................

Cotton Seed Meal...............

Cypress Ashes..................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ......................
Potash Salt ................... .

Fertilizer ......................

Shrimp Heads..................

Fertilizer .....................

Cotton Seed Meal...............

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer "AAA"..............

Fertilizer "BBB"...............

Cotton Seed Meal..............

Canc. Carbonate and Phosphate..


3525 .....

3526 5.08

3527 .....

3528 .....


5.93


..... ..... ..... 0.49 M. M. Quinlan, Tampa.

0.72 6.65 4.15 4.97 0. F. Berry, Center Hill.

..... ..... 8.00 .... E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

..... ..... ..... 0.36 Alf. R. Neilson, Melbourne.

0.55 2.30 6.45 3.04 A. H. MacFarlane, Dania.

0.42 6.00 2.52 4.76 C; L. Urmston, Dania.
..... ..... ..... 52.80 R. P. Johnson, Orlando.

1.92 8.25 4.80 4.82 E. S. W. Holland, Arch Creek.

..... 3.65 9.38 ..... E. G. Hyde; Fernandina.

9.82114.20 4.90 5.32 0. R. Leigh, Tampa.

..... .... 7.55 ..... Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Tallahassee.

0.751 9.00 3.98 8.35 H. A. Perry, Pomona.

0.60 7.80 3.98 4.91 S. M. Hawkins, Plant City.

1.42 6.55 4.98 4.72 T. G. Lockwood, Bartow.

1.52 7.30 5.05 5.09 T. G. Lockwood, Bartow.

..... ..... 7.90 ..... Palmer Sylvester, Hinson.

..... 12.30 ..... .....The Wells-Kahn Co., Pensacola.


"


7.391 4.38










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.
O

NAME, OR BRAND. ) BY WHOM SENT.

.s 0 0
~1 I IE-


Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer ....

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer ....

Fertilizer ....


1................

2................


1.................
2................
2 ................

3 ................


7.38

7.93

6.24

4.63

7.28

5.02

7.75

6.40


Sea Grass..................... 3550 .........

Pine Wood Ashes .............. 3551 ..... .....


1.42

3.17 1

2.51

2.75

1.82

2.50

0.85

1.32


...... 1.9(


9.41 A. O'Day, Perrine.

5.25 A. O'Day, Perrine.

5.13 C. W. Bridges, Fulford.

4.58 S. G. Merrick & Son, Miami.

4.98 S. G. Merrick & Son, Miami.

5.19 S. G. Merrick & Son, Miami.

5.50 Lum Luffman, Oak.

5.46 E. D. V. Burr, Arch Creek.

0.19 R. L. Roberts, Pensacola.

6.661C. H. Simpson, Milton.








Fish Scrap ..................... 3552 ....

Fertilizer ...................... 3553 10.58

Fertilizer ..................... 3554 4.16

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3555 8.13

Fertilizer No. 2................ 35561 8.591

Steamed Ground Bone........... 3557 .....

Fertilizer ............... ......... 3558 8.02

Fertilizer ..................... 3559 11.39

Guano ......................... 3560 .....

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3561 5.88 1

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3562 8.91


..... .

6.37

5.87

7.671

8.35



5.58

7.65

9.21

0.23

9.65


0.28

2.481

1.27

1.45



0.67

1.900

1.27

0.47

0.40


5.90 8.45 ..... R. C. McGahey, Islamorada.

6.65 ..... 11.041R. W. Rhodes, Miami.

8.35 4.80 5.20 H. C. Morris, Fulford.

8.94 4.95 7.71 L. S. Harvard, Live Oak.

9.80 4.851 6.86 L. S. Harvard, Live Oak.

23.50 4.05 ..... Nocatee Fruit Co., Nocatee.

Gi.25 5.32 5.12 T. F. Adams, Sanford.

9.55 5.40 5.48 C. G. Armstrong, Wimauma.

10.46 0.59 4.53 W. L. McKeown, Blountstown.

10.70 2.13 2.35 J. C. Stewart, Bascom.

10.05 2.67 2.98 J. C. Stewart, Bascom.


Cotton Seed Meal............... 3563 .... .......... ..... 7.62 ..... L. A. & C. M. Carlisle, Campbellton.

Basic Slag No. 1................ 3564 ..... 55 11.40 16.95 ........ Wm. B. Malone, Quincy.

Basic Slag No. 2.............. 3565 ..... 5.00 12.80 17.80 ........ Wm. B. Malone, Quincy.

Fertilizer ...................... 3566 0.71 3.451 4.05 7.50 3.96 10.38 Mrs. Jno. O'Brien, Leesburg.

Ashes ......................... 3567 ..... ..... .......... ..... 0.90 C. I. Betts, Greenville.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


A shes .........................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Guano .........................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer.....................
Fertilizer ..

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 1.................


3568 .....

356912.48

3570 6.83

3571 7.24

3572 7.09i

357310.371

3574 .....

3575 1.49

357617.04

3577 7.00

357810.57


Phosphoric Acid.


a


1i
0




P


BY WHOM SENT.


.... ......... ..... 0.48 Geo. Fiensenger, Lutz.

6.95 0.50 7.45 4.25 4.47 Chas. Ericsson, Hallandale.

6.35 0.85 7.20 5.42 5.71 John T. Barber, Palmetto.

6.45 6.60 13.05 4.95 6.84 T. M. Coon, Greenville.

6.25 0.60 6.85 2.5710.69 D. D. Rawlins, Ft. Lauderdale.

6.50 1.351 7.851 4.101 5.161 D. D. Rawllnus, Ft. Lauderdale.

8.15 2.45 10.60 2.50 2.24 J. B. Sims, Bouifay.

4.10 4.00 8.10 3.80 9.84 Mrs. J. Martha O'Brien, Leesburg.

4.88 0.34 5.221 4.97 4.01 0. R. Gregory, Winter Garden.

11.50 0.3511.851 0.55 3.811 Ed. Chason, Willis.

1 6.39 1.251 7.641 4.25 4.93 D. D. Rawlins, Ft. Lauderdale.


0










Fertilizer No. 2................. 3579 7.69

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3580 .....

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3581 .....

Fertilizer No. 3................. 3582 .....

Fertilizer ..................... 3583 .....

Peruvian Guano ............... 3584 ....

Fertilizer ...................... 3585 .

Fertilizer ...................... 358625.60

Fertilizer ..................... 3587 ..

Fertilizer ...................... 3588 6.29

Fertilizer ...................... 3589 18.10

Cotton Seed Meal............... 3590 .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3591 8.45

Hard-wood Ashes ............... 3592 ..

Palmetto Root Ashes ........... 3593 ..


6.53 0.57

..... .....

10.80 3.40

8.66 0.741

9.50 0.75

..... .....

11.77 1.25

4.99 0.30

4.86 1.29

7.93 0.87

5.82 1.25


7.10U 2.4


9.83 0.42 10.25


5 9.90

S0.68

.3.85

5 2.741

S3.81

) .... .

S4.12

S3.92

S6.03

L 4.86

)4.69



3.89

3.22

S0.24


D. D. Rawlins, Ft. Lauderdale.

Joseph W. Russ, Marianna.

Joseph W. Rus, Marianna.

Joseph W. Russ, Marianna.

T. M. Money, Grand Ridge.

C. Upton, Boynton.

U. D. R. Melvin, Cottondale.

J. P. Williams, Orlando.

C. D. Colson, Archer.

D. M. Wood, Lovett.

Independent Fertz. Co., Jacksonville.

Lem Chavers, Milton.

C. E. Pledger, Marianna.

S. H. Strom, Juniper.

Punta Gorda Pineapple Corporation,
J. F. Gleason, Mgr., Punta Gorda.


I


jj//_









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915--Continued.


Phosphoric Acid
d

NAME, OR BRAND. BY WHOM SET.
S. ... .. 0
-4 U 1.A lr, arir


Fertilizer No. 1................. 3594

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3505

Fertilizer ..................... 3596

Fertilizer ...................... 3597

Fertilizer ...................... 3598

Fertilizer ...................... 3599

Fertilizer No. 156 (Acid Phos.).. 3600

Fertilizer No. 157............... 3601

Acid Phosphate .............. 3602

Guano ......................... 3603


8.33 9.39 0.261 u.6

..... 10.50 2.75 13.25

4.14 4.23 1.27 5.50

..... 6.26 0.79 7.05

7.64 5.15 2.50 7.65

12.58 4.60 0.60 5.20

..... 18. 0 0.6018.78

..... 13.08 1.2014.28

.... 116.25 0.85 17.10

8.57 8.20 1.051 9.25


4.30

5.65

4.92

3.05


3.40 i. A. ClarK, Laurel Hill.

4.09 H. A. Clark, Laurel Hill.

4.78 C. D. Colson, Archer.

7.73 J. E. Pedrick, Palmetto.

4.97 M. C. Bailey, Wauchula.

8.31 W. C. Grimes, Dallas.

..... .John A. Johnson, Munson.

1.08 John A. Johnson, Munson.

..... W. H. Matthews, Faceville

1.80 J. W. Matthews, Faceville


(Ga.).

(Ga.).








Fertilizer ...................... 3604

Fertilizer No. 1 (Acid Phos.)... 3605

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3606

Fertilizer ...................... 3607

Fertilizer .............. ....... 3608

Fertilizer ..................... 3609

Fertilizer ...................... 3610

Potassium Sulphate............. 3611

Hard Wood Ashes............... 3612

Hard Wood Ashes.............. 3613

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3614

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3615

Palmetto Ashes................. 3616

Fertilizer ...................... 3617

Fertilizer ...................... 3618

Fertilizer ...................... 3619


8.11 5.60

8.03 5.55



7.83 6.711

3.80 7.80

9.971 6.15


1.52

0.40

0.82

0.40

0.46

L.42

2.35

.I ..


1.20

1.20



2.39

1.10

1.451


8.70 4.70

18.35 .....

9.00 2.65

12.20 .

9.05 2.78

15.00 1.85

6.60 4.(65

..... ... .



..... .....

fi.S 4.70

6.75 4.78



9.10 4.28

8.901 4.781

7.60 4.471


4.57j Arch Creek Packing Co., Arch Creek.


I. A. Bowen, Gretna.

1.60 I. A. Bowen, Gretna.

3.24 E. C. Mayo, Willis.

1.87 F. N. Riley, Holt.

..... H. S. Laird, Ponce de Leon.

5.92 J. D. Lamb & Co., Parish.

17.85 J. E. Thrasher, Micanopy.

1.61 E. B. Priest, West Tampa.

1.27 L. M. Hatton, Tampa.

5.231 E. R. Brion, Arch Creek.

5.15 E. R. Brion, Arch Creek.

1.70 H. M. Stringfellow, Pineland.

8.67 Marcus Waters, Parish.

6.25 E. V. Palmquest, Hallandale.

6.621 R. L. Gribble, Arch Creek.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


0


Fertilizer ...................... 3620 .. .

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3621 .....

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3622 .....

Fertilizer ..................... 3023 9.45

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3624 .....

Fertilizer ...................... 362510.47

Septic Tank Waste ............. 326 4.26

Fertilizer ..................... 3627 .

Fertilizer ...................... 3628 .

(;otlon Seed Meal............... 3629 .....


Phosphoric Acid


I -





7.80 0.70 8.50

11.45 1.20 12.65

12.35 1.15 13.50

8.55 0.90 0.45

7.50 2.9010.40

5.70 1.20 6.90

1.05 0.60 1.15

9.05 1.45 10.50

8.45 2.7111.16

..... ..... ......


BY WHOM SENT.


4.98 5.49 W. F. Abshill, Oak.

2.23 1.87 J. E. Duce, Bascom.

1.70 1.68 J. E. Duce, Bascom.

8.37 3.93 Blowers Lime & Phosp. Co., Ocaln.

5.35 5.85 Henry W., Smith, Wauchula.

4.600 5.23 A. C. Bennett, Arch Creek.

2.88 0.21 Wm. Greer, Lakeland.

2.65 2.18 J. W. Cain, Baker.

2.00 3.83 S. M. Mitcheam, DeFuniak Springs.

6.95 ..... L. Heimburger, Tallahassee.










Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 1.................

Fertilizer No. 2................

Tobacco Stems ................

Bean Fertilizer ................

Tomato Fertilizer ............
Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Starch Pulp ...................

Fertilizer ................... .

Fertilizer ......................

Cotton Seed Meal ..............

Fertilizer ...................

Fertilizer ................ ...


..... 6.28 1.92

5.62 9.55 0.75

4.08| 7.83 0.27


6.61

5.13
4.32



6.60

12.62

12.37



9.43


5.81

8.80
13.10

10.75

7.28

9.30



7.98

11.291



7.531

6.45


8.20

10.30

8.10


0.85 6.60

0.70 9.50
0.45 13.55

1.55 12.30

1.42 8.70

1.50110.80


5.20

3.50

3.00

3.60

5.95

4.05
4.40

2.55

4.82

2.35

1 5


0.12 8.10 3.05

0.41 11.70 .....

..... ..... 8.25

1.371 8.90 5.60

0.901 7.35 2.47


6.82 A. J. Bass, Live Oak.


10.20

9.57

6.78

4.94

8.29
5.40

2.49

5.23

1.98



11.11

3.48



6.15

10.02


A. M. Minor, Crown Point.

A. M. Minor, Crown Point.

W. T. Carter, Miami.

Samuel Slack, Martin.

Samuel Slack, Martin.
Walter Cliff, Crescent City.

W. B. Bedenbaugh, Sneads.

B. A. Guthie, Griffin.

D. P. Ray, Baker.

Drake Produce Co., Miami.

peSoto Fruit Co., Nocatee.

R. M. Miller, Grand Ridge.

Zolfo Mercantile Co., Zolfo.

S. L. Griggs, Oxford.

J. M. Gates, Jr., Anthony.


I


I


I









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer No. .................

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Cotton Seed Meal ..............

Fertilizer .....................


Phosphoric Acid.








4.59 5.781 2.80 8.58

14.09 6.80 3.00 9.80

9.60 7.65 0.95 8.60

7.31 6.70 1.35 8.05

..... 11.40 0.50 11.90

..... 11.42 1.00 12.42

2.71 8.05 0.20 8.25

9.65 6.20 2.25 8.45



5.41 10.78 1.12 11.90


3.0111.83

4.75 4.91

4.40 4.41

4.30 5.01

2.30 1.91

..... 1.87

3.47 9.62

4.05 6.58

8.15 .....

2.20 2.35


BY WHOM SENT.


DeSoto Fruit Co., Nocatee.

Howell & Griggs, Oak.

Howell & Griggs, Oak.

Geo. M. Wright, Griffin.

A. J. Key, Haywood.

A. J. Key, Haywood.

J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

McDowell & Benns, Fulford.

Max Wedeles Tobacco Co., Quincy.

A. E. Dukes. Westville.








Ashes ........................ 36561.... ....


Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


N o. 1................

N o. 2................


Dried Ground Fish............

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ......................

Liquid Fertilizer ...............

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 2...............

Corn Fertilizer ...............

Tomato Fertilizer .............

Ash from Pineapple............

Deposit ......................


3661.....

3662.....

3663 2.61

3664 3.20

3665 8.701

366 10.38

3667 ....

3668 ....


..... ..... ..... 5.11 A. L. Chandler, Goulds.

S1.60 6.92 4.57 7.621Cheves Brothers, Newberry.

-0.62 8.48 4.20 5.551 MeSaunders, Sunnyside.

1.9511.10 2.60 2.49 M. M. Carroll and H. W. Speairs,
Westville.
0.67118.05 .......... M. M. Carroll and H. W. Speairs,
Westville.

S.... 7.65 13.00 ..... E. G. Hyde, Fernandina.

5.0412.30 4.05 5.61 D. F. Collins, Webster.

0.371 1.40 1.32 0.34 R. J. Bush, Jennings.

........ 5.21 5.05 Thos. P. Hill, Bay View.

2.311 9.00 4.01 7.81 Roy D. Basby, Fulford.

2.001 8.85 4.20 6.95 Roy D. Basby, Fulford.

S0.80 6.90 3.20 4.87 G. W. Easterling, Ocala.

1.07 7.10 4.50 7.53 G. W. Easterling, Ocala.

..... .. .... .. 6.89 G. S. Saylor & Co., Ankona.

23.12|28.55 0.75 ..... J. H. Tatum, Miami.


---~------ ~---------









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915.

Phosphoric Acid.

0
NAME, OR BRAND. Z





Fertilizer ...................... 3671 8.39 6.75 0.801 7.55 4.19 9.53 D.

Guano ......................... 3672 ..... 10.40 0.95111.35 5.98 ..... J.

Acid Phosphate ............... 3673 .... 19.28 1.32 20.60 ........ .

Fertilizer ...................... 3674 7.22 6.901 5.10112.00 5.22 8.56 Cro!

Fertilizer No. 3................ 3675 6.70 6.904 6.1013.00 4.60 7.56W.

Fertilizer No. 4................ 3676 8.93 7.36 4.1411.50 5.39 4.37 W.

Fertilizer ...................... 3677 ..... 10.971 1.56 12.53 4.52 3.83 E. I

Fertilizer ...................... 3678 16.0110.311 0.59 10.90 2.60 2.32 Bag

Principally Calcium Carbonate.. 3679..... .. ..... 0.68 ..... .... A.

Fertilizer ......................3680 ..... 8.1 1.8510.00 4.50 6.60M.


BY WHOM SENT.


E. Davis, Bowling Green.

3. Taylor, Chipola.

. Taylor, Chipola.

shy & Wartman, Citra.

H. Roberson, Gotha.

H. Roberson, Gotha.

R. Washington, Tucker.

dad Land and Lbr. Co., Bagdad.

Drost, Inverness.

C. Rhames, Wewahitchka.







Fertilizer ...................... 368114.61 5.25 1.161 6.401 4.30 7.10 T. P. Chaires, Old Town.

Fertilizer ...................... 368215.12 9.75 0.870.62 2.55 2.40 D. G. Gordon, Red Rock.

Fertilizer ...................... 3683 ... 9.8 4.42 9.80 4.30 3.87 J. P. Williams, Orlando.

Fertilizer ...................... 3684 6.21 6.60 1.45 8.05 3.65 10.55 R. B. Campbell, Tampa.

Special Fruit and Vine......... 3685 2.38 6.20 0.40 6.60 3.50 9.56 R. B. Campbell, Tampa.
Special Mixture ................ 3686 7.82 9.20 14.40 23.60 3.82 0.66 R. B. Campbell, Tampa.

Phosphate Floats .............. 3687... 2.25130.10132.35 ........... J. T. Barrows, Bartow.

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 3688 .... .......... ..... 7.80 .... A. M. Minor, Crown Point.
Button Wood Ashes........... 3689 .... ..... I..... .. .. .. 6.02 A. L. Chandler, Goulds.

Ashes No. 1.................. 3690..... .................. 3.37 Oscar A. DeLong, E'enton.

Ashes No. 2 .................... 3691 ..... ........ ...... 3.29 Oscar A. DeLong, Ellenton.
Fertilizer tankagee) ........... 369210.00 3.17 7.28 10.45 9.68.....Phoenix Fruit Co., Stuart.
F51 I 1. 1 6
Fertilizer .................... 3693 5.35 0.36 1.44111.80 4.05 7.81 G. L. Comer, Jr., Oak Hill.

Fertilizer-. .................... 3694 13.40 7.90 1.05] 8.95 1.95 3.64 J. T. Norris, Indian Ford.
Hardwood Ashes .............. 3 .. .. ........ ..... 0.86 Geo. V. Leonard, Hastings.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Potash ........................ 3696 ..... .....

Fertilizer (Tankage) .......... 3697 8.611 3.081

Fertilizer ...................... 3698 ..... 8.00

Fertilizer .................... 3699 . 5.80

Fertilizer Sweepings ........ 3700121.4812.29

Bat Manure ................... 3701 10.891 3.36

Bat Manure ................... 3702 10.80 0.43

Fertilizer (Sulphate of Potash). 3703 ..... .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3704 ..... 1.60

Palmetto Ashes ............... 3705 ..... .....


Phosphoric Acid.



S o

. I


BY WHOM SENT.


..... .......1.. |47.801 C. U .Garrett, Haines City.

7.17110.25 9.30 ..... John Gastafson, Rio.

1.35 9.35 2.75 2.43 A. J. Key, Haywood.

0.70U 6.50 4.48 5.21 Nathan Mayo, Summerfield.

1.5113.80 1.14 0.32 J. E. Dubuisson & Bro., Pensacola.

3.22 6.58 8.05 0.30 B. Fitzpatrick, Homestead.

3.12 3.55 8.37 1.00 B. Fitzpatrick, Homestead.

I. ..... 0.70 Lowry & Barns, Plant City.

11.10 12.70 4.00 4.501 J. W. Douglas, Tampa.

..... ..... ..... 0.251 Admer D. Miller, Ruskin.


-i


'









Alluvial Deposits ............ 3706 23.121 5.

Shell Mound .................. 3707 3.01 1.

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3708 13.14 5.

Fertilizer No. 2................ 370913.70 4.

Coffee Hulls (or Chaff)........ 710 ..... ...

Canada Hardwood Ashes....... 3711 ........

A shes ......................... 3712 ..... ...

Soft Phosphate ................ 3713 ..... 2.

Fertilizer ...................... 3714 ..... 5.

Fertilizer ...................... 3715 ..... 6.

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3716 9.29 7.

Fertilizer No. 2................ 3717 9.26 9.

Fertilizer No. 1............... 3718 6.66 5.

Fertilizer ...................... 3719 7.90 4.

Ashes ......................... 3720 ..... ...


821

12
121

83

84


6.60 12.42

4.681 5.80

0.57 6.40

0.841 5.78

..... 0.40
I


. .. . . . .

. .. .. .

38 27.90 30.28

55 0.85 6.40

03 1.52 7.55

15 7.20114.35

13 6.97114.10

48 1.621 7.10

33S 7.82112.20

.. ..... .... .


4.301 0.90

0.57 0.12]

2.91 2.261

1.74 1.97]

1.82 1.33

. . 2.74]

... 4.37]



2.90 12.24

4.37 4.75]

4.85 3.45

5.10 3.44

4.40 5.01

5.02 4.45


... 3.421 B.


B. Tower, Homestead.

A. Cabel!, Carbon, W. Va.

H. Bass, Indian Ford.

H. Bass, Indian Ford.

B. Moffett, Homestead.

W. Smith, Clearwater.

J. Brown, Tampa.

M. Bearss, Tampa.

A. Langford, Altha.

T. Haddock, Live Oak.

D. Coutoy, Venice.

D. Coutoy, Venice.

E. Gaskins, Plant City.

W. Douglas, Tampa.

F. Blackburn, Laurel.


.








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914.-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. I0 ,2 | BY WHOM SENT.
12 W

6 ,3 E
Z Cd-


Palmetto Ashes ................3721

Manure Salt ...................3722

Fertilizer ..................... 3723

Ashes ......................... 3724

Fertilizer ..................... 3725

Ground Tobacco Stems......... 3726

Ashes ........................ 3727

Palmetto Root Ashes...........3728

Palmetto Ashes No. 1.......... 3729

Ashes No. 2.................... 3730


.....



17.57



13.47






I....


1.44 J. T. Thomas, Plant City.

19.45 A. J. Adams, Manatee.

8.55 C. A. Langford, Altha.

0.26 C. K. Lucas, Sanford.

4.94 H. E. Whitehead, Sydney.

4.43 Chas. Montgomery, Buena Vista,
Miami.
1.81 J. J. Brown, Tampa.

4.04 Cramer B. Potter, St. Petersburg.

2.33 Oscar A. DeLong, Ellenton.

0.96 Oscar A. DeLong, Ellenton.


""'/""'
I-

I
1
.....(...,

1








Tankage ....................... 37311 ... .. .... ... .. 10.58 9.45 .....

Tobacco Stems ............... 3732 .... ... .... .. 4.94
Fertilizer ................... .. 3733..... 6.65 1.35 8.00 3.60 5.57

Fertilizer ...................... 373 14.25 9.05 0.35 9.40 ..... 3.18

Guano ......................... 3735 ..... 2.95 1.15 4.10 4.21 1.51

A she's ......................... 3736 ..... ..... .. .... .. 0.28


R. L. Goodwin, Fort Pierce.

S. Burd & Son, Delray.
Henry B. Miller, Fort Myers.

Ed Chason, Willis.

A. W. Corbett, St. Augustine.

F. C. W. Kramer, Jr., Leesburg.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915. L. HEIMBURGER, Asst. Chemist.
Samples taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Ashes (Fass) ..................

Ashes (Hathaway) ............

Ashes (Tobacco and Bark Sub-
stances).
Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 1 (Wet).........

Fertilizer No. 2 (Dry)..........

A shes .........................


Phosphoric Acid



3 C3 o 5



5.99 ..... ..... ...

2.16 ..... ..........

26.88 ..... ... ....

14.14 9.77 0.05 9.8'

5.60 ..... ..... 1.5E

13.81 ..... .... 2 .8.

11.871 ......... .....


Goat Manure No. 1............. |3744' 9.89 .... .. .....


BY WHOM SENT.


..... 3.30 E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jackson-
ville.
3.10 E. O. Painter Fertilizer Co., Jackson-
ville.
..... 2.83 S. A. Blount, Tampa.

0.55 2.48 E. C. Mays, Willis.

1.63 0.54 A. W. Corbett, St. Augustine.

4.64 1.36 A. W. Corbett, St. Augustine.

..... 2.39 A. W. Corbett, St. Augustine.

2.05, 3.841E. S. Hubbard, Federal Point.









Fertilizer (Special Mixture No. 2) 3745 13.54 ..... .....

Ashes ......................... 3746 9.84 ..... .....

Ashes ......................... 3747 13.54 .....

Fertilizer ................... 3748 3.72 9.67 3.45

Tankage ...................... 3749 7.58 ..........

Ground Tankage .............. 3750 7.52 ..... .....

Fertilizer No. 2................ 375120.15 7.29 0.71

Fertilizer No. 3................ 3752 26.57 8.90 0.49

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3753 9.95 9.44 -0.41

Fertilizer No. 2................ 3754 9.22 7.94 0.05

Fertilizer .................. .. . 3755 7.94 4.98 6.65

Fertilizer No. 1............. 3756 21.22 8.02 0.751

Ashes ......................... 375715.70 .... .....

A shes ....................... 3758 2.52 ..... ....

Fertilizer ...................... 3759 20.75 11.40 12.95

Fertilizer ...................... 3760113.731 1.90 6.95


6.76 5.15 2.37 E. S. Hubbard, Federal Point.

.... ..... 3.11 T. A. Brown, Bulow.

..... ..... 4.41Lee S. Day, Bradentown.

13.12 2.58 0.16 T. M. Andrews, Westville.

12.23 7.60 ..... Chase & Co., Sanford.

12.37 10.17 ..... Chase & Co., Sanford.

8.00 2.03 2.83 J. I. Hentz, Blountstown.

9.39 1.28 1.36 J. I. Hentz, Blountstown.

9.85 3.36 1.36 J. M. Brownlee, Starke.

7.99 2.45 2.37 J. M. Brownlee, Starke.

11.63 2.63 5.14 Hawley D. Blake, Tampa.

8.77 1.39 1.51 J. I. Hentz, Blountstown.

..... ..... 4.23 E. C. Stuart, Bartow.

..... ..... 3.19 Manatee Fruit Co., Palmetto.

24.35 1.05 0.16 J. W. Moffett, Hollandale.

8.85 1.35 1.17 Frank Holmes, Tampa.


,








SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


Ashes .........................

Guano No. 1 ....................

Guano No. 2 ...................

Cotton Seed Meal...............

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer (Special Mixture)....

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ......................

Acid Phosphate ................

Fertilizer ......................


3761 39.23 .....

3762 14.3618.84

3763 9.71 5.91

3764 ..... .....

3765 8.17 6.16

3766 10.51 6.45

3767 ..... 6.11

3768 6.33 6.82

3769 ..... 16.78

3770 7.89 3.98


.......... 0.08 Dr. J. G. DuPuis, Lemon City.

27.05 2.35 0.91 J. P. Williams, Orlando.

18.42 1.35 0.12 J. P. Williams, Orlando.

..... 8.25 ..... C. E. McLaughlin, Ft. Myers.

11.83 10.28 4.911C. E. McLaughlin, Ft. Myers.

11.20 5.10 4.81 J. H. Blake, Tampa.

7.78 3.201 2.92 C. A. Poppell, Kathleen.

8.62 3.90 4.29 C. S. Dishong, Ft. Meade.

17.51 ..... ..... Liddon & Bro., Sneads.

4.71 1.301 5.29 R. P. Miller, Newberry.









Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Fertilizer No.

Tankage ....

Ground Tobaci

Fertilizer ....


1-S .......... 3771 10.47110.13

2-S............ 3772 13.25j10.70!

3-S............. 3773 11.7010.70

4-S............. 3774 10.58 9.79

1-D............. 3775 11.06 10.61

2-D............. 3776 12.51110.95

3-D............. 3777 14.16 10.50

.................. 3778 ..... .....

co Stems......... 3779 9.09 .....

........... ..... 3780 ... 6.65


1.02 11.15 4.70

1.35 12.05 5.08

1.35 12.05 5.20

1.16 10.95 4.88

1.11 11.72 4.93

1.12 12.07 4.95

0.95 11.45 4.78

..... 19.70 10.67

..... ..... 2.78

1.10 7.751 3.22


i


3.42 T. J. Peters, Peters.

3.14 T. J. Peters, Peters.

2.781T. J. Peters, Peters.

3.35 T. J. Peters, Peters.

3.04 T. J. Peters, Peters.

2.81 T. J. Peters, Peters.

3.18 T. J. Peters, Peters.

..... James I. Hoey, St. Augustine.

7.52 Thos. Taylor, Stuart.

3.30 C. M. Williams, Ft. Meade.









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Palmetto Root Ashes...........

Potash (Sulfate) ..............

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer No. 3................

Sheep Manure ................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Hardwood Ashes ...............


Phosphoric Acid




ai 0


3787 14.38

3788 2.98

3789 .....


7.63!

7.50

7.60



6.38

6.85

. .. .


L __ __


9.85 5.30

9.85 5.37

9.80 5.08

0.30 3.90

7.10 3.28

8.55 2.25

. .. . ... .


BY WHOM SENT.


0.81 Gust Johnson, Baldwin.

50.68 W. K. Lett, Plant.City.

2.99 L. K. Reed, Peters.

2.98 L. K. Reed, Peters.

3.25 L. K. Reed, Peters.

0.31 E. 0. Painter Fertz. Co., Jacksonvillle

9.80 J. I. Hentz, Blountstown.

5.30 W. H. Lewis,-Shady Grove.

2.571James L. Waterbury Co., Bradentown.


I I









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspector Under Sections 1 and 2,
Act Approved May 22, 1901.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.

Phosphoric Acid.
SS BY WHOM AND
NAME, OR BRAND. 4o Y WHERE
; 4 o 0 MANUFACTURED.
05 -P. u2 PC ,d |
i <0 0 P3 0


The Mapes Orange Tree Manure 2195 Guaranteed 12.00 6.00 2.00 ..... 4.00 3.00 The Mapes F. & P. Guano
Found .... 9.91 6.65 3.40 10.05 4.37 3.36 Co., New York.

Green Band .................... 2196 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 3.00 4.00 The Coe-Mortimer Co.,
Found .... 7.07 6.25 2.55 8.80 3.25 4.17 Charleston, S. C.

Gulf Fruit and Vine............. 2197 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 7.00 3.00 10.00 The Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
Found .... 6.22 7.60 2.50 10.10 3.50 9.84 Tampa, Fla.

Corn Special................... 2198 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 3.00 4.00 Fla. Fertz. Co. (Branch),
Found .... 6.35 5.95 0.70 6.65 3.67 4.89 Gainesville, Fla.

Strawberry Fruiter.............. 2199 Guaranteed 12.00 5.00 1.00 ..... 2.00 10.00 Fla. Fertz. Co. ,(Branch),
Found .... 1.97 5.93 0.671 6.601 2.45 11.96 Gainesville, Fla.










OFFICIAL


NAME, OR BRAND.


Cotton Seed Meal............... 22001


Cotton Seed Meal............... 2201


Cotton Seed Meal............... 2202


Cotton Seed Meal............... 2203


Acid Phosphate................. 2204


Green Band Strawberry Special.. 2205


Lettuce Special................. 2206


FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915.-Conti


Phosphoric Acid.




CSg r 4 S
Q 10 .* 0 .



Guaranteed ......... .. 2.50 7.5
Found .... ..... ..... ..... ..... 8.12


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


12.00 14.00
..... 14.20

10.00 0.00
6.21 2 45

8.00 5.00
6.10 5.25


. . 2.50 7.50
..... ..... 8.05j

..... 2.50 7.50
.. ..... 8.20

..... 2.50 7.50
..... .. 7.50

1.00 ..... .....
0.65 14.85 .....

1.00 ... 4.00o
4.85 8.30 4.23

... 8.00 6.00
5.45110.70 6.05


.nued




0


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


(
]


1.50Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
..... sonville, Fla.

1.50 Ocilla Oil & Fertz. Co.,
..... Ocilla, Ga.

1.50 Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
..... Cordele, Ga.

1.50 Georgia Cotton Oil Co., Al-
..... bany, Ga.

..... Osceola Fertz. Co., Jack-
..... sonville, Fla.

5.00 The Coe-Mortimer Co.,
5.14 Charleston, S. C.

3.00 The West Coast Fertz. Co.,
3.58 Tampa, Fla,










Orange Tree Grower...........


Armour Long Cotton............


High Grade Orange Tree Fruiter.


Armour Bean Fertilizer.........


Bradley Fla. Vegetable.........


Gulf Celery Special .............


Bradley Fruit & Vine...........


American Standard Guano......


Special Mixture for Cowpenned
Trees ........................

Cotton Seed Meal...............


Original Ideal Fertilizer ........


2207 Guaranteed 8.001 6.00 4.0010.00
Found .... 6.66 6.25 5.4511.70

2208 Guaranteed 10.001 S.00 1.00 ....
Found .... 7.021 7.59 1.21 8.80

2209 Guaranteed 10.00 10.00 1.00 .....
Found .... 4.70 10.77 0.15 10.92

2210 Guaranteed 10.00 5.00 1.00 .....
Found .... 6.32 5.53 0.72 6.25

2211Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 .....
Found..... 9.54 6.79 1.37 8.16

2212 Guaranteed 10.00 5.00 1.00 6.00
Found .... 6.61 6.40 2.35 8.75

2213 Guaranteed 10.00 5.50 1.00 .....
Found .... 7.07 5.95 0.60 6.55

2214 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 2.00.....
Found .... 12.16 8.61 0.87 9.48

2215 Guaranteed 8.00 8.00 ..... .....
Found .... 7.48 8.86 3.64 12.50

2216 Guaranteed ..... .... .... 2.50
Found .... ..... ..... ..... .....

2217 Guaranteed 8.00 5.001 1.00 .....
Found .... 8.37 5.981 4.44110.42


4.00 5.00 West Coast Fertz. Co.,
4.65 5.40 Tampa, Fla.

2.00 5.00 Armour Fertz Works, Jack-
2.72 3.35 sonville, Fla.

3.00 13.00Amer. Agricultural Chem.
3.60 12.83 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Armour Fertz. Works, Jack-
5.13 5.12 sonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Amer. Agricultural Chem.
4.57 5.56 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 7.50 Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa, o
6.45 8.25 Fla.

2.25 10.00 Amer. Agricultural Chem.
3.02 11.12 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 2.00 Amer. Agricultural Chem.
2.60 2.16 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

..... 13.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
..... 13.16 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
6.63 ..... sonville, Fla.

4.00 6.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
4.87 6.201 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915.-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRAND 0 al ad d 4 BY WHOM and WHERE
N B 'o MANUFACTURED.


i | I I

Southern States Vegetable Grower 2218lGuaranteedl 8.001 6.00 1.00 .... 4.00 5.00 Virginia-Carolina Chemical
Found .... 1 4.95 6.05 0.97 7.02 5.25 5.371 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Va.-Car. Tip Top Tomato Trucker 2219 Guaranteed 8.00 7.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 5.00 Virginia-Carolina Chemical
Found .... 4.40 7.12 0.76 7.88 5.07 5.47 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Key-Tree Alkaline Mixture Fruit 2220 Guaranteed 12.00 8.00 2.00 10.00 5.00 5.00The Coe Mortimer Co.,
and Vine..................... Found .... 4.41 5.80 4.45 10.25 5.50 5.671 Charleston, S. C.

Bean Special.................... 2221 Guaranteed 10.00| 6.0 1.00 ..... 3.00 4.00 Amer. Agricultural Chem.
Found .... 6.07' 6.48 1.87 8.25 3.75 3.90 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

No. 1 Peruvian & Fish Guano 2222 Guaranteed 12.00 5.0 1.00..... 4.00 5.00Fla. Fertz. Co. (Branch),
05.001Fa. Fertz. Co. (Branch),
Mixture ...................... Found .... 5.73 5.21 1.34 6.65 4.76 5.401 Gainesville, Fla.

Nitrate of Soda ................. 2223 Guaranteed 3.00 ..... ...... 18.00 ..... Virginia-Carolina Chemical
Found . .... . .... .. ... 18.62 .. .. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Standard Vegetable No. 1........ 2224 Guaranteed 11.00, 6.00 1.001 7.00 4.00 5.00 Standard Fertilizer Co.,
Found .... 9.501 8.80 0.60 9.40 4.85 6.321 Gainesville, Fla.










Mapes Orange Tree Manure..... 2225 Guaranteed
Found ....

Armour Practical Trucker....... 2226 Guaranteed
Found ....

Armour Cucumber Special...... 2227 Guaranteed
Found ....

Wilson & Toomer's Special Mix- 2228 Guaranteed
ture No. 1 .................... Found ....

Standard Vegetable No. 1........ 2229 Guaranteed
Found ....

Special Mixture ................ 2230 Guaranteed
Found ....

Standard Melon Special......... 2231 Guaranteed
Found ....

High Grade Cuke and Lettuce 2232 Guaranteed
Special ...................... Found ....

Bradley Florida Vegetable....... 2233 Guaranteed
Found ....

Ground Phosphate.............. 2234 Guaranteed
Found ....


12.00 6.00 2.00 ..... 4.00 3.00 The Mapes Formula & Pe-
9.521 5.40 5.96 11.36 5.05 3.43 ruvian Guano Co., N. Y.

10.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 3.0010.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
4.78 5.95 0.35 6.301 3.35 9.80 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 8.00 1.00 ..... 5.00 7.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
6.40 7.63 2.27 9.90 5.51 6.98 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 5.00 5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
6.77 7.00 1.60 8.60 5.85 6.46 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

11.00 6.00 1.00 7.00 4.00 5.00 Standard Fertz. Co., Gaines-
8.351 7.78 1.07 8.85 4.86 7.14 ville, Fla.

10.00 7.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 5.00 Armour Fertz. Works,
7.671 6.90 0.801 7.70 4.30 4.99 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 6.00 1.00 7.00 4.00 5.00 Standard Fertz. Co., Gaines-
8.27 6.50 0.55 7.05 3.33 6.73 ville, Fla.

10.00 4.00 1.00 ..... 6.00 5.00 Amer. Agricultural Chem.
9.08 5.03 1.37 6.40 6.12 5.10 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 6.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 5.00 Amer. Agricultural Chem.
6.53 6.43 2.15 8.58 4.60 5.12 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

..... .... ..... 30.00 ..... .... A. D. W right & Co., Eustis,
..... ..... ..... 34.60 ..... ..... F la.


I









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1901.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Mapes Vegetable Manure......



Armour's Fruit and Vine.......


Virginia Carolina Tip Top To- 223'
mato Trucker ...............

So. States Special Vegetable 223!
Grower .....................

Special Mixture ............... 2239


2235 Guaranteed 12.00
Found..... 10.50


3 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 4.11

7 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 6.55

8 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 6.65

SGuaranteed 10.00
Found..... 7.89


Phosphoric Acid.


o .n
6 3
5: 3


2.001 .....
5.10110.40


6.00 1.00 .
6.75 1.25 8.00

6.00 ..........
6.62 0.70 7.32


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


5.00 4.00 Mapes Formula & Peru-
5.45 4.63 vian Guano Company,
New York, N. Y.

2.50 11.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
2.72 10.24 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Virginia Carolina Chem.
4. 77 4.67 Co., Sanford, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Virginia Carolina Chem.
4.35 4.99 Co., Sanford, Fla.

4.00 8.00 American Agri. Chem. Co.,
4.22 8.76 Jacksonville, Fla.


6.95


gil
w a o
"> gf
" g-o
c S r










Special Sugar Cane Mixture... .2240 Guaranteed ..... 6.50
Found..... 8.78 7.05

High Grade Vegetable ......... 2241 Guaranteed 8.00 6.00
Found..... G.92 5.58

Orange Tree Grower.......... 2242 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00
Found..... 6.88 6.40

Armour Practical Trucker...... 2243 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00
Found..... 8.15 5.90

Cotton Seed Meal............. 22441Guaranteed ... ...
Found..... .... ......

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2245 Guaranteed ..........
Found..... ..... .....

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2246 Guaranteed ..........
Found..... ..... .....

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2247 Guaranteed ..........
Found..... ..... .....

Sea Island Cotton Seed Meal... 2248 Guaranteed 12.00 .....
I Found........ .. ..

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2249 Guaranteed ..... ..
S Found.......... ...
I I


1.50 .... 5.00 6.00 Osceola Fertz. Co., Jack-
1.60 8.65 4.95 6.47 sonille, Fla.

4.00 ..... 4.00 5.00 West Coast Fertz. Co.,
5.02 10.60 4.23 5.01 Tampa, Fla.

4.00 10.00 4.00 5.00 West Coast Fertz. Co.,
7.90114.30 4.35 4.58 Tampa, Fla.

1.00 ....3.00 10.00Armour Fertz. Works,
0.70 6.60 3.70 7.72 Jacksonville, Fla.

..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack-
..... ..... 7.48 ..... sonville, Fla.

..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co., Jack- os
..... ..... 7.60 ..... sonville, Fla. C

.... 2.50 8.00 1.50 Fidelity Cotton Oil Co.,
..... .... 9.07 ..... Houston, Tex.

..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Americus Oil Co., Amer-
S7.01 ..... icus, Ga.

.... 1.50 4.50 1.00 Fla. Manufacturing Co.,
..... .... 5.00 Madison, Fla.

.....2.501 7.50 1.50Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
... ..... 7.20 ..... Macon, Ga.
I i








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER A


NAME, OR BRAND.


(Uu-
CcJ


Wilson & Toomer's Special 2250 Guaranteed 8.00
Fruit & Vine Manure........ Found..... 7.96

Special Peruvian Grower....... 2251 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 10.15

Williams & Clark's Orange Tree. 2252 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 10.64

Tomato Special ............... 2253 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 10.07

Va.-Car. Fruit Grower's Formula 2254 Guaranteed 8.00
Found.....1 7.01

Bradley Fruit and Vine......... 2255 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 8.891

Seminole Tree Grower......... 2256 Guaranteed 8.00
S |Found..... 5.94


NALYSES, 1915-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

BY WHOM AND
S .WHERE
i MANUFACTURED.




6.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 13.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
5.75 4.00 9.75 4.70 13.21 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 2.00 ..... 5.00 5.001Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
6.20 3.20 9.40 5.65 4.73 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 1.00 ..... 3.50 5.00 American Agri. Chem. Co.,
6.70 0.60 7.30 3.47 4.721 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 ..... 10.00 4.00 6.00 West Coast Fertz. Co.,
5.37 3.20 8.57 4.10 5.83 Tampa, Fla.

7.00 1.00 ..... 3.50 4.00 Virginia Carolina Chem.
7.51 1.37 8.88 3.77 4.33 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

5.501 1.00 ..... 2.25 10.00 American Agri. Chem. Co.,
5.81 0.46 6.27 2.50 9.86! Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 ..... ..... 4.00 8.00 Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
5.83 3.87 9.70 4.201 8.401 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.









Wilson & Toomer's Special Mix-12257Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.001..... 5.00 5.00Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
ture No. 1................... Found .... 11.37 .13 1.92 8.05 5.20 4.88 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Special Formula for Corn...... 2258[Guaranteed 10.00 S.002.50 3.50Wilson & Toomer Fertz.
Found..... 12.40 7.60 1.20 8.802.85 3.85 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.










-)










*








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915. L. HEIMBURGER, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Sections 1 and 2. Act Approved May 22, 1901.


Phosphoric Acid.


. 3
.d .z
.G .o


..... 3.00 10.00
6.70 3.17 9.40


Cotton Seed Meal............. 2261 Guaranteedl...J .... 2.50
ound..... ..... ...... ..... ... .

Standard Grade Cotton Seed 2262 Guaranteed ..... .......... 2.50
M eal ........................ Found..... ..... .... ...... ....

Gem Fruit and Vine........... 2263 Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 .....
Found..... 11.131 7.43[ 0.97 8.40


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED


Independent Fertilizer Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.


.. 2.00 Independent Fertilizer
.. 2.37 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 1.50 Florida Cotton Oil
8.59 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 1.50 King Lumber and Oil
7.89 ..... Umanilla, Ga.

3.00110.001E. 0. Painter Fert.
3.691 9.881 Jacksonville, Fla.


__~








Gulf Orange Tree Grower...... 2264 Guaranteed 8.0 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found.... 10.73 7.58 1.12 8.70

Armour's Original No. 1....... 2265 Guaranteed 10.00 5.00 1.00 .....
Found..... 9.58 5.51 1.19 6.70|

V. C. Tip Top Tomato Trucker. 2266 Guaranteed 8.00 7.00 1.00 .....
Found.... 6.71 7.02 1.92 8.94

So. States Spec. Veg. Grower.. 2267 Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 .....
Found..... 8.74 5.99 1.47 7.46

W. & T.'s Special Mixt. No. 1.. 2268 Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 .....
Found..... 14.61 6.38 2.00 8.38

Armour Orange Fruiter........ 2269 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 1.00 .....
Found..... 6.07 8.37 0.56 8.93!
1 1
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2270 Guaranteedl ..... ..... .... 2.50|
Found ... .. I ... . .. ... .

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2271 Guaranteed ..... .. .... 2.00
F ound ..... ... ..... ..... .....

Prince Cotton Seed Meal.......2272 Guaranteed ..... ..... .... 2.50

Found.....
rS.Found ... .. ... .. ..... .. .....

W. & T.'s Emergency Veg. 2273 Guaranteed ]0.00 6.00 ..... .....
Special ........ .............. Found .... 9.551 5.671 0.91 6.58


5.00 5.001Gulf Fertilizer Co.,Tampa,
5.05 5.27 Fla.

5.00 5.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
5.10 5.08! Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
4.37 5.27 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Va.-Carolina Chem. Co.,
4.33 4.93 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
5.54 6.05 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 12.00 Armour Fert. Wks., Jack- co
4.24 12.39 sonville, Fla.

7.50 1.50/Buckeye Cotton Oil Co.,
7.85 ..... Macon, Ga.

7.50 1.00 A. A. Smith, Atlanta, Ga.
8.14 .....

7.50 1.50 Union Brokerage ana
8.05 ..... Commt. Co., N. O., La.

4.00! 4.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
4.03 5.881 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.









OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


W. & T.'s Emergency Tree 2274
(Special) ....................

Armour's Practical Trucker.... 2275


Wilson & Toomer's Emergency 2276
Fruit and Vine...............

Special Mixture ............... 2277


Gulf Special Fruiter........... 2278


Gem Pineapple Manure..


.......12279


Young Tree Grower............ 12280





Phosphoric Acid.

BY WHOM AND
WHERE
"Ug) 0 Z MANUFACTURED.



Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 ......... 4.00 4.00]Wilson & Toom'er Fert.
Found..... 5.30 6.98 1.061 8.04 4.36 4.341 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Guaranteed 10.0J1 6.00 1.00 ..... 3.00 10.00 Armour Fertilizer Works,
Found..... 8.52 5.62 1.30 6.92 3.31 9.34 Jacksonville, Fla.
I I I
Guaranteed 10.001 7.00 .......... 2.50 5.00 Wilson & Toomer Fert.
Found..... 9.32 8.33 1.11 9.44 2.82 5.58 Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

Guaranteed 10.001 7.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 5.00 Armour Fert. Wks., Jack-
Found..... 11.92' 6.91 1.02 7.93 4.19 5.66 sonville, Fla.

Guaranteed 8.00 8.00 1.00 9.00 4.00 6.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa,
Found..... 7.92 9.62 3.16 12.78 4.18 6.50 Fla.

Guaranteed 10.00 .......... 2.50 5.00 6.00E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
Found..... 7.91 ......... 3.04 5.19 7.81 Jacksonville, Fla.

Guaranteed 10.001 5.00 1.00 ..... 5.00 5.00 Am. Agri. Chemical Co.,
Found..... 9.21 5.10 1.83 6.93 4.85! 4.77 Jacksonville, Fla.








Mapes' Vegetable Manure...... 2281 Guaranteed 12.00 6.00 2.00 .....
Found..... 10.16 2.93 6.29 9.221

Early Bird Bearing Pineapple 2282 Guaranteed0. 00 2.00 3.00.....
Manure ..................... und..... 8.61 2.25 2.92 5.17

Gulf Orange Tree Grower...... 2283 Guaranteed 8.001 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found..... 12.05 8.38 0.77 9.15

Goulding's Bone Compound..... 2284 Guaranteed 16.00 8.00 0.50 .....
Found..... 13.14 8.18 2.62 10.80

Goulding's O. J. G. English Guano 2285 Guaranteed 16.00 10.00 0.50.....
Found.....14.63110.50 1.49 11.99

Pace's Lettuce Special......... 2286 Guaranteed 10.00 5.00 ..... .....
Found..... 16.57 4.60 1.99 6.59

Mape's Potato Special.......... 2287 Guaranteed 12.00 5.50 2.00 .....
Found..... 9.80 3.49 6.9810.421

Gulf Citrus Special............. 2288 Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found..... 6.60 8.35 3.6612.01

Gulf Veg. Special .............. 229 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found.....12.35 7.45 1.50 8.95

Special Citrus Fruiter.......... 2291 Guaranteed 8.008.00 ..... 10.00
Found..... 10.67 8.25 5.9714.251


5.00 4.00 The Mapes Form. Per Gu-
5.77 5.001 ano Co., New York, N.Y.

6.00 8.000Osceola Fert. Co., Jack-
6.30 7.461 sonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa,
5.10 4.97 Fla.

2.00 2.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
2.30 2.13 Goulding Fert. Wks.,
Pensacola, Fla.
2.00 2.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
2.15 2.11 Goulding Fert. Wks.,
SPensacola, Fla.
5.00 5.00 Independent Fert. Co., a
4.80 6.11 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.50 7.00 Mapes Form. Per. Guano
4.05 7.97 Co., New York, N. Y.

4.00 8.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa,
4.25 7.99 Fla.

5.00 5.00 Gulf Fert. Co., Tampa,
5.05 5.64 Fla.

3.00 5.00 West Coast Fert. Co.,
3.37 5.95 Tampa, Fla.









OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND 0 )
1 wno I-




Mapes Fruit and Vine Manure. 2292iGuaranteed 10.001
Found..... 12.54

Gulf Orange Tree Grower...... 2293 Guaranteed 8.001
Found..... 15.66

Bradley's B. D. Seafowl Guano.. 2294 Guaranteed 16.001
Found..... 13.21

Gulf Seafowl Guano ........... 2295 Guaranteed 10.00
Found..... 12.71

Goulding's Fish Guano......... 2296 Guaranteed 16.00
Found..... 9.59:

Gem Sugar Cane.......... ..... 2298 Guaranteed 8.00
Found..... 11.63

Simon Pure No. 1.............. 2299 Guaranteed 8.00
I Found..... 12.01


Phosphoric Acid.
BY WHOM AND
3 WHERE
o 0 MANUFACTUREDD




5.00 2.00..... 2.00 10.00Mapes Form. Per. Guano
3.25 6.48 9.73 2.5410.43 Co., New York, N. Y.

6.00 1.00 7.00 5.00 5.00 Gulf Fert. Co., Tampa,
6.67 4.8511.52 5.08 5.14 Fla.

9.00 0.501 ..... 2.25 3.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co., Pen-
6.71 4.85 11.56 2.48 3.011 sacola, Fla.

7.00 1.00 8.00 5.00 8.00 Gulf Fert. Co., Tampa,
7.86 5.3413.20 4.98 8.571 Fla.

10.00 0.50 2.. 2.00 2.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co., Pen-
10.56 3.3213.88 2.10 2.21 sacola, Fla.

8.001 1.50..... 3.00 5.00E. O. Painter Fert. Co.,
9.37 1.66 11.03 3.50 5.09 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 1.00 ..... 4.0012.00E. 0. Painter Fert. Co.,
7.141 0.50 7.64 4.3011.561 Jacksonville, Fla.








Gem Strawberry ..............2300 Guaranteed
Found.....

Gem Tomato Manure......... 2301 Guaranteed
Found.....

Gem Trucker ..................2302 Guaranteed
Found.....

Gem Cabbage ................. 2303 Guaranteed
Found.....

Gem Vegetable ................ 2304 Guaranteed
Found.....

1914 Potato Special............ 2305Guaranteed
Found.....

Favorite Irish Potato Special... 2306 Guaranteed
Found.....

Special Mixture ............... 2307 Guaranteed
SFound.....


5.00
13.14

8.00
9.43


10.46

10.00
11.56

5.00
7.84

8.00
8.69

10.00
7.39


10.74


6.00 1.75 .
6.85 3.56 10.41

4.00 1.00 .....
5.79 1.00 6.79

. .. .... 6.00
7.35 0.95 8.30

6.00 2.00 .....
7.23 2.72 9.95

5.00 3.00 .. .
5.42 3.90 9.32

4.00 1.00 .....
6.15 5.55 11.70

6.50 1.00 .....
6.23 0.60 6.83

5.00 ... ...
4.73 1.17 5.90


4.00 8.001E. O. Painter Fert.
5.35 6.55 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 11.00 E. O. Painter Fert.
4.4612.20 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00E. O. Painter Fertz.
5.38 5.04 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00E. O. Painter Fertz.
4.90 5.45 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 6.00 E. O. Painter Fertz.
5.03 6.98 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 6.00E. O. Painter Fertz.
4.40 6.32 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 6.50 Independent Fertz.
4.18 6.37 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 5.00 Independent Fertz.
5.95 5.04 Jacksonville, Fla.


Co.,


Co.,


Co.,


Co.,


Co.,


Co.,


Co.,


Co.,


,


i











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. SPECIAL FEEDING STUFF, ANALYSES, 1915. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by Purchaser Under Section 9, Act Approved May 24, 1905.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Cotton Seed Meal ..................

Cotton Seed Meal ..................

M ixed Feed ......................

Paint Root .......................

Poultry Feed .....................

Feed .......... .... .... .......

M aiden Cane ......................

Grape Vine .......................

Ground Sweet Feed...............


6.52

12.25

14.75

2.08

9.72

5.67

22.27

18.09

10.19


43.44

38.52

13.95

3.21

20.45

11.76

16.76

16.06

10.19


m a MM



26.56 9.22

29.71 6.90

53.28 2.871

9.64 0.18

47.07 3.771

59.63 9.471

39.541 3.871

48.36 2.021

52.36 3.171


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.


6.01 C. F. Barber, MaoClenny, Fla.

5.72 E. J. Blume, Live Oak, Fla.

3.65 Chipley Gin Co., Chipley, Fla.

1.23 John M. Scott, Gainesville.

10.67 Emory H. Clarke, Miami.

2.70 H. A. Perry, Pomona.

5.94 John M. Scott, Gainesville.

5.90 R. S. Howland, Floral Bluff.

7.561 Cappleman Bros., Winter Garden.








Ground Dry Feed.................

M ixed Feed ......................

Mixed Feed No. 1..................

Mixed Feed No. 2..................

Mixed Feed No. 3..................

Crushed Oats and Corn...........

Poultry Feed ......................

Cotton Seed Meal..................

Excellent Horse and Mule Feed....

Corn Bran (Husks) ...............


12.11

10.58

12.15

4.95

12.11

7.60

1.87J

13.86

12.13

7.40


12.72

13.06

20.45

12.11

12.94

11.23

26.32

36.33

9.82

9.30


54.60

57.36

41.60

64.60

54.76

63.49

37.61

30.26

53.12

69.33


3.711 6.67! Cappleman Bros., Winter Garden.

3.36 3.78 Hester & Hughes, Tampa.

4.40 10.70 Hester & Hughes, Tampa.

4.37 3.42 Hester & Hughes, Tampa.

4.27 4.32 Hester & Hughes, Tampa.

3.53 3.00 Consolidated Gro. Co., Jackson-
ville.
8.80 18.00 August Voss, Jacksonville.

5.81 5.53 The Lewis Bear Co., Pensacola.

3.28 7.76 Peninsular Naval Stores Co., Jack- -
S sonville.
3.20 1.27 Louis R. Chazal & Sons Co., Ocala.









SPECIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.


0.


NAME AND ADDRESS OF


NAME, OR BRAND. c s MANUFACTURER.



Mixed Corn Shucks and Cobs....... 325 29.27 3.51 55.65 1.02 1.45 Williamson & Dennis, Gainesville,
Fla.
Ground Corn Cobs ............... 326 29.95 3.07 56.69 0.72 1.60 Williamson & Dennis, Gainesville,
32 F 05 la.
Ground Shucks .................. 32727.52 3.24 56.54 0.65 2.10 Williamson & Dennis, Gainesville,
Fla.
Ground Corn with Cob............ 328 4.25 7.63 71.83 3.17 1.10 John Parrish, Parrish, Fla.

C. O. C. Feed...................... 329 6.42 12.99 62.12 3.77 3.83 Bartow Milling Co., Bartow, Fla.

C. O. V. B. Feed.................. 330 8.30 11.41 62.86 3.85 2.63 Bartow Milling Co., Bartow, Fla.

Mexican Clover .................. 331 23.42 7.02 49.09 3.20 11.62 W. S. Moore, Hawthorn, Fla.

Corn ............................. 332 1.32 8.78 75.82 2.80 1.06 The Alger-Sullivan Lumber Co.,
1 Century, Fla.
Ground Beggarweed Hay........... 333 34.65 8.78 39.45 1.73 5.99 C. L. Willoughby, Gainesville, Fla.
Ground Peanut Vines.............. 334 29.62 9.921 38.44 6.30 6.60 C. L. Willoughby, Gainesville, Fla.

Laying Mash .................... 335 6.00 18.95 51.791 4.77] 8.27 J. E. Dubuisson, Pensacola, Fla.
Miller Oats (Illegal)-(310)-Oats, 89.2%; barley, 5.8%; wheat, 5%-E. B. Quinby, Tampa, Fla.
Canadian Oats-(323)-Oats, 77.50%; barley, 14.50%; wheat, 4%; seeds, 4%-Miller-Jackson Grain Co., Tampa.
Oats-(324)-Tested for SO,; none found.-A. S. Baker Co., Jacksonville.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FEEDING STUFF SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF ANALYSES, 1915. E. PECK GREENE, Asst. Chemist.
g Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspector Under Sections 1, 2, and 13, Act Approved May 24, 1905.
E Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Eagle


3 D. Grains.............. 1893


Standard Scratch Feed......... 1894


Dried Beet Pulp ............... 1895


Wheat Bran and Screenings.... 1896


CdC



Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


Ship Stuff..................... 1897 Guaranteed
Found ....

Clover Leaf Shorts............ 1898 Guaranteed
I Found ....1


: .2 2


13.00 30.00
9.50 30.98

4.50 10.00
2.65 11.23

20.00 8.00
15.67; 9.92

9.501 14.75
2.401 15.71

8.00' 14.50
6.24 17.11

6.00 14.00
5.6,' 13.861


'0





30.00
36.02

64.00
68.10

58.50
59.90

57.50
61.75

58.62
56.19

56.00
60.911


NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.
4i

10.00 ...... The Dewey Bros. Co., Blan-
12.85 3.05 chester, Ohio.

2.50 ...... Standard Feed Mills, Mem-
2.65 5.29 phis, Tenn.

0.50 ...... The Larrowe Milling Co.,
1.52 3.07 Detroit, Mich.

4.00 ...... The Dunlop Milling Co.,
3.92 6.50 Clarksville, Tenn.

4.00 ...... Atlanta Milling Co., Atlanta,
4.10 6.17 Ga.

4.00 ..... Akin-Erskine Milling Co.,
4.501 6.72j Evansville, Ind.









OFFICIAL FEED STUFF ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.



AMEOR BRAND. NAME AND ADDRESS OF
NAME, OR RAND MANUFACTURER.
Z W
-1

"Rex" Dry Stock Feed.........


Arrow Mixed Feed.............


Cotton Seed Meal..............


Larrow Feed...................


Ringleader Horse & Mule Feed.


Snow's Horse & Mule Feed....


Evergreen Molasses Feed......


Peter's "Arab" Horse Feed....


1899 Guaranteed
Found ....

1900 Guaranteed
Found ....

1901 Guaranteed
Found ....

1902 Guaranteed
Found ....

1903 Guaranteed
Found ....

1904 Guaranteed
Found ....

1905 Guaranteed
Found ....

1906 Guaranteed
Found ....


10.00
7.62

6.00
4.30

25.00
16.57

14.00
9.55

16.00
11.40

12.00
9.90

12.00
11.62

15.00
8.85


10.00
12.72

10.00
12.29

25.00
25.01

19.00
20.71

9.00
9.48

10.50
10.03

9.00
10.78

9.00
10.87


50.00
57.27

65.00
66.87


41.13

50.00
52.84

70.00
56.04

55.00
56.85

55.00
54.95

59.00
62.84


...... Milam-Morgan Co., New Or-..
7.75 leans, La.

...... Steinmesch Feed Co., St.
2.27 Louis, Mo.

...... Union Seed & Fertilizer Co., o
4.77 Albany, Ga.

3.50 The Larrowe Milling Co.,
5.47 Detroit, Mich.

....... International Sugar Feed
7.79 Co., Memphis, Tenn.

...... Milam-Morgan Co., New Or-
7.93 leans, La.

..... Milam-Morgan Co., New Or-
7.78 leans, La.

...... M. C. Peters Mill Co., Oma-
4.64 ha, Neb.










Little Ned Sweet Feed......... 1907 Guaranteed 12.00
Found .... 12.02

Peerless Alfalmo Horse Feed..11908 Guarantee 12.00
Found .... 11.50

Darling's Meat Scraps ........ 1909 Guaranteed 3.00
Found .... 2.47

Harvester Molasses Feed...... 1910 Guaranteed' 11.00
Found .... 13.90

Circle C. Molasses FeAed........ 1911 Guaranteed 12.00,
Found .... 11.02

Eq-Ui-No Feed ................ 1912 Guaranteed 14.00
Found .... 11.92

Extra Horse Feed............. 1913 Guaranteed 10.00
Found .... 7.92

Liberty Horse & Mule Feed.... 1914 Guaranteed 12.00
Found .... 8.35

Pure Alfalfa Meal.............. 1915 Guaranteed 25.00
Found .... 25.90

Lunt Patsy's Poultry Feed..... 1916 Guaranteed 11.00
Found .... 9.05

Toopkins' Special Horse Feed.. 1917 Guaranteed 12.00
Found .... 12.68


8.5
10.3

10.0
10.1

45.0
50.3

10.5
10.3

10.0
10.8

9.0
11.4

9.0
11.9

10.0
10.5

16.0
15.0

15.7
20.5

9.0
11.5


0 57.001 1.50
3 56.33 2.13

0 55.00 2.00
8 57.20 2.24

0 1.00 5.00
1 2.26 5.46

.0 59.00 3.00
.9 50.45 3.44

'0 55.00 2.50
0 56.47 3.29

0 52.00 2.00
5 56.711 1.56

0 57.00 2.50
11 58.56 2.61

'0 50.00 2.50
8 59.68 2.45

0 ...... 2.02
1 38.31 1.57

5 50.00 3.50
3 46.30 3.90

'0 58.00 2.00
3 50.861 2.23


7.54


6.16


29.78


6.97


6.20


5.70


5.80


5.33


8.96


12.42


Edgar-Morgan Co., Memphis,
Tenn.

Omaha Alfalfa Milling Co..
Omaha, Neb.

The Van Inderstine Co.,
Long Island City, N. Y.

Cairo Milling Co., Cairo, Ill.


Cairo Milling Co., Cairo, Ill.


Memphis Milling Co., Mem-
phis, Tenn.

G. E. Patteson & Co., Mem-
phis, Tenn.

Capital City Oil Co., Baton
Rouge, La.

The Alfalfa Meal & Milling
Co., Cherokee, Okla.

Aunt Patsy Poultry Feed
Co., Memphis, Tenn.


...... Southern Feed Co., Miami,
S6.22 Fla.









OFFICIAL FEEDING STUFF


NAME, OR BRAND. 2 S
0 r



Marco Molasses Feed.......... 1918 Guaranteed 12.00
Found .... 11.22

Falco Horse Feed.............. 1919 Guaranteed 12.001
Found .... 10.741

Otto Weiss Alfalfa Meal....... 1920 Guaranteed 30.00
Found .... 30.15

Pure Winter Wheat Middling... 1921 Guaranteed 7.00
Found .... 8.55

Palace Bran.................. 19221Guaranteed 10.00
Found .... 8.741

Pure Wheat Middlings .........1923 Guaranteed 7.00
Found .... 5.37

Arrow Shipstuff................ 1924 Guaranteed 7.00
IFound .... 4.17

Suwanee Horse & Mule Feed... 1925 Guaranteed 12.00
Found .... 9.921


ANALYSES, 1915-Continued.

'
.9 NAME AND ADDRESS OF
MANUFACTURER.


9.00 50.00 2.00 ......Florida Milling Co., Tampa
11.06 48.32 3.16 9.13 Fla.

9.00 59.00 2.00 ...... Baker & Holmes Co., Jacl
14.53 53.17 2.53 5.50 sonville, Fla.

14.00 35.00 1.50 ...... Otto Weiss Alfalfa Stock.
14.74 37.30 1.62 8.02 Food Co., Wichita, Kan.

16.00 56.00 4.00 ......Peerless Feed Co., Cairo, III
16.76 57.12 4.22 5.60

14.50 54.00 4.00 ...... Kehlor Flour Mills Co., SL
18.47 52.47 3.55 6.32 Louis, Mo.

16.00 64.89 5.001 ......Igleheart Bros., Evansville.
18.08 58.66 4.77 4.171 Ind.

16.00 60.00 4.501...... The Dunlop Mills, Richmona,
17.81 58.86 4.171 4.76 Va.

9.50 55.00 3.50 ...... Milam-Morgan Co., New OI
9.87 52.76 4.50 8.61 leans, La.




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