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 Title Page
 State chemist's report, 1914
 Financial
 Appropriation and expenditures
 Summary of analytical report,...
 The state of Florida, department...
 Department of agriculture - Division...
 Miscellaneous analyses and examinations,...
 Expenditures chemical division,...






Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00077083/00035
 Material Information
Title: Florida quarterly bulletin of the Agricultural Department
Uniform Title: Avocado and mango propagation and culture
Tomato growing in Florida
Dasheen its uses and culture
Report of the Chemical Division
Alternate Title: Florida quarterly bulletin, Department of Agriculture
Florida quarterly bulletin of the Department of Agriculture
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some fold) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: -1921
Frequency: quarterly
monthly[ former 1901- sept. 1905]
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agricultural industries -- Statistics -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 31, no. 3 (July 1, 1921).
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 19, no. 2 (Apr. 1, 1909); title from cover.
General Note: Many issue number 1's are the Report of the Chemical Division.
General Note: Vol. 31, no. 3 has supplements with distinctive titles : Avocado and mango propagation and culture, Tomato growing in Florida, and: The Dasheen; its uses and culture.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00077083
Volume ID: VID00035
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 28473206
 Related Items

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    State chemist's report, 1914
        Page 3
    Financial
        Page 4
    Appropriation and expenditures
        Page 5
    Summary of analytical report, 1914
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
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    The state of Florida, department of agriculture
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    Department of agriculture - Division of chemistry
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    Miscellaneous analyses and examinations, 1914
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    Expenditures chemical division, 1914
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Full Text



VOLUME 25 NUMBER 1


FLORIDA QUARTERLY

BULLETIN


January 1, 1915.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

W. A. McRAE
COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE


REPORT O.F THE CHEMICAL DIVISION.



R. E. ROSE
STATE CHEMIST


Analysis of Fertilizers, Feed Stuffs, Food and Drugs.
Rules and Regulations.


Entered January 31, 1903, at Tallahassee, Florida, as second-class
matter under Act of Congress of June, 1900.


These Bulletins Are Issued Free to Those Requesting Them.


T. J. Appleyard, State Printer,
Tallahassee, Fla.











STATE CHEMIST'S REPORT, 1914.


Tallahassee, Fla., January 1, 1915.
To His Excellency,
Park Trammell, Governor,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Sir:-I have the honor to submit the following report
of the Chemical Division of the Agricultural Department
of the State of Florida for the year ending December 31,
1914:
The report of the State Treasurer, shows the sale of
inspection stamps covering 240,S12.36 tons of Commercial
Fertilizers and Cotton Seed Meal-
Amounting to ............................. .$60,203.14
And 117,737.64 tons of Commercial Feeding
Stuffs-
Am counting to .............................. t'. I-. 4.41


A total revenue of........................$89,687.55
paid into the State Treasury to the credit of the General
Revenue Fund. From which is to be deducted the total
expenses of the Chemical Division, incident to the execu-
tion of the Fertilizer, Feed Stuff, and Pure Food and
Drug Laws, including the expenses of the Immature
Citrus Fruit Law, $1,884.58, the total expense of the chem-
ical division being $20,738.37, showing a balance of
$68,949.18 paid into the General Revenue Fund of the
State. A summary of these expenditures will be found
on the succeeding page. A detailed Financial Report will
be found on the last pages of this report.










FINANCIAL REPORT.

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF CHEMICAL

DIVISION, 1914.

Salary of the State Chemist ................. 3,000.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Fertilizers..... 1,800.00
Salary of Asst. State Chemist, Food and Drugs 1,800.00
Salary of Asst State Chemist, Stock Feed.... 1,800.00
Salary three Food and Drug Inspectors ....... 4.500.01
Salary Clerk Chemical Division ............. 900.00
Traveling expenses three Food, Druig and Fer-
tilizer Inspectors ......................... 2,489.93
Samples and Incidentals, Pure Food Depart-
ment .................................... 817.27
Chemicals, Apparatus and Incidentals, State
Laboratory ............................. 804.59
Traveling Expenses State Chemist and Assist-
ants ................. .................. 807.85
Postage State Chemist ...................... 134.15
Salaries of four Citrus Fruit Inspectors....... 1,083.32



Total Expenses Chemical Division.......... .$20,738.37
Unexpended to Credit of Gen. Rev. Fund...... 1,461.63

Total Appropriations for 1914 ............ .22.'2111 11-n



Total Revenue Chemical Division............. .$89,687.5
Total Expenses Chemical Division ............ 20,738.37

Balance to credit of General Revenue ...... 868,949.18



















APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURES.



Your attention again is called to the considerable dif-
ference between the sums named in the "Pure Food and
Drugs Law" (Section 10 and 11, $25,500.00) ; and $19,-
700.00-the sum estimated as necessary in the budget
prepared by this Division; accepted by the Appropriation
Committee, and fixed by the Legislature, for the support
of the Chemical Division, in the execution of the Pure
Food, Fertilizer, Stock Feed and Cotton Seed Meal Laws,
per annum, from Jan. 1st, 1914, to Dec. 31st, 1914-a
difference of $5,800.00 per annum in excess of the budget.
This $19,700.00, together with $2,500.00, appropriated
for the expenses for Citrus Fruit Inspection, fixes the
total appropriation for the Chemical Division, per annum,
Actual appropriation, 1914 .................$. $22,200.00
Actual expenditures ........................s n..7::;, 7
1914 appropriations, not expended. ...........$ 1,467.63
















SUMMARY OF ANALYTICAL REPORT, 1914.

The following analyses were made during the year:
Official samples fertilizers ........................ l24'
Special samples fertilizers (sent in by citizens).... 32'1
Official samples feed stuff ....................... 243
Special samples feed stuff (sent in by citizens)...... ;i3
Official food and drug samples ...................... 8
Special food and drug samples (sent in by citizen,) 41
Official samples citrus fruit ...................... .
Special samples citrus fruit ................ . ..
W ater sam ples .................................. 1U
Miscellaneous samples (sent in by citizens) ........ 93

Total number analyses ........................1081
It will be noted that the "Special Sample" of fertilizer,
feeds, foods and drugs, sent in by citizens of the State,
has materially increased, showing an increased demand
on the part of the citizen for specific information on these
subjects, of such vital importance-economical and other-
wise.
The Florida Law is peculiar in this respect, permitting
the submission of such samples by the citizen, only re-
quiring that the sample shall be properly drawn, duly
authenticated, and properly transmitted, in order to pre-
vent the submission of spurious or fake samples, as pro-
vided by Section 9, of the Pure Food and Drugs Law.











FERTILIZERS.
Frank T. Wilson, B. S., Analyst.

Official samples fertilizer ........................ 246
Special samples fertilizers ....................... 320

Total analyses fertilizer department ........... 566

The 192 samples of complete fertilizer drawn by the
State Chemists and Inspectors had the following average
composition and guarantee.
Available
Ammonia. Phos. Acid. Potash.
Official analysis ........ 3.96% 7.11% 7.18%
Guarantee ............. 3.84% 6.06% 6.74%
Excess above guarantee.. 0.12% 1.05% 0.44%

Average State value found, per ton...... .28.87
Average State value guaranteed, per ton.. 26.91

EXCESS 0.20% ABOVE GUARANTEE.


We find complete fertilizers exceeding the guarantee
0.20% (twenty points), as follows
'In Ammonia ............... 76 samples, or ... .39.6%
In Available Phosphoric Acid.157 samples, or.... 82.8%
In Potash ..................113 samples, or....58.8%

DEFICIENCY 0.20% BELOW GUARANTEE.


We find complete fertilizers below guarantee 0.20%
(twenty points), as follows:

In Ammonia ................ 37 samples, or .... 19.2%
In Available Phosphoric Acid. 11 samples, or.... 5.7%
In Potash (K20) ............ 39 samples, or.... 20.3%











COMMERCIAL STOCK FEED.

E. Peck Greene, B. S., Analyst.

The following analyses have been made during the
year:

Official samples feed stuff ........................ 243
Special samples feed stuff ....................... 33

Total average in Feed department ............ 275
Total analyses in Feed department ............ 276
follows:


Starch and
Protein. Sugar.
Official analysis ............ 13.31 56.81
Guaranteed analysis ........ 12.61 54.88


Fats.
3.70
3.60


Average Excess ...........


.70


1.93 0.10


We find the official samples of feed stuffs exceeded the
guarantee 0.20% (twenty points), as follows:
In Protein ................ 161 samples, or.... 67.32
In Starch and Sugar ........149 samples, or.... 62.34c/
In Fats ................... 97 samples, or....4i : ,.

There was a deficiency of 0.207c (twenty points), as
follows:


In Protein ................ 40
In Starch and Sugar ........ 78
In Fats ................... 87


samples,
samples,
samples,


or....16.69;
or. . .30.12 ;
or .... 36.4(0c











FOODS AND DRUGS.
L. Heimburger, B. S., M. S., Analyst.

Official food and drugs samples ................... 85
Special food and drugs samples ................... 41
Official citrus fruit samples ...................... 3
Special citrus fruit samples ...................... 7
W ater sam ples .................................. 10

Total food and drugs samples ..................... 146
Immature citrus fruit samples reported ............ 1

Those samples found adulterated or misbranded have
been reported to the proper officer.




FERTILIZERS.

It will be found that the average of the officially drawn
samples of fertilizer show a slightly greater guaranteed
percentage in Ammonia as compared to the season of
1913, the average guarantee for 1913 being 3.85%, for
1914, 3.96%.

An increase is shown in Available Phosphoric Acid.
The 1913 average guarantee was 5.76%, that for 1914
was 6.06%.
In Potash, the average guarantee decreased. In 1913
it was 7.49%, while for 1914, it was 6.741%.

The excesses-.20% above guarantee-have materially
increased, while deficiencies-.20% below guarantee-
have also increased, showing less careful manipulation
of the raw materials, grinding and mixing, and particular-
ly less efficient chemical and technical control of factories,
as most, if not all, have modern grinding and mixing
apparatus and employ competent chemists to check raw











materials and manufactured goods, this condition is in-
excusable.
The average guaranteed "State value" of the "official
sample" has decreased as compared to the season of 1913.
$0.56 per ton.
The official analysis shows a decrease of $0.36 per ton
as compared to 1913.
The average excess value of all the official samples
above "guarantee" is $1.95 per ton.
Practically 6% in excess of guaranteed value.

COMMERCIAL VALUE OF FERTILIZER MATERIAL.
There has been practically little change in the commer-
cial values of Animoniates. Phosphates are still quoted
at the same prices as in 1913, for ton lots, though liberal
concessions are made for cash in car lots by manufac-
turers.
Owing to the European war the supply of Potash salts
has been limited and prices largely increased. The fact
that a cargo of Potash salts has recently been received in
Jacksonville by Florida manufacturers indicates that this
shortage will soon be relieved.

Special samples of Fertilizers.
There was an increase in "special samples" sent in by
purchasers, under Section 9, of the Fertilizer Law, from
274 in 1913, to 320 in 1914; being practically 32 per
cent increase in the "special sample," showing an in-
creased demand by the consumer for an exact knowledge
of the commercial and agricultural value of goods pur-
chased afforded him by the Florida Law; a feature pecu-
liar to the Florida Law, permitting the purchaser to send
in a properly drawn and duly authenticated sample of
goods purchased (feeds and fertilizers) and without cost.
to obtain an analysis of the same.
It is needless to say that the "special sample," when
properly and legally drawn, as the Law directs, affords











the consumer immediate information as to the "State
value" of fertilizers or feeds purchased, giving him the
same protection demanded by the manufacturer, who
"purchases his raw materials on guarantee, and pays for
them on alalysis."

ABUSE OF THE SPECIAL SAMPLE.

During the year numerous --pl..,i. samples" have been
received by the State Chemist, not drawn, nor transmitted
according to the spirit and letter of Sections 9, of both
the Fertilizer and the Stock Feed Laws, sent in very
small packages, not isuficient for the necessary determi-
nations, and the preservation of a duplicate sample in
case of contest, and addressed to the "State Chemist."
This misunderstanding of the law and its purport, caused
the issuname, on Sept. 5, 1914, of amended regulations,
under Sec. 15, of both the Fertilizer and Stock Feed Laws,
for properly drawing, packing and transmitting such
samples, in order to secure fair samples, properly identi-
fied, as to hleir genuineness, properly protected from
tamperilng with, the full text of these amended regula-
tions are published herein.

SPURIOUS SAMPLES.

There is evidence that spurious "special samples" of
fertilizers have been submitted for analysis. To prevent
such fraudulent practice and insure the genuineness and
representative character of the "special sample," an
amendment to the fertilizer law is recommended, fixing
a penalty for the submission of spurious or manipulated
samples.

Illegal Samples of I'erlilizcrs, Stock Feed, Food, Drugs
and Liquors Reported.

Official samples of fertilizers, deficient.............. 90
Official samples of stock feed, deficient............ 128











Ollicial samples of fo:os misbranded or adulterated. 2s
Special samples of foods and drugs misbranded or
adulterate:! ................................... 27
Official samples of citrus fruit, immature .......... 1

Total number of illegal samples reported ........ 274


Prosecutions.

Misbranded ginger ale (failure to state net contents),
plead guilty-Palm Beach County.
Misbranided Scotch Whiskies, (failure to state net con-
tents), found guilty-sentence suspended.


"THE NEW MINERAL FERTILIZER."

Notwithstanding the exposure of this fraud upon the
farmers and growers of the State by this Iivision, during
the year 1913, as reported to you in the report for that
year, numerous advertisements of this material have ap-
peared in several repulable newspapers of the State, offer-
ing the material to the growers of the State, sold direct
from their home office outside the State.
That this material has no value as a fertilizer is shown
by the published analyses and results of experiments by
various agricultural experiment stations, including lhe
Florida Agricultural Station, and the United States De-
partment of Agriculiure.
This imposition upon the credulity of a number of our
farmers and growers, is of such importance that I repeat
the results of the investigation of 1913, and respectfully
suggest that you call the attention of the national author-
ities to this interstate shipment of a fraudulent material,
greatly to the damage of the citizens of this and other
States.

Last year's report on this subject is as follows:-










THE NEW MINERAL FERTILIZER.

"Early in July of this year (1913), the attention of this
division was called to this material. A grower of the
State sent tags and literature lauding the value of this
so-called "New Mineral Fertilizer," asking information
as to its fertilizing value.
Being aware of the history of this material and the
effort to impose it upon the credulity of the farmers of
the country for years past, under various names or
brands, by a campaign of pseudo-scientific misinforma-
tion, notably by the 'Professor of Polaric Nutrition of the
Divine Science University," etc., that "Bread from
Stones," "Stone Meal," "Mineral Fertilizer," has been
fully tested and condemned as worthless as a fertilizer by
competent agriculturists, scientific and practical; In-
spectors were at once directed to procure samples of the
goods, specimens of tags, circulars and literature.
On July 12th, a sample was analyzed, by the official
methods of the "Association of Official Agricultural
Chemists"-the only recognized methods used by agri-
cultural chemists, and agricultural experiment stations,
which analysis showed:
Total Phosphoric Acid..................0.06%
Available Phosphoric Acid.............. None.
Water Soluble Potash (KO)............ None.
This sample, was obtained from Ft. Pierce; another
sample from Cocoanut Grove, bearing the same tag and
accompanied by the same literature, was analyzed August
31st. This analysis showed:
Total Phosphoric Acid ................ 0.15%
Available Phosphoric Acid.............. None.
Potash (K20) ........................ None.
That this matter should be fully investigated and no
injustice done, parts of these samples were sent to the










Florida Agricultural Experiment Station for analysis.
The report of this analysis, by Prof. S. E. Collison,
Chemist of the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station,
shows:

Total Phosphoric Acid.................0.04 %
Available Phosphoric Acid............. None.
Water Soluble Potash (K20) ..........0.001%

The material being simply "micaceous shist," the
Potassium, Phosphorous, Soda, Calcium and Magnesia
being combined as Silicates in the rock, the sulffur as Sul-
phides, were insoluble in the strongest boiling acids.
The only two "plant foods" claimed by the tag, Phos-
phate and Potash, being absolutely unavailable silicates,
on further investigation it has been shown that this ma-
terial has been exploited on various occasions previously
under various names-"Stone Meal," "The New England
Mineral Fertilizer," "The New Mineral Fertilizer," and
has been declared worthless as a fertilizer and insecticide
by various agricultural experiment stations from Maine
to Florida, and by the Chemical Bureau, of the U. S.
Dept. of Agriculture, and exposed by various agricultural
journals, notably the "Rural New Yorker," and the
"Southern Ruralist"-both reputable and responsible
journals.
Circular letters were sent out by this division to the
Press and citizens of the State warning them of the utter
worthlessness of this so-called "New Mineral Fertilizer,'
the material being as insoluble as ordinary glass, which
contains from 3 to 20 per cent of Potassium (or soda) as
silicates, and is equally as soluble, or available, as this
silicate (Igneous sandstone).
There are millions of acres of soil in Florida that con-
tain (on a dry basis) two to three per cent of nitrogen,
which can be readily made available. Other large areas
of soil, with from one-half to three per cent of phos-
phates, enormous deposits of low grade phosphate of









lime and alumina, with one or more per cent available,
and seven or more per cent insoluble phosphates (the
waste of phosphate plants, in excellent mechanical con-
dition, that can be had for hauling) ; while vast deposits
of "soft phosphates," with 1.50 per cent or more availalbe,
and 15 to 25 per cent insoluble phosphate, that can be
had for digging and hauling. With such materials;
abundant nitrogen, immense quantities of phosphates-
well distributed-having large actual plant foods readily
made available, it is needless to say that it is folly to
purchase absolutely inert material of less fertilizing value
than good average Florida soil, which can be purchased
by the acre, from twenty-five to fifty dollars per acre, of
which six inches off the surface will afford 1,000 tons of
material superior to this "New Mineral Fertilizer" in
fertilizing value.
At the above price per acre, the cost per ton would be
2.5 to 5 cents. The actual value of this "New Mineral
Fertilizer," according to present market prices, of avail-
able phosphate, and water soluble potash being abso-
lutely nothing, as it contains no available plant food
whatever.

The principal stock in trade of this concern is the
credulity of its victims, and abuse of all scientists, agri-
cultural chemists, experiment stations, and manufactur-
ers of commercial fertilizers.
Threats of suits for slander and libel have been made,
none however, instituted.

After full investigation and on advice of the Attorney
General, the following order was prepared by the State
Chemist, and issued by the Agricultural Department:









Press Bulletin
State of Florida
Agricultural Department

Tallahassee, November 15, 1913.
NOTICE TO DEALERS, AGENTS AND CONSUMERS
OF COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS, INSECTICIDES,
AND FUNGICIDES.
It having been shown by analysis by the Florida State
Laboratory, the Laboratory of the Florida Agricultural
Experiment Station, and the Bureau of Chemistry of the
United States Department of Agriculture, together with
those of a number of other State Agricultural Experi-
ment Stations, that the "New Mineral Fertilizer," made
by the New Mineral Fertilizer Company, of Boston,
Massachusetts, cal not be classed as either a fertilizer,
insecticide or fungicide, and that the analysis quoted on
the tags and in the literature issued by the said com-
pany is misleading and calculated to deceive, the material
actually having no nitrogen (Ammonia), soluble Potash,
nor available Phosphoric Acid or Sulfur in its compisi-
tion; and on being advised by the Attorney General of
the State of Florida that the sale of this material in the
State as a fertilizer, insecticide or fungicide, under the
laws of Florida, is illegal, notice is hereby given that the
"New Mineral Fertilizer," made by the New Mineral Fer-
tilizer Company, of Boston, Mass., can not be legally sold
in the State of Florida.
Therefore, all dealers, or agents are duly notified that
the sale, or offering for sale, of this "New Mineral Fer-
tilizer," as a fertilizer, insecticide, or fungicide, will sub-
ject them to the penalties of Chapter 4983, Laws of
Florida.
W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculture.
R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist."










IMMATURE CITRUS FRUIT.

During the inspection period-September 1st to No-
vember 5th-1914, there were received by the State Labor-
atory three samples of citrus fruit, two samples being
grapefruit, both of which were mature by the standard
fixed by the Legislature, having less than 1.75% of acid,
as crystallized citric acid, though in fact, and by color,
the fruit was not mature. The detailed analyses will be
found under the proper head, of official food analyses.
But one sample of oranges was received, which was
found immature, by analysis, containing more than 1.30%
of acid, as crystallized citric acid, and were also imma-
ture by colar, as shown by the detailed report under the
proper heading.
The prevention of the shipment of actually immature
citrus fruit, under the standard fixed by the Legislature,
involving the "color test," as follows:-"PROVIDED, THAT
ORANGES OR GRAPEFRUIT SHOWING AN AVERAGE ON THE TREES
OF ONE-HALF COLOR, INDICATING RIPENESS, SHALL BE DEEMED
TO BE MATURE AND FIT FOR CONSUMPTION, AND MAY BE
SHIPPED OR SOLD WITHOUT FIRST BEING SUBMITTED TO THE
ACID TEST PROVIDED IN THIS ACT," is practically impossible,
as demonstrated by this season's experience. The color
standard introduces into the inspection at once the per-
sonal opinion of the Inspector and the shipper, as to per-
centage of color and how to apply it. The various prob-
lems arising are readily perceived and honest differences
as to the intent of the law become apparent. Citrus fruit,
on the tree, "showing an average of one-half color, indi-
cating ripeness," are not subject to the acid test. The
question at once arises," "If one-half the fruit on the trees
are yellow and the remainder green, is the fruit subject
to the acid test?" If all the fruit be yellow on one side
and green on the other, is it subject to the acid test?"
"If all the fruit be of a hue showing green and yellow
mixed or blended, who shall decide the fact that it is one
2-Chem.










"half colored indicating ripeness," and shall the acid test
be applied or not?" The personal equation at once be-
comes evident, possibly influenced by interest, prejudice,
friendship, enmity or carelessness.

I would call your attention to the fact that in the
analytical study of grapefruit, among the hundreds of
specimens analyzed by the chemist of the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station, Prof. S. E. Collison, BE-
TWEEN OCTOBER 1, 1912, AND MAY 2, 1914, BUT THREE SPECI-
MENS OF GRAPEFRUIT CONTAINED 1.75% OR MORE OF ACID
AS CRYSTALLIZED CITRIC ACID-THE STANDARD FIXED FOR
IMMATURE GRAPEFRUIT BY THE LEGISLATURE. THE LEGIS-
LATURE HAVING SELECTED THE THREE SPECIMENS HAVING THE
GREATEST PERCENTAGE OF ACID, AS THE "STANDARD" FOR MA-
TURE GRAPEFRUIT. It is unnecessary to say that the law
and inspection had little, if any, effect on the protection
of the public from immature and unwholesome citrus
fruit, and the grower from serious financial loss.

The cost of the effort to enforce the law, the fact that
it did not prevent the shipment of large quantities of un-
ripe citrus fruit, and seriously damaged the reputation of
Florida oranges for excellence, the criticism of the law
by the people and the press of the State, and its failure to
accomplish its purpose, has doubtless been justified, as
the necessity of protecting the consumer from immature,
unwholesome citrus fruit, and the honest grower and
shipper from demoralized markets, has fully demonstrated
the necessity of a law, with a standard similar to that
recommended by the Commission appointed by the Agri-
cultural Department and accepted by, and recommended
by, the organized growers of the State.

Regulation Adopted by the United States Department of
Agriculture.

This and last season's experience and the wide distri-
ution of immature citrus fruit from Florida and other










States, with the publicity given the subject by the efforts
of Florida growers to prevent this abuse, has lead to the
adoption of the following by the National authorities:

DEFINITION OF ORANGES COLORED TO CONCEAL
INFERIORITY.
Department of Agriculture Will Regard Excessive Acidity
As a Bar to Shipment.
Washington, D. C., November 28, 1914.
To prevent the interstate shipment of immature citrus
fruit which has been colored by sweating or exposure in
warm, moist air to an extent that will conceal its inferior-
ity, the Department of Agriculture has issued an an-
nouncement defining the minimum of sweetness that
oranges must attain on the tree, if later sweating is not
to be held to conceal inferiority. In the past, much imma-
ture fruit, colored by sweating, has been shipped. They
point out that the law prohibits the coloring of any food
product so as to conceal inferiority, and shipments of
fruit so colored always have been prohibited. The an-
nouncement is as follows:
"The bureau of chemistry has received repeated requests
to define the terms 'immature' and 'maturity' as used in
food inspection decision 133, relating to the coloring of
green citrus fruits. Such a definition seems desirable in
view of the uncertainty now existing regarding the scope
of this decision.
"As a result of the investigation carried out during the
season of 1913 and 1914, the bureau of chemistry con-
siders California oranges to be immature if the juice does
not contain soluble solids equal to, or in excess of eight
parts to every part of acid contained in the juice, the
acidity of the juice to be calculated as citric acid without
water of crystallization. Owing to the fact that oppor-
tunity has been given to study the composition of Cali-
fornia oranges during one season only, the ratio set at










this time is lower than that which is believed to be the
minimum for properly matured fruit. It may, therefore,
be expected that the requirements will be made more
strict after data from several crops are available."

Comparison of National and Florida Standards.

The National standard "one part of anhydrous citric
acid to eight parts total solids," is practically the same
as that recommended by the Florida commission which
recommended a standard of "one part crystalized acid to
seven parts sugar," at Gainesville, in August, 1912, whose
report was adopted by the convention of orange growers.
This standard, tentatively adopted by the National
authorities, is one that can be readily applied in the field
or the packing house, by any one with but a rudimentary
knowledge of chemistry, who can read percentages and
apply the ordinary arithmetical rules of proportion, re-
quiring no costly apparatus, reagents, nor skill in the
determinations.
It will also apply to all citrus fruit, from different
States and countries, and thus remove one of the prin-
cipal objections to a standard for Florida alone, though
her former reputation for the excellence of her citrus
fruits one of her greatest assets, was destroyed to a large
degree by the shipment of sour, unpalatable and unwhole-
some oranges, so prevalent during recent years, and so
vigorously protested against by her growers in general.








Comparison of the National Standard for mature oranges-"one part of anhydrous citric acid to eight
parts of total solids, minimum," and the Florida Standard of 1.30% maximum crystallized citric acid.
(To convert anhydrous acid into crystallized acid, multiply by 1.0937).
SAMPLES PURCHASED IN OPEN MARKET DECEMBER 1ST TO 7TH.

Anhydrous Crystallized Total
Number. Taste. citric acid citric acid solids Ratio. REMARKS.
(per cent). (per cent). (per cent).


U. S. 2041... Tart. 1.14 ............ 11.02 1 to 9.67 Legal.
Florida 2041... ........ ............ .1.25 ........... ............ Legal.

U. S. 2042... Sour. 1.53 ............ 10.94 1 to 7.15 Illegal.
Florida 2042... ........ ............ .1.67 ........... ............ Illegal.

U. S. 2043... Sour. 1.49 ............ 10.92 1 to 7.33 Illegal.
Florida 2043... ........ ............ .1.63 ........... ............ Illegal.

U. S. 2044... Tart. 1.13 ............ 10.82 1 to 9.57 Legal.
Florida 2044... ........ ............ .1.24 ......................... Legal.

U. S. 2045... Sweet. 0.87 ............ 9.97 1 to 11.45 Legal.
Florida 2045... ........ ............ .0.95 ......................... Legal.

U. S. 2046... Sweet. 0.67 ............ 10.92 1 to 16.26 Legal.
Florida 2046... ........ ............ .0.73 ........... ............ Legal.

U. S. 2047... Sour. 1.85 ............ 11.57 1 to 6.26 Illegal.
Florida 2047..... .... .. ............ 2.02 ........... ............ Illegal.











Citrus Fruit Inspection.
According to the standard fixed by the legislature, only
such citrus fruit as are not "half-colored" are subject to
the "acid test," hence but few citrus fruit, offered for sale
or shipment, were subject to the "field test by the In-
specors," as yellow oranges were exempt from such test.
Grapefruit, though green in color, seldom contains
1.75% of citric acid, as shown by the large number of
specimens analyzed by the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. As yellow, or "half-colored" fruit is not
subject to the field test, Inspectors necessarily found no
grapefruit immature, under the law, though large quan-
tities, immature in fact, were shipped.
The Citrus Inspectors were viligent and in every way
attempted to enforce the law, in the effort to prevent the
shipment of immature citrus fruit. The failure to do so
can be attributed solely to the failure of the law to pro-
vide an enforcible standard.

Recommendations.

It is recommended that the present "Citrus Fruit
Standard Law" be repealed, and that the standard
adopted by the National authorities be adopted by the
legislature, and that the necessary machinery to enforce
it be provided, with a sufficient appropriation for efficient
inspection, by Inspectors who shall be subject to examina-
tions by some qualified authority as to their fitness for
the performance of this important duty, from their expe-
rience, education, physical capacity, activity, and adapt-
ability, and that the inspection period extend from Sep-
tember first to December first, of each year.

FOOD INSPECTORS.

This report shows that the Food, Drug and Fertilizer
Inspectors have attached numerous misbranded, adul-
terated and light weight foods, misbranded alcoholic










liquors, whiskies, beer, ciders and various so-called non-
intoxicating beverages (slops), their judgment in practi-
cally each of these cases being confirmed by the analyses
of the State Chemist, but two of these infringments of the
law having been prosecuted by the proper authorities
charged therewith. Inspectors have necessarily been dis-
credited, subjected to ridicule and criticisms, and accused
of officiousness, hence discouraged in their effort to pro-
tect the public from these various fraudulent practices.

Light Weight Flour-Violation of the Net Weight Law.

Several instances of the shipment into the State of
lightweight flour have been reported to the Departmen of
Agriculture. In but one instance has a sample been sent
by the Inspector to this Division. In this case, 1140 sacks,
purporting to contain six pounds net each, were found to
be 9.22% short of the guaranteed weight, or 631 pounds
short in the lot attached.
Though evidently a gross violation of law, this case
has not been prosecuted.
This matter has been taken up by this Division with
the National authorities, with the assistance of whom it
is hoped this fraudulent practice, imposed principally
upon the purchaser of small packages of this necessary
food stuff, may be prevented in the future, and the perpe-
trators of the fraud punished by a fine or imprisonment.

Replevin of Adulterated or Misbranded Foods Attached,
Pending Investigation.

In reference to the replevin of goods attached as adul-
terated or misbranded foods by the Inspectors, under
Sections 2 and 9 of the Pure Food and Drugs Law, pend.
ing investigation by this Division and the Agricultural
Department, your attention is again called to this prac-
tice, which, to a great extent, has nullified the law, and










prevents its execution, I respectfully call your attention
to the report of the State Chemist on this subject for the
year ending December 31, 1913, as follows:-
I would respectfully call your attention to this evident
miscarriage of justice, and the necessity of having the
proper officer resist the replevin of such goods found to
be illegal, and under the law unfit for consumption.

In this connection, I am pleased to say, the position as-
sumed by this Division of the Agricultural Department,
is sustained by the Attorney General, who, in an opinion
dated November 18, 1913, says:

"In view of this rule and the great public im-
portance of the question, I would suggest that
the proper course for your Department (the
Agricultural Department) to pursue would be
to assume the statute valid until declared invalid
by the highest court of the State."

In view of the fact that goods attached by Inspectors,
under Section 9, of Chapter 6541-the Pure Food and
Drugs Law-and after analysis by the State Chemist,
showing them to be illegal, (under Section 2) have been
replevined, without resistance, and sold or shipped for
consumption, I respectfully call your attention to this
very important matter, on which depends the proper en-
forcement of the Pure Food Law of the State and the pro-
tection of our citizens from adulterated, misbranded, im-
mature, unwholesome or deleterious foods and drugs.


Inspection, Examination and Analysis.

Section 2, of the "Pure Food and Drug Law" provides,

"That the inspection, examination or chemical
analysis of foods and drugs, shall be made by the










State Chemist of Florida, or under his direction
and supervision."

Section 9, provides that,

"Said Food, Drug and Fertilizer Inspectors, of
the Chemical Division of the Department of Agri-
culture, shall have the authority, and it shall be
their duty, under instructions from the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture and the State Chemist, to
inspect foods and drugs, and commercial stock
feed and commercial fertilizers, and other ma-
terial subject to inspection, as now provided by *
law, throughout the State, or any territory as-
signed to them, and to seize and attach all goods
subject to inspection, as are visably misbranded
or palpably adulterated, or offered for sale in vio-
lation of the provisions of this Act. * The
Inspectors shall, under the direction of the Com-
missioner of Agriculture, or the State Chemist,
draw samples of foods and drugs, commercial
stock feed, commercial fertilizer and other goods
subject to inspection, offered for sale in the
State, or district assigned to them, and forward
samples to the State Chemist for examination or
analysis as provided by law."

Inspectors, therefore, report to and receive their in-
structions from the Commissioner of Agriculture, not
from the State Chemist, though circular letters of advice
and suggestion have frequently been sent to all Inspectors
by the State Chemist, calling their attention to illegal,
misbranded, deficient and light weight goods being sold
throughout the State.

Inspection Districts.

I again recommend that an Inspector be located in
each large importing city-Pensacola, Jacksonville and











Tampa, from whence probably ninety percent of the goods
sold in this State are distributed, the Inspection districts
thus being to a large extent consolidated, more compact
and accessible.
The welfare and protection of the State and her citizens
and the enforcement of the law being of greater impor-
tance than the convenience of the Inspector. With three
active Inspectors located in the three large cities of the
State, a much more efficient service may be expected. The
change of Inspectors from one territory to another at
intervals would also tend towards efficiency and more
rigid inspection.

Inspection of Weights and Measures.

Section 1241, General Statutes, fixes standards of
weights and measures for various materials. Section
3715 provides penalties for selling by false weights or
measures, and Section 3716 provides penalties for selling
by untested weights and measures. There is no State or
County Inspector of Weights or Measures, provided by
law, excepting in the case of a few cities under municipal
ordinance, there is no inspection or testing of weights or
measures provided by law.
It is unnecessary to say that numerous complaints of
light weights and short measures are made, particularly
by purchasers of small quantities of goods. The percent-
age of deficiency in weight or measure of these small
quantities of foods is great. This fraudulent practice
bears most heavily upon those of our citizens who are
least able to protect themselves.











ANALYSIS OF FLORLDA MUCK SOILS.

Fertility and Productiveness, When Drained.

A series of analyses of saw grass muck soils, from the
saw grass territory of the upper St. John's valley, in St.
Lucie County, will be found under the proper heading.
It will be noted that these analyses are practically iden-
tical with those of the Everglade muck soils, reported in
1912, analyses by the U. S. Department of Agriculture
and the Florida State Laboratory, samples of Everglade
soils, taken in 1912, in duplicate by the representatives
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and the State of
Florida, being practically concordant.
These analyses, together with many others; made by
the U. S. Department of Agriculture; the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station, and the Florida State
Laboratory, show that the "saw grass muck land of all
parts of the State, in their original unreclaimed condi-
tion, or soon after being unwateredd" and previous to
cultivation; those of the upper St. Johns and Oklawaha
Rivers (Lake Apopka saw grass), the Kissimmee Valley,
the Everglades, and similar soils in all parts of the State,
in large and small bodies; are of similar chemical compo-
sition; that when properly drained, aerated and oxidized,
by plowing and proper cultivation, become a "fine soil of
wonderful productiveness," producing large crops of corn,
cane, rice, potatoes and similar farm crops, without the
addition of commercial fertilizers; when planted in the
proper season and properly cultivated. Also that the
intelligent use of commercial fertilizers, particularly
potash and phosphoric acid, hastens decomposition,
quickens nitrification, and hastens the maturity of early
truck or vegetable crops, greatly adding to the market
value of the same.
That these muck soils, properly drained, and placed in
good physical and biological condition, properly fitted for











agriculture, are wonderfully productive when properly
cultivated, has been known for many years; that they are
equal to any in America (or any other country) in pro-
ductiveness, superior to most agricultural soils anywhere,
and are exceedingly productive without the addition of
commercial fertilizers, has been practically demonstrated.
These facts have been so frequently certified to by
eminent agricultural scientists, of national and inter-
national repute, by practical farmers, and men of affairs,
and published in many government reports-the United
State Department of Agriculture, the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station, the Agricultural Department
of the State of Florida, the reports of the State Chemists
of Florida, under previous administrations as well as the
present, together with the various reports of legislative
committees of the State of Florida, at divers times, parti-
cularly since 1885-committees composed of eminent
citizens of Florida, representatives of the best citizenship
of the State, selected by various legislatures of the State
on account of their well known ability, unquestioned in-
tegrity and loyalty of the State's best interest and honor,
and that of her people; messages by various Governors of
Florida, each urging the drainage and reclamation of
these lands, calling the attention of the State and the
Nation to their exceeding fertility and productiveness,
when properly fitted for culture by drainage and reclama-
tion.
The further fact that capitalists, individual and cor-
porate, have recognized the great value of these lands
agriculturally, have, invested immense sums, involving
many millions of dollars in these lands, and are now
successfully draining and cultivating large bodies of them,
have established beyond question their fertility and pro-
ductiveness, and that at the present time capitalists and
wealthy corporations are competing with each other to
acquire holdings in the Everglades, and other saw grass
muck soils of the State, establishes beyond question their










great agricultural value-soils of extreme fertility,
situate in a semi-tropical region, with abundant rainfall,
and maximum sunlight-a combination found in no other
part of America.
*(See U. S. Senate Document No. 89, Aug. 7, 1911).
In reply to political agitation; questioning the practi-
cability and utility of draining the Everglades, inspired
evidently by interested parties; the State, through the
Governor and Cabinet (the Internal Improvement Board) ;
to justify the undertaking and expenditure, and forever
set at rest criticism and inspired political agitation,
employed "The Florida Everglades Engineering Commis-
sion," consisting of Isham Randolph, Marshall A. Leigh-
ton and Edmund Perkins, engineers of international re-
pute, scientists of unquestioned ability and reputation,
at a cost of exceeding $35,000.00, who, after six months of
careful personal investigation, assisted by numerous en-
gineering parties, using the canals previously cut by the
State as a base of operations, and convenient means for
thorough exploration, reported in full, with most com-
plete maps, levels, detailed estimates of cost, with loca-
tion, size and capacity of necessary canals, location, size
and cost of necessary locks and control works, on Octo-
ber 25, 1913 (which has also been published in U. S.
Senate Document No. 379, Jan. 29, 1914). On page 7 of
this report, the Commission reports as follows:-

"The present canals will, as a part of a broad,
comprehensive system, be worth to the State
every dollar that they have cost. They are there
to serve a useful purpose in the great scheme of
reclamation upon which the State has embarked;
a scheme which has only to be carried to com-
pletion to make fertile fields of a watery waste
and a populous land where now no man dwells."

Again, on page 42, of the same document, this Com-
mission says:-










"The virgin muck is a coarsely fibrous sub-
stance; after cultivation has taken place for
several seasons, it becomes a fine grained soil, of
almost unexampled productivity."

On the same page, the following occurs:

"This commission, in its goings about the Ever-
glades, has gathered from old residents and from
apparently reputable observers and experiment-
ers, more contradictory information about muck
than the Commission's members have confronted
about any other subject in all their professional
lives."

The following conclusions as to the value of chemical
analyses of soils, alone, without considering other factors
-drainage, culture, physical and biological conditions of
the soil under consideration, as to its productiveness, are
those now generally accepted by experiment stations,
practical and scientific agriculturists, chemists and
biologists:
* Hence, for a chemist to have stated
that a given soil was necessarily productive be-
cause he had found present in it all of the ele-
ments that plants required in growth, would have
been a great mistake, for a practical test would
often have proved his statement false."
"There is probably no one subject in connec-
tion with their profession, that is so little under-
stood by farmers generally, as that of the real
value to be attached to a chemical analysis of a
soil. Indeed, I may say, that there is scarcely
a question that is the subject of so much discus-
sion and disagreement, even among the agricul-
tural chemists of the country, as that of the real
importance to be attached to such an analysis."










"It will be seen that the weak point in an
analysis is that, while it reveals what a soil
actually contains and in what proportions the
several constituents are present, it does not state
with absolute accuracy just how much of that
plant-food is in an available form, i. e., in a form
suited for plant assimilation."
"While a chemical analysis cannot definitely
answer everything in connection with the above
queries, still it can aid very much in solving all
such problems, and, together with a physical
analysis, can contribute much valuable informa-
tion along all such lines."

(A. A. Persons, Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station, 1897).

"It is generally admitted that the productive-
ness of a soil cannot be determined by a mere
chemical analysis alone. True, the analysis will
show what elements are present and in what
quantities, but it does not show what is absolute-
ly available for the immediate use of the plant.
Of two' soils showing great similarity in chemical
composition, the one may be highly productive
and the other very unproductive. The reasons
for this may possibly be found in different mois-
ture conditions, or a difference in physical
texture, or in the difference in the amount of
available plant food, or in a combination of all
these differences. The chemical analysis may,
however, be of value in showing what the possi-
bilities of the soil are under the proper treat-
ment."
"This subject has been studied by the agricul-
tural chemist, the soil physicist, and the prac-
tical farmer, and all have contributed to the
fund of knowledge."











(A. W. Blair, Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station, 1906).

"The Experiment Station does not analyze
samples of soil to determine the fertilizer re-
quirements. There is no chemical method known
that will show reliably the availability of plant
food elements present in the soil, as this is a
variable factor, influenced by the kind of crop,
the type of soil, the climate and biological con-
ditions; hence, we do not recommend this method
of testing soil."

(Agricultural Experiment Station, Perdue Uni-
versity, 1908).

"There is but little information to be derived
from a soil analysis that would be of benefit to
farmers. So much depends on tilth, drainage,
culture and other physical conditions, that an
analysis, made under laboratory conditions, is
of little value.
"A chemical analysis of soil may indicate a
very fertile soil, rich in plant food, while the
facts are the soils are not productive. This is
instanced by the rich sawgrass muck lands and
river bottoms of the State, that are fertile chemi-
cally, but not productive until properly drained;
also, by the arid lands of the West, rich in the
elements of plant food, but not productive until
irrigated. Other soils, with less plant food, but
on account of proper physical conditions, culture
and tilth, are exceedingly productive."
(R. E. Rose, Florida State Chemist, 1908).

The foregoing facts and opinions are drawn from prac-
tical experience, and scientific deduction, after careful










observation, by competent men, as to the practicability
and comparatively small cost of draining and reclaiming
the Everglades, and other muck lands of the State.

The fact that the State has expended more than
$2,500,000.00 to date, and has contracts, with reliable
constructing companies, involving large sums, with nego-
tiations now pending for other large contracts, and has,
as provided by law, some six millions of dollars of bonds
not yet issued, which, together with practically one mil-
lion acres of Everglade lands, conservatively valued at
$20,000,000.00, with which to accomplish this work of
such enormous economic value-a work which has been
the State's avowed policy at all times, since the accept
ance from the National Government in 1850, of the trust
to "drain and reclaim the swamp and overflowed lands
of the State," and the further fact, that there are at the
present time, large areas of the "Everglades," formerly
submerged, now unwateredd" and ready for cultivation,
when the necessary local field drains are provided by the
owners; and further, that when the removal of the tem-
porary dams, necessary to float the dredges, in canals now
under construction, has occurred, there will be additional
vast areas unwateredd" and ready for culture, when pro-
vided with the local field drains, should convince the
citizens of Florida and of the Nation, of the good faith
and earnest desire of the State of Florida to, in good
faith, carry out the trust assumed by the Commonwealth
to "drain and reclaim the swamp and overflowed lands"
of the State, granted for that purpose to Florida by the
Nation, and of the extreme fertility, productiveness and
great agricultural value of the "saw grass muck lands of
the State," when drained and reclaimed.

Very respectfully,

R. E. ROSE,
State Chemis .


3-Chem.












THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
Department of Agriculture.


RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE
ANALYSIS OF WATER, SOILS, COMMERCIAL
SAMPLES, AND SAMPLES INVOLVING CRIMI-
NAL CASES.

WATER ANALYSIS.

The State Laboratory will analyze samples of water
from publicly-owned water supplies, municipal plants,
etc., owned and operated by the city or town, when ac-
companied by the certificate of the mayor, or other city
officer, that the water is furnished the public by the city
or town.
It will not analyze water for individuals or corpora-
tions selling water to the public, water companies, ice
companies, mineral springs, health resorts, etc., main-
tained for profit. Such samples should be sent to a com-
mercial laboratory.
The State Laboratory does not make bacteriological
examinations for disease germs. Such examinations are
made by the State Board of Health, at Jacksonville, Fla.,
which has entire charge of the public health.
We do not make a sanitary analysis. We determine
the total dissolved solids in the sample quantitatively,
and report them as parts per 1,000,000, naming the prin-
cipal ingredients in the order of their predominance quali-
tatively. We find Calcium Carbonate (lime), Sodium
Chloride (salt), Magnesium Sulphate (epsom salts), Sil-
ica (sand), and Iron, is the general order of their pre-
dominance, though on the coast, where the total dissolved
solids amounts to 5,000 or more parts per 1,000,000, So-
dium Chloride (salt) is the predominant substance.










From a knowledge of the chemical analysis of a water,
unaccompanied by any further information, no conclu-
sion as to the potability and healthfulness of the water
can be deduced.
Therefore, we requ,re the following information to be
given in regard to the source of the water:
(1). The source of the water: spring, lake, river, driven
well, dug well, bored well, artesian well, or flowing well;
and also the depth of the water surface below the top of
the soil, and in cased wells, the depth of the casing.
(2). The locality of the source of the water; town,
city or village; or the section, township and range.
No sample of water will be analyzed unless the name
and address of the sender is on the package for identifi-
cation.
We require two gallons of each sample of water, in a
new jug, stopped with a new cork, and sent by prepaid
express. We will not accept any sample of water for
analysis not in a new jug. Vessels previously used for
other purposes are never properly cleaned for sending
samples of water for analysis. Corks, once used for other
substances (molasses, vinegar, whiskey, kerosene, etc.,
are never properly cleaned.

NOTE.-We find the waters of the State-springs,
wells, driven wells and artesian wells-generally very
pure and wholesome, with but little mineral impurity,
and that such as are not harmful. Except in cases of
gross carelessness, in allowing surface water to contami-
nate the well or spring, the waters of the State are pure
and wholesome. The deep wells of the State are noted
for their purity and healthfulness.

SOIL ANALYSIS.

Frequently samples of soil are sent in for analysis with
a request to advise as to the best methods of fertilizing.










There is but little information to be derived from a soil
analysis that would be of benefit to farmers. So much
depends on tilth, drainage, culture and other physical
conditions, that an analysis made under laboratory condi-
tions is of little value.
A chemical analysis of soil may indicate a very fertile
soil, rich in plant food, while the facts are the soils are
not productive. This is instanced by the rich sawgrass
muck lands and river bottoms of the State, that are fer-
tile chemically, but not productive until properly
drained; also, by the arid lands of the West, rich in the
elements of plant food, but not productive until irrigated.
Other soils, with less plant food, but on account of proper
physical conditions, culture and tilth, are exceedingly
productive.
The average of thousands of analyses of Florida soils
made by the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
and the State Laboratory is as follows:
Nitrogen (per cent) .................. 0.0413
Potash (per cent) ................... 0.0091
Phosphoric Acid (per cent) ............. 0.1635
This is a fair average of all of the Norfolk and Ports-
mouth soil series of the State, which comprise by far the
greater portion of the State.
In this connection we quote from the report of the Indi-
ana Agricultural Experiment Station, Purdue Univer-
sity, Lafayette, Indiana, 1908, as follows:
"SOIL ANALYSIS OF LITTLE VALUE IN SHOWING FERTILI-
ZER REQUIREMENTS.-The Chemical Department is called
upon to answer hundreds of letters of inquiry in relation
to agricultural chemical problems from people all over
the State. In this connection-it might be well to say that
there is a widespread idea that the chemist can analyze
a sample of soil and, without further knowledge of the
conditions, write out a prescription of a fertilizer which
will fill the needs of that particular soil.










"The Experiment Station does not analyze samples of
soil to determine the fertilizer requirements. There is no
chemical method known that will show reliably the avail-
ability of the plant food elements present in the soil, as
this is a variable factor, influenced by the kind of crop,
the type of soil, the climate and biological conditions;
hence, we do not recommend this method of testing soil.
"The method recommended by the Indiana Station is
the field fertilizer test or plot system, in which long,
narrow strips of the field to be tested are measured off
side by side. The crop is planted uniformly over each.
Different fertilizers are applied to the different plots,
every third or fourth one being left unfertilized. The
produce from these plots is harvested separately and
weighed. In this manner the farmer can tell what fer-
tilizer is best suited for his needs. As climatic conditions
may influence the yield with different fertilizers, it is best
to carry on such tests for more than one year before draw-
ing definite conclusions. There is positively no easier or
shorter method of testing the soil that we feel safe in
recommending.
"Soil can be greatly improved by an intelligent rotation
of crops, the conservation of stable manure, and the use
of some kind of commercial fertilizer. Farmers need
have no fear that the proper application of commercial
fertilizer will injure the land."

ANALYSIS OF FOODS AND DRUGS.

Samples of Foods and Drugs are drawn under special
regulations as provided by law.
Applications should be made to the Commissioner of
Agriculture or State Chemist for the necessary blanks,
instructions, etc., for drawing and transmitting samples
of foods and drugs, including drinks of all kinds.
FOOD AND DRUG SAMPLES NOT DRAWN AND TRANSMITTED
ACCORDING TO LAW WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED FOR ANALYSIS.










COPIES OF LAWS, RULES AND REGULATIONS
AND STANDARDS.

Citizens of the State interested in fertilizers, foods and
drugs, and stock feed, can obtain free of charge, the
respective Laws, including Rules and Regulations and
Standards, by applying to the Commissioner of Agricul-
ture or State Chemist. Application for the Quarterly
Bulletin of the State Department of Agriculture should
also be made to the Commissioner of Agriculture or
State Chemist. The Bulletins of the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station can be had by application to
the Director at Gainesville.


ANALYSIS MADE BY STATE LABORATORY.

Only such materials as are of public interest are
analyzed by the State Laboratory, such as are directed
by the Pure Food, the Fertilizer, and Stock Feed Law.
There are no fees or charges of any kind made by the
State Laboratory.
The State Laboratory is not permitted to compete with
commercial laboratories.
No commercial work of any kind is accepted.

The State Laboratory does not analyze samples for in-
dividual account wherein the public is not interested.
Such samples should be sent to a commercial laboratory.

ANALYSES IN CRIMINAL CASES.

The State Laboratory does not make post mortem ex-
aminations, nor furnish evidence in criminal cases (ex-
cept as provided by the Pure Food, Fertilizer, and Stock
Feed Laws). Such analyses and examinations are made








39

by specialists employed by the grand jury and prosecuting
attorney, the cost being taxed as other criminal costs, by
the court.

R. E. ROSE,
State Chemist.

W. A. McRAE,
Commissioner of Agriculiure.
Tallahassee, Florida, September 5, 1914.











SPECIAL SAMPLES.

Florda is the only State in the Union that provides for
the "special sample," drawn by the consumer or purchaser,
under proper rules and regulations fixed by law-to tbe
sent to the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost.
Any citizen in the State who has purchased fertilizers or
feeds for his own use may draw a sample of the same,
according to law, and have the same analyzed by the State
Chemist free of cost. And in case of adulteration or de-
ficiency he can, on establishing the fact, receive double
the cost of price demanded for the goods.

The law requires the "special samples" to be drawn in
a manner to prevent the submission of spurious samples;
rules and regulations are published in every Bulletin for
drawing and transmitting "special samples."

This special sample has been a most potent factor in
enforcing the law and discouraging the sale of adulter-
ated or misbranded goods.

Special samples of foods and drugs may also be sent to
the State Laboratory for analysis free of cost, when the
sample is properly drawn according to law. The neces-
sary instructions and blanks required to properly draw
and transmit samples of "food and drugs" will be sent to
any citizen requesting the same.

"THE SPECIAL SAMPLE FURNISHES THE CON-
SUMER WITH THE SAME PROTECTION DEMAND-
ED BY THE MANUFACTURER, WHO BUYS HIS MA-
TERIALS ONLY UPON GUARANTEE AND PAYS
FOR THEM ACCORDING TO ANALYSIS, AND IS
PAID FOR BY THE CONSUMER OUT OF THE
FUNDS DERIVED FROM THE INSPECTION FEE
OF TWENTY-FIVE CENTS PER TON PAID ON FER-
TILIZERS AND FEEDS SOLD IN THE STATE.











NEW YORK WHOLESALE PRICES, CURRENT

JAN. 1, 1915-FERTILIZER MATERIALS.

"Under unsettled conditions, quotations are wholly
nominal."


AMMONIATES.

Ammonia, Sulph., foreign, prompt...... 2.55 @ 2.70
futures .......................... 2.55 @ -
Ammonia, Sulph., domestic, spot....... 2.55 @ 2.80
futures .......................... @ -
Fish Scrap, drier 11 p.c. Ammonia and
14 p.c. Bone Phosphate, f.o.b. fish
works ................... per unit 3.35 ( 10
wet, aciduated, 6 p.c. Ammonia, 3
p.c. Phosphoric Acid, delivered... -- @ -
Ground Fish Guano, imported, 10 and 11
p. c. Ammonia and 15-17 p.c. Bone
Phosphate, c.i.f. N. Y., Baltimore,
or Philadelphia ................ @ -
Tankage, 11 p.c. and 15 p.c. f.o.b. Chicago 2.95 @ 10
Tankage, 10 and 20 p.c., f.o.b. Chicago,
ground .......................... 3.05 (@ 10
Tankage, 9 and 20 p.c., f.o.b. Chicago,
ground .......................... 3.05 @ 10
Tankage, concentrated, f.o.b. Chicago,
14 to 15 p.c., f.o.b. Chicago......... 2.95 0 10
Garbage, tankage, f.o.b. Chicago ....... 9.00 ( -
Sheep Manure, concentrated, f.o.b.
Chicago .................. per ton 13.00 @ -
Hoofmeal, f.o.b. Chicago ....... per unit 2.60 ( 2.70
Dried Blood, 12-13 p.c. Ammonia, f.o.b.
New York ....................... 3.15 @ -
Chicago ......................... 3.00 @ -
Nitrate of Soda, 95 p.c. spot, per 100 lbs. 1.90 @ -
futures, 95 p.c ..................... 1.80 ( 1.90










PHOSPHATES.


Acid Phosphate...............per unit
Bones, rough, hard .............per ton
soft steamed unground ............
ground, steamed, 11/4 p.c. ammonia
and 60 p. c. Bone Phosphate...
ditto, 3 and 50 p. c................
raw, ground 4 p. c. Ammonia and
50 p. c. Bone Phosphate.......
South Carolina Phosphate Rock, kiln
dried, f.o.b. Ashley River...........
Florida Land Pebble Phosphate Rock,
68 per cent, f.o.b. Port Tampa, Fla..
Florida high grade Phosphate hard rock
77 per cent., f.o.b. Florida ports .....
Tennessee Phosphate Rock, f.o.b. Mt.
Pleasant, domestic, 78@80 p. c.
per ton .........................
75 p. c. guaranteed ...........
68@72 p. c ..................


45
22.50
21.50


50
24.00
22.00


20.00 @ 21.00
23.50 @ 24.00

28.50 @ 30.00

3.50 @ 3.75

3.00 @ 3.25

5.75 @ 6.25


5.00
4.75
4.25


5.50
5.00
4.50


POTASHES.


Muriate of Potash, 80-85 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags...............
Muriate of Potash, min. 95 per cent.,
basis 80 per cent., in bags..........
Muriate of Potash, min. 98 per cent., basis
80 per cent., in bags.............
Sulphate of Potash, 90-95 per cent., basis
80 per cent.,, in bags..............
Double Manure Sale, 48-53 per cent., basis
48 per cent., in bags ...............
Manure Salt, min. 20 per cent., K20,
in bulk ..........................
Kainit, min. 12.4 per cent., K20, in bulk.


Nominal











MARKET PRICES OF CHEMICALS AND FERTILIZ-

ING MATERIALS AT FLORIDA SEA

PORTS, JAN. 1, 1915.
"Under unsettled conditions, quotations are wholly
nominal."

AMMONIATES.

Nitrate of Soda, 17% Ammonia................ 52.00
Sulphate of Ammonia, 25% Ammonia........... 75.00
Dried Blood, 16% Ammonia .................. 66.00
Cynanamid, 18% Ammonia.................... 60.00

POTASH.

High Grade Sulphate of Potash, 90%
Sulphate, 48% K-0 ................. Nominal
Low Grade Sulphate of Potash, 48%
Sulphate, 26% K0 ................. "
Muriate of Potash, 80%; 48% K20 .....
Nitrate of Potash, imported, 15% Am-
monia, 44% Potash K20............. "
Nitrate of Potash, American, 13% Am-
monia, .42% Potash K ............. "
Kainit, Potash, 12% K20.............. 18.00
Canada Hardwood Ashes, in bags, 4%
K20 Potash ......................... 20.00

AMMONIA AND PHOSPHORIC ACID.

Water Soluble Tankage, 14% Ammonia ......... 65.00
High Grade Tankage, 10% Ammonia, 10% Phos-
phoric Acid ................................ 47.00
Tankage, 8% Ammonia, 18% Phosphoric Acid... 40.00
Low Grade Tankage, 61/1% Ammonia, 12% Phos-
phoric Acid ................................ 27.00










Sheep Manure, ground, 5% Ammonia........... 27.00
Imported Fish Guano, 11% Ammonia, 51/2%
Phosphoric Acid ........................... 60.00
Pure Fine Steamed Ground Bone, 3% Ammonia,
22% Phosphoric Acid ...................... 32.00
Raw Bone, 4% Ammonia, 22% Phosphoric Acid. 38.00
Ground Castor Pomace, 51/2% Ammonia, 2%
Phosphoric Acid .................. ...... ..... 27.00
Bright Cotton Seed Meal, 71/2% Ammonia...... 25.00
Dark Cotton Seed Meal, 41/2% Ammonia........ 22.00


PHOSPHORIC ACID.

High Grade Acid Phosphate, 16% Available
Phosphoric Acid ...........................$ 15.00
Acid Phosphate, 14% Available Phosphoric Acid. 14.00
Bone Black, 17% Available Phosphoric Acid. ... 25.00


MISCELLANEOUS.

High Grade Ground Tobacco Stems, 27c Ammo-
nia, 7% Potash .............................$ 24.00
High Grade Ground Kentucky Tobacco Stems,
21/2% Ammonia, 10% Potash ................. 28.00
Tobacco Dust No. 1, 2% Ammonia, 2% Potash... 24.00
Cut Tobacco Stems, in sacks, 2% Ammonia, 4c
P otash .................................... 20.00
Dark Tobacco Stems, baled, 2% Ammonia, 49(
Potash ............................ ...... 22.00
Land Plaster, in sacks ........................ 12.00

The charges by reputable manufacturers for mixing and
bagging any special or regular formula are $1.50 per ton
in excess of above prices.











STATE VALUATIONS.

(Based on commercial values, July 1st, 1914)
For Available and Insoluble Phosphoric Acid, Ammonia
and Potash, for the Season of 1914.
Available Phosphoric Acid............... 5c a pound
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid................ cl a pound
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). .17c a pound
Potash (as actual potash, KIO) ........... *5c a pound
If calculated by units-
Available Phosphoric Acid............. $1.00 per unit
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid............. 20c per unit
Ammonia (or its equivalent in nitrogen). 3.50 per unit
Potash ............................... 1.10 per unit
With a uniform allowance of $1.50 per ton for mixing
and bagging.
A unit is twenty pounds, or 1 per cent., in a ton. We
find this to be the easiest and quickest method for calcu-
lating the value of fertilizer. To illustrate this, take
for example a fertilizer which analyzes as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid.. .6.22 per cent.x$1.00--$ 6.22
Insoluble Phosphoric Acid.. .1.50 per cen .x .20- .30
Ammonia ................. .3.42 per cent.x 3.50- 11.97
Potash .................... 7.23 per cent.x 1.10- 7.95
Mixing and Bagging .........................- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports ................... $27.91
Or a fertilizer analyzing as follows:
Available Phosphoric Acid..... 8 per cent.x$1.00-$ 8.01)
Ammonia ....................2 per cent.x 3.50- 7.00
Potash ......................2 per cent.x 1.10- 2.20
Mixing and Bagging.................... ......- 1.50

Commercial value at sea ports................... $18.70

The valuations and market prices in preceding illustra-
tions are based on market prices for one-ton lots.











STATE VALUES.

It is not intended by the "State valuations" to fix the
price or commercial value of a given brand. The "State
values" are the market prices for the various approved
chemicals and materials used in mixing or manufactur-
ing commercial fertilizers or commercial stock feed at
the date of issuing a Bulletin, or the opening of the
"season." They may, but seldom do, vary from the market
prices, and are made liberal to meet any slight advance
or decline.
They are compiled from price lists and commercial re--
ports by reputable dealers and journals.
The question is frequently asked: "What is 'Smith's
Fruit and Vine' worth per ton?" Such a question cannot
be answered categorically. By analysis, the ammonia,
available phosphoric acid and potash may be determined
and the inquirer informed what the cost of the necessary
material to compound to a ton of goods similar to
"Smith's Fruit and Vine" would be, using none but ac-
cepted and well known materials of the best quality.
State values do not consider "trade secrets," loss on
bad bills, cost of advertisements and expenses of collec-
tions. The "State value" is simply that price at which
the various ingredients necessary to use in compounding
a fertilizer, or feed, can be purchased for cash in ton lots
at Florida seaports.
These price lists published in this report, with the
"State values" Jan. 1, 1915, are nominal.













COMPOSITION OF FERTILIZER MATERIALS.
NITROGENOUS MATERIALS.

POUNDS PER HUNDRED.

Ammonia PhAshoric Potash
Acid
Nitrate of Soda.......... 17 to 19 .......................
Sulphate of Ammonia.... 21 to 24 ............ ...........
Dried Blood ............ 12 to 17 ............ ...........
Concentrated Tankage.... 12 to 15 1 to 2 ............
Bone Tankage .......... 6 to 9 10 to 15 ...........
Dried Fish Scrap ........ 8 to 11 6 to 8 ...........
Cotton Seed Meal........ 7 to 10 2 to 3 1 to 2
Hoof Meal .............. 13 to 17 l1 to 2 ............

PHOSPHATE MATERIALS.

POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Ammonia Available Insoluble
Phos. Acid I
Florida Pebble Phosphate ........................ 26 to 32
Florida Rock Phosphate.. ............ ......... 33 to 35
Floyida Super Phosphate ............ 14 to 45 1 to 35
Ground Bone ........... 3 to 6 5 to 8 15 to 17
Steamed Bone .......... 3 to 4 6 to 9 10 to 20
Dissolved Bone ......... 2 to 4 13 to 15 2 to 3

POTASH MATERIALS AND FARM MANURES.

POUNDS PER HUNDRED

Potash Acid Lime

Muriate of Potash...... 50 .... ....... ....
Sulphate of Potash..... 48 to 52 ....... ..................
Carbonate of Potash.... 55 to 60 ...........................
Nitrate of Potash....... 40 to 44 12 to 16 ..................
Double Sul. of Pot.& Mag. 26 to 30 ...........................
Kainit ................. 12 to 12J ......... ..................
Sylvinit ............... 16 to 20 ...........................
Cotton Seed Hull Ashes. 15 to 30 ......... 7 to 9 10
Wood Ashes, unleached. 2 to 8 ......... 1 to 2.........
Wood Ashes, leached... 1 to 2 .........1 to 1j 35 to 40
Tobacco Stems ......... 5 to 8 2 to 4 ......... 31
Cow Manure (fresh).... 0.40 0to0.41 0.16 0.31
Horse Manure (fresh).. 0.53 0 to 0.60 0.28 0.31
Sheep Manure (fresh).. 0.67 1.00 0.19 0.33
Hog Manure (fresh).... 0.60 0.55 0.19 0.08
Hen Dung (fresh)...... 0.85 2.07 1.54 0.24
Mixed Stable Manure... 0.63 0.76 0.26 0.70











FACTORS FOR CONVERSION.

To convert-
Ammonia into nitrogen, multiply by............ 0.824
Ammonia into protein, multiply by.............. 5.15
Nitrogen into ammonia, multiply by............. 1.214
Nitrate of soda into nitrogen, multiply by........ 0.1647
Nitrogen into protein, multiply by.............. 6.25
Bone phosphate into phosphoric acid, multiply by 0.458
Phosphoric acid into bone phosphate, multiply by 2.184
Muriate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.632
Actual potash into muriate of potash, multiply by 1.583
Sulphate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.41
Actual potash into sulphate of potash, multiply by 1.85
Nitrate of potash into nitrogen, multiply by ...... 0.139
Carbonate of potash into actual potash, multiply by 0.681
Actual potash into carbonate of potash, multiply by 1.466
Chlorine, in "kainit," multiply potash (K,O) by.. 2.33
For instance, you buy 95 per cent. of nitrate of s6da
and want to know how much nitrogen is in it, multiply 95
per cent. by 0.1647, you will get 15.65 per cent. nitrogen;
you want to know how much ammonia this nitrogen is
equivalent to, then multiply 15.65 per cent. by 1.214 and
you get 18.99 per cent., the equivalent in ammonia.
Or, to convert 90 per cent. carbonate of potash into
actual potash (KO), multiply 90 by 0.681, equals 61.29
per cent. actual potash (KO).

FORMULAS.

There are frequent inquiries for formulas for various
crops and there are hundreds of such formulas published;
and, while there are hundreds of "brands," the variations
in these grades are surprisingly little. Dozens of "brands"
put up by the same manufacturer are identical goods, the
only difference being in the name printed on the tag or
sack. A good general formula for field or garden might
be called a "vegetable formula," and would have the fol-











lowing: Ammonia, 31%; available phosphoric acid,
61%; and potash, 7-%. The following formulas will
furnish the necessary plant food in about the above pro-
portion. I have purposely avoided the use of any fraction
of 100 pounds in these formulas to simplify them. Values
are taken from price lists furnished by the trade, January
1, 1914.

For cotton, corn, sweet potatoes and vegetables: Am-
monia, 37%; available phosphoric acid, 6%; potash.
71.


(A) "VEGETABLE."

Based on Commercial Values July 1, 1914.

No. 1.

Per Cent.
900 pounds of Cotton Seed Meal (71-2-1j) ..... 3.25 Ammonia
800 pounds of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent).... 6.46 Available
300 pounds of Muriate or (Sulphate) (50 per cent) 7.50 Potash

2,000
State value mixed and bagged.............. $27.52
Plant Food per ton........................ 343 pounds

No. 2.

Per Cent.
1,000 lbs. of Blood and Bone (6-8)........... 3.25 Ammonia
400 lbs. of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)..... 7.00 Available
600 lbs. Low Grade Sulp Pot. (26 per cent.)... 7.80 Potash

2,000
State value mixed and bagged .............$28.45
Plant Food per ton........................ 360 pounds

No. 3.

Per Cent.
300 lbs. of Dried Blood (16 per cent) ....... ) 3.25 Ammonia
100 lbs of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent) ..... 8.00 Available
1,000 lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent) ..... 7.80 Potash
600 lbs. of Low Grade Sulp. Pot. (26 per cent)

2,000
State value mixed and bagged.............. $29.45
Plant Food per ton ......................... 381 pounds
4--Cbem.












(B) "FRUIT AND VINE."

No. 1.

Fruits, Melons, Strawberries, Irish Potatoes: Ammonia, 4 per
cent., Available Phosphoric Acid 7 per cent., Potash 10 per cent.

Per Cent.


1,000 lbs. of Blood and Bone (61-8)..............
400 lbs. of Muriate of Potash (50 per cent).
500 lbs. of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)....
100 lbs. of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)....

2.000


500
200
900
400

2,000


500
100
100
900
400

2,000


4 Ammonia
8 Available
10 Potash


State value mixed and bagged .............. $34.50
Plant Food per ton ........................ 440 pounds

No. 2.
Per Cent.
lbs. of Castor Pomac6 (6-2 per cent)..... 4.00 Ammonia
lbs of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent)......... 7.70 Available
lbs of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)..... 9.60 Potash
lbs. of Sulp. of Pot. (48 per cent)........


State value mixed and bagged .............. $33.76
Plant Food per ton........................ 426 pounds

No. 3.
Per Cent.
lbs. of Cotton Seed Meal (7-2j-1) .....
lbs. of Nitrate of Soda (17 per cent)..... 3.97 Ammonia
lbs. of of Sulp. of Am. (25 per cent)..... 8.30 Available
lbs. of Acid Phosphate (16 per cent)... 8.97 Potash
lbs. of Sulp. of Potash (48 per cent).....


State value mixed and bagged.............. $33.56
Plant Food per ton........................ 425 pounds










AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS.



NAME OF FEED.

o 2 9
s s S01^ W


Bright Cot'n Seed Meall

Dark Cotton Seed Meal
Linseed Meal, old pro-
cess ...............

Linseed Meal, new pro-
cess ...............
Wheat Bran .........
Wheat Middlings ......

Mixed Feed (Wheat) .

Ship Stuff (Wheat) ...

Corn (grain) .........

Corn Meal ...........

Corn Cobs ............

Corn and Cob Meal ....
Hominy Feed .........

Corn and Oats, equal
parts ..............
Barley (grain) .......

Maiden Cane .........


9.351 39.70 28.601
20.001 22.90 37.101


7.50 35.70 36.00


8.40 36.10 36.70

9.00 15.40 53.90
5.40 15.40 59.401

7.80 16.90 54.40

5.60 14.60 59.80(

2.10 10.50 69.60

1.90 9.70. 68.70

30.10 2.40 54.90
6.60 8.50 64.80

4.05 10.50 65.30


5.80 11.15 64.65

2.70 12.40 69.801

30.60 10.10 43.401


7.80

5.50


7.201


3.60

4.001
4.10

4.80

5.00

5.40

3.80,

0.50
3.501

7.85


5.20

1.80

2.151


5.80
5.00


5.30


5.20

5.80
3.20

5.30
3.70

1.50

1.40

1.40

1.50
2.55


2.25

2.40

3.65










AVERAGE COMPOSITION OF COMMERCIAL
FEED STUFFS- (Continued).



NAME OF FEED. -
o~ W


Oats (grain) ......... 9.50 11.80 59.701 5.00 3.110
Rice (grain) ......... 0.20 i 7.401 79.20 i 0.40 0.40
Rice Bran ........... 9.50 12.10 49.90! 8.80 10.0
Rice Hulls ...........i 35.70 3.60) 38.60 0.701 13.20)
Wheat (grain) ...... 1.80 11.90 71.90' 2.10) 1.8)
Dry Jap Sugar Cane ..26.221 2.28 62.55 1.55 2.77
Cow Pea .......... ... 4.101 20.80 55.70 1.40 3.2i)
Cow Pea Hay ......... 20.10 16.60' 42.20 2.20' 7.50
Velvet Beans ......... 6.70 23.08 51.281 5.57 3 3.91)
Velvet Bean Hulls .... 27.02 7.46! 44.56 1.57 4.32
Velvet Beans and Hulls 9.20 19.70' 51.30' 4.50! 3.30
Velvet Bean Hay ...... 29.70 14.70 41.001 1.70 5.70
Beggarweed Hay ..... 24.70 21.70 30.20' 2.30 10.90
Japanese Kudzu Hay .. 32.14 17.43 30.201 1.67 6.87
Cotton Seed (whole) .. 23.20. 18.40 24.701 19.90' 3.50
Cotton Seed Hulls .... 44.40 4.00 36.60! 2.001 2.60
Para Grass .......... 31.20 8.00 45.751 1.55! 6.20











COMMERCIAL STATE VALUES OF FEED STUFF
FOR 1915.

For the season of 1915 the following "State values" are
fixed as a guide to purchasers, quotation January 1.
These values are based on the current prices of corn,
which has been chosen as a standard in fixing the com-
mercial values; the price of corn, to a large extent, gov-
erning the price of other feeds, pork, beef, etc.:

COMMERCIAL VALUES OF FEED STUFFS FOR 1915.

Indian corn being the standard @$35.00 per ton.
($1.75 per sack of 100 lbs., 98c per bu. 56 lbs.)
To find the commercial State value, multiply the per-
centages by the price per unit.
A unit being 20 pounds (1%) of a ton.
Protein, 4.8c, per pound ................. 96c. per unit
Starch and Sugar, 1.55c. per pound .......31c. per unit
Fats, 3.5c. per pound ................... 70c. per unit

EXAMPLE No. 1.

CORN AND OATS, EQUAL PARTS-

Protein ....................... 11.15 x 96c, $10.71
Starch and Sugar ...............64.65 x 31c, 20.01
Fat ............................ 5.20 x 70c, 3.64

State value per ton ..........................$34.49

EXAMPLE NO. 2.

Protein ........................10.50 x 96c, $10.08
Starch and Sugar ...............69.60 x 31c, 21.57
Fat ............................ 5.40 x 70c, 3.78

State value per ton ......................... $35.43









DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. FERTILIZER SECTION. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist and State Inspector Under Sections 1, 2, and 13,
Act Approved May 24, 1905.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer No. 1 (Acid Phosphate)

Fertilizer No. 2................


Fertilizer No. 3 (C. S. Meal)....


o
0 m
*cZ *5
Cd


3162

3163

3164

3165

3166

31671.

3168

3169


Phosphoric Acid.




S U2
? s .
t8 = -


6.10 12.30 4.38

1.23 7.15 4.70

0.77 9.8.- 4.62

0.80 8.80 4.69

0.82 9.60 5.03

0.20117.90 .. .

0.6012.10 .

..... ..... 7.63


BY WHOM SENT.


5.90 M. C. Britt Winter Garden.

6.72 T. B. Glass, Hastings.

7.02 R. T. Hewitt, Hastings.

6.86 Miss Estelle Hewitt, Hastings.

7.94 E. D. Davis, Hastings.

..... E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

4.08 E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

..... E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.


I


..... ... I








Fertilizer


...................... 131701 5.66


Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer No. 1.................

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ......................

Cotton Seed Oil Cake Sweepings.

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer No. 1.................

Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................


7.45

6.98

9.38

7.29



6.33


i I


0.451

1.151

1.371

1.001

1.001

0.27

1.77


8.27 0.381

6.90 0.70

9.10 0.101

6.88 1.371

7.34 1.341

7.05 5.15

9.40 0.30

3.10 1.60
. . . . . .


8.65

7.00

9.20

8.25

8.68

12.20

9.70

4.70



1.50

9.45

8.45

7.90

8.00

8.10

9.10


3.80 10.28 H. A. Perry, Pomona.

3.05 10.34 Henry W. Smith, Wauchula.

4.50 11.76 Henry W. Smith, Wauchula.

4.60 8.80 J. W. Case, Hastings.

4.80 7.88 J. W. Case, Hastings.

6.61 16.49 J. E. Griffin, Lakeland.

4.45 11.80 D. M. Bryan, Wauchula.

2.15 8.60 W. B. Denham, Jacksonville.

6.42 ..... J. E. Dubuisson & Co., Pensacola.

7.40 14.82 K. R. Breuizer, Hastings.

4.55 7.09 J. W. Case, Hastings.

4.52 9.32 J. W. Case, Hastings. (For Mrs. S. I.
Killingsworth.
4.18 7.84 J. A. Cody, Hastings. (For A. M. Ste-
vens).
4.82 8.04 J. A. Cody, Hastings. (For W. A. Ste-
vens.)
4.13 8.00 J. A. Cody, Hastings.

5.03 8.18 M. V. Wilder, Limestone.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ...................... 3186 5.11

Fertilizer ..................... 3187 ....

Cotton Seed Meal............... 3188 .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3189 6.32

Fertilizer ....................... 3190 6.52

Fertilizer ...................... 3191 6.37

Fertilizer ..................... 3192 8.52

Fertilizer ...................... 3193 5.76

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3194 7.74

Fertilizer ...................... 3195 10.59


Phosphoric Acid.


-2 -
d a




8.35 0.45 8.80

5.68 4.121 9.80



7.43 2.251 9.68

7.05 1.15 8.20

6.53 1.47 8.00

7.48 1.27 8.75

7.40 0.80 8.20

5.78 0.92 6.70

7.73 1.77 9.501


BY WHOM SENT.


12.25 W. G. Norsworthy, McIntosh.

5.22 J. R. Pounds, Ocoee.

..... Capital City Grocery, Tallahassee.

7.77 J. J. Brown, Hastings.

5.86 F. H. Smith, Hastings.

9.041W. R. Underhill, Barberville.

6.56 S. H. Lane, Barberville.

5.33 A. M. Anderson, Bowling Green.

4.30 Albert McClain, Candler.

7.61 C. J. Masters, Armst on,.








Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer ......................

Guano No. 1...................

Guano No. 2 ........ ... ... .

Cotton Seed Meal.............

Fertilizer {Floats) .............

Fertilizer No. 1..............

Fertilizer No. 2 (Dried Blood)...

Fertilizer No. 3 (Nitrate of Soda)

Cotton Seed Meal.............

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2...............

Fertilizer No. 3................

Fish Scrap ...................


7.181 7.65


1.35 9.00 5.15

2.60 9.00 4.18

3.30 10.50 5.23

3.10 7.85 6.20

0.25 6.40 3.35

0.771 6.50 5.15

. . . 7.58


25.45 27.35

1.101 0.60







0.87 10.30

1.50 10.80

1.45 11.10

4.65 9.50


4.88

13.42

18.50

7.75

4.15

4.55

4.50

11,00


I 8.00 J. L. Burton, Crescent City.

9.04E. R. Watson, Arcadia.

S5.50E. R. Watson, Arcadia.

I 9.14lTonner & Borland, Citra.

8.401C. W. Edwards, Day.

8.11 C. W. Edwards, Day.

..... Independent Fertz. Co., Jacksonville.

..... W. S. Reeve, Pensacola.

7.71 Gus A. Morton, Williston.

..... Gus A. Morton, Williston.

..... Gus A. Morton, Williston.

..... C. E. Van Landingham, Juniper.

11.43 T. J. Peters, Perrine.

10.87 T. J. Peters, Perrine.

10.93 T. J. Peters, Perrine.

0.62 Florida Freezer & Fertz. Co., Jensoin.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


NAME, OR BRAND. 0 BY WHO. SENT.

C 4
S z i 0
Cda % Ia
3A E

Fertilizer ...................... 3212

Ashes ......................... 3213

Fertilizer ...................... 3214

Fertilizer ...................... 3215

A shes ......................... 3216

Fertilizer No. 1 (Muriate of Pot- 3217
ash).
Fertilizer No. 2 (Muriate of Pot- 3218
ash).
Fertilizer No. 3 (C. S. M. Sweep- 3219
ings).
Cotton Seed Meal No. 1 ......... 3220

Kainit ........................ 3221

'oft Phosphate No. 1............ 3222


3.961 4.201 4.901 9.101 4.39


. .. 2.82


26.68129.50 .....


J. P.

J. L.

H. A.

J. M.

IA. A.

L. B.

L. B.

L. B.


Cowburn, Crescent iUty.

Overstreet, Kissimmee.

Perry, Pomona.

Brownlee, Starke.

Calhoun, Marianna.

Thompson, Pensacola.

Thompson. Pensocola.

Thompson, Pensacola.


..... Shelfer & Ellinor Co., Havana.

13.12 W. E. Privette, Jasper.

..... W. C. Rerdell, Tampa.







Soft Phosphate No. 2........... 3223 .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3224 6.87


Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer ......................

Manure Salt ...................

Fertilizer No. 1 (White)........

Fertilizer No. 2 (Gray)..........

Fertilizer No. 1...............

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Fertilizer No. 3................

Cotton Seed Meal...............

Kainit .........................

Cotton Seed Meal..............


32251.....


3.35 5.00 8.35

8.00 2.30 10.30

11.901 0.65 12.50

10.25 1.45 11.70

7.22 1.03 8.25

8.83 1.67 10.50

5.35 3.85 9.20

. . .. . .. .. . .
20.35 4.45 24.80

6.50 1.40 7.90

9.45 2.35 11.80

8.40 0.60 9.00

6.00 1.50 7.50

.. .. .....

..... .... .....


. . . I


..... W. C. Rerdell, Tampa.

8.76 J. V. Cyreen, Hallandale.

11.80 W. E. Quarterman, Live Oak.

7.47 W. E. Quarterman, Live Oak.

5.01 Geo. W. Futch, Bowling Green.

6.62 E. K. Head, Coquina.

5.35 E. Dickerman, Mt. Dora.

19.25 J. D. Trammell, Muscogee.

18.92 J. E. Ward, Lake Jackson.

4.03 J. E. Ward, Lake Jackson.

3.15 W. W. Hurston, Laurel Hill.

3.961W. W. Hurston, Laurel Hill.

4.01 W. W. Hurston, Laurel Hill.

..... N. H. Shaw, Quincy.

14.49 Putnam & Wilcox, Perry.

..... Julian Howard, Quincy.











SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


...................... 3239 8.31

..................... 3240 6.84

...................... 3241 6.51

.................... 3242 6.28

...................... 3243 4.48

.................... 3244 10.501

...................... 3245 6.75

...................... 32461 8.841
I I
...................... 32471 7.271

.................... 132481 6 .42

...................... 3249 i 6.231


Phosphoric Acid




c F
ad M <


6.60

6.88

6.00

6.90

7.271

6.75

6.52

6.80

6.481

7.75

8.2:1


0.30 6.901 4.47

1.071 7.95 4.77

2.00 8.00 5.751

0.35 7.25 4.571

0.83| S.10 4.651

1.85 S.60 4.30

0.28 6.80 4.50|

0.50 7.30! 4.45.

1.07 7.551 4.431

1.051 8.80] 4.281

0.871 9.10O 4.410


0


BY WHOM SENT.


8.72 Geo. B. Price, Hastings.

6.31 F. H. Smith, Hastings.

7.53 J. L. Morrison, Hastings.

8.441W. S. Stevens, Hastings.

7.211R. T. Hewitt, Hastings.

7.30 N. J. Adams, Hastings.

9.22 S. I. Killingsworth, Hastings.

8.141Grady Stevens, Hastings.

7.381W. R. Sellers, Hastings.

8.02 J. W. L. Bessert, Hastings.

7.201D. W. Knight, Hastings.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer







Fertilizer ..................... 3250 6.64

Fertilizer ...................... 3251 8.87

Fertilizer ...................... 3252 7.63

Fertilizer ...................... 3253 13.45

Fertilizer ...................... 3254 4.89

Fertilizer ...................... 3255 6.94

Fertilizer ...................... 3256 7.50

Fertilizer ...................... 3257 8.06

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3258 9.09]

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3259 10.24

Fertilizer ...................... 3260 8..90

Fertilizer ...................... 3261 11.01

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3262 11.55

Fertilizer No. 2 ................ 3263 10.29

Potassium Muriate .............132641 .....

Fertilizer ...................... 3265 7.79


6.63 0.27 G.90 4.70 8.40 H. R. Brown, Hastin

6.90 0.90 7.80 3.80 9.71 T. A. Minton, Hastings.

6.23 1.22 7.45 3.95 9.32 Mary Leahy, Hastings.

6.43 1.30 7.SO 4.30 7.38(M. Minton, Hastings.

9.07 0.481 9.55 4.77 8.68 E. D. Davis, Hastings.

6.70 1.00 7.70 5.05 5.62 A. M. Stevens, Hastings.

6.13 1.37 7.50 3.98 9.22[Gordon Stanton, Hastings.

7.08 0.77 7.85 4.25 7.67 R. K. Theris, Hastings.

11.18 1.37112.55 1.86 2.05 P. B. Senterfitt, Laurel Hill.

9.12 1.70 10.2 ..... 5.03 P. B. Senterfitt, Laurel Hill.

6.90 1.20 8.10 3.70 8.43 Joseph Crews, Wachula.

10.25 1.80 12.15 2.24 2.78 0. A. Gavin, Laurel Hill.

11.35 0.50 11.85 ..... 4.68Edward Wang, Sr., Laurel Hill.

9.28 0.82 10.101 2.04 3.541Edward Wang, Sr., Laurel Hill.

..... ..... ... .... 48.04 Edward Wang, Sr., Laurel Hill.

6.84 0.96 7.80 1 .86 1.701J. A. McVicker, Baker.











SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914.-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.


a 0


I I I


Fertilizer No. 1................. 3266 9.52 7.07

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3267 ..... 16.25

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3268 10.39 8.35

Fertilizer No. 3................. 3269 ..... 9.10

Fertilizer No. 4................. 3270 11.68 8.95

J. E. W. Fertilizer No. 1......... 3271..... 18.70

J. E. W. Fertilizer No. 2........ 3272 ..... 17.30

A. F. W. Fertilizer No. 1........ 3273 ..... 18.25

A. F. W. Fertilizer No. 2........ 3274 ..... 19.401

Fertilizer No. 1 ............... .327511.24 11.05

Fertilizer No. 2................. 132761 9.56110.25


BY WHOM SENT.


0.4:3 .50 3.89 6.71 R. E. Whittle, Milton.

0.10 16.35 .. ....... Culpepper Bros., Laurel Hill.

0.15 8.50 1.55 3.90 Culpepper Bros., Laurel Hill.

0.15 9.25 1.891 2.49 Culpepper Bros., Laurel Hill.

0.15 9.10 3.37 4.23 Culpepper Bros., Laurel Hill.

3.00 1.70 ..... 27.25 J. E. Ward, Lake Jackson.

2.8021).10 ..... 27.25 J. E. Ward. Lake Jackson.

2.05 20.0 ..... 29.60 Lake .ackson Mercantile Co., Lake
SJackson.
2.75122.15 ..... 28.25,Lake Jackson Mercantile Co., Lake
I | Jackson.
0.3511.4(1 0.47 3.20 M. M. Grimes, Laurel Hill.

0.60110.851 2.301 3.921M. M. Grimes, Laurel Hill.


NAME, OR BRAND.







I I I
Fertilizer No. 1................. 3277 8.07 9.07 0.58 9.65 2.281 3.18Raymond Grey, Havana.
Fertilizer No. 2................. 3278 ..... ..... .... ..... 8.15 ..... Raymond Grey, Havana.
Fertilizer No. 16................ 327910.75 8.15 0.80 8.95 3.98 8.61 J. R. McDonald, Galloway.
Fertilizer No. 18................ 3280 12.92 6.85 1.85 8.70 4.67 5.64 J. R. McDonald, Galloway.
Fertilizer No. 1................. 3281 6.36 6.55 0.15 6.70 ..... 10.47 M. F. Lee, Marianna.
Fertilizer No. 2................3282 8.66 11.23 0.47111.70 1.56 3.191M. F. Lee, Marianna.
Guano No. 1.................... 3283 11.42 13.20 1.3014.50 1.00 2.02 W. W. Gay, Round Lake.
Guano No. 2 .................... 3284 4.73 8.08 0.22 8.30 .... 4.97 W. W. Gay, Round Lake.
Guano No. 3.................... 3285 9.74 8.53 0.77 9.30 ..... 4.24 W. W. Gay, Round Lake.
Fertilizer ...................... 3286 8.8914.83 1.2716.10 ..... 6.16 T. M. Tidwell, Bascom.
Kainit ......................... 3287 ......... ..... .......... 12.54 0. L. Mizell, Dukes.
Guano .........................3288 9.62110.00 0.1510.15 1.50 4.021L. Adams, Glendale.
Fertilizer No. 1............... 3289 9.58110.10 0.10110.201 1.30 2.131A. W. Shurette, Laurel Hill.

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3290 ..... 17.00 0.1517.151..... ..... A. W. Shurette, Laurel Hill.
Fertilizer No. 1................. 3291 9.9710.05 0.1510.20 3.75 2.86 E. J. Johnson, Laurel Hill.

Fertilizer No. 2.................132921..... 16.801 0.15116.951........... E, J. Johnson, Laurel Hill.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


00 n
0c 0.,
oa
'C1 3
-I


Phosphoric


? 3
. 0
Q5 a;

a
^ S


No. 1................. 32931 7.021 7.501

No. 1................. 3294 11.76 2.10

No. 2................. 3295 6.34 2.60

No. 3................. 3296 4.19 1.65

...................... 3297 7.38 9.00

No. 1................. 3298 7.43 6.38

No. 2................ 3299 8.74 9.70

No. 3 ................. 3300 6.941 6.75

No. 4................. 3301 4.96 10.75

N o. 1................. 3 02 .. 17.60

. .................. ::03 7.39 6.70


Fertilizer

,'ertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Guano ...

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer

Fertilizer


Acid.
0
& BY WHOM SENT.
0

0

11.05 4.27 8.891J. A. Stevens, DeLand.

6.40 0.39 8.68 L. R. Woods, Tampa.



4.30 0.31 9.921L. R. Woods, Tampa.

9.95 1.66 2.281R. L. Williams, Clarksville.

13.05 4.52 5.601H. S. Riggins, Winter Haven.

13.70 3.98 3.58 11. S. Riggins, Winter Haven.

11.35 5.19 6.84 H. S. Riggins, Winter Haven.

11.15| 2.47 11.431H. S. Riggins, Winter Haven.

18.45 ........ ..IS. A. Stokes, Laurel Hill.

7.901 3. 18,10.731C. 1. Vani Landlinglimn, Juniper.





^ --








Fertilizer .................... .. 33041 9.45 8.35

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3305 8.14 7.03

Fertilizer No. 2.............. 3306 2.46 4.75

Fertilizer No. 1......... ...... 3307 6.48 6.60

Fertilizer No. 2................ 33081 8.51 6.531

Cotton Seed Meal........... 3309

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 3310 ......

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3311 9.49 7.63

Fertilizer No. 2 ... ..... 3312 7.06 8.00

Fertilizer No. 3............... 3313 7.87 8.25

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3314110.88 10.35

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3315 9.20 10.95

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3316 11.50 9.93

Fertilizer No. 2................ 3317 7.32 8.75

Fertilizer No. 3................. 3318 8.09 7.55

Fertilizer No. 4.............. 3319 ..... 10.15


0.35

1.52

3.60

0.90

0.531


8.70

8.55

8.35

7.50|

7.051


. '. '. '. '. . . .
.1

0.37 8.00

0.50 8.50

0.55 8.80

0.35 10.75

0.90111.85

0.51710.50

0.15 8.90

0.85 8.40

2.0512.20


2.49!

4.70

4.65

4.81

4.66

7. 5

7.55

2.65

2.54

2.081

2.121

2.12

1.34

2.39

2.13'

2.30


3.971T. M. Tidwell, Bascom.

5.96 W. E. Campbell, Seminole.

5.85 J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

8.09 W. A. Parrish, Dania.

7.84 W. A. Parrish, Dania.

..... Frank T. Wilson, Tallahassee.

...A. L. Wilson, Quincy.

3.60 Lud Givens, Laurel Hill.

3.80 Lud Givens, Laurel Hill.

3.51 Lud Givens, Laurel Hill.

2.341M. M. Grimes, Laurel Hill.

1.85 M. M. Grimes, Laurel Hill.

2.03 D. R. Moore, Laurel Hill.

4.25 D. R. Moore, Laurel Hill.

2.17 D. R. Moore, Laurel Hill.

2.23 D. R. Moore, Laurel Hill.










SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid


NAME, OR BRAND. S ." BY WHOM SENT.
5 aa 0
0 0


Fertilizer No. 5................. 3320 ..... 4.98 0.17 5.151

Guano No. 1................... .13321 8.38 8.95 0.75 9.703

Guano No. 2 ................... 133221 8.871 7.85 0.801 8.65l

Fertilizer .............. ........ 3323110.52 11.65 0.60112.25.
Fertilizer No. 1................ 3324 8.20 5.101 1.201 6.30
I I I 2 S.50
Fertilizer No. 2................. 133251 7.30 5.95 2.55 50

Fertilizer No. 1................. 133261 6.54 8.910 0.30 9.201

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3327 9.10 11.70 0.25 11.951
1 I 8.901
Fertilizer No. 1................. 13328 ..... 7.35 1.55 8.90

S. F. Guano No. 1............... 3329 11.50 10.13 2.17 12.30

A. T. Guano No. 2............... 3330 8.531 8.10 0.50 8.60


4.38

4.07

2.801

0.41

3.86

2.441

2.92|


1.iv u. t. iiMoore, Laurel cHill.
3.7 1J. C. Stewart, Bascom.

4.07 J. C. Stewart, Bascom.

3.83 J. D. Johnson, Holt.

6.911J. E. Hancock, Oakland.

7.73 J. E. Hancock, Oakland.

7.55 W. H. Hertel, Gainesville.

3.80 W. H. Hertel, Gianesville.

5.62 C. L. Eaddy, Linden.

3.32 Chas. C. Haynes, Wallace.

4.97 Chas. C. Haynes, Wallace.


n sn'









Fertilizer No. 1................. 33311 7.37 7.701

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3332 11.22 9.50

Fertilizer No. 2 ................. .3333..... 6.40

Cotton Seed Meal............... 3334 ..........

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3335 18.89 10.40

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3336 16.73 11.40

Fertilizer ...................... 3337 8.09 6.55

Fertilizer ...................... 3338 ..... .....

Fertilizer No. 3 ................. 3339 4.00 4.40

Fertilizer ...................... 3340 ..... 6.70

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3341 11.28 7.90

Guano No. 1 ................. 3342 6.86 7.43

Guano No. 2.................... 3343 10.08 10.18

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3344 9.00 6.60

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3345 10.46 6.83

Fertilizer ...................... 3346 9.87 11.57


2.101 3.80 2.051 1.85 J. O. Boyett, Otahite.

1.50|11.00U 2.00 2.14 J. 0. Boyett, Otahite.
I i
0.40j 6.80. 5.00 8.04C. L. Eaddy, Linden.

.... 7.05 .....W. K. Hall, Panama City.

0.30 10.601 3.40 5.40 D. R. Moore, Laurel Hill.

0.1011.50 1.63 1.80 D. R. Moore, Laurel Hill.

1.95 S.50 4.10 6.92 G. A. McCort, Hastings.

.......... 48.55 E. S. Chase, Ft. Lauderdale.

2.70 7.10 4.23 13.62 J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

1.30 8.00 4.70111.30 A. E. Berry, Brandon.

0.90 8.80 2.10 2.62IJas. A. Davis, Laurel Hill.

0.82 8.25| 3.45 6.40 Milton Foster, Munson.
I I
1.27111.45 2.451 2.07 Milton Foster, Munson.

0.85 7.45 4.42 4.18 F. W. Lanfear, Citrus Center.

0.77 7.60 4.00 6.271F. SV. Lanfear, Citrus Center.

0.6912.26J 1.96 2.56 W. J. Wilkerson, Glendale.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid


NAME, OR BRAND. o 6 . BY WHOM SENT.
5 a
Z 0; 0

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3347 11.08 7.97 1.70 9.67 1.94 6.62 D. R. Henderson, In ian Ford.
Fertilizer ...................... 3348 14.44 6.80 0.85 7.65 3.911 6.541G. A. Lee, Parrish.
Fertilizer No. 36................ 3349 5.61 7.45 0.88 8.33 3.12 14.72 Jay Stubbs, Winter Haven.
Fertilizer No. 46................ 33501 6.60 8.02 0.31 8.33 4.1511.02 Jay Stubbs, Winter Haver.
Muriate of Potash .............. 3351 ............... ..... ... 52.56 J. O. Enzor, Baker.
German Kainit ................ 33521 ..... ........ .. .... .13.28 J. O. Enzor, Bak-r.
Acid Phosphate ................ 3353 .... 18.37 0.63 19.00 ....... O. Enzor, Baker.
Acid Phosphatq ................ 33541 .. .. 19.42 0.38119.801 .. .... 1. O. Enzor, Baker.
Kainit ......................... 3355 ..... .. .. .. 54J. Enzor, Baker.
Meal Mixture .................. 3356 5.54 8.481 0.971 9.35 2.02 2.07 J. 0. Enzor, Baker.
Fertilizer ...................... 33r57 4.411 6.20\ 1.201 7.401 3.281 5.80R Armour Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.









Fertilizer ...................... 3358 7.63 8.42 1.16 9.58

Fertilizer ...................... 3359 4.40 6.051 0.63] 6.68

Fertilizer ..................... 3360 2.66 5.25 0.901 6.15

Fertilizer ..................... 3361 5.95 6.90 0.90 7.80

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3362 4.78 5.36 1.09 6.45

Fertilizer ..................... 3363 9.301 7.89 0.60 8.49

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3364 5.63 6.72 1.23 7.95

Fertilizer No. 2................ 33651 8.0610.89 1.02111.91

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3366..... 8.86 0.621 9.48

Fertilizer No. 1................. 3367 7.57 9.11 0.08 9.19

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3368 8.57 9.54 0.79 10.33

Fertilizer ....................... 3369 7.08 7.60 0.70 8.30

Cotton Seed M eal............... 3370 ....... ..... ...... .

Fertilizer ...................... 3371 12.81 11.45 0.05 11.50
Fertilizer No. 4................. 3372 1.83 5.53 4.5210.05

Fertilizer ..................... 3373114.18 4.65 0.15] 4.80


5.43 7.301

1.12 8.931

3.31 8.40

3.01 10.21

5.41 5.401

2.56 1.87

3.21 6.23

2.65 7.63

2.23 2.60

2.43 3.331

2.181 2.06

4.131 7.12

8.05 .....

2.00 1.95
3.99 13.14

4.67 6.33


Armour Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.

Armour Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.

Armour Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.

Armour Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.

Armour Fertilizer Co., Jacksonville.

T. G. Manghon, Baker.

O. A. Gavin, Laurel Hill.

O. A. Gavin, Laurel Hill.

J. W. Kelley, Otahite.

J. W. Kelley, Otahite.

J. W. Kelley, Otahite.

Geo. F. Nelson, Floral City.

H. I. Enzor, Baker.

H. I. Enzor, Baker.

J. P. Cowburn, Crescent City.

W. H. Crawford, Zolfo.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914.-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid
O
NAME, OR BRAND. BY WHOM SENT.

1^;z *i ci 0 0


Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 5.................

Kelp Ashes ...................

Fertilizer No. 1 ................

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2................

Fertilizer No. 3 ................

Fertilizer No. 4................

Fertilizer No. 5.................


..... 9.65 0.80 10.45

6.6510.05 0.45 10.50


. . . .. . 1
0.82 8.10

0.77 8.25

0.85 8.70

0.75 7.75

1.10 8.60

0.85 7.00

0.92 6.90

0.72 10.10


3382110.471 6.15


Fertilizer No. 6................. 3383 11.41 5.98

Fertilizer ....................... 3384 9.05 9.38


2.70 2.27 J. A. McVicker, Galliver.

3.39 11.96 H. S. Riggins, Winter Haven.

..... 11.05 Chas. Carroll, Yamato.

3.G5 5.62 F. W. Lanfear, Citrus Center.

4.10 7.49 C. S. Keating, Citrus Center.

4.15 5.76 C. S. Keating, Citrus Center.

6.00 2.58 C. S. Keating, Citrus Center.

4.50 4.50 C. S. Keating, Citrus Center.

3.95 6.51 C. S. Keating, Citrus Center.

4.30 5.54 C. S. Keating, Citrus Center.

3.1: 4.80 M. P. Rushing, Ponce de Leon.








Fertilizer .......................

Fertilizer ......................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 1................

Corn Special ..................

Fertilizer No. 2 ................

Special Mixture ...............

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer No. 2.................

Tankage .......................

Cotton Seed Meal..............

Fertilizer No. 1................

Fertilizer No. 2...............

Fertilizer No. 3 .................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer ......................


11.551

4.80

7.08

6.65

4.74

9.85

9.65

8.70

7.13

3.08



9.63

9.70

10.98

6.58

7.55


0.85 12.401
1
1.90 6.70

0.50 7.58

1.22 7.87

0.76 5.50

1.95 11.80

0.35 10.00

0.20 8.90

0.67 7.80

2.32 5.401


10.75

10.85

11.68

7.60

8.65f


I I
3.601 4.35jM. R. Senterfitt, Holt.

4.15112.71 Walter Cliff, Crescent City.

3.93 11.18 C. E. Taylor, DeLand.

3.60 12.14 W. N. Swain, Millville.

2.10 6.66 C. W. Prates, DeFuniak Springs.

2.33 3.24 W. N. Swain, Millville.

2.95 7.39 John Haughton, Branford.

3.90 9.36 H. A. Perry, Pomona.

4.23 11.76 C. E. Taylor, DeLand.

1.84 ..... J. Helseth, Viking.

7.40 ..... E. O. Painter Fertz. Co., Jacksonville.

2.70 7.10 J. C. Smith, Glendale.

2.25 2.57 J. C. Smith, Glendale.

..... 4.11 J. C. Smith, Glendale.

4.55 7.86 Z. G. Holland, St. Johns Park.

4.07 7.80 Geo. Salyereds, St. Johns Park.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer ...................... 3401

Fertilizer ...................... 3402

Nitrate of Soda ............ . . 3403

Fertilizer No. 1 ................. 3404

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3505
Fertilizer ...................... 3406

Fertilizer ...................... 3407

Fertilizer ................... 3408

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3409

Hardwood Ashes ............... 3410

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 3411


7.251


11.85110.151


BY WHOM SENT.


0.80 8.05! 4.00 7.75 P. T. Pellicer, St. Johns Park.

0.65 10.80 2.40 4.49 R. S. Renfroe, Gonzalez.

. .. .. .17.20 . A. D. Dutton, Aucilla.

1.27 9.60 2.23 5.96 M. Miller, Dorcas.
0.63 11.40 2.50 2.02 J. M. Miller, Dorcas.

1.07 6.70! 4.85! 4.681TJ. P. Buchan, Tiger Bay.

1.75 7,25 5.081 7.531D. G. Calkins, E. Palatka.

1.30 8.60 4.621 9.490J. W. Case. Hastings.

1.50 !.301 5.00 0.95 J. W. Case, Hastings.

. . . I ... 3.611R. F. Blaclburn, Osprey.

..... ..... 7.35 ..... Phoenix Fruit Co., Stuart.
:: ::








Fertilizer ...................... 3412 5.83 4.11 5.29 9.40 5.42 5.32 A. W W arner, Jensen.
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 3413. .. .. ..... 8.10 ..... J. O. Holman, Quincy.
Tankage ....................... 3414 .......... .......... 9.85 ..... Fred W Lease, Ft. Meade.
Fertilizer ...................... 3415 8.98 1.23 0.57 1.89 6.03 3.49 Seminole Fruit Co., Ft. Pierce.
Fertilizer ...................... 3416 ..... 6.00 0.85 6.85 3.02 3.77 Z. T. Bagwell, Zolfo.
Fertilizer No. 1................. 3417 12.51 6.18 1.12 7.30 3.98 5.61 Bert L. Woolf, Citrus Center.
Fertilizer No. 2................. 341812.94 6.00 1.10 7.10 3.75 6.58 Bert L. Woolf, Citrus Center.
Fertilizer No. 3................. 3419 12.23 6.00 1.32 7.32! 4.08 5.65 Bert L. Woolf, Citrus Center.
Fertilizer No. 4................. 3420 13.23 4.731 1.021 5.75 4.42 5.55 Bert L. Woolf, Citrus Center.
Fertilizer No. 5................. 3421 14.96 5.60 1.30 6.901 3.85 5.01 Bert L. Woolf, Citrus Center.
Fertilizer No. 6................. 3422 10.65 6.95 0.95 7.90 4.14 5.15 Bert L. Woolf, Citrus Center.
Fertilizer ...................... 342316.37 5.16 1.49 6.65 3.35 4.11 J. A. Nagel, Citrus Center.
Fertilizer ...................... 3424 ..... 6.10 1.10 7.20 2.58 9.94 R. A. Baskin, Anthony.
Sea Weed Ash ................. 3425 ............ ..0.2 ... 0.90 DuVal & Franklin, Miami.
Fertilizer ......................3426 9.97 8.15 0.85 9.00 4.85 7.151R. E .Emmerson, Dade City.

Fertilizer ...................... 3427 13.121 6.851 0.90 7.75 3.43 8.06 J. P. W illiams, Orlando.









SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914.-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilizer .....................

Fertilider "R" .................

Fertilizer "X".................

Black Mangrove Ashes.........

Canada Hardwood Ashes........

Fertilizer .....................


3436 .....

34:37 .....

3:438 6.93





Phosphoric Acid.


0
cz



6.23 1.171 i.40

5.86 1.04 G.SO

6.23 0.971 7.20

7.05 1.181 8.23

6.16 0.881 7.01

5.75 1.03 6.78

6.25 0.77 7.02

5.46 1.251 6.71

..... .. .. 2.15

..... ..... 0.) 9 1

5.38 0.971 6.351


O

BY WHOM SENT.


0

3.931Frank Counett, Citrus Center.

4.45 J. Mallow, Citrus Center.

6.34 T. A. Hilton, Citrus Center.

4.27 J. Miller, Citrus Center.

4.09 F. Lanfear, Citrus Center.

5.54 C. S. Keating, Citrus Center.

6.921H. S. Roe, Citrus Center.

:.41 H. S. Roe, Citrus Center.

7.51 A. B. Micheal, Wabasso.

2.721Lewis & Greiner, Fellsmere.

4.91 Seminole Fruit Co., Ft. Pierce.


4.95







W ood Ashes.................... 3439

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3440

Fertilizer No. 2................ 3441

Hardwood Ashes .............. 3442

Complete Fertilizer .............3443

Cotton Seed Meal............... 3444

Tankage ....................... 3445

Fertilizer ...................... 3446

Fertilizer ...................... 3447

Tobacco Stems ................. 3448

Acid Phosphate................. 3449

Acid Phosphate................. 3450

Ashes No. 1.................... 3451

Ashes No. 2.................... 3452

Mixed Salts ....................3453

Fertilizer ...................... 3454


..... ..... ..... .... .

..... 6.52 0.96 7.48

..... 6.15 0.65 6.80



5.50 6.70 4.00 10.70


6.49

5.58

.....

17.38

17.60


..... i . .

... 4.55

2.41 8.90

5.47111.00

..... .....

0.26 17.60

0.25 17.85


4.42

2.83



4.45

7.52.

10.65

3.85

4.70

3.081


1 .... 1. 1.001... 2... 3.831.
12.52 1.80 1.00] 2.80 3.831


2.00 George E. Dunan, Apalachicola.

5.17 R. E. McDonald, Sydney.

5.45 R. E. McDonald, Sydney.

3.21 D. C. Tyner, Tampa.

4.78 D. C. Tyner, Tampa.

..... Phoenix Fruit Co., Stuart.

.W. D. Morton, Jacksonville.

5.90 R. E. Van Ness, Hernando.

7.80 D. C. Tyner, Tampa.

7.57 E. P. Blanton, Brandon.

..... E. B. Shelfer, Quincy.

..... C. F. Zeek, Pensacola.

1.05 Thos. J. Peters, Perrine.

0.86 Thos. J. Peters, Perrine.

0.81 N. D. Smith, Tampa.

2.88 Phoenix Fruit Co., Stuart.











SPECIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914.-Continued.


Phosp


NAME, OR BRAND. 0 p
00


.Fertilizer "M". ................. 345510.08 6.85

Fertilizer "B".................. 3456111.00 6.45

Fertilizer "L"................. 3457 13.86 7.05

Fertilizer "G"................... 3458|17.96 5.60

Fertilizer "F". ................. 3459 9.39 6.58

Tobacco Stem s ................ 3460 ......... .

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3461 20.65 8.881

Fertilizer No. 2................3462 17.97 10.95

Fertilizer No. 3 (Muriate of Pot.) 3463 ..........

Salty Soil ..................... 3464 ..... .

Fertilizer ...................... 3465 .... 6.45


ihoric Acid.


SBY WHOM SENT.




0.80 7.65 4.44 5.96iJ. H. Miller, Citrus Center.

0.85 7.30 3.88 5.36 J. H. Bushhusen, Citrus Center.

0.90 8.05 3.55 5.98 F. W. Lanfear, Citrus Center.

1.00 6.60 3.79 3.33 Chas. R. Gist, Citrus Center.

0.971 7.55 4.30 6.70 Geo. H. Fisher, Citrus Center.

.. 3.58 9.55 E. B. Brown, Tampa.

0.92 9.80 2.04 2.15 M. M. Carroll, Westville.

0.95111.90 1.15 0.91 M. M. Carroll, Westville.

..... ..... ..... 56.15 M. M. Carroll, W estville.

..... ..... ... 1.34 Monroe & Stevens, Daytona.

1.001 7.45 4.15 7.36C. M. Boland, Bartow.








Ashes ......................... 3466

Cotton Seed Meal .............. 3467

A shes ........................ 3468

Fertilizer ...................... 3469

Fertilizer ...................... 3470

Fertilizer No. 2................. 3471

Salty Substance ................ 3472

A shes .......................... 3474

Fertilizer ...................... 3475

Fertilizer No. 1 ................ 3476

Basic Slag ..................... 3477

Sulphate of Potash.............. 3478

Fertilizer No. 1................ 3479

Fertilizer No. 2............... 3480


. . . . . 4.31

..... ..... ..... ..... 7 .80 ....

.. .. ... .. .... trace 1.42

7.42 3.38 1.82 5.40 5.13 5.24

8.37 6.59 1.91 8.50 9.86 3.89

6.94 3.42 1.76 5.18| 5.17 5.45

4.47 ......... ...... ..... 1.04

0.12 ..... ..... ..... ..... 1.47

..... 6.43 1.12 7.55 5.12 5.50

10.60 10.15 0.75 10.90 ..... 5.22

..... 4.90 13.25 4.90,13.25 18.15

..... ..... ..... ..... .. .. 50 .45

7.84 6.10 1.60 7.70 3.40 10.02

6.90 5.60 1.55 7.15 3.3011.78


H. E. Memminger, Lakeland.

Frank I. Pillsbury, Palma Sola.

E. C. Stuart, Bartow.

Seminole Fruit Co., Ft. Pierce.

T. P. Drake, Yalaha.

SeminoleFruit Co., Ft. Pierce.

Albert W. Gilchrist, Punta Gorda.

A. S. Mohr, Supt. Cypress Lumber Co., .
Apalachicola.
Chas. Tyler, Sanford.

E. B. Shelfer Co., Quincy.

Thos. Brewer, Homestead.

Thos. Brewer, Homestead.

A. M. Minor, Crown Point.

A. M. Minor, Crown Point.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.
R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914. FRANK T. WILSON, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1905.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.

Phosphoric Acid.

NAME, OR BRA 4 BY WHOM and WHERE
N R MANUiACTURED.

0 << g
Standard Bean & Pea Special... 1949 Guaranteed 8.00 6.001 1.00 7.00 5.00 4.00 Standard Fertz Co., Gaines-
Found .... 7.31 7.23 1.77 9.00 2.93 5.44 ville, Fla.

Special Mixture ............... 1950 Guaranteed 10.00 7.00| 1.50 ..... 4.001 7.50 Armour Fertz. Works, Jack-
Found .... 4.98 7T. 5 1.75 9.4 4.75 7.80 ville, Fla.

Sun Hastings Potato Fertilizer.. 1951 Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 7.00 Peninsula Fertz Co., Pa-
Found .... 6.68 7.4.5 0.25 7.70 4.08 7.34 latka, Fla.

Special Fertilizer .............. 1952Guaranteed 10.00 11.00 1.00 ..... 2.00 ..... Peninsula Fertz. Co., Pa-
Found .... 7.69 12.10| 0.25 12.35 2.50 ..... latka, Fla.

Hastings Meal Mixture......... 1953 Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 ..........4.00 7.50 Independent Fertz. Co.,
Found .... 5.191 7.10 1.15 8.25 4.70 7.76 Jacksonville, Fla.

Mapes Orange Tree Manure.... 1954 Guaranteed 12.00| 6.00! 2.00..... 4.00 3.001Mapes Formula & Peruvian
Found .... 8.77| (;.10| 2.85 8.95 4.43j 5.771 Guano Co., New York.








Cotton Seed Meal.............. 1955 Guaranteed .....
Found .........
Standard Grade C. S. Meal..... 1956Guaranteed .....
Found .... .....'
Cotton Seed Meal...............1957 Guaranteed .....
| Found .... .....
I I
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 1958 Guaranteed .....
I Found .... .....
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 1959 Guaranteed .....
I Found .... .....

No. 1 Peruvian & Fish Guano 1960 Guaranteed 12.00
Mixture ..................... Found .... 7.07

Tomato Special ................ 1961 Guaranteed 10.00
Found .... 6.481

Georgia State Standard Ammoni-11962 Guaranteed 10.001
ated Superphosphate........... Found .... 10.351

Lettuce and Cuke Special....... 1963 Guaranteed 12.00i
Found .... 6.22|
So. States Special Vegetable 1964 Guaranteed 8.00
Grower ......................I Found .... 6.26

No. 1. Peruvian & Fish Guano 1965 Guaranteed 12.001
Mixture. Double Strength Pot. Found .... 4.621


..... ..... 2.50 7.501 1.50 Camilla Cotton Oil & Fertz.
..... ..... ... 8.15 ..... Co., Camilla, Ga.

..... ..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Donalsonville Oil Mill, Don-
... 8.20 ..... I alsonville, Ga.

..... ..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Camilla Cotton Oil & Fertz.
.... ... ..... .7.88 ..... Co., Camilla, Ga.

..... ..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Empire Cotton Oil Co.,
.. ... ..... 7.60 ..... Quitman, Ga.

..... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Thomasville Mill & Forage
. . . ..... 8.30 ..... Co., Thomasville, Ala.

5.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 5.00 Florida Fertz. Co., Gaines-
4.901 0.90 5.80 3.90 6.57 ville, Fla.

6.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 8.00 Florida Fertz. Co., Gaines-
6.58 0.57 7.15 4.30 8.31 ville, Fla.

8.00 1.00 ..... 2.00 2.00Va-Carolina Chemical Co.,
7.93 1.42 9.35 3.33 3.16 Gainesville, Fla.

5.00 1.00 ..... 6.50 4.00 Florida Fertz. Co., Gaines-
6.03 0.92 6.95 6.50 3.93 ville, Fla.

6.00 1.00 .... 4.00 5.00 Va-Carolina Chemical Co.,
6.93 0.75 7.68 4.80 7.08 Gainesville, Fla.

5.00 1.00 ..... 4.00 10.00 Florida Fertz. Co., Gaines-
5.901 1.00 6.90 4.6510.97 ville, Fla.










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.

Phosphoric Acid.

NA M Ed R BY WHOM and WHERE
NAME, OR BRAND MANUFACTURED.
.,- 70' MANUFACTURED.
5| s 3


Standard Melon Special........ 1966

Standard Potato Special........ 1967

H. G. Sulphate of Potash...... 1968

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 1969

Standard Grade C. S. Meal...... 1970

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 11971

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 1972

Standard C. S. Meal............11973

Cotton Seed Meal............. 1974

Bright C. S. Meal............... 1975

Cotton Seed Meal .......... 1976


Guaranteed 8.00 6.001 1.00 7.001 4.001 6.001Standard Fertz. Co., Gaines-
Found .... 12.41 8.251 0.75 9.00 3.60 6.851 ville, Fla.
Guaranteed 10.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 3.50 8.00 StandardFertz. Co., Gaines-
Found .... 9.31 8.05 0.65 8.70 3.38 8.86 ville, Fla.
Guaranteed 5.00 ..... ... ..... ..... 50.00 Armour Fertz. Works, Jack-
Found ......... .... .. .. .. ... ..... 49.45 ville, Fla.
Guaranteed ..... .......... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Montezuma Mfg. Co., Mon-
Found .... ................ ... 7.90 ..... tezuma, Ga.
Guaranteed..... ........... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Donaldsonville Oil Mill,
Found .... ................ ..... 8.00 ..... Donaldsonville, Ga.
Guaranteed ..... .... ..... 2.50 7.0 1.50 Florida Cotton Oil Co..
Found .. .. .... ..... ..... 7.70 .... Jacksonville, Fla.
Guaranteed ..............2.50 7.50 1.50 McCaw Mfg. Co., Macon,
Found .... ............. 7.45 ..... Ga.
Guaranteed .... ........ .. 2.50 7.50 1.50 Grovania Cotton Oil Co..
Found ....................... 7.75 ..... Grovania, Ga.
Guaranteed ........ .....2.50 7.50 1.50 Ashburn Oil Mill, Ashburn
Found .... ..... 8.40 ..... Ga.
Guaranteed...............2.50 7.50 1.50 Armour Fertz. Works, Jack-
Found .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... 7.55 ... ville, Fla.
Guarant d .............. 2.50 7.50 1.50 Florida Cotton Oil Co.,
Found ..... ..... ..... ... .... 7.95 ..... Jacksonville, Fla.








Bean Special No. 2............. 1977|Guaranteed
I IFound ....


Ideal Fruit & Vine Manure.... 1978


Palmetto Tomato Formula..... 1979


Gaskin's DeSoto Orange Tree 1980
Grow er .....................

H. G. Sou. States Special Vege-1981
table Grower ..............

Early Bird Orange Tree Manure 1982


Early Bird Young Pineapple 1983
M anure .....................

Early Bird Orange Tree Manure 1984


Early Bird Florida Vegetable 1985
M anure .....................


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed


Found ....


6.40

8.00
6.79


6.25

8.00
6.63

8.00
8.42

10.00
7.35

10.00
5.57

10.00
7.36

10.00
7.121


5.00 ......
5.02 1.10


6.00
7.45


6.10

6.00
6.40

6.00
6.90

6.00
7.08

2.00
2.65

6.00
6.58

6.00
6.40


2.65


...... i
6.12


10.10

4.75
6.35


7.00


7.15


7.80


5.30


7.30


0.801 7.201


5.00
4.27

3.00
3.24

4.50
4.50

5.00
4 55

4.00
4.60

4.00
3.74

5.00
5.25

4.00
3.75

4.00
3.60


6.00 Independent Fert. Co.,
7.06 Jacksonville. Fla.

10.00 Wilson & Toomer Co.,
10.45 Jacksonville, Fla.

9.50 E.O.Painter Fert. Co.,
11.20 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.50 Va.-Caro. Chem. Co.,
6.95 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Va.-Caro. Chem. Co.,
5.51 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.000Osceola Fert. Co., 0
5.07 Jacksonville, Fla. -

5.00 Osceola Fert. Co.,
5.08 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Osceola IFert. Co.,
4.78 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Osceola Fert. Co.,
5.44 Jacksonville, Fla.











DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY.
FERTILIZER SECTION.

R. E. ROSE, State Chemist. OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914. L. HEIMBURGER, Asst. Chemist.
Samples Taken by State Chemist Under Sections 1 and 2, Act Approved May 22, 1905.
Deficiencies Greater than 0.20% are Distinguished by Black Face Type.


NAME, OR BRAND


Standard Grade Cotton Seed
M eal .......................

Cotton Seed Meal............


Better Grade .................


Myers' Choice ...............


Bighee Meal Compound........


'4 64


Io 5

Guaranteed ......
Found .... ......

Guaranteed .......
Found .... ... .

Guaranteed .....
Found .... 7.30

Guaranteed ......
Found .... 5.87

Guaranteed 16.00
Found ... 7.11


Phosphoric Acid.


6

Po Q
1 C
ag C
a0


. . . . . . .





10.00 ......
11.97 0.64

8.00 ......
9.29 0.40

8.00 0.50
11 .32, 0.57


2.50



12.61


9.69


11.89


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED
Cd
6=


7.50 ..... Richland Cotton Oil
7.56 ...... Co:, Richland, Ga.

7.50 1.50 Cuthbert Oil Co.,
7.83 ...... Cuthbert, Ga.

1.00 3.00 A. D. Campbell, Chip-
1.20 2.91 ley, Fla.

2.00 6.00 A. D. Campbell, Chip-
1.99 6.86 ley, Fla.

1.00 3.00 Bighee Fertz. Works,
0.971 2.48 Pensacola. Fla.


'






New Life .................... 1991 Guaranteed
Found ....
Bigbee Fish Guano............. 1992 Guaranteed
Found ....
Favorite Early Trucker........ 1993 Guaranteed
Found ....
Favorite Bean Special No. 2.. 1994 Guaranteed
Found ..
Favorite Bone-Black and Potash 1995 Guaranteed
Compound .................. Found ....

Price's Lettuce Special........1996 Guaranteed
Found ....
Favorite Non-Ammonlated Spe- 1997 Guaranteed
cial ........................ Found ....

Hastings' Meal Mixture........ 1998 Guaranteed
Found ....
Favorite Fruiter Manure..... 1999GGuaranteed
Found ....
Potato Producer .............. 2000 Guaranteed
Found ....
Favorite Orange Formula...... 2001 Guaranteed
Found ....


8.32

16.00
11.43

10.00
7.79

10.001
6.11

10.00
6.00

10.00
6.38

10.00
9.59

10.00
5.92

10.00
3.19
1
13.75

10.001
5.601


10.00 ............ 2.00
9.05 1.56 10.61 1.90

10.00 0.50 ...... 2.00
11.65 1.33 12.98 1.83

6.00 2.00 .. 3.00
6.021 0.3 6.41 3.25

5.00 1.00 ...... 5.00
5.07 0.57 5.64 4.79

8.00 0.50 .. .
7.85 0.74 8.59 .

5.00 ............ 5.00
5.81 0.58 6.39 5.16

10.00 1.00 ... .. ...
11.01 0.28 11.29 .....

7.001 ...... ...... 4.00
7.071 0.891 7.96 3.95

8.00o 0.05 ....... 4.001
9.371 0.241 9.69 5.15!

5.00 ...... ...... 5.00
5.731 1.22 6.951 4.39

0.00[ 1.001 ...... 3.00
8.131 0.111 8.241 2.87!


2.00 A. D. Campbell, Chip-
2.37 ley, Fla.

2.00 Bigbee Fertz. Works,
2.23 Pensacola, Fla.

10.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
10.60 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
6.40 Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
10.74 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
5.00 Jacksonville, Fla.

11.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
9.33 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
10.12 Jacksonvile, Fla.

12.00iIndepend't Fertz. Co.,
9.71 Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
8.32 Jacksonville, Fla.

14.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
13.63 Jacksonville, Fla.












OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND. 5





Favorite Vegetable ........... 2002


Cotton Seed Meal............. 2003


Va.-Car. High Grade Fish Guano 2004


Standard Tomato Special...... 2005


W. F. Hastings Potato Special. 200G


Ideal Vegetable Manure........ 2007


Ideal Celery Fertilizer ........ 2008


Phosphoric Acid.


I


10.00
8.95!

5.00
7.5C,

6.00
8.43

6.00

S. 00!
fl.00
3 .'8


2. 00 ......


...... 2.00


2.00 ......
5.42 14.37
2.00 7.00
0.6: 3 8.19


1.32 *9.75

1.00 ......
0.75 7.83
01.







2.151


0




4.00
3.81

7.50
7.35

2.00
2.18

4.00
3.761

4.00
4.03

4.00
4.16

r.00
5.92


O BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTI'REI).




6.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
5.66 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.50 McCaw Mfg. Co., Ma- o
.. con, Ga.

2.00Va.-Car. Chem. Co..
1 26 Montgomery, Ala.

10.00 Standard Fertz. Co.,
9.051 Gainesville, Fla.

7.00 Wilson&ToomerFertz.
7.211 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

8.00 W11son&TooinerFertz.
7.771 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

7.00 Wilson&ToomerFertz.
8.22 Co., .lacks'ville, Fla.







Special Mixture ...............


Armour's High Grade Blood and
B one .....................

Armour's Irish Potato Special..


Armour's Practical Trucker....


Gulf Celery Special..........


Gulf Orange Special.........


Southern Tree Grower.......


Vegetable Fertilizeer ..........


Special Mixture, 4-10-10-A.......


Germofert Orange Fruiter, Spe-
cial ........................

Va.-Car. Early Potato Manure..


20091Guaranteed 10.00 6.001...... ......
Found .... 5.17 6.29 2.531 8.82

2010 Guaranteed 10.00 3.00 1.50 ......
Found .... ...... ...... ...... 9.45

2011 Guaranteed 10.00 5.50 1.00 ......
Found .... 4.82 5.66 0.80 6.46

2012 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 .....
Found .... .5.401 6.031 0.57 6.60

2013 Guaranteed 10.001 5.001 1.00 6.00
Found .... 7.681 7.051 0.19 7.241

2014 Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found .... 6.06 7.531 0.72 8.25

2015lGuaranteed 8.001 6.00 1.00 .....
|Found .... 6.731 7.10 0.171 7.27

2016iGuaranteed 8.00 6.00 2.00 .....
Found .... 7.33 6.491 1.321 7.811

20171Guaranteed .. .. . . ...... 10.00
Found .... 6.16 7.70 3.621 11.32

2018 Guaranteed 5.001 3.00 9.00 12.00
Found .... 3.12 6.88| 9.15 16.03

2019 GuaranteedI 8.60 7.001 1.00 ......
Found ....1 3.85 9.231 0.89 10.12


4.251 7.75|Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
4.551 7.891 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 ...... Armour's Fertz. Wks.,
9.83 ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

3.50 8.50 Armour's Fertz. Wks.,
3.25 8.10 Jacksonville, Fla.

3.00 10.00 Armour's Fertz. Wks.,
3.05 9.171 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 7.50 The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
5.59 9.151 Tampa, Fla.
I i
4.00 11.00 The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
4.21 11.98 Tampa, Fla.

4.00 8.00 The Southern Fertz
4.041 9.97 Co., Orlando, Fl.

5.001 6.001The Southern Fertz.
4.841 7.121 Co., Orlando, Fla.

4.00 10.001E. O. Painter Fertz.
4.26 10.451 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

2.00 16.00 The Tampa Fertilizer
2.14 12 27 Co., Tampa. Fla.

4.00 7.00 Va.-Car. Chemical Co.,
3.90 7.39 Sanford, Fla,










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Sun Hastings Potato Fertilizer. 2020


Sun Hastings Potato Fertiizer. 2021


Acid Phosphate 16% .......... 2022


Special Mixture .............. 2023


Young Tree Fertilizer.......... 2024


Dixie Trucker Fertilizer....... 2025


Colery Special ................ 2026


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


10.00
6.80

10.00
5.62

10.00


10.00
5.19

10.00
4.66

8.00
4.52

8.00
6.02


Phosphoric Acid.



0




7.00 1.00 ......
7.29 1.24 8.53

5.00 1.00 ......
5.82 0.07 5.89

16.001 1.001......
17.83 0.96 18.79

6.50 1.50 ......
6.79 1.15 7.94

6.00 1.00 ......
6.02 0.27 6.29

6.00 1.00 ......
7.1(H 0.321 6.84

6.001 1.00 ......
6.681 0.371 7.05


4.00
4.18

4.50
4.70




4.25
4.68

5.00
4.80

4.00
4.94

6.00
6.39


O BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.
03



7.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
6.98 Palatka, Fla.

8.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
9.52 Palatka, Fla.

.... Armour's Fertz. Wks.,
..... Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 Armour's Fertz. Wks.,
7.14 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00|Armour's Fertz. Wks.,
4.691 Jacksonville, Fla.

8.00 Va.-Car. Chemical Co.,
8.61 Sanford, Fla.

8.00 Va.-Cnr. Chemical Co.,
8.01 Sanford, Fla.


i









Special Formula for Corn....


2027


Ideal Tomato Special.......... 2028


Ideal Cucumber Special........ 2029


Wilson & Toomer's Special Mix- 2030
ture No. 1...................

Germofert H. G. Special...... 2031


Germofert Fruit & Vine No. 2.. 2032


Germofert Grapefruit Special.. 2033


Germofert Tampa Fruiter...... 2034


Gulf Fruit and Vine........... 2035


Gulf Sea Fowl Guano.......... 2036


Tomato Special ............... 2037


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


10.00 8.00 ......
8.92 9.01 0.95 9.96

8.00 6.00 .. .....
5.67 7.05 2.14 9.15

8.00 5.00 ...... ..
8.22 6.72 0.08 6.80

8.00 6.001 1.00 ......
7.58 7.62 1.72 9.34

5.00 5.00 7.00 12.00
5.99 6.72 7.83 14.55

5.00 3.00 ...... 12.00
5.68 6.36 6.10 12.46

5.00 3.00 12.00
5.36 5.16 7.27 12.43

5.00 3.00 9.00 12.00
3.68 6.17 7.07 13.24

10.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
4.25 7.41 4.18 11.b9

10.00 7.00 1.00 8.00
11.23 8.29 1.831 10.12

10.00 5.00 1.00 6.001
9.41 6.07 0.29 6.361


2.50
2.81

5.00
5.53

4.00
4.08

5.00
5.071

4.00
3 50

3.00
3.39

4.00
4.25

4.00
3.75

3.00
3.20

5.00
4.30

4.50
4.29


3.50
4.83

5.00
4.79

6.00
6.11

5.00
5.55

6.00
6.88

10.00
11.42

10.00
9.11

12.00
12.84

10.00
10.18

8.00
8.26

8.00
8.49


Wilson&ToomerFertz.
Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

Wilson&ToomerFertz.
Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

Wilson&ToomerFertz.
Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

Wilson&ToomerFertz.
Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

The Tampa Fertz. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

The Tampa Fertz. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

The Tampa Fertz. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

The Tampa Fertz. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
Tampa, Fla.








OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Gulf Citrus Special............. 2038


Special Fruit and Vine........ 2039


Gulf Orange Tree Grower...... 2040


Vegetable Special ............ 2041


German Kainit ................ .2042


Number Three ................ 2043


Bradley Fruil and Vine....... 2044


Phosphoric Acid.


.; 4




Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 7.001
Found .... 6.35 6.52| 1.10 7.62

Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found .... 6.99 7.03 0.09 7.12

Guaranteed 8.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found .... 9.4 6.48 0.07 6.55

Guaranteed 10.00 6.00 1.00 7.00
Found .... 9.56 7.48 0.92 8.401

Guaranteed 15.00 .........
Found .... ...... .. .. .... ......

Guaranteed 8.001 ;.0 2.00 ......
Found .. 7.191 6.571 0.491 7.061

IGuaranleed 10.00| 5.50! 1.00 ......
Found .... I 6.981 n .17 0.621 7.09!


0 BY WITOM AND
.A WHERE
S MANUFACTURED.


I

4.00 8.00!The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
4.17 10.081 Tampa, Fla.

3.00 13.00|The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
3.35 13.82 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 5.001The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
5.78 6.151 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 5.00 The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
5.27 5.53 Tampa, Fla.

..... 12.50 The Gulf Fertz. Co.,
...... 13.01! Tampa, Fla.

4.00 10.00 The Southern Fertz.
4.03 11.87! Co., Orlando, Fla.

2.25 10.001Am. Aerti. Chem. Co.,
2.36| 10.301 Jacksonville. Fla.





Bradley Orange Vine.......... 2045 Guaranteed
Found ....
Armour's Vegetable .......... 2046 Guaranteed
Found ....
Mobile Standard Guano....... 2047 Guaranteed
Found ....
Gem Meal Mixture............ 2048 Guaranteed
Found ....
Mapes' Vegetable Manure...... 2049 Guaranteed
Found ....
Mapes' Orange Tree Manure.. 2050 Guaranteed
Found ....
Dekle's Corn Maker........... 2051 Guaranteed
Found ....
Florida Grange ............... 2052 Guaranteed
Found ....

Marianna Special Guano....... 2053 Guaranteed
Found ....
Jackson County Mixture....... 2054 Guaranteed
Found ....

Lawn Special ................. 2055 Guaranteed
Found ....


10.00
5.95

10.00
8.04

10.00
12.56

10.00
10.40

12.00
10.21

12.00
9.71

10.00
7.54

10.00
8.07

10.00
8.63

10.00
8.87

10.00
10.62


6.00
7.73

7.00
8.12

8.00
8.04

10.Ou
10.36

6.00
7.74

6.00
7.65

8.00
9.28

8.00
9.18

10.00
10.651

10.00
11.17

6.00
7.42


1.00 ....
0.87 8.60

1.00 ......
0.69 8.81

2.00 ......
4.41 12.45

2.00 ......
2.08 12.44

2.00 ......
3.25 10.99

2.00 .....
4.18 11.83

2.00 ...
1.59 10.87

2.00 ....
0.91 10.09

2.00 ....
1.06 11.711

2.00 ......
0.35 11.521

1.001 7.00
2.441 9.861


3.50
3.57

4.00
3.73

2.00
2.17

2.00o
1.89

5.00
5.34

4.00
4.02

2.00
1.77

2.00
2.01

2.00
2.27

1.00
1.05

5.00
4.47


5.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
4.63 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 Armour's Fertz. Wks.,
6.22 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 Va.-Car. Chemical Co.,
1.65 Montgomery, Ala.

2.00 Va.-Car. Chemical Co.,
2.50[ Montgomery, Ala.

4.00 Mapes For.&Perv. Gu-
5.27 ano Co., N. Y. City.

3.00 Mapes For.&Perv. Gu-
3.37 ano Co., N. Y. City.

6.00 Gulf Chemical Co.,
6.03 Marianna, Fla.

4.00 Gulf Chemical Co.,
4.61 Marianna, Fla.

2.00 Gulf Chemical Co.,
2.70 Marianna, Fla.

3.00 Gulf Chemical Co.,
3.63 Marianna, Fla.

5.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
6.44 Tampa, Fla.












OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Gulf Fruit and Vine........... 2056


Gem Lawn ................... 2057


Simon Pure No. 1.............. 2058


Williams & Clark Florida Vege- 2059
table ......................

Gem Grapefruit ............. 2060


Lawn Fertilizer ............. 2061


Cotton Seed Meal............. 2062


ndo


Cii


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


10.00
5.01

10.00
6.12

8.00
6.57

10.00
7.37


6.61

10.00
6.75


Phosphoric Acid.



C 0




6.00 1.00 7.00 3.00
8.71 4.26 12.97 3.20

7.00 1.0 ...... 6.50
8.21 1.33 9.54 6.63

6.00 1.00 ...... 4.00
7.23 0.57 7.80 4.54

6.00 1.00 ...... 4.00
7.56 0.71 8.27 3.78

6.00 ...... ...... 4.00
6.38 0.58 6.96 4.00

5.00 1.00 ...... 5.00
0.751 0.33 7.08 4.72

...... 2.50 7.50
...... ...... ....... 7 .18


O BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.




10.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
9.52 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 E. O. Painter Fertz.
5.89 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

12.00 E. O. Painter Fertz.
11.21 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

5.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
5.30 Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 E. O. Painter Fertz.
11.98 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

5.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
4.81 Jacksonville, Fla.

1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
...... Tallahassee, Fla.







Dunham Brand Sea Island Cot- 2063 Guaranteed .................. 2.00
ton Seed M eal.............. Found .... ...... ...... ...... ......

Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2064 Guaranteed ...... ............2.50
Found ............... ...... ......
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2065 Guaranteed ...... ....... .. 2.50
Found .. ...... ...... ...... .
Medium Grade Cotton Seed Meal 2066 Guaranteed ......2.00
Found .... ...... .. .
Cotton Seed Meal.............. 2067 Guaranteed ...... ............ 2.5u
F found .... ...... ... .. ..... ......
Germofert Grapefruit Special.. 2068 Guaranteed 5.00 3.00|...... 12.00
Found .... 5.52 5.97 5.51 11.48
Germofert Fruit & Vine No. 2.. 2069 Guaranteed 5.00 3.00 ...... 12.00
Found ....[ 6.51 7.71 6.83 14.54
Alabama Trucker .............2070 Guaranteed 10.001 8.00 2.00 ......
Found .... 7.58 9.70 0.18 9.88

Quickstep Fertilizer .......... 2071 Guaranteed 10.00 8.00 2.00 ......
Found .... 8.44 11.37 0.85 12.22

Grasselle's High Grade Blood, 20721Guaranteed 12.00 10.00 0.50 ......
Bone and Potash............ Found .... 7.70 10.241 0.701 10.94

Cotton Seed Meal........... 12073 Guaranteed ...... ......... 2.50
IFound ... ...... I ...... ...... ......


1.501Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
..... Jacksonville, Fla.


1.50


1.50


1.00


1.50


10.00
10.87

10.00
9.76

6.00
8.41

4.00
2.99

2.00
1.69

1.50


Buckeye Oil Co., Ma-
con, Ga.

Buckeye Oil Co., Ma-
con, Ga.

Correy Cotton Oil Co.,
Eufaula, Ala.

Empire Cotton Oil
Co., Quitman, Ga.

Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

Tampa Fertilizer Co.,
Tampa, Fla.

So. Cotton Oil Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

So. Cotton Oil Co.,
Montgomery, Ala.

Grasselli Chem. Co.,
Birmingham, Ala.

Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
Tallahassee, Fla.










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.

0-s-



Grasselle's High Grade Fertilizer 2074 Guaranteed
Found ....

Germofert Cane Special........ 2075Guaranteed
Found ....

Va.-Car. Fruit and Vine........ 2076 Guaranteed
Foun:1 ....

Special Mixture .............. 2077!Gunranteedl
]Found ....

Sweet Potato Special .......... 2f78 Guairantrcd
Found ....

Va.-Car. Champion Citrus Comn-2079( uaranltee1
pound ...................... I Found .. .

Gasldn's DTSoto Orange Troo 20ROJCnara ntrc'1
Grower ..................... IFound .... I


Phosphoric Acid.








12.00 10.00 5.00 ......
10.69 1l.16 1.01 12.17

5.001 5.001 6.00.
5.99 6.64 4.37 11.01

8.001 c.fc, I 1.00 ......
4.041 7.3 l1 0.751 S.05'

12 .001 C .0 ...... ...... I
6.371 S.90n 0.31! 9.241

12.00 00 ...... ......
6.03 7.45 0.:71 7.82

10.001 61.l00 1. ('0 .. .
4.97 7 .951 0.291 8. 241

8.00! 6.0nn i.o .... ..
5.81 .5.851 0..1' 6.271


C BY WHOM AND
.- WERE
o LMAN[FACTUREID.




2.00 2.00 Grasselli Chem. Co.,
1.92 2.5:1 Birminham, Ala.

5.00 5.00 Tampa Fertilizer Co., C
5.80 5.7S Tampa, Fla. 0

2.501 10.0 QFla. Fe tz. Co. Branch,
2.58 9.S41 Gainesville, Fla.

4.00! 12.0o0Fla. Fr'z. C. Pranch,
3.99! 13.16! (Cain sville, Fla.

2.00 4.0.0F'a Fertz. Co. B'anci,
4.10 9.5S8 Gdincsville, Fla.

3.00 11.001F'a. Feitz. Co. Branch,
2n.;4 11.81! Galin sville, Fla.

5.001 6.50|Fai. Fertz. Co. Branch,
4.92 6.:13! G;inesville, Fla.









Sun Trucker Fertilizer........ 20811Guaranteed 10.001
Found .... 7.69

Sun Special Mixture and Fertili- 2082 Guaranteed 1I.0n
zer ......................... Found .... 6.74

Sun Onion Fertilizer........... 2083 Guaranteed 10.00!
Found .... 7.01

Sun Vegetable Fertilizer...... 2084 Guaranteed 10.00
Found .... 686

Sun Bean and Pea Fertilizer.. 2085|Guaranteed 10.00|
Found .... 5.481

Sun Lettuce Fertilizer......... 2086 Guaranteed 10.00!
Found .... 5.651

Sun Hastings Potato Fertilizer 2087 Guaranteed 10.00
Found .... 4.03

Sun Universal Fertilizer....... 2088 Guaranteed 10.00
Found .... 8.181

Germofert Blood, Bone & Potash 2089 Guaranteed 5.00
1 Found .... 6.43

Germofert Corn Special ....... 2090 Guaranteed 5.00
Found .... 6.37

Germofert Orange Tree Grower 2091 Guaranteed 5.00
I Found .... 5.04


5.001
5.78S

5.001
6.08|

5.00
5.98

5.00|
5.27

5.00
6.38

5.00
6.19

7.00
7.071

7.50
8.24

3.00!
3.571

2.00
5.28

3.00
5.071


1.00 ...
0.05 5.83

1.00 ......
1.22 7.30

1.00 .. .
0.02 6.001

1.00 ....
0.04 5.31

1.00 ......
0.84 7.22

1.00 ....
0.57 6.76

1.00 ......
0.57 7.64

1.00 ..... .
0.08 8.32

9.00 12.00
11.37 14.94

10.00 12.00
12.77! 18.05

9.00 12.00
9.51 14.58


5.00
4.69

4.00
4.36

4.00
3.95

4.00
3.92

5.00
4.30

6.00
6.03

4.00
4.851

2.00
2.41

5.00
4.46

3.00
3.471

4.00
3.85


7.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
7.23 Palatka, Fla.

8.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
7.39 Palatka, Fla.

10.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
9.63 Palatka, Fla.

6.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
6.51 Palatka, Fla.

6.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
6.67 Palatka, Fla.

6.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
6.61 Palatka, Fla.

7.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
8.161 Palatka, Fla.

5.00 Peninsular Fertz. Co.,
5.62 PalatKa, r a.

4.00 Tampa Fertz. Co.,
5.43 Tampa, Fla.

3.00 Tampa Fertz. Co.,
3.70 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 Tampa Fertz. Co.,
5.35 Tampa, Fla.










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.


Favorite Celery Special........ 2092


Favorite Vegetable ............ 2093


Vegetable Special ............ 2094


Gulf Orange Tree Grower...... 2095


Cane and Corn Special........ 2096


High Grade Sulphate of Potash 2097


Cotton Seed Meal .............. 2098


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....
Guaranteed
Found ....
Guaranteed
Found ....
Guaranteed
Found ....
Guaranteed
Found ....
Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed



Found ....


10.00
6.89

10.00
6.23

10.00
6.46

8.00
6.30

8.00
7.02

10.00


T-


Phosphoric Acid.








5.001 1.00 ......
6.64 0.25 6.89

7.00 2.00 ......
6.71 0.94 7.65

6.001 1.00 7.00
8.36 0.72 9.08!

6.00 1.00 7.00
8.21 0.57 7.87

6.00 1.00 7.00
9.1'4 1 1.3,2 10.81





. .. . . . . . .


O BY WHOM AND
0i WHERE
2 MANUFACTURED.

a U2


8.00 4.00 Independ't Fertz. Co.,
7.52 4.63 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00! 6.00 Independ't Fertz. Co., c
4.451 5.971 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
4.63 5.41 Tampa, Fla.

5.00 5.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
4.65 5.641,Tamnpa, Fla.

3.50 5.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
2.751 5. 0 Tampa, Fla.

..... 48.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
...... 50. 0 Tanlp Fla.

4.50 1.50 Fl':i. Cotton Oil Co.,
4.98 ...... Tallahlassee, Fla.








Gulf Citrus Special............ 2099 Guaranteed
Found ....

Gulf Orange Fruiter........... 2100 Guaranteed
Found ....

Gulf Fruit and Vine.......... 2101 Guaranteed
Found ....

Special Fruit and Vine........ 2102 Guaranteed
Found ....

Cotton Seed Meal............ 2103 Guaranteed
Found ....

Kainit ........................ 2104 Guaranteed
Found ....

Early Bird Fruit and Vine Ma-2105 Guaranteed
nure ........................ Found ....

Early Bird Vegetable Manure.. 2106 Guaranteed
Found ....

Corn Fertilizer .............. 2107 Guaranteed
Found ....

Muriate of Potash............. 210f Guaranteed
Found ....

High Grade Cuke and Lettuce 2109 Guaranteed
Special ..................... Found ....


8.00
5.16

10.00
5.02

10.00
5.20

8.00
5.18


10.00
6.28

10.00
8.34

10.00
10.86




10.00
5.82


6.00
7.06

6.00
7.34

8.00
9.16




4.00
6.15


1.001 7.00
3.41 11.80

1.00 7.00
0.05 7.90

1.00 7.00
3.66 13.15

1.00 7.00
0.09 7.72

...... 2.50
. .. . . . . .


1.00
0.61

1.00
0.95


7.67.


8.25


1.00 ......
1.37 10.53




1.00 .....
0.73 6.88


4.00 8.00 Gulf Fertrilizer Co.,
3.78 8.13 Tampa, Fla.

4.00 11.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
4.29 11.96 Tampa, Fla.

3.00 10.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
3.26 9.52 Tampa, Fla.

3.00 13.00 Gulf Fertilizer Co.,
3.10 14.46 Tampa, Fla.

7.50( 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
7.26 ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

..... 12.50 Ocala Fertilizer Co.,
...... 13.74 Ocala, Fla.

2.50 10.00 Osceola Fertz. Co.,
2.82 9.81 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Osceola Fertz. Co.,
3.83 5.45 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.00 2.00 ,m. Agri. Chem. Co.,
2.14 2.11 Jacksonville, Fla.

..... 50.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
..... 50.90 Jacksonville, Fla.

6.00 5.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
5.54 6.44 Jacksonville, Fla.












OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.

O BY WHOM AND
NAME, OR BRAND. M WHERE
5 MANUFACTURED.


High Grade Blood and Bone.... 2110


Bean Special ................. 2111


Watermelon & Cantaloupe Spe-12112
cial ........................

High Grade Orange Fruiter.... 2113


German Kainit ................ 2114


Williams & Clark Special Fruit 2115
and Vine ..................

Bradley Special Frull and Vine 2116


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


10.00


10.00
5.38

10.00
7.13

10.00
4.08




10.00
5.541

10.00
6.66


6.00
7.32

6.00
7.95

10.00
12.05




5.50
7.041

5.50
7.30


...... 8.00
...... 12.31

1.00 ......
0.68 8.00

1.00 ......
0.67 8.62

1.00 ......
0.07 12.12

. .. ..0 .. . .

2.00 ......
0.90 7.94

1 00 ......
0.41 7.78


10.00
9.32

3.00
3.38

4.00
3.85

3.00
3.14




4.25
4.43

4.25
4.31


...... Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
...... Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
3.82 Jacksonville, Fla.

5.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
5.08 Jacksonville, Fla.

13.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
12.111 Jacksonville, Fla.

12.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
13.15 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
9.91 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 Am. Agri. Chem. Co.,
9.69 Jacksonville, Fla.







Sea Island Cotton Seed Meal..12117


SEarly Bird Florida Vegetable
S M anure .....................

Va.-Car. Fruit and Vine........


Va.-Car. Tip-Top Tomato Truck-
er ..........................

Va.-Car. Champion Citrus Com-
pound ......................

Cotton Seed Meal...............


Cotton Seed Meal...............


Special Mixture ............... 2125


Gem Watermelon ............12126


Simon Pure Garden............ 2127


Special Formula for Corn...... 2128


Guaranteed
Found ....


2119 Guaranteed!


Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


12.00 ......|... ... 1. r o
...... ..... . .....

10.00 6.00 1.001 .. .
7.60 6.97 0.94 7.91

8.00 6.00 1.00 ......
3.51 5.46 1. 59 7.05

8.00 7.00 1.00 ...
5.26 7.51 0.71 8.22

10.00 6.00 1.00 ...
2.86 7.76 0.45 8.21

...... ...... ...... 2 .50


...... ...... ...... 2 .50


...... 6.00 ...... ......5
6.13 7.341 2.39 9.731

5.00 6.00 2.00 ......
7.29 7.23 1.04 8.27

8.00 4.00 3.00 ......
7.42 5.40 2.84 8.24

10.00 ...... ......
10.02 3.a4 2.69 6.63


4.50 0.75 Tl.e Florida Mfg. Co.,
4.55 ...... Madison, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Osceola Fertz. Co.,
3.78 5.45 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.50 10.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co.,
2.95 9.13f Gainesville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Va.-Car. Chem. Co.,
4.06 4.85 Gainesville, Fla.

3.00 14.00 Va.-Car. Cnem. Co.,
3.67 13.66 Gainesville, Fa.

7.50 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
7.49 ...... Jacksonville, Fla.

7.50 1.50 Fla. Cotton Oil Co.,
8.01 ......Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 12.00 E. 0. Painter Fertz.
4.29! 12.451 Co.,Jacks'ville, Fla.

3.00 10.00 E. Painter Fertz.
3.68 9.85 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

6.00 6.50 E. 0. Painter Fertz.
6.12 7.10 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

2.50 3.50 Wilson&ToomerFertz.
3.30 4.23 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.










OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


NAME, OR BRAND.





Favorite Fruit and Vine No. 1.. 2120 Guaranteed1 10.00
Found ... .1 5.671

High Grade Acid Phosphate.... 2130 Guaranteed ...
Found .... ......

Cotton Seed Meal, Forest City 2131 Guaranteed ......
Brand ......................I Found .... ......

Mapes' Vegetable Manure...... 2132 Guaranteed 12.00
S Found .... 10.28

Mapes' Orange Tree Manure... 213 Curnirainteed 12.00
Found .... 7.75

Complete Sweet Potato Fertill-2134 C(uraniteed 10.00
zer ......................... Found .... 9.61

Mapes' Fruit and Vine Manurr. 121:1 rin ia'ultre 10.00
I Found .... 9.73:


Phosphoric Acid.

& C1

L 2



6.00 1.00 ......
9.29 0.90 10.19

16.00 . . . . . .


. . . . . . 2.50


6.00 2.00 ......
10.23 0.32 10.55

6.00 2.00 ..
5.:32 4.48 9.80

s.00 1.00| ......
S.3 ,1 1.3 9.67

5.00| 2.00 ......
5,3:1 3:.3:1X 8.771


S BY WHOM AND
. WHERE
2 \ MANI'FACT HIRED.
I
O< [


I
3.00 10.00 In(lepend't Fertz. Co..
3.36 ).23 Jacksonville, Fla.

... .. .. . Ocala Fertilizer 'o..
...... ......1 Ocala, Fla.

4.50 1.50|Soiuhern Cotton Oil
4.75 ...... Co., Savannah, Ga.

5.00 4.001Mapes' For.&Perv.Gu-
5.07 5.71 ano Co., N. Y. City.

4.00 3.00 Map)oB' For.&Perv.Gu-
4.NS4 :.01 ano Co., N. Y. City.

2. 50 3.50 \Vilson&TcomerFortz.
2.84 4 .61 Co., J.icks'ville, Fla.

2.001 10.00 1Maes' Ior.&Perv.Gu-
2.45 11.041 ano Co., N. Y. City.








Muriate of Potash............ 2136


Superior Corn Fertilizer ...... 2137


Cotton Seed Meal............. 2138


Standard Vegetable No. 1...... 2139


Standard Tree Grower........ 2140


Standard Fruit and Vine......2141


Gem Sweet Potato No. 2...... 2142


Gem Orange Tree.............. 2143


Cotton Seed Meal..............2144


Armour's Blood, Bone & PotashI2145


Armour's Sugar Cane.......... 2146


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ...

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....


.... .. ...... ...... ...... 48.50 Ocala Fertilizer Co.,
...... ...... .. .. ...... ...... 54.80 Ocala, Fla.

8.00 6.00 1.00...... 2.50 4.50O0cala Fertilizer Co.,
13.11 7.48 0.13 7.61 2.32 4.75 Ocala, Fla.

...... ...... .. 2.50 7.00 1.50Boston Oil & Guano
.. .. .. . . 7.40 ...... Co., Boston, Ga.

11.00 5.00 1.00 6.00 4.00 6.00|Standard Fertz. Co.,
11.35 6.00 0.55 6.55 3. 8.87 Gainesville, Fla.

7.00 6.00 1.00 7.00 5.00 5.00 Standard Fertz. Co.,
9.82 7.64 1.87 9.51 3.98| 4.811 Gainesville, Fla.

5.00 7.00 1.00 8.00 3.00 13.00 Standard Fertz. Co.,
3.63 7.92 0.35 8.27 3.87 14.431 Gainesville, Fla.

... .... ... .... 3.00 2.00 5.001E. O. Painter Fertz.
5.56| 6.03 0.57 6.60 3.73 7.231 Jacks'ville, Fla.

5.00 5.001 3.09 ...... 4.00 6.001E. O. Painter Fertz.
6.231 6.351 4.37 10.72 4.40 6.751 Co.. Jacks'ville, Fla.

...... ...... ... 2.50 7.50 1.50 Valdosta Oil Mill,
...... ...... .. .. .. .. 6.88 .... Valdosta, Ga.

10.00 8.00 1.00 ...... 5.00 7.00OArmour Fertz. Wks.,
7.15 8.02 1.73 9.75 5.05 7.45 Jacksonville, Fla.

10.00 6.001 1.00 ...... 5.00 8.001Armour Fertz. Wks.,
7.93 6.621 0.27 6.89 4.45 7.621 Jacksonville, Fla.
















NAME, OR BRAND.


Wilson & Toomer's Special Mix- 2147
ture ........................ I

Medium Grade Cotton Seed Meal 2148


Ideal Sugar Cane Fertilizer.... 2149


Cotton Seed Meal............. 2150

Early Bird Florida Vegetable.. 2151


Early Bird Fruit & Vine Manure 2152


Early Bird Orange Tree Manure 21531


OFFICIAL FERTILIZER ANALYSES, 1914-Continued.


Phosphoric Acid.



.i 3 ;3 I

^ =


Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ....
Guaranteed
Found ....

Guaranteed
Found ... :

a'uanteed .
Found ....


8.00 6.00 1.00 ......
9.99 6.76 1.76 8.52

...... ...... ...... 2 .30


10.00 7.00 ..... ......
8.19 GC.80 1.44, 8.241


10.00
5.69

10.00
6.07

10.00
6.95


6.00
6.47

(;.00
;.92

(;.00
6.75


1.00
0.49

1.00
0.45

1.00
0.5(6


2.50


6.96


7.37


7.31


BY WHOM AND
WHERE
MANUFACTURED.


5.00 5.00 Wilson&ToomerFertz.
4.68 5.56 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

7.50 1.20]Planters' Oil Co.,
7.27 ..... Albany, Ga.

3.00 4:001 Wilson&ToomerFertz.
3.03 5.60 Co., Jacks'ville, Fla.

7.00 1.50 Boston Oil & Guano
7.18 ...... Co., Boston, Ga.
4.00 5.000Osceola Fertz. Co.,
3.76 5.31 Jacksonville, Fla.

2.50 10.00Osceola Fertz. Co.,
2.45 9.85 Jacksonville, Fla.

4.00 5.00 Osceola Fertz. Co.,
3.74 5.20 Jacksonville, Fla.




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